August 27th, 2015

DJ’s Brass Service Hydro-Forms Cartridge Brass

Darrell Jones DJ's Brass hydraultic hydro-forming cartridge brass 6 Dasher 6mmBR 6BR BRX BRDX

DJ’s Brass Service now offers custom case hydro-forming to your exact specs. Darrell Jones offers this service for a variety of popular cartridges: 6mm Dasher, 6mm BRX, 6mm BRDX, and 6mm Shehane. After hydro-forming your brass, Darrell can also neck-up or neck-down the cases to meet your needs. For example, if you shoot a 22 Dasher, Darrell can hydro-form the cases and then neck them down to .22 caliber. He can also turn the necks to your specs (for an additional charge).

Darrell is a hydro-forming wizard who has perfected the process over the last couple of years. He has learned a few special techniques along the way to ensure uniform case-forming. Without revealing any trade secrets, we can say the Darrell has very special dies and Darrell doesn’t use a mallet or hammer — he has a system that is much more consistent. Darrell tells us: “Many of my customers take this brass and load it ‘as is’ and go straight to a match and shoot some very nice groups.”

Hydro-forming by Darrell costs $0.60 (sixty cents) per case with a minimum order of $60. Neck-turning is an additional $0.50 (fifty cents) per case plus actual return shipping. The turnaround is usually less than five days.

With Darrell’s hydro-forming service you don’t have to buy any special dies or other equipment. Darrell says: “Simply send me the brass you need or have it dropped-shipped to me along with a fired case that has not been sized. If you need formed brass for a new build (gun not yet fired), let me know and I will size the brass to fit within .001 of a PT&G GO gauge.”

For more information, visit DJsBrass.com, or call Darrell at (205) 461-4680. IMPORTANT: Contact Darrell for shipping instructions BEFORE sending brass for processing. In a hurry, don’t have time? Just call Darrell and he’ll make something work for you.

DJs Brass hydro-forming

Hydro-Forming Customer Reports

Here are testimonials from recent customers.

“Recently had Darrell Jones of DJ’s Brass Service hydro-form 6 BRX brass for me. The turn around time was very fast and the brass was to the exact specification I ask for. I actually shot the hydro-formed brass in a match [without further fire-forming]. It shot a 3.597″ — pretty amazing. Let DJ do the work for you!” — Mike Wilson (3 Time IBS Record Holder; 2013 and 2014 1000-yard IBS Shooter of the Year.)

“Darrell Jones of DJ’s Brass Service went far beyond the call of duty, to assist me in preparation to shoot for my first time in an IBS match. I have had an interest in 1000-yard competition for many years and finally got the opportunity to try it. After researching the winning competitors, rifles, and rounds I ordered a Panda action with Krieger barrel in 6mm Dasher from Kelby’s. It was one week before the match and I had a rifle and no rounds. I contacted Darrell to hydraulically form 6mm dasher from Lapua 6mm BR brass. He formed the brass and had it in the mail the next day[.] Since I have only reloaded for hunting or magazine fed rifles I was not familiar with proper seating to allow land engagement of the bullets for 1000-yard accuracy. Darrell took the time to advised me every step of the way to allow me to shoot a 3.158″ (5) shot group to win my first round of my first competitive match ever.” — Mike Youngblood

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading 1 Comment »
March 1st, 2014

How to Fire-Form Dasher and BRX Brass without Bullets

Many of our Forum members shoot an “improved” 6mmBR cartridge. This might be a 30°-shoulder 6mm BRX, or a 40°-shoulder 6mm Dasher, or the 6mm BRDX, which is very similar to the Dasher, but with a slightly longer neck. This Editor shoots a 6mm BRDX and has found it very accurate, and maybe a bit easier to fire-form than a standard Dasher. Speaking of fire-forming, in our Shooters’ Forum, we often see questions about fire-forming BRX/Dasher brass. For those who need a large number of BRX or Dasher cases, one option to consider is using pistol powder in a dedicated fire-forming barrel. Here’s an explanation of how this process can work.

Forum member Skeeter has a 6mm Dasher falling block varmint rifle. The Dasher case is based on the 6mm BR Norma cartridge with the shoulder blown forward about 0.100″ and out to 40°. This gives the Dasher roughly 3.5 grains added capacity compared to the standard 6BR.

A few seasons back, Skeeter needed to form 300 cases for varmint holiday. Skeeter decided to fire-form his brass without bullets. This method avoids barrel wear and saves on components. There are various ways to do this, but Skeeter chose a method using pistol/shotgun powder, some tissue to hold the powder in place, Cream of Wheat filled to within an 1/8″ of top of the neck, and a “plug” of tissue paper to hold it all in place. Shown below are cases filled with a pistol/shotgun powder charge topped with Cream of Wheat and then a tissue paper plug.

To ensure the case headspaced firmly in his Dasher chamber, Skeeter created a “false shoulder” where the new neck-shoulder junction would be after fire-forming. After chamfering his case mouths, Skeeter necked up all his cases with a 0.257″ mandrel (one caliber oversized). Then he used a bushing neck-sizing die to bring the top half of the neck back down to 0.267″ to fit his 0.269″ chamber. The photo below shows how the false shoulder is created.

After creating the false shoulder, Skeeter chambered the cases in his rifle to ensure he could close the bolt and that he had a good “crush fit” on the false shoulder, ensuring proper headspace. All went well.

The next step was determining the optimal load of pistol powder. Among a variety of powders available, Skeeter chose Hodgdon Titewad as it is relatively inexpensive and burns clean. The goal was to find just the right amount of Titewad that would blow the shoulder forward sufficiently. Skeeter wanted to minimize the amount of powder used and work at a pressure that was safe for his falling block action.

Working incrementally, Skeeter started at 5.0 grains of Titewad, working up in 0.5 grain increments. As you can see, the 5.0 grain charge blew the shoulder forward, but left it a hemispherical shape. At about 7.0 grains of Titewad, the edge of the shoulder and case body was shaping up. Skeeter decided that 8.5 grains of Titewad was the “sweet spot”. He tried higher charges, but the shoulder didn’t really form up any better. It will take another firing or two, with a normal match load of rifle powder and a bullet seated, to really sharpen up the shoulders. Be sure to click on the “View Larger Image” link to get a good view of the cases.


The process proved to be a success. Skeeter now has hundreds of fire-formed Dasher cases and he hasn’t had to put one bullet through his nice, new match-grade barrel. The “bulletless” Cream of Wheat method allowed him to fire-form in a tight-necked barrel without neck-turning the brass first. The only step now remaining is to turn the newly Dasher-length necks down about .0025″ to fit his 0.269″ chamber. (To have no-turn necks he would need an 0.271″ or 0.272″ chamber).

Skeeter didn’t lose a single case: “As for the fire-forming loads, I had zero split cases and no signs of pressure in 325 cases fire-formed. Nor did I have any misfires or any that disbursed COW into the action of the firearm. So the COW method really worked out great for me and saved me a lot of money in powder and bullets.” To learn more about the COW fire-forming process, read this Dasher Fire-Forming Forum Thread.

Skeeter did have a fire-forming barrel, but it was reamed with a .269 chamber like his 10-twist Krieger “good” barrel. If he fire-formed with bullets, he would have to turn all 300 necks to .267″ BEFORE fire-forming so that loaded rounds would fit in the chamber. Judging just how far to turn is problematic. There’s no need to turn the lower part of the neck that will eventually become shoulder–but how far down the neck to turn is the issue. By fire-forming without bullets now he only has to turn about half the original neck length, and he knows exactly how far to go.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading 1 Comment »
November 2nd, 2013

Wildcat Report: 30 BRX Developed for Score Shooting

By popular request, this story has been reprinted from 2011.

30 BRX wildcat cartridge VFSForum member Al Nyhus is a top-level score shooter who has competed successfully with the 30BR cartridge in VFS (Varmint for Score) matches. Al has been working on an “improved” 30 BR cartridge that delivers extra velocity. Al’s 30 BRX cartridge is inspired by the 6mm BRX cartridge, popular in 600-yard benchrest and across-the-course competition. The 6mm BRX cartridge maintains the same sidewall profile and shoulder angle as the parent 6mmBR case. Likewise, the 30 BRX retains the 30° shoulder used on the popular 30 BR cartridge.

Al reports: “Thought you might like to see what I’ll be working with in my VFS gun this season. It’s a true 30 BRX — a 30 BR with the shoulder moved forward 0.100″ with the standard BR shoulder angle. Stan Ware of SGR Custom Rifles built one last season for Steve Grosvenor and I was really impressed by the performance of Steve’s gun. The 30 BR barrel on my VFS gun needed replacing, so the new 30 BRX got the nod.”

30 BRX Delivers 150-200 FPS More Velocity than 30 BR
Al’s testing shows the 30 BRX gives a solid 150-200 fps speed gain over the 30 BR at the top, while needing just 2.5-3.0 more grains of Hodgdon H4198 to do so. A 30 BR case holds on average 40.8 grains of water, while the 30 BRX holds 42.3 grains (roughly 4% more). So the 30 BRX delivers a 7% increase in velocity with a mere 4% increase in H20 capacity. That’s pretty good efficiency. [Editor’s Note: Assuming 34 grains of H4198 is a typical 30BR match load, Al’s increase of 2.5-3.0 grains for the 30BRX represents roughly a 7.5-8.5% increase in actual powder burned. That explains the higher velocities.]

Why did Nyhus decide to try an “improved” 30 BR? Al explains: “The 30 BRX was created to operate at a [higher] velocity level than can be achieved with the standard 30BR case, while at the same time keeping the easy-tuning characteristics of the standard 30BR case. We also wanted to use the same powders currently used with the 30BR and maintain similar operating pressures.” Is the 30BRX harder to shoot because of the increased velocity? Al doesn’t think so: “In a 13.5-lb HV gun, the 30 BRX case is a pleasure to shoot with just a flea bite of recoil.”

Will the 30 BRX Replace the 30 BR in Score Competition?
The 30 BR is already an exceptionally accurate cartridge that dominates short-range Benchrest for Score competition. Will the 30 BRX make the standard 30 BR obsolete? Nyhus doesn’t think so. However, Al believes the 30 BRX offers a small but important edge in some situations: “On any given day, it’s the shooter that hits the flags best and makes the fewest mistakes that ends up on top. No amount of velocity will save you when you press the trigger at the wrong time. Missing a switch or angle change at 200 yards that results in 3/4″ of bullet displacement on the target can’t be compensated for with another 200 fps. That’s the hard fact of benchrest shooting. But on those days when, as Randy Robinett says, ‘our brains are working’, the BRX may offer enough of an advantage to turn a close-but-no-cigar 10 into an ‘X’ at 200 yards. Or turn a just-over-the-line 9 into a beggar 10.” Given the fierce competition in Score matches, an extra 10 or another X can make the difference between a podium finish and also-ran status.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Competition, Reloading 6 Comments »
May 30th, 2013

First Time’s a Charm with 6BRX in Eliseo Tubegun Chassis

6mm BRX fire formingFor those of use who have sweated through fire-forming and load development, it’s nice to see things coming together right out of the gate. With the 6mmBR improved wildcats such as the BRX, BRDX, and Dasher, it’s not unusual to see outstanding accuracy even while blowing out cases. In fact the accuracy is usually good enough that you might as well do your fire-forming during competition (once you’ve confirmed that everything is working with a 10-round function test). We’ve seen Dashers shoot in the low twos and even ones during fire-forming — so long as you load carefully and use good bullets, powder, and primers. Here’s a report from Forum member Chris W. (aka “baydawg”) on his new 6mm BRX tube gun:

Shot my 6 BRX last night for the first time at 600 yards last night. The result was a 199-11X. Not bad for fire-forming brass with thrown loads… LOL. Thanks Gary Eliseo and Competition Machine for a kick-ass chassis!”

6mm BRX Fire forming Eliseo Tubegun

Gun Specs: Competition Machine R1 in Granny Smith green. Pierce repeater tube gun action. 32″ Bartlien 6mm barrel, chambered in 6mm BRX. Smithed by Pierce Engineering in Lansing, Michigan.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo 4 Comments »
February 19th, 2012

Forum Member Averages 1.677″ for Six Targets at 600 Yards

Tim Claunch (aka tclaunch) recently put on an amazing display of precision shooting. At an MSSA 600-yard Benchrest Score match in Memphis, TN, Forum member Tim shot six targets in a row, with an average 5-shot group size of 1.677″. Tim’s stellar performance began with a two-target shoot-off for club Shooter of the Year honors (he won). Then Tim shot four more targets as part of the club’s regular 4-target score match. NOTE: this is NOT an official six-target match result. The actual match that day was four (4) targets only, and Tim’s Agg for those four was about 1.8″, still darn impressive. No one is claiming any records here. Still give credit where credit is due — Tim put together six targets in a row, in competition, averaging 0.267 MOA for all six. Tim’s small group (of the six) was 1.351″ and his large group was 2.088″. That shows amazing consistency. This is spectacular shooting by any measure*.

Tim Claunch 6BRX Agg

Tim tells us: “I can check off one of the items on my ‘bucket list’ now — shooting a sub-two-inch Agg. We shot our monthly match here in Memphis at our awesome MSSA range. Though this was a score match, and the first two targets were part of a club shoot-off, I wondered about the average group size of all six. We measured all six targets I shot in sequence on Sunday. I was some kind of happy when I saw it was a 1.677″ 6-target average. That Bartlein and the .140″ FB BRX reamer are a good match. I used Varget with Berger 105gr VLDs and CCI 450 primers. I had never Agged under two inches before in my life (the 4-target Agg was 1.8″). Sure was nice to do it at home the first time.”

Tim Claunch 6BRX Agg

Tim shoots a 6mm BRX Light Gun with Shehane ST1000 Tracker stock, Borden Rimrock BR action, and Bartlein 6mm cut-rifled barrel. He uses a Leupold 45X scope in Burris Signature Zee rings sitting on a +20 MOA rail. Tim jokes: “People might laugh at my cheapo Burris rings. Well I guess those Signatures hold zero just fine.” Tim tried a power-booster lens on his Leupold for a while, but this altered eye relief, producing the occasional smack in the forehead. Not surprisingly, Tim removed the booster.

Borden Action with Dwight Scott Bolt and Firing Pin Upgrade
The action is a Borden Rimrock BR dual-port. “This action is smooth, and it allows me to rip ‘em when the conditions are good. For these six targets I shot fast.” The Borden action has some interesting mods: “The firing pin and bolt body were re-worked by Dwight Scott. He has a weight of pin to power of spring he worked out with Tony Boyer. I could tell a significant difference in performance.”


For better target resolution, click the gear-shaped icon and select 480p playback.

The stock is a Shehane fiberglass ST1000 Tracker bedded by TM Stockworks (Tom Meredith). The metalwork was done by Stephen Hall of Dyersburg, Tennessee. Tim reports: “I can’t say enough about this highly-talented guy. He’s a great smith and a great point-blank benchrest shooter himself. I’ve had four chambers cut by him and couldn’t be happier”. The barrel is a 1.250″ straight contour, finished at 26″. That’s a bit shorter than you’ll find on most 600-yard rigs these days, but Tim wanted some weight off the nose so he could add weight to the butt to balance the gun better (and still make weight). Tim raves about this Bartlein barrel: “Readers should not give up on maybe that next barrel being the one barrel a guy gets in a lifetime. I have tried all the cut-rifling barrel-makers, but I’ve recently gone to Bartlein. Based on my ratio of great-shooting barrels to average barrels I am there to stay.”

Tim’s Accurate Reloading Methods
Tim’s reloading procedures could rightly be described as the “relentless pursuit of perfection”. After two firings, once “the brass has settled down and conformed to the chamber”, Tim anneals his cases. He then re-anneals after EVERY subsequent firing. The brass he shot at the MSSA match had eight firings, so it had been annealed many times. Tim uses current-generation (blue box) Lapua 6mmBR brass, and he lightly turns his necks for an 0.269″-necked chamber. Tim points his bullets, but does not trim them: “These were pointed, no trimming, just point and shoot. I have shot a few of the new Berger hybrids, but I keep going back to the Berger VLDs.”

Superior accuracy, Tim believes, requires ultra-consistent neck tension. Tim uses a K&M arbor press with a force gauge. If the needle shows any notable variance in seating force, Tim will pull the round apart, run a mandrel in the neck, resize the neck, and re-seat the bullet. If the bullet still doesn’t seat smoothly, he won’t shoot the round for record. Tim is also particular about seating depth: “I measure every loaded round base to ogive using a comparator. All my match ammo is held to plus/minus .0005″ (i.e. one thousandth total spread) in base to ogive length. Yes, this is possible if you anneal regularly and monitor bullet-seating force carefully. If you can’t hold .001″ [base-to-ogive] tolerances with good bullets, that’s probably because of inconsistent neck tension.”

Secret of Success — Improved ‘Bench Manners’ and Gun Handling
Tim had a personal break-through not so long ago that improved his accuracy dramatically. Previously he got down on the gun, and would use some cheek pressure. But he noticed some erratic horizontal in his groups. Tim changed his shooting position, getting his head completely off the stock. The change worked: “After cleaning up my ‘bench manners’ and getting my head off the gun, my groups started shrinking. It was a real eye-opener.” Tim shoots with minimal hand contact (“just touching”) on the stock, and he doesn’t pin the gun to the stop. Tim explained: “I run the gun up to touch the stop before each shot, but I don’t use any shoulder pressure. I don’t push on the gun at all.”

Tim Claunch 6BRX Agg

You can learn more about Tim’s amazing six-target display of accuracy in this Forum thread. Registered Forum members can post questions about Tim’s rifle and the shooting conditions, and Tim will answer them when he has the opportunity.

* Just for comparison sake, the NBRSA official Light Gun 600-yard, 6-Target (30-shot) Agg record is 2.092″ (Robert Hoppe, 2006). The IBS official Light Gun 600-yard, 4-Target (20-shot) record is 1.6068″ (Sam Hall, 2011). The IBS does not list a LG 6-target Agg record for 600 yards.

Permalink - Videos, Competition, Shooting Skills 6 Comments »
June 7th, 2011

The 6mm BRX — Myth-Busting with Bob Crone

Bob Crone 6mm BRXDispelling Some 6mm BRX Myths, by Robert Whitley
I recently had an interesting and fact-filled conversation with Bob Crone (the inventor of the 6mm BRX) about his BRX. Bob actually called me because he was concerned that there are a lot of myths and about his 6mm BRX and he wanted to “set the record straight” on a few things. Here’s my summary of some topics we discussed:

Myth One: Bob made his 6mm BRX chamber by running a 6mm BR reamer in too deep.

Truth: There is no truth to Myth One. Bob said he specifically designed the BRX reamer and had it made with the head space he specified and a neck length appropriate for his newly designed 6mm BRX wildcat cartridge.

Myth Two: In the course of making up his 6mm BRX, Bob had a version with a .120″ longer head space than a 6mm BR Norma.

Bob Crone 6mm BRXTruth: Bob was clear that his original design for the 6mm BRX always had a .100″ longer head space than a 6mm BR and that he never deviated from that. Right after Bob started working with his 6mm BRX, Bill Shehane came forward with a 6mm BRX version he made up that had a .120″ longer head space, and thus the confusion started. In truth, the original 6mm BRX always was (and still is) a chambering with a head space .100″ longer than a 6mm BR Norma.

Myth Three: The BRX was originally set up for 105-107gr bullets.

Truth: Bob said he set up his original reamer with a zero freebore and he has his gunsmith use a throater to throat whatever chamber was being made to where he wanted a particular bullet to touch the lands. Bob said he originally started with a 1:10″ twist barrel and shot a bunch of the 95gr VLDs and also 87gr bullets. Later he used an 8.5″ twist barrel for the heavier bullets.

Myth Four: The original BRX was set up also for use with Remington BR Brass.

Truth: Bob said he always used Lapua brass. He originally was an avid reader of Precision Shooting magazine and saw that the .262″ neck-turn neck was working real well with the 6 PPC and 6mm BR bench rest shooters and he decided to try to go with something that was already working well for 6mm shooters. He says his original reamer had a .262″ neck, but he also has a .272″ “no-neck-turn” version that he used on some of his rifles. He said the Lapua brass was so good and consistent, that for some rifles he just “didn’t want to mess with it” so he went with the “no-neck-turn” .272″ neck too.

Bob Crone 6mm BRXMyth Five: The “false shoulder” method was used to make brass.

Truth: Bob said he never used the “false shoulder” method to make 6mm BRX brass, he just loaded 6mm BR brass with a bullet well into the lands of the BRX chamber and fire-formed brass that way. He noted that the accuracy with some of the fire-forming rounds was “outrageous” (i.e. outrageously good that is), so much so, they were shot in matches sometimes.

Myth Six: The 6mm BRX has a blown-out or straightened out body.

Truth: Bob said he kept the basic body taper of the 6mm BR cartridge. He wanted the cartridge to be an easy and inexpensive (but high performance) 6mm wildcat, and the original design was (and still is) set up to use readily available 6mm BR dies (up off the shell holder about .100″ from the normal position).

Author’s note: It was a most enjoyable experience to talk to Bob Crone. He is not only still passionate about his 6mm BRX, but he has a commanding knowledge of it as well.

6mm BRX reamer print, Whitley

Reamer Print provided by AR-X Enterprises LLC, www.6mmAR.com.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading 7 Comments »
September 20th, 2009

6BR vs. Dasher vs. 6BRX for 600 Yards

After scanning the equipment list for the recent 600-yard IBS Nationals, one of our readers noted how the 6mm Dasher dominated the Top 10 list in both Light Gun and Heavy Gun Classes. But Sam Hall won the Grand Agg with a straight 6BR, Mike Davis won the Heavy Gun Agg with a 6BRX, and Richard Schatz won the Light Gun Agg with a 6mm Dasher. So which cartridge should you pick? What’s the best for the 600-yard game — 6BR or Dasher or BRX?

Sam Hall, 2008 IBS 600-yard Shooter of the Year and back-to-back 2009/2008 IBS 600-yard National Champion, offers this advice:

“I shot a Dasher most of this year at IBS 600-yard matches and shot a no-turn BRX in a couple of shoots. I even tried a BRDX (40° improved with a longer neck than Dasher) in a practice barrel. By looking at the results on my target, I would never have been able to tell the difference between any of them if I did not already know what cartridge I was shooting. The 6BR or an improved version are just downright inherently accurate. They are all easy to load for and tune. I do believe the 6-6.5×47 Lapua is harder to get tuned than the 6BR. There are always the exceptions though. I have been beaten a few times this year by one exceptionally good shooting 6-6.5×47.

My next step is to try a no-neck-turn 6BR. I have been beaten by some a few times. I am now wondering if neck-turning is worth the time. A lot of the top BRX and Dasher shooters are not turning their necks and doing extremely well.

Samuel Hall 6BR Tracker

In my opinion pick your favoite BR or improved version, learn it well, practice, and don’t deviate. If someone you know shoots a BRX (or Dasher) and has a lot of experience with it — that is a good head start for loads. You can then compare what shoots good and what does not. I sure did not learn everthing on my own. I got some good load info here on this website (AccurateShooter.com) and I used to hound Terry Brady to death for loads to find out what he was winning with. Don’t be afraid to ask questions! I still do! Good luck and have fun.”

– Samuel Hall

Permalink Competition, Reloading No Comments »
May 12th, 2009

Should Lapua Make Factory 6BR Improved Brass?

Given the many matches won and records set by 6BR Improved cases, both 6 BRX and 6 Dasher varieties, product planners at Nammo Lapua have shown some tentative interest in manufacturing an official 6BR Improved case. This would be something very similar to a 6BRX, with about 41-42 grains of capacity, compared to about 38 grains for the 6BR. The case would be bigger than a 6BR, but smaller than a 6-6.5×47 or 6XC. The case would retain the small primer pocket and small flash hole of the 6BR case. A “bigger BR” would easily drive the 105-108gr 6mm bullets at 2950-3000 fps, where they often seem to shoot the best.

Before you jump out of the chair shouting “Oh Boy!”, keep in mind that Lapua’s interest is very preliminary — the engineers are merely fact-finding. This is just in the “idea stage”. Lapua’s cartridge designers are, however, intrigued by the accuracy and efficiency of the 6BR Improved case. Anything that regularly sets world records is worth considering. And Lapua would like to have a cartridge that will prove superior to the 6XC in international 300m competition.

AccurateShooter.com’s Editors have advocated the production of an “official” 6BR Improved. This wildcat deserves to become standardized. We suggest that it be similar to the 30-degree-shoulder 6BRX, but with a longer neck than a BRX (which loses neck length as the shoulder is moved forward). Existing BRX shooters could simply trim the necks shorter as needed to fit existing chambers. Dasher fans could proceed to “improve” the shoulder to 40 degrees, for their preferred configuration.

Obviously, as with any potential product, the question remains “is there sufficient market demand to justify production set-up and tooling costs?” We think the answer is yes. Not only would a factory 6BR Improved case be popular with Benchrest and across-the-course shooters, but this case would be great for varminters looking for something with more velocity than a 6BR but better barrel life than a 22-250. So, would you be interested in a factory 6BR Improved? Express your views in our Product Poll.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, New Product 7 Comments »
May 10th, 2009

Davis and Isenhour Set New 600-Yard IBS Records

On May 9, 2009, friends and shooting buddies Larry Isenhour and Mike Davis set two new IBS 600-yard records at the Piedmont Gun Club (Rutherfordton, NC). First, Isenhour broke his own 50-3X (0.944″) 600-yard IBS Light Gun Score Record, shooting a perfect 50-5X at 600 yards, with a tiny .904″ group. Larry used a 6 BRX and Berger 105gr VLDs to shoot his sub-inch group and perfect score, in tricky conditions. Not to be outdone, Mike Davis shot an impressive 4-Target, 20-shot Aggregate 600-yard Heavy Gun Record of 1.460″. Mike was also shooting a 6 BRX and Berger 105gr VLDs, but in a mammoth rig with a 1.45″-diameter Brux barrel. Mike’s Heavy Gun looks like it came from Area 51, complete with the stealth gray finish.

Larry Isenhour IBS Record Target
Photo courtesy Greg Culpepper

ISENHOUR 600-Yard Record: 50-5X (.904″) Score
Larry reports: “Sometimes everything just works right and things like this happen. It was the last target of the day and it was pretty windy. Sam Hall was shooting and I knew I’d have to shoot great to beat him. I got on target and must have got those five rounds downrange in 12-15 seconds.” Larry’s gun wears a beautiful maple and walnut stock made by his brother, Robert (Mike) Isenhour. Larry says: “The stock is the same as in the photo, but now the gun has a Viper action and a different scope. This gun was smithed by Mike Davis.” Other gun specs and Larry’s load data are listed below. Readers should note that Larry was running a “no-turn” chamber in a gain-twist barrel, and shooting H4895. Most guys run Varget or RL15 with the 6BRX, but this proves that H4895 can be super-accurate in 6BR Improved cases. Larry does caution that “with H4895 I’m getting single-digit ES, but you have to watch the pressure as you get near max. Reloder 15 is a little more forgiving at the top end — it doesn’t spike so hard.” Larry is running his 105gr VLDs at 2970 fps. He says: “I’ve run ‘em as fast as 3050 fps with the BRX but the accuracy is better at 2970. At that velocity the BRX is coasting and you’re not working the brass hard.” Larry’s load procedure involves three dies. First he neck-sizes with a .268″ bushing in a Redding neck die. Then he uses a .308 Win FL die to size the body. As a final step he uses a Redding body die to bump the shoulder about 1.5 thousandths.

Larry Isenhour IBS Record Target

ISENHOUR 6BRX Light Gun
Stiller Viper Drop-port action
Isenhour Maple/Walnut stock
30″ Krieger (gain-twist, 1:9″ to 1:8.3″) 6mm barrel
Leupold 45X Competition Scope
6BRX .272″ neck (brass is NOT turned, but necks are mic’d)
Berger 105 VLDs, Tungsten Disulfide coated
32.5 grains Hodgdon H4895, Fed 205M

“What about that gain-twist barrel?” we asked Larry. He revealed: “Well, there’s a story behind that. This was one of four prototype barrels Krieger produced that we sourced through Lester Bruno. Krieger wanted to keep things quiet until the barrels had been proven in competition. Well I guess we can let the cat out of the bag. Yep the Krieger shoots great with a slght gain twist (9 to 8.3). However, if I had my choice, I’d go with a 28″ length rather than a 30″. You don’t need 30″ with a BRX.”

DAVIS 600-Yard Record: 1.460-inch, 4-target HG Aggregate
Mike Davis’s 4-Target, 20-shot Aggregate was also set with the dimunitive 6BRX cartridge, but in a massive rifle. Davis stealth gray rig is a true heavy gun, complete with a full-length rest set-up. Mike told us: “Larry and I started shooting together over ten years ago. In early 2002 I started building my own personal guns. Larry was the first person that I built a rifle for other than my own. This new gain-twist barrel for long range was something that Krieger and I have been working on trying to get a twist rate exactly what I wanted. It looks like [Krieger] has got the twist just right. These things are going to shoot! I think Larry’s group is proof.” Mike added: “Both of the barrels I am shooting now are Brux barrels. These barrels are great, and the people are great to work with.”


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DAVIS 6BRX Heavy Gun:
BAT Model B RB/LP/RE
Alvey Aluminum stock
30″ Brux 1.450″ diam., 1:8.5″ twist
6BRX .272″ no-turn neck
Leupold 45x Competition Scope
Berger 105 VLDs, Tungsten Disulfide coated
32.5 grains Reloder 15, CCI 450 primers

CLICK HERE for Video of Mike Davis Shooting his Light Gun in 2008.

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