June 21st, 2019

Summer is Here — Essential Summer Survival Guide

Stonehenge summer solstice sunrise
Solstice Sunrise at Stonehenge. Photo shared under Creative Commons License.

Yes, folks, it’s officially summer now. This year’s Solstice, considered the official start of summer, transpired Friday, June 21, at 5:54 AM EDT. We hope you have fun this summer with friends and family. To help ensure those summer adventures remain safe and trouble-free, the CTD Shooters’ Log has prepared a helpful Essential Summer Survival Guide. This is worth reading before you venture away from civilization.

CLICK to READ Essential Summer Survivors Guide »

Here are some highlights of the article with links for MORE INFO:

first aid kitFirst Aid Kits for Campers
You should never venture outside without a first aid kit close at hand. While exploring the outdoors, all types of accidents can occur—from cuts, scrapes, and burns to broken limbs and severe allergic reactions.

Basic Survival Skills
Basic survival skills are a necessity if you plan to spend any amount of time outdoors. These five tips, plus a how-to on what to pack in a lightweight, basic survival kit will help if you are ever stuck, lost, stranded or injured in the field.

How to Treat Burns
Fireworks, barbeques and campfires — in the summer we are frequently around fire, which increases our chance of getting burned. A first-degree burn is most likely home treatable, while a third degree burn requires immediate medical attention. Learn how to spot the differences between minor and severe burns.

Permalink News, Tech Tip No Comments »
May 19th, 2019

Blood and Gore — Injury After Pistol Powder Loaded in Rifle Case

Varget Kaboom TiteGroup Hand injury reloading fingers accident

This is a grim tale. A man almost lost the use of his right hand, and did suffer terrible injuries to his fingers. All because he picked the wrong bottle of powder off the shelf. We have run this story before, and we will continue to run it every year, as a caution to our readers. This mistake is easy to make, but the consequences can be dire. Always, always double-check your powder labels before you start the hand-loading process. If you don’t, you may not have a hand to load with next time…

Similar Labels, Disasterous Consequences
The shooter, Denny K., was assembling some rounds for his brand new 7mm-08 Savage hunting rifle. He thought he was loading with Hodgdon Varget. Instead he had filled his powder measure with Hodgdon TiteGroup, a fast-burning pistol powder. The labels are similar, so the mistake is understandable. But the results were devastating. Here’s what 41 grains of TiteGroup can do in a 7mm-08:

Varget Kaboom TiteGroup Hand injury reloading fingers accident

Posting on the Firing Line, in a thread entitled “Lucky to Be Alive”, Denny writes:

“This is the hardest post to post. I know if I had read it a week ago my comment would have been: ‘You have no business reloading’. I had everything perfect, except pouring the wrong powder in the powder measure. I type this slowly with my left hand, embarrassed but … possibly saving someone else a tragedy or, like me, a long drive to the Emergency Room and surgery to save my finger.”

CLICK HERE for bigger, more graphic photo of injury.
Varget Kaboom TiteGroup Hand injury reloading fingers accident

The Still-Sealed Bottle of Varget
Denny did not initially comprehend exactly why the kaboom happened. He thought maybe his new Savage rifle was at fault. Then, on his return home, he discovered something…

Denny wrote: “The seven-hour period it took to go to ER, transport to Trauma Center and surgery made me think it was a Savage rifle issue. Brand new rifle, new brass, triple-checked loading data. The next day I was humbled when I realized the Varget powder was still sealed.

I knew what powder to use. I thought [Varget] was what I used. Not until the following day did I realize the Varget was still sealed.”

At that point, Denny realized what caused the accident — “operator error”. He knew he had to warn others about using the wrong powder: “I knew I needed to share my mistake, even though it is embarrassing, just to remind people. I’ve been reloading for 30 years…”

Editor’s Comment: Denny was not a novice reloader. His experience demonstrates that this kind of mistake can be made by any hand-loader, even one with decades of experience. Be safe guys, take your time when you load your ammo. Remove powders from measures after your loading sessions (pistol powders can look very similar to rifle powders). And by all means CHECK the LABEL on the jug. As the TiteGroup label says: “A little goes a long way.”

It’s not a bad idea to separate your pistol powders from your rifle powders, or perhaps even load for pistol in a separate part of your workshop.

Permalink News, Reloading, Tech Tip 12 Comments »
January 4th, 2018

Compact Trauma Kit for Shooters and Hunters

Micro Traum Kit Now! Now shooting illustrated

Shooting Illustrated Magazine recently announced its annual Golden Bullseye Awards. To be honest, some of the selections were questionable, but one product did stand out — a compact, totable first-aid kit: the Micro Trauma Kit NOW! from Blue Force Gear (BFG).

The handy Micro Trauma Kit NOW! was named “Accessory of the Year” by Shooting Illustrated. Measuring 6″ x 3.5″ x 2″ and weighing just 3.3 ounces, this little kit is easily carried in a cargo pocket or strapped to a belt or pack. We think every shooter and hunter should have something like this. (But you may want to make your own to save money).

Reviewing the Micro Trauma Kit, Shooting Illustrated found it easy to carry and deploy: “Designed for law enforcement, hunters and a citizen’s EDC kit, the trauma kit is easily deployed with a single hand or finger, made easy through the use of the company’s BLIP pull tabs. Once the tabs are pulled, the two main components of the kit separate: the outer pouch [and] the organizer insert.”

Micro Trauma Kit Now!™ Overview

This Trauma Kit comes in two versions. The standard kit includes: hemostatic dressing, 4-inch emergency trauma dressing, six 9″ lengths of medical-grade tape, Tourni-Kwik compression tourniquet, plus a pair of heavy-duty medical gloves.

The advanced fill option includes: QuickClot combat gauze, two HyFin vent chest seals, a Cleer medical trauma bandage 4-inch flat pack, a decompression needle, six 2×9 sections of frog tape, a size 28 nasopharyngeal airway and a pair of medical gloves.”

Good Product, But Pricey — Consider Making Your Own
We think every shooter and hunter should keep a small trauma kit like this in their vehicle or range bag. Much as we like these Blue Force Gear Micro Trauma Kits, we think they are over-priced at $129.00 for the standard version and $200.00 for the advanced fill option. We suggest you inspect the kits on the Blue Force Gear website, and make a list of the contents. Then you can probably create your own similar kits for one third the cost. Amazon sells basic Trauma Kit fill sets for under $25.00. Shown below are the Micro Trauma Kit Advanced Fill Option contents:

Micro Trauma Kit NOW! Supplies for Advanced Fill Option:
Micro Traum Kit Now! Now shooting illustrated

Permalink Hunting/Varminting, New Product No Comments »
March 10th, 2016

When the Worst Happens — Responding to Gunshot Injuries

We recently showed a video of an incident at a pistol match that easily could have resulted in the death of a range worker. If you watched that video, you’ll understand that one momentary oversight is all it takes to put someone in the hospital (or the morgue). That’s why shooters should be prepared for the worst. Get first-aid training, and carry a basic first-aid kit whenever you go to the range.

Carry a Basic First-Aid Kit
Shinnosuke Tanaka, reporter for RECOIL Magazine, offers some good advice: “OK, most of us have seen the [pistol match incident] video. YES, it is RSO’s fault not checking down range enough. BUT it’s your bullet that could hurt someone when it happen. So don’t let someone take care of safety for you, look around one more time after the command ‘Make ready’.”

Four basic firearms safety rules always apply. The Fourth Rule is: “Always be sure of your target and what is beyond it”. Shinnosuke adds: “My own fifth rule is ‘If there is doubt, don’t pull the trigger’.”

First Aid Kit Tannaka EMT

Shinnosuke cautions: “If you play with firearms you should know how to deal with gunshot wounds… Carry a simple medical kit. Here is my first aid kid, always carried on top of my shooting pack. Seek professional training and know how to use it. It’s your responsibility to stop the loss of your blood when an accident happens.”

Watch Gun Shot First Aid Video

If someone at a range is seriously injured by a gunshot, you should immediately summon emergency medical professionals. In addition, basic first aid can help stabilize the injured individual. This 55-minute video explains Basic First Aid for Gunshot Wounds:

Permalink - Videos, Shooting Skills 2 Comments »
June 22nd, 2015

Summer’s Here — Guide to Outdoor Safety

Stonehenge summer solstice sunrise
Solstice Sunrise at Stonehenge. Photo shared under Creative Commons License.

This year’s Solstice, considered the official start of summer, was celebrated around the world at 12:38 pm on June 21, 2015. We hope you have fun this summer with your friends and family. To help ensure those summer adventures remain safe and trouble-free, the CTD Shooters’ Log has prepared a helpful Essential Summer Survival Guide. This is worth reading before you venture away from civilization.

CLICK to READ Essential Summer Survivors Guide

Here are some highlights of the article with links for MORE INFO:

first aid kitFirst Aid Kits for Campers
You should never venture outside without a first aid kit close at hand. While exploring the outdoors, all types of accidents can occur—from cuts, scrapes, and burns to broken limbs and severe allergic reactions.

Basic Survival Skills
Basic survival skills are a necessity if you plan to spend any amount of time outdoors. These five tips, plus a how-to on what to pack in a lightweight, basic survival kit will help if you are ever stuck, lost, stranded or injured in the field.

How to Treat Burns
Fireworks, barbeques and campfires — in the summer we are frequently around fire, which increases our chance of getting burned. A first-degree burn is most likely home treatable, while a third degree burn requires immediate medical attention. Learn how to spot the differences between minor and severe burns.

Permalink News No Comments »