May 15th, 2017

New Website for Extreme Long Range — ELR Central

Extreme Long Range ELR Central Bryan Litz website Ballistics

There’s a new home on the web for Extreme Long Range (ELR) shooters. Bryan Litz and Applied Ballistics recently launched ELR Central, a new website dedicated to ultra-long-range shooting*. This new site will offer a wide variety of information. Bryan Litz explains: “The most visible element of ELR Central will be a website which will serve to publish and promote all ELR shooting events going on across the country. Although owned and operated by Applied Ballistics, ELR Central will rely heavily on input from the community in order to best serve the sport as a whole.” Along with the ELR Central website, Applied Ballistics has launched a new ELR Central Facebook page.

Content Available on ELR Central
The ELR Central website will eventually offer a comprehensive library of information and activity reports. Bryan and his team plans to build out the website to include all the following:

1. Map of ELR ranges across the USA.
2. List of ELR events with links to the Match Directors’ pages.
3. Technical information and articles for the ELR community.
4. Match results/reports, including equipment lists where available.
5. Analysis of what equipment and shooters are doing well in ELR.
6. Links to other ELR shooting resources such as forums and websites.

Extreme Long Range ELR Central Bryan Litz website Ballistics
On 5/13/17, the Applied Ballistics ELR Team had a successful practice at 3161 Yards (1.8 miles). Bryan Litz reports: “The main goal … was to test how the Berger and Cutting Edge bullets traveled through transonic and subsonic speeds. We all made several hits on target and several within 1 MOA of center.”

IVEY adjustable scope rings with 50 Mil travel are offered in 30mm, 34mm, 35mm, and 40mm sizes.
IVEY adjustable scope rings Extreme Long Range ELR Central Bryan Litz website Ballistics

ELR Central MGM Targets Steel Applied BallisticsStandardized ELR Targets
Another goal of ELR Central is to develop standardized ELR targetry. Bryan explains: “In competitive rifle shooting, standardization of targetry is important. Applied Ballistics, through ELR Central, will provide steel targets to organizations wishing to run ELR matches and/or record-setting events. No one would be required to use these standard targets, we’re simply providing resources to help promote promote some consistency.” The initial standard target, produced by MGM Targets, will be a steel square, 3 feet (36″) per side.

ELR Central is Not A Rule-Making Entity
Bryan was quick to explain that ELR Central is not a governing body, but rather it was created to help advance the sport (and science) of shooting at very long distances, one mile and beyond: “The concept of ELR Central is a result of the ongoing discussions about standardizing ELR matches, records, targets, and more. Although ELR Central will not be enforcing these details, there is a measure of organization which we feel is appropriate, would benefit the sport, and that we are willing to provide. ELR Central is NOT a governing or sanctioning body. We do not have nor seek the authority to dictate how matches are run. For anyone who asks, we can advise on best practices, and what’s generally working, but we’re not here to tell anyone what to do nor how to do it.”


More Information on ELR Competition, per ELR Researcher:

(1) By consensus of the parties involved in the ELR meetings held at SHOT this year, and notwithstanding the names and descriptions of certain “ELR” web sub-forums, “ELR” has been defined as “beyond 1500 yards”.
(2) ELR Central-recognized “ELR” events require that more than one-half of targets must be beyond 1500 yards. Where all criteria are not met an event may be promoted as having “ELR components”.
(3) “ELR Central has published a set of guidelines and standards by which official world records can be established.” CLICK HERE for guidelines/standards.

Story tip from EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.
Permalink Competition, News 2 Comments »
August 28th, 2012

Berger Bullets Reloading Manual Officially Released

Berger 2012 Reloading ManualBerger Bullets just announced the completion of the first-ever Berger Bullets Reloading Manual (1st Ed.). This $29.00, 829-page manual will be available to the public starting in October, 2012. Eric Stecker notes: “Our team worked very hard to create a thorough manual which gives the shooter everything they come to expect from a reloading manual, along with several extra items we hope the shooters will find interesting and useful. We spent a considerable amount of time putting together loads for seventy-one different cartridges. The majority of powders used to develop the loads for each cartridge were selected due to the fact that they result in 90% or higher fill ratio. It is generally believed that powders which have a fill ratio over 90% will perform best in a given case, since the powder will not be moving around as much in the case.”

The new Berger Manual includes many informative technical articles. Noted Editor John Barsness tackles the subject of Lot to Lot Powder Variations with skill and experience. He provides the shooter with a much greater understanding of why loading manuals do not list the same loads from manual to manual, yet are more consistent than shooters might think. Other technical sections written by Ballistician Bryan Litz include: G1 vs. G7 Ballistic Coefficients, Form Factor: A Useful Analysis Tool, and The Effects of Cartridge Overall Length (COAL) and Cartridge Base to Ogive (CBTO).

With new rifle shooters in mind, the manual also spotlights ten different types of rifle-shooting activities, each explained by an expert in that discipline/activity. Among these ten activity-focus segments, Short Range Benchrest is covered by Walt Berger, High Power and Across the Course Competition is explained by Sherri Jo Gallagher, while Nancy Tompkins wrote the Palma, Long Range & Fullbore segment. Precision Hunting is covered by John Burns.

Berger Reloading ManualThere are several other informational sections that will enhance readers’ understanding of reloading techniques and the shooting sports. This includes everything from Handloading Basics for new and novice shooters, to an article on Statistics for Handloading for more advanced shooters looking to better understand their work processes and thereby improve their results on the target.

Another interesting feature in the Manual is a profile of company founder Walt Berger. This segment, tracking back to 1920s and 1930s, explains how Walt overcame great odds and built a successful enterprise when almost everyone around him was convinced he would fail.

Overall, this book represents a massive amount of work by numerous individuals over many years. Eric Stecker explains: “One of the reasons it took so long to complete this manual is because we wanted to include as much good information as we could provide. It is my opinion that we have succeeded in this effort and I am proud that we are ready to provide a quality loading manual which will help rifle shooters at all levels.”

Collector-Edition Signed Copies Available for Pre-Order
The retail price is $29.00. Berger is accepting pre-orders for the Reloading Manuals, which will begin shipping in October. The first 3,000 manuals have been signed by Walt Berger, Eric Stecker, Bryan Litz and Michelle Gallagher. Bryan Litz tells us: “Walt, Eric, Michelle and I spent many hours last week signing 3,000 copies of the book. We went through many boxes of Sharpies… it was quite the task!” To place an advance book order, call 714-447-5422 or CLICK HERE for Berger’s Online Shopping Cart.

Berger Bullets Reloading Manual

Permalink - Articles, New Product, News 8 Comments »
March 25th, 2011

More Hybrid Bullet Designs Coming from Berger Bullets

Berger BulletsIn the Berger Bulletin this week is a further discussion of the new Berger “Hybrid” bullet design. This combines a secant ogive shape in the front of the bullet with a tangent ogive shape near the full-diameter (shank) section. Currently the Berger Hybrid is available in .338 caliber and 7mm. Berger will soon release a new hybrid .30 caliber bullet, with 6mm and 6.5mm hybrid projectiles to follow.

How the Hybrid was Developed
In the late 80s, the VLD was born. This design allowed shooters to use lighter bullets and smaller calibers to achieve the same or better trajectory than heavier bullets in bigger calibers. Lighter bullets shot in small calibers were easier on shooters resulting in higher scores and an improved shooting experience. But, this improvement came with a price. Each shooter had to adjust their load in each rifle until they could get the VLD bullet to shoot precisely. Once the load was dialed in, the VLD was one of the most efficient bullet designs in history. But this didn’t stop shooters from yearning for a bullet that is easier to tune.

The VLD design was created by Bill Davis who was one of the top ballistic minds during this time. His [designs] have made a tremendous impact on how long range shooting over the last two decades. One might think that nothing this good can be improved upon. But it could… Ballistician Bryan Litz recognized both the advantages and disadvantages of the VLD design. He went to work to see if he could keep the good results the VLD produced while reducing its sensitivity to seating depth. His efforts have produced the Berger Hybrid.

The Berger Hybrid design incorporates two different shapes within the nose. As the bearing surface ends, a tangent ogive begins. This tangent section of the ogive results in the bullet being much less sensitive to seating depth. Testing results show that the Berger Hybrid shoot equally well at either a jam or a jump. As you move forward along the tangent portion, the shape changes into a secant ogive. The secant ogive is the shape used on the VLD bullets. This shape is very efficient in the wind and is why the VLD became so popular.

By bringing these two shapes together, Bryan has successfully created a bullet that is both not sensitive to seating depth and shoots very flat like a VLD. The key to all this is not just the combining of these two shapes, but also the partnership between the ballistician and the bullet maker.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo 2 Comments »