June 9th, 2019

Ammo Reference Book Covers 200+ Cartridge Types

Ammunition Ammo Factory commerical hunting load data ballistics hunt Bob Forker

Do you use factory ammo in your hunting rifles? Perhaps you buy bulk centerfire ammo for your AR15 or varmint rifle. Then this book is for you.

If you ever shoot factory ammo, you should consider getting Ammo & Ballistics 6. This resource book lists over 2,600 different loads for 200+ cartridge types from 17 Mach 2 up to .700 Nitro Express, including the most popular centerfire and rimfire cartridges (both rifle and handgun). In this updated-for-2017 Sixth Edition, there are over 3,000 tables covering virtually every caliber and every load for all commercially-loaded hunting ammunition sold in the USA. Tables include velocity, energy, wind drift, bullet drop, and ballistic coefficients up to 1,000 yards.

Ammunition Ammo Factory commerical hunting load data ballistics hunt Bob Forker

Ammo & Ballistics 6 helps you select ammo for a hunt — quickly compare the velocity and knock-down power of various commercial ammo. This book can help you choose a caliber/chambering for your next hunting rig.

Verified Book Purchaser Reviews
“Outstanding reference guide for shooters and ballistic enthusiasts alike. Has data on velocity, energy delivered, Taylor KO index, windage and elevation on numerous loadings for hundreds of [cartridge types]. Each cartridge has all dimensions labeled (i.e rim, case length, neck, etc.), and has an informative description of the cartridges history/relevance.” — S. Step, 2017

“Great heaps of data! This volume has pages and pages of new data for .22LR like the hot Velocitor, and also on the .22 WMR from 30 grains up into the 50s. Most importantly there is lots of range data, drop, windage, kinetic energy, etc. — Terrific reference guide….” — E. Svanoe

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Hunting/Varminting No Comments »
April 5th, 2019

Half-MOA with Factory Ammo? Weatherby VMC Comes Close

Weatherby Vanguard Modular Chassis PRS rifle .308 Winchester American Rifleman
Three factory ammo types shot 0.53″, 0.55″, and 0.57″ respectively. That’s impressive.

Chassis rifles are hugely popular for PRS/NRL practical rifle competition. There are many good options for Production Class. You may not know that Weatherby, a company that built its reputation on hunting rifles, offers a great-shooting chassis rifle for PRS comps and other tactical disciplines.

Called the Vanguard® Modular Chassis (VMC), this rig has shown remarkable accuracy. Vanguard’s VMC features a Modular Driven Technologies (MDT) aluminum stock, Luth AR MBA-1 buttstock, and 22″ heavy barrel. The Weatherby Vanguard action is fitted with an adjustable 2-stage trigger. Priced at $1519.00 MSRP, this rifle can be campaigned in the PRS “Production Class”, which limits complete rifles to $2000.00 without optics. The rifle is offered in three chamberings: .223 Rem, 6.5 Creedmoor, and .308 Winchester.

Weatherby says its Vanguard Modular Chassis tactical rifle is very accurate. To back that claim, Weatherby offers a SUB-MOA accuracy guarantee — Weatherby guarantees the rifle will shoot .99” or smaller 3-shot groups at 100 yards when used with Weatherby® factory or premium ammunition.

Weatherby Vanguard Modular Chassis PRS rifle .308 Winchester American Rifleman

Near Half-MOA Accuracy with Factory Ammo (5-Shot Groups)
It turns out Weatherby’s accuracy claims are conservative. This tactical rifle is closer to a half-MOA rig than a 1-MOA gun. American Rifleman tested a .308 Win version of this rifle and recorded really stellar accuracy — close to half-MOA. What’s more, this rifle is not fussy — with a 1:10″-twist barrel it proved very accurate with six types of factory ammo, with three of types registering 0.57″ or better.

The rifle delivered near-half-inch 5-shot groups with two types of Hornady ammo along with Black Hills 168gr. The worst group of six ammo types tested, Black Hills 175gr, was 0.76″, still very impressive for factory fodder. With good hand-loads this gun could go well under half-MOA (for five shots).

Vanguard Modular Chassis FIVE-SHOT Factory Ammo Test Groups:

0.53 inches | Hornady 168gr Match BTHP (2718 fps)
0.55 inches | Hornady 155gr Steel Match (2612 fps)
0.57 inches | Black Hills 168gr BTHP (2608 fps)
0.66 inches | Federal Premium 168gr MatchKing BTHP (2659 fps)
0.70 inches | Hornady 155gr American Gunner (2697 fps)
0.76 inches | Black Hills 175gr BTHP (2603 fps)

NOTE: Group sizes are for 5-shot groups shot from bench at 100 yards with Caldwell pedestal rest and rear sandbag. Pentax Lightseeker 6-24x50mm scope. Velocities in FPS from PACT Chronograph.

READ American Rifleman’s FULL REVIEW of Weatherby Vanguard Modular Chassis Rifle

The accuracy testing was done by gunwriter Mike Detty, who notes: “My single best group was fired with Hornady’s Match 168-gr. BTHP ammunition. Five shots measured just slightly more than a half-inch. Hornady’s 155-gr. Steel Match ammo wasn’t far behind with a group of .55″. Also accounting for the small groups is the VMC’s wonderful trigger. It is a two-stage affair and the first stage has about 3/8” take up with about a pound of pressure until it reaches the second stage where another 1 ¾ lbs. was required to break the shot.”

Vanguard Modular Chassis FEATURES:
Action with Fully Enclosed Bolt Sleeve, Integral Recoil Lug
CNC-machined, hard-anodized, 6061 aluminum chassis
Fully adjustable LUTH-AR MBA-1 buttstock
Adjustable 2-stage trigger with 3-Position Safety

PRS Production Class Cost Limits
Production Division combined rifle and scope MSRP as listed on the company’s website shall not exceed $3,000 USD, the rifle shall not exceed $2,000 USD and the optic not exceed $2,000 USD. [Editor: For example, you could have a $2,000 rifle with a $1000.00 scope or vice-versa. The total system cannot exceed $3000. Rifle alone cannot exceed $2000.00 retail sale price.]
Production Division rifles are not permitted to be altered or improved in any way from the original factory configuration.

Permalink Competition, Gear Review, Tactical No Comments »
April 5th, 2019

SAVE MONEY — AmmoSeek Finds Best Ammo Prices

Ammoseek search engine ammuntion reloading supplies

Here’s a great search service that can help you locate hard-to-find ammunition and reloading components — while saving money in the process. Ammoseek.com monitors more than a dozen online vendors — checking current pricing and available inventory, for pistol, rifle, and shotgun ammunition. Looking for .22 LR ammo for your rimfire trainer or .45 acp ammo for your 1911? Just select the cartridge type from the “Quick Seek” list on the right. Likewise you can find .223 Rem and .308 Win Rifle ammo with one click.

Ammoseek search engine ammuntion reloading supplies skagit arms WA
Got Ammo? Here’s just part of the vast inventory at Skagit Arms in Washington State.

Find .22 LR Ammo Quickly
Looking for hard-to-find .22 LR rimfire ammunition? Well AmmoSeek makes it easy — you don’t even have to enter any search words. Simply click on the highlighted links for AmmoSeek’s 22LR Page.

CLICK HERE for AmmoSeek.com .22 LR Ammo Search Results

Use Ammoseek.com to Find Reloading Components Too
Ammoseek.com also lets you search for reloading components, including powder, primers, brass, and bullets. This is a huge time-saver. You can instantly check a dozen or more vendors to see if a particular type of powder is in stock. Likewise, you can quickly check for primer availability. If you have a big match coming up and are short on primers — this could solve the problem.

Ammoseek search engine ammuntion reloading supplies

Story Tip by Boyd Allen. We welcome reader submissions.
Permalink - Articles, Bullets, Brass, Ammo No Comments »
February 22nd, 2019

MV on the Box? Why You Still Need to Chron Factory Ammo

muzzle velocity applied Ballistics MV chronograph

Why You CANNOT Rely on the MV Printed on the Ammo Box!
When figuring out your come-ups with a ballistics solver or drop chart it’s “mission critical” to have an accurate muzzle velocity (MV). When shooting factory ammo, it’s tempting to use the manufacturer-provided MV which may be printed on the package. That’s not such a great idea says Bryan Litz of Applied Ballistics. Don’t rely on the MV on the box, Bryan advises — you should take out your chrono and run your own velocity tests. There are a number of reasons why the MV values on ammo packaging may be inaccurate. Below is a discussion of factory ammo MV from the Applied Ballistics Facebook Page.

Five Reasons You Cannot Trust the Velocity on a Box of Ammo:

1. You have no idea about the rifle used for the MV test.

2. You have no idea what atmospheric conditions were during testing, and yes it matters a lot.

3. You have no idea of the SD for the factory ammo, and how the manufacturer derived the MV from that SD. (Marketing plays a role here).

4. You have no idea of the precision and quality of chronograph(s) used for velocity testing.

5. You have no idea if the manufacturer used the raw velocity, or back-calculated the MV. The BC used to back track that data is also unknown.

1. The factory test rifle and your rifle are not the same. Aside from having a different chamber, and possibly barrel length some other things are important too like the barrel twist rate, and how much wear was in the barrel. Was it just recently cleaned, has it ever been cleaned? You simply don’t know anything about the rifle used in testing.

2. Temperature and Humidity conditions may be quite different (than during testing). Temperature has a physical effect on powder, which changes how it burns. Couple this with the fact that different powders can vary in temp-stability quite a bit. You just don’t know what the conditions at the time of testing were. Also a lot of factory ammunition is loaded with powder that is meter friendly. Meter friendly can often times be ball powder, which is less temperature stable than stick powder often times.

3. The ammo’s Standard Deviation (SD) is unknown. You will often notice that while MV is often listed on ammo packages, Standard Deviation (normally) is not. It is not uncommon for factory ammunition to have an SD of 18 or higher. Sometimes as high as 40+. As such is the nature of metering powder. With marketing in mind, did they pick the high, low, or average end of the SD? We really don’t know. You won’t either until you test it for yourself. For hand-loaded ammo, to be considered around 10 fps or less. Having a high SD is often the nature of metered powder and factory loads. The image below is from Modern Advancements in Long Range Shooting: Volume II.

muzzle velocity applied Ballistics MV chronograph

4. You don’t know how MV was measured. What chronograph system did the manufacturer use, and how did they back track to a muzzle velocity? A chronograph does not measure true velocity at the muzzle; it simply measures velocity at the location it is sitting. So you need to back-calculate the distance from the chrono to the end of the barrel. This calculation requires a semi-accurate BC. So whose BC was used to back track to the muzzle or did the manufacturer even do that? Did they simply print the numbers displayed by the chronograph? What kind of chronograph setup did they use? We know from our Lab Testing that not all chronographs are created equal. Without knowing what chronograph was used, you have no idea the quality of the measurement. See: Applied Ballistics Chronograph Chapter Excerpt.

5. The MV data may not be current. Does the manufacturer update that data for every lot? Or is it the same data from years ago? Some manufacturers rarely if ever re-test and update information. Some update it every lot (ABM Ammo is actually tested every single lot for 1% consistency). Without knowing this information, you could be using data for years ago.

CONCLUSION: Never use the printed MV off a box of ammo as anything more than a starting point, there are too many factors to account for. You must always either test for the MV with a chronograph, or use carefully obtained, live fire data. When you are using a Ballistic Solver such as the AB Apps or Devices integrated with AB, you need to know the MV to an accuracy down to 5 fps. The more reliable the MV number, the better your ballistics solutions.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Shooting Skills, Tech Tip 1 Comment »
January 14th, 2019

Creedmoor Heaven — New Factory Ammo from Berger and Lapua

Berger Bullets Lapua Capstone 6.5 Creedmoor 6mm creedmoor ammo ammunition hunting lead free Naturalis

PRS and NRL shooters, as well as game hunters, now have new ultra-accurate Berger and Lapua factory ammo for the popular 6mm Creedmoor and 6.5 Creedmoor chamberings. For shooters who do not have the time or equipment to hand-load, these new factory ammo options promise outstanding performance. We fully expect that these new offerings from Berger and Lapua will set new standards for accuracy and ballistic uniformity among commercial ammunition for the 6mm Creedmoor and 6.5 Creedmoor. Lapua’s match ammo for the similar 6.5×47 Lapua cartridge has shown outstanding accuracy with ES/SD numbers rivaling high-quality hand-loads. (SEE 6.5x47L Test Results).

New Lapua 6.5 Creedmoor Target and Lead-Free Hunting Ammunition
Lapua has added the popular 6.5 Creedmoor cartridge to its line of Scenar-L Target ammo and its Naturalis Hunting ammunition offerings. The 6.5m Creedmoor 136 grain Scenar-L offers a high ballistic coefficient (BC) for long-range competitive target shooting, yet maintains SAAMI configuration for flawless function through all factory or custom rifle magazines. Lapua ammo will also be loaded with the excellent 123 grain OTM Scenar. One of our favorite bullets, the 123-grainer offers faster velocities (and less recoil) than its bigger brother, and may be the best choice for many PRS stages.

6.5 Creedmoor ammo loaded with the 140 grain Lapua Naturalis provides hunters a lead-free option for hunting in areas that ban lead bullets. Designed and manufactured from pure copper, Naturalis bullets will reliably retain 90-100% of their original weight. Lapua’s Naturalis projectiles produce consistent, controlled expansion at the widest velocity range on the market.

Related Story: Read Lapua 6.5 Creedmoor Brass Test Results »

Berger Bullets Lapua Capstone 6.5 Creedmoor 6mm creedmoor ammo ammunition hunting lead free Naturalis

New Berger 6mm Creedmoor Target and Hunting Ammo
New 6mm Creedmoor Target Ammunition is loaded with Berger 105 grain Hybrid Target bullets, the “go-to” for PRS shooters and long-range accuracy enthusiasts alike. Built using premium-grade Lapua cartridge cases, Berger’s 6mm Creedmoor Target Ammunition provides the discriminating shooter the highest quality components and sub-MOA accuracy “off-the-shelf”, unequaled by the competition.

New Berger 6mm Creedmoor Hunting Ammunition is loaded with 95 grain Hybrid Classic Hunter bullets in premium Lapua brass. These top-flight components deliver lethal precision and sub-MOA accuracy — impressive for hunting ammo. The hybrid ogive design of the Classic Hunter projectile is the same as Berger Hybrid Target bullets, while allowing for SAAMI length configurations for efficiency in the field and reliable functioning through magazines.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, New Product, Tactical No Comments »
October 7th, 2017

Excellent Factory Ammo Offered by Creedmoor Sports

Creedmoor Sports Ammunition Powder Anniston Alabama

You may not know this, but Creedmoor Sports sells very high-quality loaded ammunition crafted with top-quality bullets and premium-grade Lapua brass for .308 Win and .30-06. We have friends who have shot some of this ammo in .223 Rem and .308 Win, and it is very impressive. The 6.5 Creedmoor ammo is capable of winning PRS matches outright. Creedmoor’s rifle cartridge match ammunition includes:

.223 Rem: (55gr FMJ, 68gr HPBT, 69gr TMK, 75gr HPBT, 77gr TMK)
6.5 Creedmoor: (140gr HPBT Hornady, 140gr HPBT Nosler, 142gr Sierra — all Hornady brass)
.308 Win: (155gr, 167gr, 168gr Sierra, 175gr all in Lapua Brass; also precision hunting in other brass)
.30-06 Springfield: (167gr Lapua Scenar HPBT in Lapua Brass)

Use Coupon Code CS929 to receive Free Ground Shipping on orders over $99!

Creedmoor Sports Ammunition Powder Anniston Alabama

Oh, the beauty of it — all that Lapua brass. From Finland with love….

Creedmoor Sports Ammunition Powder Anniston Alabama

What does 13,005 pounds (6.5 tons) of powder look like? That would last most reloaders a few seasons. Hoarders, eat your hearts out….

Creedmoor Sports Ammunition Powder Anniston Alabama

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Gear Review, Hot Deals 1 Comment »
August 8th, 2017

Ammo Encyclopedia — 1000+ Pages, 320+ Cartridge Drawings

Brussard ammunition encyclopedia 6th Edition

Wouldn’t it be nice to have a print resource at your fingertips that has hundreds of true-size cartridge illustrations, plus technical descriptions of thousands of popular cartridge types? That could be a real time-saver. It’s no wonder this book is an Amazon category best-seller.

If you’re a serious shooter, the latest 6th Edition of the Ammo Encyclopedia belongs in your library. This 1008-page book by Michael Bussard is probably the most comprehensive and up-to-date book in print covering current and obsolete cartridges and shotshells. The Ammo Encyclopedia is a massive resource work. The 6th Edition now boasts 100+ chapters, covering thousands of handgun, rifle, and shotgun cartridges from the past century and a half.

One of the best features is a full-color section depicting actual size drawings of over 320 current rimfire/centerfire cartridges and shotshells. You won’t find that many “life-size” cartridge drawings in one place even on the internet. Cartridge profiles and ballistic charts have been expanded to include many new factory cartridges. The authors have even included air rifle pellets and historical images and charts. Softcover, 1008 pages, $38.80.

Brussard ammunition encyclopedia 5th Edition

Comments from guys who bought the book:

“This book contains a vast array of information on many modern and even obsolete ammunition. Definitely recommend for any modern reloader novice or experienced.” – Duggaboy460

“It’s a great reference book for individuals who reload their own ammunition. There is a lot more info in this Edition. Everyone who likes this information should have it in their library.” – Reloader

“I like the general and technical comments that are available for each and every cartridge. Information that predicts if a cartridge will stay in production for many more years or rapidly become obsolete.” – RSL1

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, New Product No Comments »
March 4th, 2017

6.5 Creedmoor Ammo from Norma Tested in Ruger Precision Rifle

Gavin Gear 6.5 Norma Ammunition Scirocco II

Quality Factory Ammo for 6.5 Creedmoor

by Gavin Gear, UltimateReloader.com
Norma is known for its high-quality brass and ammunition. I’ve used Norma brass for precision reloading in calibers like .30-06 with great results. Recently, I saw that Norma had announced a new addition to their Professional Hunter lineup of ammunition: in 6.5 Creedmoor! I thought I should try some out with the Ruger Precision Rifle, and that’s what I’ll cover in this post.

As you saw in the video, this ammunition behaves more like match ammunition than it does hunting ammunition — I really wish it was deer season! Here are the chronograph results:

This article comes from the Midsouth Shooters Blog. You’ll find other helpful gear reviews, reloading tips, and technical articles at www.MSSBlog.com.

With an SD of 13.7 FPS, this ammunition is very consistent in terms of velocity. It’s not surprising that the first four shots went into a .5″ group. This new ammunition is built around the Swift Scirocco II 6.5mm Bullet, and here’s more info about this precision-oriented hunting projectile:

Technical Information

  • Caliber: 264, 6.5mm
  • Bullet Diameter: 0.264
  • Bullet Weight: 130 Grains
  • Bullet Length: 1.350″
  • Bullet Style: Polymer Tip Spitzer Boat Tail
  • Bullet Coating: Non-Coated

Ballistics Information:

  • Sectional Density: .266
  • Ballistic Coefficient:.571

Gavin Gear 6.5 Norma Ammunition Scirocco II

This is certainly a great choice of ammunition if you are hunting medium game with a rifle chambered in 6.5 Creedmoor. Can’t wait to sit down again with this ammunition to see if I can get that 3/8″ 5-shot group I know this ammo is capable of! If you want to try this Norma 6.5 Creedmoor Professional Hunter ammo yourself, you can purchase this excellent ammunition at Midsouth Shooters Supply.

Check out the Ultimate Reloader site HERE for more reviews, how-to’s, and much more!

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Gear Review, Hunting/Varminting 7 Comments »
September 18th, 2016

Why MVs Supplied with Factory Ammo May Be Unreliable

muzzle velocity applied Ballistics MV chronograph

Why You CANNOT Rely on the MV Printed on the Ammo Box!
When figuring out your come-ups with a ballistics solver or drop chart it’s “mission critical” to have an accurate muzzle velocity (MV). When shooting factory ammo, it’s tempting to use the manufacturer-provided MV which may be printed on the package. That’s not such a great idea says Bryan Litz of Applied Ballistics. Don’t rely on the MV on the box, Bryan advises — you should take out your chrono and run your own velocity tests. There are a number of reasons why the MV values on ammo packaging may be inaccurate. Below is a discussion of factory ammo MV from the Applied Ballistics Facebook Page.

Five Reasons You Cannot Trust the Velocity on a Box of Ammo:

1. You have no idea about the rifle used for the MV test.

2. You have no idea what atmospheric conditions were during testing, and yes it matters a lot.

3. You have no idea of the SD for the factory ammo, and how the manufacturer derived the MV from that SD. (Marketing plays a role here).

4. You have no idea of the precision and quality of chronograph(s) used for velocity testing.

5. You have no idea if the manufacturer used the raw velocity, or back-calculated the MV. The BC used to back track that data is also unknown.

1. The factory test rifle and your rifle are not the same. Aside from having a different chamber, and possibly barrel length some other things are important too like the barrel twist rate, and how much wear was in the barrel. Was it just recently cleaned, has it ever been cleaned? You simply don’t know anything about the rifle used in testing.

2. Temperature and Humidity conditions may be quite different (than during testing). Temperature has a physical effect on powder, which changes how it burns. Couple this with the fact that different powders can vary in temp-stability quite a bit. You just don’t know what the conditions at the time of testing were. Also a lot of factory ammunition is loaded with powder that is meter friendly. Meter friendly can often times be ball powder, which is less temperature stable than stick powder often times.

3. The ammo’s Standard Deviation (SD) is unknown. You will often notice that while MV is often listed on ammo packages, Standard Deviation (normally) is not. It is not uncommon for factory ammunition to have an SD of 18 or higher. Sometimes as high as 40+. As such is the nature of metering powder. With marketing in mind, did they pick the high, low, or average end of the SD? We really don’t know. You won’t either until you test it for yourself. For hand-loaded ammo, to be considered around 10 fps or less. Having a high SD is often the nature of metered powder and factory loads. The image below is from Modern Advancements in Long Range Shooting: Volume II.

muzzle velocity applied Ballistics MV chronograph

4. You don’t know how MV was measured. What chronograph system did the manufacturer use, and how did they back track to a muzzle velocity? A chronograph does not measure true velocity at the muzzle; it simply measures velocity at the location it is sitting. So you need to back-calculate the distance from the chrono to the end of the barrel. This calculation requires a semi-accurate BC. So whose BC was used to back track to the muzzle or did the manufacturer even do that? Did they simply print the numbers displayed by the chronograph? What kind of chronograph setup did they use? We know from our Lab Testing that not all chronographs are created equal. Without knowing what chronograph was used, you have no idea the quality of the measurement. See: Applied Ballistics Chronograph Chapter Excerpt.

5. The MV data may not be current. Does the manufacturer update that data for every lot? Or is it the same data from years ago? Some manufacturers rarely if ever re-test and update information. Some update it every lot (ABM Ammo is actually tested every single lot for 1% consistency). Without knowing this information, you could be using data for years ago.

CONCLUSION: Never use the printed MV off a box of ammo as anything more than a starting point, there are too many factors to account for. You must always either test for the MV with a chronograph, or use carefully obtained, live fire data. When you are using a Ballistic Solver such as the AB Apps or Devices integrated with AB, you need to know the MV to an accuracy down to 5 fps. The more reliable the MV number, the better your ballistics solutions.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading 1 Comment »
August 26th, 2016

Reference Guide for Factory Ammo Includes 190+ Cartridge Types

Ammunition Ammo Factory commerical hunting load data ballistics hunt Bob Forker

If you ever shoot factory ammo, you should consider getting Ammo & Ballistics 5. This resource book lists over 2,600 different loads for 190 cartridge types from 17 Mach 2 up to .700 Nitro Express, including the most popular centerfire and rimfire cartridges (both rifle and handgun). There are over 1,400 tables with ballistics data for nearly all commercially-loaded hunting ammunition sold in the United States (as of 2013, the publication date). Tables include velocity, energy, wind drift, bullet drop, and ballistic coefficient.

Ammunition Ammo Factory commerical hunting load data ballistics hunt Bob Forker

This book can be helpful when choosing ammo for a hunt. You can quickly compare the velocity and knock-down power of various types of commercial ammo. In addition, this book can help you choose a caliber/chambering for your next hunting rig, as you can compare factory load options.

Book Purchaser Reviews
“The data contained in this book is invaluable. If you don’t understand momentum vs. energy, MER and MEPBR, this book will help you gain an understanding. If you don’t know what the Taylor Knock Out (KO) Index is, this book will enlighten and inform.” — Daryl ID

“Great heaps of data! This volume has pages and pages of new data for .22LR like the hot Velocitor, and also on the .22 WMR from 30 grains up into the 50s. Most importantly there is lots of range data, drop, windage, kinetic energy, etc. — Terrific reference guide….” — E. Svanoe

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Hunting/Varminting No Comments »
February 28th, 2014

New Online Ballistics Calculator from Federal Premium

Federal Premium Ballistics Online CalculatorFederal Premium has a new online Ballistics Calculator. This free program can determine the trajectory for any rifle or handgun load, and even save your ballistics solutions for future reference. This is handy if you shoot Federal ammunition, because all Federal ammo types are included in the built-in database, with BCs and velocities. That makes it very easy to get a ballistics solution for Federal factory ammo — simply enter the caliber and bullet type/weight and the solver fills in the BC and velocity for you.

Federal’s Ballistics Calculator can also be used for handloaded ammo with non-Federal components. However, you can only use a G1 BC and Federal’s solver is not as sophisticated as some others. We still recommend JBM Ballistics or the new Applied Ballistics Online Solver. These both offer both G1 and G7 and extensive databases of field-derived BCs for hundreds of bullets. The Federal Ballistics Calculator only has BC numbers for factory-made Federal ammunition.

Federal Premium Ballistics Online Calculator

Federal Premium Ballistics Online Calculator

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, New Product No Comments »
July 5th, 2013

Cartridge Comparison Guide (2d Ed.) Is Gold Mine of Information

Cartridge Comparison Guide second editionThe updated Second Edition of the Cartridge Comparison Guide is now available. The Cartridge Comparision Guide is the product of many years of labor by Andrew Chamberlain, a Utah-based hunter. Andrew says his Guide “compares every factory available cartridge from the 17 calibers up to the 50 caliber cartridges”. (Sorry, most wildcat cartridges are not covered.) Chamberlain’s Guide also compiles cartridge data from major ammunition manufacturers such as Barnes, Federal, Hornady, Norma, Nosler, Remington, Sierra, Swift, Weatherby, and Winchester. It shows the optimal velocity achieved for each bullet weight and calculates bullet energy, recoil, and powder efficiency.

The Cartridge Comparison Guide provides data for thousands of cartridge/bullet/velocity combos. Charts provide cartridge ballistics including downrange energy. The Second Edition adds 90 more pages devoted to ballistics. The Cartridge Comparison Guide offers a firearms lexicon, plus Appendices covering Cartridge Selection for Game Animals, Bullet Selection/Design, Bullet Expansion, Wound Channel Characteristics and more. In the Second Edition, there is expanded coverage of factory-loaded hunting ammo. The book now provides “100% coverage of all handgun and rifle cartridges produced in the USA by at least two minor factory load sources or one major factory load source.”

New Content in Second Edition of Cartridge Comparison Guide
The Cartridge Comparison Guide (2nd Edition) costs $32.95 plus shipping and tax. This is more pricey than the $24.99 First Edition (which is still for sale), but the latest Cartridge Comparison guide offers considerably more content. Here’s what’s new in the Second Edition:

  • Addition of Shotgun Ammunition (Both Slug and Shot loads).
  • Momentum Calculation for all Rifle, Shotgun and Handgun loads.
  • Integration of Shotgun Slug Ammunition with Center Fire Rifle Data Tables.
  • Factory Load Summary Added (Shows manufacturers and loads produced).
  • One factory load and one hand load for every bullet weight available in each cartridge.
  • Over 90 pages of additional ballistics content (roughly 35% more than in First Edition).

Award-Winning Content
The Cartridge Comparison Guide has been awarded the POMA Pinnacle Award for Excellence. (POMA, the Professional Outdoor Media Association, is the trade association for outdoor writers).

Cartridge Comparison Guide

Cartridge Comparison GuideGreat Resource for Hunters
The Cartridge Comparison Guide’s author wanted to help hunters select the “right cartridge for the job.” Chamberlain states: “This started as a personal project to gather information on the more popular cartridges commonly used for hunting. I began comparing cartridge performance, versatility, bullet selection, powder efficiency, recoil generation vs. energy produced, standing ballistic data for different environments, etc.” Chamberlain adds: “I wanted to find the best all-around performing cartridge and rifle that a guy on a budget could shoot.”

Giant Cartridge Poster for Computer Wallpaper (1665×1080 pixels)
Here’s a great illustration of hundreds of cartridges and shotshell types. For dedicated reloaders, this would work great as desktop “wallpaper” for your computer. CLICK HERE for full-size image.

cartridge poster

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Hunting/Varminting 2 Comments »
January 30th, 2013

New Loaded Ammunition from McMillan Group Int’l

McMillan Group International (McMillan) has added three new lines of ammunition: Extreme Velocity ammo (optimized for long range), McMillan Precision ammo (match quality for hunting), and McMillan Tactical ammo. All three new types of ammo are loaded with premium bullets. McMillan claims that its precision cartridge-loading methods ensure: “better concentricity, better uniformity of velocity, [and] better uniformity of pressure”. Along with these three NEW ammo types, McMillan already offers African Dangerous Game ammunition (ADG).

McMillan Ammunition Extreme Tactical Hunting

McMillan Extreme Velocity Ammunition — Long Range
McMillan’s Extreme Velocity (ExVel) ammunition utilizes high-BC Berger Bullets exclusively. Powders are selected for High FPS and low ES to minimize vertical spread at long range. ExVel ammo was designed with input from Bob Beck of Extreme Outer Limits TV.

Cartridge List: 22-250, 243 Win, 6.5×284 Norma, 7mm EOL Ultra Mag, 7mm Rem Mag, 7mm Rem Ultra Mag, .300 EOL Ultra Mag,.300 Win Mag, 300 Rem Ultra Mag, .338 Lapua Magnum.

McMillan Precision Ammunition — Hunting
In its new Precision line, McMillan offers traditional hunting cartridge types. Barnes LRX, TSX, and TTSX bullets with excellent accuracy AND strong terminal performance are used. All critical cartridge measurements are held to precision tolerances and Powders are selected for consistent velocity. Each round is hand inspected.

Cartridge List: .243 Win, 270 WSM, 7mm Rem Mag, .308 Win, 30-378, .300 RUM, .300 WSM, .30-06, .300 Win Mag, .338 Win Mag.

McMillan Tactical Ammunition
McMillan’s Tactical ammunition offers .308, .300 WM, .338 LM, and 50 BMG cartridges loaded to “match-quality standards”. Bullets are carefully selected for mission-specific applications and powders are selected for low ES to minimize vertical spread at extreme long ranges. Each round is hand inspected.

Cartridge List: .308 Subsonic, .308 Win, .300 Win Mag, .338 Lapua Magnum, 50 BMG.

For more information on McMillan ammunition, visit www.McMillanusa.com. To order, call McMillan toll-free at 877-365-6148.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, New Product 2 Comments »
September 20th, 2012

Fiocchi Issues Warning and Recall for 22-250 and .243 Win Ammo

ammunition recall Fiocchi 243 Win 22-250Fiocchi of America is recalling various lots of 22-250 Remington and .243 Winchester centerfire rifle ammunition. There is a serious safety issue affecting certain lots of Fiocchi ammo types: 22250B, 22250HVD, 243SPB, 243HSB, and 243SPD. The problem involves the loading of multiple bullets in a single cartridge. If you have any Fiocchi ammo from the affected product lots listed below you should return it immediately. The following ammunition products are affected by this recall:

ammunition recall Fiocchi 243 Win 22-250

Text of Fiocchi’s Recall Notice:

Through extensive evaluation Fiocchi has determined that the above lots of 22-250 and 243 may have been loaded with multiple bullets that can cause excessive pressure. This ammunition with multiple bullets may cause firearm damage rendering the firearm inoperable, and subject the shooter or bystanders to a risk of personal injury when fired. DO NOT USE THE ABOVE LISTED FIOCCHI 22-250 REM. OR 243 WIN. AMMUNITION OF SPECIFIED LOT NUMBERS. The ammunition lot number is black ink stamped inside one of the box end tuck flaps that you would open to remove the 20-round carrier.

To determine if your ammunition is subject to this notice, review the ITEM and LOT NUMBER. If the item number AND last three digits of the lot number match the above listed products, please return the ammunition to FIOCCHI of America via United Parcel Service (UPS) or FedEx Ground. Securely pack the ammo in a strong fiberboard box with packing materials to make it “snug” in the box. You will need an “LQ” label to ship the ammunition. To get the “LQ” label, [CLICK this LINK] or you can call the factory customer service directly at 417-449-1039 or email service@fiocchiusa.com prior to shipping. Affix the “LQ” label to the package with packing tape ensuring that all sides are adhered to the carton and ship to:

FIOCCHI OF AMERICA, INC., ATTN. Recall, 6930 N. FREMONT RD., OZARK, MO 65721

Fiocchi will provide replacement product upon receipt of your return. Please include your name, street address, phone number (required for return shipping), and email address with your return. Ammunition cannot be shipped to post office boxes.

This notice only applies to above listed Fiocchi 22-250 Rem. and 243 Win ammunition with the above lot numbers. If you have questions concerning this ammunition recall, please call customer service directly at 417-449-1039, write to the above address, email service@fiocchiusa.com, or visit our website, www.fiocchiusa.com.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, News 2 Comments »