October 29th, 2019

Amazing Arms — Head-Turning Guns from Our Archives

swing-out breech blockThis one-of-a-kind .50-caliber rifle was crafted by the late J.T. Smith. Along with the lever-actuated falling block, it has a massive swing-out breech block — like an artillery piece.

Beautiful and Historic Firearms
We’ve collected some of the most eye-catching firearms featured on AccurateShooter.com over the past decade. There are famous pistols, a shotgun owned by a princess, the fanciest Savage ever made, and some beautiful examples of engraving and stock-making. Enjoy this collection of firearms eye candy.

Centennial 1911 from Colt — Marking 100 Years
In 2011, to celebrate the 100th birthday of the 1911 hangun, Colt created a spectacular, fully-engraved “Anniversary Edition” pistol. J.M. Browning’s 1911 pistol was officially adopted by the U.S. Army on March 29th, 1911. {The U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Navy adopted the 1911 pistol roughly two years later). This Centennial 1911 is pimped to the max, complete with gold inlay and genuine ivory grips.

Savage President’s Engraved Savage 99 Rifle
When you run the company, you get some pretty nice stuff — in this case you get what may be the most elegant Savage ever made. This rifle was created for Joseph V. Falcon, who served as President of Savage Arms. This highly embellished Savage 99 lever-action rifle is chambered for the .300 Savage. It features deluxe checkering and gold inlays.

World’s Most Perfect Colt Paterson — Worth Nearly $1 Million
This 1836 Colt Paterson Revolver sold in 2011 for $977,500 at auction. That set a world record (at the time) for the sale of an American firearm. The very rare, ivory-gripped Texas Paterson Revolver, with a 9-inch barrel and attached loading lever, is the finest known surviving example of Samuel Colt’s first revolver, produced in Paterson, New Jersey.

Stunning Engraved Trio — Colt, Mauser, and Luger
Here is a matching set of three three beautifully engraved pistols by the late Indiana engraving wizard Ben Shostle — a Luger, a Mauser, and a diminutive Colt. By themselves, these three matching pistols would make a prized handgun collection. Photo courtesy Amoskeag Auction Company.

Gun porn glamour rifle pistol shotgun stunning engraved Luger Colt Mauser Walther

Princess Diana’s Westley Richards Shotgun
This stunning Westley Richards & Co. shotgun was made for the 1981 nuptials of Lady Diana Spencer and HRH Prince Charles. It is rare, has a unique history of ownership, and is also elaborately decorated.

Princess Diana Gun porn glamour rifle pistol shotgun stunning

Butch Cassidy’s Colt Wheelgun
This revolver isn’t so pretty, but it has an impressive heritage — it belonged to Butch Cassidy. Butch Cassidy’s famous “Amnesty Colt” Revolver sold to a foreign museum for $175,000. The handgun was offered as part of a collection of Western guns and memorabilia auctioned in Casitas Springs, California.

Butch Cassidy Gun

The Right Stuff — Chuck Yeager’s Gold-Plated Beretta
Here’s another pistol with a famous owner “The Right Stuff” Pilot, Chuck Yeager, the first human to break the sound barrier. This Beretta has extra value because it was owned by pilot Chuck Yeager. Photo NRA Museum.

Chuck Yeager Beretta

Stunning Mauser Custom — Master-grade Wood and Steel
Forum member Kurz posted a dream gun owned by a friend in England. Kurz included a quote from a book created by the rifle’s owner: “There, with my father’s words ringing in my ears, I shall take that ‘step forward’ and order a perfect machine based on the Mauser ’98 action, built from metal and wood by master craftsmen who truly understand that ‘reliable’ and ‘mechanical integrity’ have as much relevance today as they did all those years ago.”

Rifle engraved

Permalink Gear Review, Gunsmithing, Handguns 1 Comment »
August 8th, 2019

Jesse Kaufmann — The Art of Engraving

Jesse Kaufmann Black Hills engraving remington stock checkering
Impressive engraving by Jesse Kaufmann. Note how the scope rings have been engraved to perfectly match the engraving pattern on the Remington 547 action.

Who says fine craftsmanship is dead? There’s a fellow up in South Dakota, Jesse Kaufmann, who produces some of the most handsome engraving we’ve seen. Jesse, who operates Black Hills Gunstocks and Engraving LLC, is a true master at metal engraving and he also does superb stock checkering. Here are some examples of Jesse’s engraving work:

Jesse Kaufmann Black Hills engraving remington stock checkering

Jesse Kaufmann Black Hills engraving remington stock checkering

Jesse Kaufmann Black Hills engraving remington stock checkering

Jesse Kaufmann Black Hills engraving remington stock checkering

Jesse Kaufmann engraving stock checkering black hillsAbout Jesse Kaufmann, Master Engraver
Jesse Kaufmann was a professional stockmaker for Dakota Arms for over a decade. In 2009, he was inducted in the American Custom Gunmakers Guild as a checkering specialist. In January 2017, Jesse was awarded his Master Engraver certification by the Firearms Engravers Guild of America. With his broad skill set, Jesse is able to offer his clients a unique and complete package of stock work, finish, checkering, and engraving for a custom package that is all completed under one roof by his own hands.

Jesse Kaufmann’s work has been featured in American Rifleman, American Hunter, FEGA’s The Engraver, Sports Afield, Waidmannsheil Journal of German Gun Collectors Assn., Gun Digest 71st Edition, Modern Custom Guns Volume 2, Dangerous Game Rifles 2d. Edition. For more info, visit BlackHillsgunstocksandengraving.com, email blackhillsgunstocks [at] gmail.com, or call Jesse at (605) 499-9090.

Permalink Gear Review, Gunsmithing No Comments »
January 1st, 2018

Beautiful Rifles for the New Year

Ruger Number 1 maple walnut glamour shot
This stunning Celtic Engraved Double Bolt Action rifle is from Fuchs Fine Guns.

Ruger Number 1 maple walnut glamour shot

As a New Year’s gift to our readers, we thought we’d share some beauty pictures — rifle beauty that is. In our Shooters’ Forum, a Gun Glamour thread recently started entitled: “Show me what a beautiful gun looks like!” Well here are some very handsome rifles featured in that Forum Thread. Enjoy.

Beautiful Rifles from our Shooters’ Forum

Forum member Kurz posted a dream gun owned by a friend in England. Kurz included a quote from a book created by the rifle’s owner: “There, with my father’s words ringing in my ears, I shall take that ‘step forward’ and order a perfect machine based on the Mauser ’98 action, built from metal and wood by master craftsmen who truly understand that ‘reliable’ and ‘mechanical integrity’ have as much relevance today as they did all those years ago.”

Ruger Number 1 maple walnut glamour shot

A gun can “shoot dots” and still be handsome. Here is a short-range benchrest rifle with a stunning, exhibition-grade Walnut stock. Forum member Josh B found this beauty.

Ruger Number 1 maple walnut glamour shot

This “old school” rimfire sports a Stolle Swindlehurst Chrome Moly action, Unertl 20X scope, Krieger barrel, and Kelbly trigger. Forum Member FFEMT tells us this rifle “has a nice little piece of English Walnut”. Yes indeed — the stock is from John Maxon

Ruger Number 1 maple walnut glamour shot

Forum member JRS submitted a stunner from Europe. This beauty features a truly exquisite piece of wood with elaborately engraved receiver. It also has escutcheons and special metal work on the grip.

Ruger Number 1 maple walnut glamour shot

Lever-action Falling Block rifles can be beautiful too. This one features a color case-hardened receiver and handsome two-piece fancy wood stock. This was submitted by Forum member Kurz who notes: “Besides exhibition grade walnut, I like the variations available in spalted maple for rifle stocks.”

Ruger Number 1 maple walnut glamour shot

A competition rifle must be “performance first”. But that doesn’t mean they can’t be handsome too. Forum member XTR’s rifle, an F-TR rig, features Maple wood with Bubinga tips.

Ruger Number 1 maple walnut glamour shot

“Wood is Good” — as demonstrated by all the rifles showcased above. But, as a “parting shot”, we’ll add a blue British beauty from the long-running Pride and Joy Forum Thread we started a decade ago. This eye-catching 270-7mm WSM F-Classer belongs to Forum member Elwood from the UK. A well-executed hydro-dip finish can really dress up a competition rifle.

Click Photo to See Hundreds More ‘Pride and Joy’ Rifles…
Pride and Joy Hydro dip F-Class

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December 2nd, 2017

Gun Collecting 101: Five Factors That Determine Value

Lady Diana Prince Charles shotgun
This stunning Westley Richards & Co. shotgun was made for the 1981 nuptials of Lady Diana Spencer and HRH Prince Charles. It is rare, has a unique history of ownership, and is also elaborately decorated.

Jim Supica, Director of the NRA Firearms Museum, has written a trio of articles about gun collecting. If you are thinking of starting your own collection of firearms, you should read Supica’s informative articles. The first talks about the basics of gun collecting, the second explains the five key factors that govern gun values, and the third article explains where to find rare and valuable arms. Today we want to highlight the five factors that contribute most to a gun’s value, according to Supica:

Make and Model, Condition, Rarity, History, Art — These are the five factors that … appeal to collectors and help determine the value of collectible guns.

Read Full Gun Collecting Article on NRABlog.com »

1. Make and Model

Make and model tends to be the starting point for evaluating collectible guns for most collectors and will be a basic threshold requirement for those with specialized collections.

Factors here include the quality of a particular manufacturer’s products, the historical usage of the guns in question, and the brand’s aura of romance. As an example of that last (and most intangible) factor, consider that Colt Single Action Army revolvers were for several decades the most prevalent focus for collectors interested in full-size revolvers from the post-Civil War to turn of the 20th Century-era, and there is no question that Colts were widely used during that time. In recent years, there has been a refreshing trend in gun collecting to look at a broader range of guns than the traditional blue chip Colts, Winchesters, and Lugers.

Colt Single Action Army revolver engraved
Colt Single Action Army Revolvers remain among the most prized (and collectible) firearm.

2. Condition (and Originality)

Obviously, condition plays a major role in the value of a collectible firearm. The classic advice to new collectors in this regard has always been to hold out for guns in the best condition and pay the extra premium they demand. This condition-emphasis seems to have developed in the 1970s and 1980s. In the early post-WWII years of gun collecting there was more interest in rare variations and history, and fewer collectors to whom a few percentage point difference in remaining original finish was of much concern.

Although the highest-condition guns continue to bring record prices, it seems that the pendulum is beginning to swing back the other way, a trend met with my hearty approval. The appeal of “mint” guns has been largely lost on me, and seems to be more appropriate to coin or stamp collecting than a field in which the possible historic usage of the artifact holds so much interest and significance. There is a definite segment of the collector market that is not overly concerned with perfect condition, so long as the gun is original and has not been messed with in a more recent (and, in my opinion, usually misguided) attempt to enhance its desirability.

3. Rarity

In terms of rarity, the well-worn saying that “just because a gun is rare doesn’t mean it’s valuable” remains true to a certain extent. There may only be five known examples of a particular gun, but if only three people care about it, the market is saturated. However, there does seem to be more interest in cornering the rare variations within established collecting fields. There is a bit of a resurgence of the collecting philosophy of completing a punchlist of models and variations within a specialization, and this lead to vigorous competition for the rarest examples in these fields. In emerging collecting fields, when new research is published revealing the rarity of certain variations there can develop a brisk interest in those guns.

4. History

Individual guns with a known history of ownership by a specific individual or usage in a specific historical event have always captured the fascination of collectors, as well as historians and the general public. This seems to reflect a basic human interest and shows no sign of abatement. A positive trend here seems to be an increase in general understanding of the type of documentation which must accompany a historically attributed firearm to give it the credibility to justify a premium price, and the importance of creating and preserving such documentation.

Chuck Yeager Pistol
This Beretta has extra value because it was owned by pilot Chuck Yeager. Photo NRA Museum.

5. Art (Decorative Embellishment)

Fine engraved guns are collected more for their artistic value than for their worth as firearms. Here the market for classic works by the great engravers of the 19th and early 20th Centuries remains strong, as well as for factory-engraved pieces from more recent years. Interest in recent non-factory engraving seems to have diminished, as has… the trend of adding modern engraving to older firearms.

engraved pistols Ben Shostle Luger Mauser Colt
Here is a matching set of three three beautifully engraved pistols by the late Indiana engraving wizard Ben Shostle — a Luger, a Mauser, and a Colt. Photo courtesy Amoskeag Auction Company.

Factory-custom engraving should not be confused with mass-produced, factory-made commemorative firearms, which flooded the market in the 1960s and 1970s. A couple of major manufacturers worked this genre to death, and prices on commemoratives have been stagnant for many years now, although the market for these shows some signs of renewal.

CAUTIONARY WORDS about RESTORATION
With prices for high-condition original finish guns running away from the budgets of many collectors, period-of-use refinished guns and older factory-refinished guns are finding more enthusiastic buyers than they did a few years ago.

The availability of excellent-quality restoration services is another factor that I anticipate may impact collector preferences in the future. The top restoration artists are reworking guns to “as new” condition with such skill that it has become increasingly difficult for even knowledgeable collectors to distinguish mint original finish guns from the best restorations.

When such restoration is disclosed to a prospective buyer (as it ethically should be), the prices the gun will bring are significantly below a similar gun with original finish, and may be less than the original cost of the pre-restoration gun plus the cost of the rework. This creates a mighty incentive for deception by a motivated seller, either by active misrepresentation (a.k.a. “fraud”) or passively by simple failure to mention the modification.

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January 23rd, 2017

Shiloh Sharps at SHOT Show — Blast from the Past

Shiloh Sharps 45-70 vintage Quigley rifle

With all the blacktical rifles and tacticool camo gear on display at SHOT Show, it was nice to see some old style craftsmanship — hand-built rifles with colored case-hardened receivers, fine engraving, and beautiful wood. We found just that at the Shiloh Sharps booth. The heritage style of the Shiloh Sharps rifles harkens back to another era, when the West was still wild, and gifted smiths crafted rifles with pride, skill, and true artistry.

The cartridges shown in the photo (left to right above rifle) are: 45-110, 50-100, 45-90, and 40-70.
Shiloh Sharps 45-70 vintage Quigley rifle

This video shows how Shiloh Sharps crafts its rifles, from “Foundry to Finish”:

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Gunsmithing 3 Comments »
July 3rd, 2016

The Gun-Maker’s Art — Holland & Holland

Holland and Holland Video gunsmithing

What goes into a £77,500.00 ‘Royal’ model hand-crafted shotgun? Watch this remarkable video from Holland & Holland to find out. Filmed in the Holland & Holland factory, this nine-minute video shows all the key stages in the creation of H&H’s prized shotguns and rifles. The video shows barrel-making, stock checkering, metal engraving and more…

Holland and Holland Video gunsmithing

Holland & Holland ‘Royal’ Side-by-Side Shotgun

Holland & Holland Double Rifle with Fitted Case
Holland and Holland Video gunsmithing

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October 5th, 2015

$78,000 Bolt-Action Double Rifle — Marvel in Metal

double rifle

double rifleHere’s something you don’t see every day — a bolt-action, repeating, double rifle. This amazing twin-barreled bolt-gun has a closing mechanism that locks two separate bolt bodies into the chambers of the right and left barrels. Yes there are two firing pins, two ejectors, two extractors, and two triggers. We’re not sure how one jumbo camming system closes two bolts, but there might be a geared center shaft rotating both right and left bolt bodies at the same time (but in opposite directions). Perhaps one of our gunsmith readers can explain how this system works.

This Rifle Has TWO Barrels and TWO Bolts
double rifle

Just $78,000 at “Half-off Pricing”
This unique firearm, chambered in .416 Remington, was sold a few years back on Gunbroker.com for $78,000. That astronomical sum is just half the original cost, according to the seller. Crafted by Fuchs, this double rifle has 22″ barrels and weighs 11.5 pounds. Deep-chiseled, full-coverage engraving decorates the receiver. So, if you have a cool $78 grand to burn you can acquire a very rare firearm — we doubt if you’ll find another one of these anytime soon.

Permalink Gunsmithing, Hunting/Varminting 6 Comments »
May 2nd, 2015

Historic Colt Paterson Revolver Sells for $414,000

Colt Engraved Patterson Revolver Auction RIA
This handsome Paterson revolver, the earliest known, factory-engraved Colt, sold for remarkable $414,000 at an April 2015 RIA auction.

Gun prices climbed into the stratosphere last month during the 2015 April Premiere Firearms Auction conducted by the Rock Island Auction Company (RIA). The most expensive gun at auction was an historic Colt Paterson, the first-ever factory-engraved Colt handgun. Complete with the original fitted factory case with various accessories, this Paterson inspired a bidding war that saw the price rise to a stunning $414,000. That is an amazingly high price for a gun that was not owned by a well-known historic personage. Generally, to command a price in the multiple hundreds of thousands of dollars, a gun must have a significant historic provenance — such as having been owned by a legendary figure such as Billy the Kid or Wyatt Earp.

It seems like prices continue to rise every year at auctions of historic and collectible firearms. At RIA’s April Premier Auction, the total sale value of the auctioned guns topped $11.6 million. Remarkably, a first-year production Colt Python (serial #170) sold for $17,250! That makes this Editor regret not having acquired an early model Snake decades ago.

Permalink Handguns, News No Comments »
January 13th, 2014

NSSF and SAAMI Sue to Block California Microstamping Policies

microstamping pistol identificationOn January 10, the National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF) and the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers’ Institute (SAAMI) filed a lawsuit on behalf of their members against the State of California in Fresno Superior Court challenging the state’s microstamping law. NSSF and SAAMI seek to invalidate and enjoin enforcement of provisions of California state law enacted in 2007, but not made effective until May 2013. These newly “activated” provisions of California law will effectively require that ALL future models of semi-auto pistols be microstamp-capable. Note — semi-auto handguns that are currently on California’s “approved” handgun roster will not be banned from sale. But guns introduced in the future cannot be sold in California unless they have microstamping technology. If gun makers cannot include such features in their future designs, the next generation of handguns will effectively be banned from sale in California.

Under California law, firearms manufacturers would have to micro laser-engrave a gun’s make, model and serial number on two distinct parts of each gun, including the firing pin so that, in theory, this information would be imprinted on the cartridge casing when the pistol is fired. “There is no existing microstamping technology that will reliably, consistently and legibly imprint the required identifying information by a semiautomatic handgun on the ammunition it fires. The holder of the patent for this technology himself has written that there are problems with it and that further study is warranted before it is mandated. A National Academy of Science review, forensic firearms examiners and a University of California at Davis study reached the same conclusion and the technical experts in the firearms industry agree,” said Lawrence G. Keane, NSSF senior vice president and general counsel. “Manufacturers can not comply with a law the provisions of which are invalid, that cannot be enforced and that will not contribute to improving public safety. As a result, we are seeking both declaratory and injunctive relief against this back-door attempt to prevent the sale of new semiautomatic handguns to law-abiding citizens in California.”

In 2007, California Assembly Bill 1471 was passed and signed into law requiring microstamping on internal parts of new semiautomatic pistols. The legislation provided that this requirement would only became effective if the California Department of Justice certified that the microstamping technology is available to more than one manufacturer unencumbered by patent restrictions. On May 17, 2013, Attorney General Kamala D. Harris provided such certification. The DOJ’s certification notice has been attacked on the grounds that it is scientifically unsound, founded on little more than “wishful thinking”.

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January 23rd, 2013

SHOT Show Report: ‘Pimped’ Turnbull TAR-10 Sells for $136,024

Turbull TAR-10 Heritage

A “pimped-out” Turnbull Manufacturing TAR-10 (AR 10-platform) rifle shattered the all-time SHOT Show Auction record with a high bid of $136,024.00. Proceeds from the auction conducted last week will go to support the NSSF’s Hunting Heritage Trust. This unique Turnbull TAR-10, chambered in .308 Winchester, has features rarely seen on an AR-style rifle: color case-hardening, hand engraving, gold inlay, and select walnut “furniture”. The upper and lower are made from 8620 carbon steel that has been color case-hardened with the Turnbull bone charcoal process.

Turbull TAR-10 Heritage

The gun has been elaborately engraved by Adams and Adams, with extensive gold inlay. The butt-stock, fore-end, and pistol grip are select fancy walnut.

Turbull TAR-10 Heritage

“We did our best to make this a very special rifle and we had hopes of beating the all-time record of $83,025.00, but we never imagined the bidding would surpass $100,000 and then soar to more than $136,000.00,” commented Doug Turnbull.

Turbull TAR-10 Heritage

“Our objective in creating the TAR-10 was to show that the AR platform is more than just a military rifle. We wanted to emphasize that these types of rifles can be made to look like any other custom rifle in terms of appeal,” commented Turnbull. The rifle, as sold, was equipped with a Zeiss 1.5-6x42mm Victory HT scope. Regular production Turnbull TAR-10 rifles will be the same as this special SHOT Show rifle minus the elaborate engraving and presentation-grade wood.

Turbull TAR-10 Heritage

Permalink New Product, News 8 Comments »
January 10th, 2013

Jack O’Connor Model 70 Tribute Rifle — A .270 Win of Course

Classic hunting rifles never go out of style. We thought our readers would enjoy some photos of a special Jack O’Connor Tribute rifle in .270 Winchester. This unique Model 70 is a featured SHOT Show 2013 rifle. It is being auctioned on Gunbroker.com, with proceeds to benefit hunting and shooting sports. Bids are currently approaching $7,000.00 with bidding open through January 18, 2013.

Model 70 Winchester Jack O'Connor .270 Win

Winchester Repeating Arms states that this 2013 SHOT Show Winchester Model 70 will be the last-ever Jack O’Connor Tribute rifle. The stock for this rifle is AAA grade Claro Walnut with Ebony forearm tip and shadowline cheekpiece. The rifle’s metalwork has been hand-engraved by the artisans at Baron Engraving. The rifle features a featherweight contour, free-floating barrel with target crown.

Model 70 Winchester Jack O'Connor .270 Win

Model 70 Winchester Jack O'Connor .270 Win

Interestingly, the Leupold 4X Mountaineer riflescope mounted on this rifle is an original 1950s-era Mountaineer from the vaults of Leupold & Stevens.

Jack O'Connor hunting classicsSporting Classics offers a collection of great Jack O’Connor stories from the pages of Outdoor Life, Field & Stream, Petersen’s Hunting and other popular magazines of his day. This 440-page book, entitled Classic O’Connor: 45 Worldwide Hunting Stories, is a sequel of sorts to Sporting Classics’ popular compendium, The Lost Classics of Jack O’Connor.

In this collection, Jack O’Connor recounts his worldwide hunting adventures, during which he pursued everything from ducks to grizzlies, pheasants to kudu. Classic O’Connor presents several of the author’s greatest gun stories and a large selection of never-before-published photographs of the celebrated sportsman and his family on hunting adventures around the world. The book is illustrated with 40+ drawings by acclaimed artist Ron Van Gilder. Hardcover with dust jacket, the book lists for $35, but it can be purchased on Amazon.com for just $23.07.

The Hunting Rifle by Jack O’Connor
Another O’Connor title worth reading is The Hunting Rifle, still considered one of the definitive works on selecting a hunting rifle and cartridge. One owner of The Hunting Rifle explains:

“It would benefit every hunter to take the time and read this book. It offers a corrective to the spirit of things that have gripped the hunting scene lately. Today, if one reads a hunting magazine, [one is] offered the view that you need the fastest and loudest cartridges, rifles with special finishes and the most expensive of anything. Ole Jack reminds us that many have killed game with ‘lesser’ guns for a very long time, and that these new gimmicks will not make you a more lethal hunter.”

Permalink Gunsmithing, News No Comments »
November 28th, 2012

Customized Loading Blocks — Perfect Gift for a Shooter

Billet Aluminum Loading Block

Forum member Tom Sziler is running a holiday sale on his customized, billet-aluminum, CNC-machined loading blocks. Machined from solid 6061 billet aluminum, these blocks are sized 3.5-4 inches wide, one inch thick (top to bottom), and 6.6-8.5 inches long. (Sizes varying slightly with cartridge type.) You’ll find more information on Tom’s website CNCShooter.com. To order, contact Tom by sending email to tom.sziler (at) gmail.com . NOTE: To guarantee delivery by Christmas, order/payment must be received by November 30th. Payment can be made by check, money order, or PayPal (3% extra).

Tom explains: “The blocks hold 50 rounds of ANY caliber you want them made for. Engraving is included on your block at no extra charge, and each block has 4 rubber feet to prevent sliding and damage to the block or work surface. The round typically sits .75″ deep in the block, holding it very securely and with no excessive rattle.”

Tom adds: “These are not ‘universal’ blocks, but rather are precision-milled on CNC machines to a tight tolerance and excellent surface finish. They are heavy, sturdy, and durable. These are by far the highest-quality loading/range blocks on the market today. For those who don’t need engraving, I offer ‘economy’ blocks for a reduced cost. These blocks are exactly the same as the standard blocks, except they do not have engraving and are .75” thick.”

Blocks with Tray, Sorting Blocks, and High-Volume Loading Blocks
Tom offers a variety of other products for reloaders. These include: 25-round blocks with a tray, bullet sorting blocks, full-length accessory trays, 100-round loading blocks, and 169-round high capacity loading blocks. Below is the 25-round block with tray. (This also works as an ammo caddy.)

Quantity Pricing for 2012 Holiday Sale:

1. QTY 1-5 will receive a 10% discount from the normal price.

2. QTY 6+ will receive lowest possible pricing (listed below).

3. QTY 16+ Free shipping in addition to the discounts in chart.

Tom Sziler
5521 W 110th Street, Ste 6
Oak Lawn, IL 60453
tom.sziler[at]gmail.com

Permalink New Product 3 Comments »
November 4th, 2012

Colt 175th Anniv. Single Action Army at NRA Firearms Museum

Report based on story by Lars Dalseide for NRAblog
Colt Manufacturing’s 175th Anniversary Single Action Army revolver is now on loan at the NRA National Firearms Museum. The one-of-a-kind gun (serial number 175) was crafted by the Colt’s Custom Shop and engraved by Master Engravers Steve Kamyk and George Spring. It was created “to commemorate the 175th Anniversary of Colt Firearms”, notes Timothy Looney, Custom Shop Manager.

Colt SAA 175 Anniversary Revolver

The firearm is based on the Colt Single Action Army with a black powder-style frame finished in color case hardening. The barrel, cylinder, trigger guard, and backstrap are finished in Carbonia Blue and the balance of small parts are fire-blued. The firearm has been scroll-engraved with C+ coverage and is accented by full gold frame borders including raised running leaf on both sides of the recoil shield. The left recoil shield exhibits “175” in high-relief gold over raised-relief scroll.

CLICK image squares to see larger photos.

The non-fluted cylinder is highlighted by the Colt dome comprised of gold and silver raised relief and the the opposing side displays the serpentine Colt in raised gold. Hand inlaid gold bands accent the barrel and the cylinder. The backstrap has been engraved and gold inlaid with Sam Colt’s signature. The elephant ivory grips are scrimshawed with a portrait of Sam Colt on the left side and the Rampant Colt on the right side.

“The 150th Anniversary pistol was auctioned off and sold for $150,000,” explained Looney. “This one is valued at $175,000. We wanted it … where people could see it because we’re very proud of our master engravers and we like their work to be shown.” The Single Action Army Revolver will be on display at the NRA National Firearms Museum through October of 2013.

Photos courtesy NRABlog and Colt Manufacturing
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May 29th, 2011

Check Out Remington Custom Shop Website

Remington Custom ShopAmong Remington rifles, Custom Shop products have long enjoyed a solid reputation, though the quality control has declined in recent years. Remington is looking to return its Custom division to the glory days. As part of that effort, Remington has produced a dedicated Custom Shop website: www.remingtoncustom.com. On the Remington Custom Shop website visitors can browse through series of highly-specialized rifles and shotguns: Hunter Series, Target/Tactical, Historical, Rimfire, 40-X™ Series and High Grade. Within each series, the user can click on a specific model for an overview, features, specifications and images of the selected firearm of interest. The Custom Shop Showcase features high-quality photos illustrating the hand craftsmanship that goes into premium Custom shop arms.

Remington Custom Shop

Remington Custom Shop

Permalink Gunsmithing, News 12 Comments »
March 31st, 2011

Spectacular Colt 1911 Auctioned to Benefit NRA Foundation

The official centennial of J.M. Browning’s 1911 pistol was March 29th, 2011, 100 years to the day since the legendary handgun was adopted by the U.S. Army. (The U.S.M.C. and U.S. Navy adopted the 1911 pistol roughly two years later). To celebrate the 100th birthday of what many experts believe is the greatest self-loading pistol ever made, Colt created a spectacular, fully-engraved “Anniversary Edition” pistol. It’s pimped to the max, complete with gold inlay and genuine ivory grips. The gun is currently up for auction at Gunbroker.com with proceeds to benefit the NRA Foundation.




Price? If You Have to Ask…
Want it? Well you may have to liquidate your 401(k) to buy it. Current bid price is $33,635.00 and a similar fully-engraved Anniversary 1911 sold for $83,025.00 three months ago. See January Auction.

Permalink News 2 Comments »
February 9th, 2008

S & W Introduces 50th Anniversary Model 41

Of the thousands of handguns on display at SHOT Show 2008, one in particular caught our eye — the 50th Anniversary Smith & Wesson Model 41 22LR Target pistol. As accurate as it is beautiful, the commemorative Model 41 features full Class A+ machine engraving from stem to stern, with 24-carat gold edging. Served up in a glass-top presentation case, the 50th Anniversary Model 41 has an MSRP of $2150.00.


The Model 41 is one of those classic American designs that has stood the test of time. Many feel the Model 41 represents the apex of American 22LR pistol design, much like the Colt Python is the “crown jewell” of double-action revolvers.

S&W historian Roy Jinks recounts the development of the Model 41: “Sales began in December of 1957 and the Model 41 was first cataloged in 1958. The factory was soon heavily back-ordered and [the Model 41] became the most popular auto-loading pistol offered by the company. In May of 1959 Smith & Wesson introduced a 5-inch lightweight barrel for the handgun to meet the demand of hunters[.] The line of Model 41s was further expanded in September of 1960 with the introduction of the Model 41-1 which fired .22 shorts for the International Rapid Fire Shooters. [I]n August of 1963 the company introduced the 5.5 inch heavy barrel. The last of the major barrel changes occurred in 1965 when the company produced the 5.5-inch heavy barrel with an extendable front sight[.] During the last 50 years the Model 41 has … established many records around the world. Today it is one of the classic target handguns.”

Click For More Info and History of the Model 41 by Roy Jinks (.pdf file)

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