June 26th, 2018

Troubleshooting the Remington 700 — Fixing Fouling Problems

Nathan Foster New Zealand Rem 700 rifle copper fouling accurizing barrel lapping

Turn a Rough Factory Rifle into an Accurate Hunting Rig
Kiwi Nathan Foster has produced a good video for hunters with “under-performing” Remington Model 700 rifles. In this video, Nathan helps a client turn a badly-behaving Rem 700 into a reliable tack-driver. A customer had sent Nathan this rifle to rectify stubborn copper fouling. After bedding the rifle, the customer discovered that the rifle produced terrible groups due to the stubborn bore.

Nathan told us: “This was a grand opportunity to study what can go wrong with the M700 rifle with regards to both do-it-yourself work and flaws within rifle production. To help structure the video, we used the chapters of our Accurizing Book as reference steps for the video. This footage also works in conjunction with our free Remington bedding tutorials on YouTube.

Those who have watched the full M700 Troubleshooting video say this is one of the most helpful videos yet released on problem-solving with a factory hunting rifle. This video is especially helpful for those just getting into the accuracy game, as it walks the viewer through the basics of rifle tuning, then proceeds to more advanced methods of improving a badly-behaving rifle.

This video focuses on the Remington M700 and Rem clones, such as the Bergara rifle. However the lessons and techniques in the video can apply to any type of bolt-action rifle suffering heavy copper fouling. The video features detailed footage of barrel break-in and barrel-lapping procedures. These procedures may be beneficial for rough factory barrels. IMPORTANT! AccurateShooter.com recommends different break-in and maintenance regimes for custom, hand-lapped premium barrels — be conservative with fine custom barrels. Our best custom barrels have all shot superbly with minimal break-in and zero use of abrasives during break-in.

Troubleshooting the Remington 700 Rifle with Nathan Foster

NOTE: This is a free 70-second trailer video. The FULL Remington Troubleshooting Video is 1 hour, 16 minutes long and can be streamed through Vimeo-on-Demand for $12.00. Access Full Video HERE.

Nathan Foster of Terminal Ballistics Research in New Zealand, is a expert hunter and highly-respected author of a series of hunting and long range shooting books. Nathan’s first book, The Practical Guide to Long Range Hunting Rifles, is a classic — one of the best treatises ever written on choosing and using a hunting rifle.

Nathan Foster Long Range Rifles Hunting Hunter

CLICK HERE to Download Remington 700 Owner’s Manual

The Remington 700 is the most popular bolt-action rifle in America, according to Gunbroker.com sales figures for new and “previously-owned” rifles. So, chances are that you (or a family member) have a Rem 700 of some vintage sitting in the gunsafe. Click the link above for a PDF version of the Remington 700 Owner’s Manual (also covers models Seven, and 673).

Permalink - Videos, Hunting/Varminting, Tech Tip No Comments »
May 20th, 2018

Tikka T3 — Video Reviews of Popular Hunting Rifle

Tikka T3 Review new zealand hunting scotland varmint rifle

The Tikka T3 rifle is very popular with hunters around the globe — for good reason. These rifles offer smooth-running actions, easy sub-MOA accuracy with good ammo, crisp triggers, and ultra-reliable detachable box magazines. The Tupperware stocks aren’t super-rigid, but they are comfortable and easy to handle. If you are looking for a hunting rifle, the Tikka T3 is a smart choice, offering good performance for the price (which starts at less than $580.00 for the T3 Lite version). The T3 series is offered in a wide selection of chamberings, from .204 Ruger up to the large magnums.

Here are two good Tikka T3 video reviews, the first from New Zealand, the second from Scotland. Both reviewers are experienced hunters who explain why the T3 is well-suited for hunting applications. In the first video, Mitch of BushBrothersNZ reviews a T3 with polymer stock and stainless barrel chambered for the .270 Win. Mitch focuses on the T3’s controls and functions, with particular attention to the operation of trigger, safety, and bolt.

In this second video, David, a hunter and wilderness skills teacher from Scotland, demonstrates the features (and remarkable accuracy) of a factory Tikka T3, chambered in .223 Remington. With David’s handloads, this rifle has grouped just over an inch at 250 yards, as shown near the end of the video.

Tikka Fox HuntingTikka Fox Hunting

David uses his rifle primarily for fox-hunting (often done at night). He employs a variable-power scope with an illuminated reticle to target his night-time prey. David offers many tips for predator hunters. He prefers an extra-high Harris bipod. With the bipod’s legs fully extended, he can assume a comfortable and solid sitting position. The rifle is supported on his shoulder and on the bipod, leaving both of his hands free. Being able to support the rifle without gripping it is a major advantage, David explains. This frees his hands to search for animals with binoculars or scan distances with his rangefinder.

Permalink - Videos, Hunting/Varminting 3 Comments »
May 19th, 2018

How to Zero A Hunting Rifle in Four Shots

hunting zero zeroing sight-in easy NSSF boresighting
Photo courtesy Vortex Optics.

Here’s a simple procedure that lets you get a solid zero for a hunting rifle in just four shots. Of course you probably want to fire a few more rounds to confirm your zero before you head off to your hunting grounds, but this will let you get on-target with a minimum amount of time and ammo expended. (This assumes your scope is securely mounted, and the bases are not drastically out of alignment.)

QUICK-TIP: The Key to this procedure is Dialing to Shot One Point of Impact (POI). Re-aim at center of target after SHOT ONE. Then with the rifle motionless, use the turrets to put the middle of the cross-hair on the first shot location.

1. First, remove the bolt and boresight the rifle. Adjust the position of the rifle so that, looking through the bore, you can see the center of the target with your eyes. Secure the rifle in the rests to maintain its position as boresighted. Then, without moving the rifle, center the reticle. That should get you on paper. With the rifle solidly secured in front and rear rests or sandbags, aim at the center of a target placed at your zeroing distance (50 or 100 yards). Confirm there are no obstructions in the barrel! Then load and fire SHOT ONE. Then, return the gun to the exact position it was when you pulled the trigger, with the cross-hair centered on the target as before.

2. Locate, in the scope, where your first bullet landed on the target. Now, while you grip the rifle firmly so it doesn’t move, have a friend adjust the turrets on your scope. While you look through the scope, have your friend turn the windage and elevation turrets until the cross-hairs, as viewed through the scope, bisect the first bullet hole on the target. In other words, use the turrets to move the center of the reticle to the actual position of shot number one. IMPORTANT: Dial the crosshairs to the hole — don’t move the rifle.

Watch NSSF Zeroing Video showing method of moving reticle to Shot 1 Point of Impact.

3. After you’ve adjusted the turrets, now re-aim the rifle so the cross-hairs are, once again, positioned on the target center. Keep the rifle firmly supported by your rest or sandbag. Take the SECOND SHOT. You should find that the bullet now strikes in the center of the target.

3-Shot Zero

4. Take a THIRD SHOT with the cross-hairs aligned in the center of the target to confirm your zero. Make minor modifications to the windage and elevation as necessary.

5. Finally, shoot the rifle from a field rest (shooting sticks, bipod, or rucksack) as you would use when actually hunting. Confirm, with SHOT FOUR, that your zero is unchanged. You may need to make slight adjustments. Some rifles, particularly those with flexy fore-arms, exhibit a different POI (point of impact) when fired from a bipod or ruck vs. a sandbag rest.

If you recently cleaned your rifle, you may want to fire two or three fouling shots before you start this procedure. But keep in mind that you want to duplicate the typical cold bore conditions that you’ll experience during the hunt. If you set your zero after three fouling shots, then make sure the bore is in a similar condition when you actually go out hunting.

Permalink Optics, Shooting Skills, Tech Tip 2 Comments »
April 13th, 2018

Forum Member Carves Superb Maple Hunting Stock

Maple laminate figured wood carved carving .338 Win Mag rifle stock Brett Minnesota
Believe it or not, this is the first stock Brett M. carved by hand. We’d say he did a darn good job!

AccurateShooter Forum member Brett M. from Minnesota (aka Spitfire_er) recently completed a handsome laminated maple gunstock. This beauty wasn’t produced with a stock duplicator. It was made the old-fashioned way — by hand. After laminating three sections, Brett carved the complete stock with hand tools. You can see the entire carving process, start to finish, in Brett’s time lapse video.

MUST-SEE time-lapse carving video. Every second is one minute in real time. This 15:54 video shows 15.9 hours of carving! Brett says the whole job took nearly 20 hours:

Maple laminate figured wood carved carving .338 Win Mag rifle stock Brett Minnesota

Maple laminate figured wood carved carving .338 Win Mag rifle stock Brett Minnesota

Maple laminate figured wood carved carving .338 Win Mag rifle stock Brett MinnesotaHandsome Maple Blank Was Lumber Yard Return!
Brett reports: “Here’s a stock I carved up over the past year or so. I found this wood as a return at a lumber yard about 7-8 years ago. I asked the guy in the yard about it and he said it had been returned because it had too much figure for the job the customer was working on. First thing I thought was “That would make a nice stock!” I finally got around to finishing it a couple months ago.

I fit it around a 1917 Enfield in .338 WM that I purchased a while back. I usually do all the work on the receiver and barrel, but this one was done up in an OK fashion already.

This stock was almost completely made using hand tools over the course of about a year. This is a piece of laminated 1x8x1″ maple that was glued together. After it sat for about eight years, I finally got around to carving it up. This stock design/shape was from my own ideas and was carved as I went along. It turned out pretty good.”

Maple laminate figured wood carved carving .338 Win Mag rifle stock Brett Minnesota

Permalink - Videos, Gunsmithing, Hunting/Varminting 2 Comments »
March 25th, 2018

How to Avoid ‘Scope Bite’ (Scope Placement Tips)

Kirsten Weiss Video YouTube Scope Eye Relief

This helpful video from our friend Kirsten Joy Weiss explains how to avoid “scope bite”. This can occur when the scope, on recoil, moves back to contact your forehead, brow, or eye socket area. That’s not fun. While common sense tells us to avoid “scope bite” — sooner or later this happens to most shooters. One viewer noted: “I have come close. I had a Win Model 70 in .375 H & H Mag and I was shooting over a large rock in a strange position. The scope hit my eye glasses hard enough to bend the wire frames and cause a little pain on the bridge of the nose from the nose piece. [That] made a believer out of me.”

Kirsten offers a good basic principle — she suggests that you mount your rifle-scope so that the ocular (eyepiece) of the scope is positioned at least three inches or more from your eyeball when you hold the rifle in your normal shooting position. From a technical standpoint, optical eye relief is a property of the scope, so you want to purchase an optic that offers sufficient optical eye relief (meaning that it allows you to see the full circle of light with your head at least three inches from the eyepiece). Then you need to position the optic optimally for your head/eye position when shooting the rifle — with at least three inches of eyeball-to-scope separation (i.e. physical eye relief).

NOTE: You should mount the scope to provide adequate eyeball-to-scope separation for the actual position(s) you will be shooting most of the time. For an F-TR rig, this will be prone. For a hunting rifle, your most common position could be sitting or standing. Your head position will vary based on the position. You can’t assume the scope placement is correct just because it seems OK when you are testing or zeroing the gun from the bench. When shooting from a prone or kneeling position you may find your eye considerably closer to the eyepiece.

Permalink - Videos, Optics, Shooting Skills 5 Comments »
March 14th, 2018

The Remarkable Merkel RX Helix — German Straight-Pull Hunter

Merkel RX Helix straight-pull rifle

EDITOR: Our story on the Strasser RS14 straight-pull rifle created quite a stir. So, we thought we’d serve up another straight-pull feature — this time the German-crafted Merkel RX Helix. We shot the Helix a few years back during Media Day at the Range. One notable difference between the German Merkel and the Austrian Strasser is the bolt travel. During cycling, the Merkel bolt stays completely inside the action (see video below at 00:30). By contrast the Strasser bolt moves pretty far back, outside the action. For some folks that makes the Helix better for fast follow-up shots. All we can say is that Merkles and Strassers BOTH cycle way faster than conventional bolt-action rifles.

Merkel RX Helix Range Report

One of the most innovative rifles we have ever shot was the Merkel RX Helix, a very impressive piece of rifle engineering. Merkel claims the RX Helix is the fastest-cycling centerfire bolt action in the world. We can’t confirm that claim, but the Helix certainly cycles faster than any other centerfire bolt-gun this Editor has ever tried. (Yes, a Fortner biathlon action can be worked more rapidly, but that’s a rimfire). Both Jason and I really liked Merkel’s RX Helix. It balances well, the action is smooth, the wood is gorgeous, and the overall design thinking that went into this German-engineered take-down rifle is very impressive. The Helix’s universal-sized action lets you shoot anything from a .222 Rem to a .300 Win Mag with the same gun. And — get this — you can really swap barrels (and change bolt heads) in a couple of minutes with no tools, employing a dead-simple bolt-release lever concealed under the push-button-released removable forearm. (Watch VIDEO BELOW to see Barrel Swap procedure).

Merkel RX Helix rifle

Merkel RX Helix rifle

Merkel RX Helix rifleRotary 7-Lug Bolt
While the RX Helix is a straight-pull rifle, it retains the strength and safety of a rotary bolt head with seven locking lugs that seat in a barrel extension. Unlike a Blaser, the RX Helix has a fully-enclosed action housing. That’s an important safety feature. Moreover, since the RX Helix employs a closed action, the bolt body doesn’t travel outside that action. This means the shooter can maintain his cheekweld with an eye on the target as he cycles the bolt.

The RX Helix’s linear (back and forth) bolt-handle motion is transmitted to the bolt head through a 1:2 ratio “transmission” gearing system. This allows smooth and fast cycling without the rotational or tipping movement found on other straight-pull, bolt-action rifles, such as the Blaser.

Merkel RX Helix rifle

The Merkel linear-movement action cycles exceptionally fast, which allows for faster follow-up shots — a good thing if you’re hunting dangerous game. The RX Helix features a manual cocking lever on the tang and a direct trigger system. And here’s good news for southpaws — though Merkel does not make a dedicated left-hand version, lefties can very easily use their right hand to work the bolt while maintaining cheekweld. That may sound awkward, but with practice, it’s actually pretty efficient.

Fast, Easy Disassembly and Barrel Exchanges
The video below shows how the Helix can be disassembled (for cleaning or transport) in a matter of seconds WITHOUT TOOLS. The forearm slips off with the push of a button. A short lever on the left side of the action holds the barrel. Simply rotate the lever and the barrel (with bolt head) slips off. That’s it — in 30 seconds the rifle is apart, and you don’t even need an allen wrench as with a Blaser.

The RX Helix has a universal action length that covers calibers from .222 Rem to .300 Win Mag. Changing calibers (or chamberings) takes less than a minute with the appropriate barrel, bolt-head and magazine. Weaver rails are integrated into the action, and iron sights with three-dot rear and one-dot front fiber-optic inserts are standard.

Merkel RX Helix rifle

The RX Helix is available with a standard black finish as well as four levels of design—Arabesque, Wild Boar, Spirit, and Deluxe. An all-carbon-fiber version is also available either with or without a carbon-wrapped barrel. The RX Helix comes in a wide range of popular calibers including .222 Rem, .223 Rem, .243 Win, 6.5×55 SE, .270 Win, 7×64, .308 Win, .30-06 Sprg., 8×57 IS, 9.3×62, 7mm Rem Mag and .300 Win Mag. Barrel lengths vary according to caliber, and barrels, bolt-heads and magazines are available for caliber changes. EuroOptic.com sells the Merkel RX Helix with Grade 2 wood for $3,785.00.

Permalink - Videos, Gear Review, Hunting/Varminting 7 Comments »
February 20th, 2018

One Gun for Hunting AND Competition — Bergara B14 HMR

Bergara HMR rifle PRS production class 6.5 Creedmoor .308 Winchester

For the second year in the row, one of the more popular rifles at SHOT Show was the versatile Bergara’s B14 Hunting and Match Rifle (HMR). Designed for the tactical, PRS, and long-range hunting markets the HMR features an ergonomic, adjustable stock fitted with an internal aluminum sub-chassis. The stock is comfortable in a variety of positions, making it suitable for both hunting and practical shooting comps. The HMR is now offered in five chamberings: 22-250, 6mm Creedmoor, 6.5mm Creedmoor, .308 Win, and .300 Win Mag. They all use AICS-compatible box magazines. We’re pleased that all HMRs are guaranteed to produce sub-MOA groups at 100 yards using factory match-grade ammunition. Weight, without optics, is 9.15 lbs, about one pound less than the Ruger Precision Rifle. MSRP is $1,150.00. That’s a good value, but we wish Bergara included a scope rail from the factory.

Watch Video Starting at 6:30 for Bergara B14 HMR (Showing Internal Chassis):

The Spanish-made HMR boasts a molded synthetic stock with built-in machined aluminum mini-chassis. This mini-chassis allows secure, repeatable bedding for Bergara’s B14 action, which features two-lug bolt with coned bolt-head. The Chrome-Moly Bergara barrels are threaded 5/8″ x 24 at the muzzle for brakes or suppressors. The HMR uses a precision-machined bottom metal and is designed to accept AICS-style magazines.

Bergara HMR rifle PRS production class 6.5 Creedmoor .308 Winchester
Bergara HMR rifle PRS production class 6.5 Creedmoor .308 Winchester

The stock has a multi-stage textured finish, which looks good. Designed for both righties and lefties, the ambidextrous stock features an adjustable cheekpiece, and length of pull is adjustable with simple spacers. For slings and accessories, the HMR stock offers multiple flush cup QD mounts as well as multiple swivel studs for bipods and/or slings.

This should be an interesting addition to the line-up of factory rifles suitable for the PRS Series Production Class. But frankly, we think Bergara went too short with the barrels (or at least should offer longer barrels as options). In 6.5 Creedmoor, at 22″ you’re giving up 90 FPS or so compared to a 27″ (See Barrel Cut-Down Test). Additionally, we think most PRS competitors would prefer a different profile on the fore-end. Nonetheless for tactical guys who don’t like modular metal stocks, this is a pretty affordable option that can also work for hunting. NOTE: The new 6mm Creedmoor version does include a 26″ 1:8″-twist barrel. We like that. CLICK HERE for Bergara B14 HMR Owners Manual.

Bergara B14 HMR Rifle Specifications:

Chamberings: 22-250 Rem, 6mm Creedmoor, 6.5mm Creedmoor, .308 Win, .300 Win Mag
Action Type: 2-lug action, sliding plate extractor, cone bolt nose and breech
Magazine: AICS style mag compatible – Includes one Magpul® PMAG AICS Magazine
Barrel Specs: 22-250 Rem (1:9″ twist; 24″), 6mm Creedmoor (1:8″ twist, 26″), 6.5 Creedmoor (1:8″ Twist, 22″); .308 Win (1:10″ twist, 20″), .300 Win Mag (1:10″ twist, 26″)
Mini-Chassis Material: 7075 T6 aluminum
Weight without scope: 9.15 pounds
MSRP: $1,150.00

Permalink Gear Review, Hunting/Varminting 3 Comments »
January 16th, 2018

Savage New Products — Adjustable Stocks, More Chamberings

Savage Arms 2018 new products Accufit AccuStock rifle stock MSR 10 Long Range

Savage Arms will launch more than two dozen new products at the 2018 SHOT Show, January 23-26 at the Sands Expo Center in Las Vegas, Nevada. The big news is the AccuFit stock system for the Model 110 rifle line. “Our new AccuFit System is designed to allow shooters to quickly adjust comb height and length-of-pull for a customized fit. This results in more consistent, more comfortable shooting”, says Beth Shimanski, Savage Senior Marketing Manager. These new Savages also feature the Accustock internal chassis with bedding block (see second video below).

AccuFit Adjustment System

Savage Arms 2018 new products Accufit AccuStock rifle stock MSR 10 Long Range

Accustock Embedded Chassis System

CLICK HERE for more videos showing new Savage Design and Engineering features.

More Chambering Options for Savage AR-Platform Rifles
Savage has added new chamberings for its MSR black rifle line-up. MSR 15 models will be newly offered in 224 Valkyrie, 22 Nosler, and 6.8 SPC. A 6mm Creedmoor version of the AR-10 platform MSR 10 Long Range has been added, and Savage will offer the hard-hitting .338 Federal chambering in the MSR Hunter rifle (along with 6.5 Creedmoor and .308 Win).

Savage 2018 New Product Highlights

Model 110 Storm with AccuFit: Features stainless steel action and barrel for adverse weather and conditions. Sixteen caliber and left-hand options.

Model 110 Long Range Hunter with AccuFit: Engineered for long-range shooting with a 26-inch barrel and muzzle brake. Nine caliber options, including 338 Lapua Magnum.

Model 110 Lightweight Storm: Easier to carry in field thanks to a lightweight stainless steel barrel and action. Length-of-pull is easily customized. Six caliber options.

AXIS II XP with New Stock: Popular package rifle with redesigned, ergonomic stock and Bushnell Banner 3-9×40 scope in full-size and compact models. Twenty caliber/configuration options.

MSR 15 Valkyrie: MSR 15 AR-type rifle chambered for the 224 Valkyrie. This new model features an adjustable gas block, furniture upgrades, and Elite Series Flat Dark Earth Cerakote finish.

MSR 15 Recon Long Range Precision: Equipped with alternate furniture options and chambered in all-new 224 Valkyrie, 22 Nosler, and 6.8 SPC.

MSR 10 Long Range in 6mm Creedmoor: AR-10 platform rifle design for long-range precision shooting. Chambered for the flat-shooting, modest-recoil 6mm Creedmoor cartridge.

MSR 10 Hunter in 338 Federal: Built specifically for hunters and chambered in the popular, hard-hitting .338 Federal.

B Series Compact and Left-hand: Extremely accurate bolt-action .22 LR, .22 WMR, and .17 HMR options. Now available in compact and left-hand models.

A Series Pro Varmint: Semi-automatic options in .22 LR, .22 WMR and .17 HMR, all with Boyd’s Pro Varmint stock and 22-inch fluted, heavy barrel.

All of these new rifles, as well as more bolt-action and semi-auto centerfire and rimfire rifles, will be on display at SHOT Show Booth No. 14551. Most will be set up so visitors can handle the rifle and work trigger and bolt. To learn more about the new Savage rifles and their features, visit www.SavageArms.com.

Savage MSR 10 Long Range (6mm Creedmoor, 6.5 Creedmoor, .308 Win)

Permalink - Videos, Hunting/Varminting, New Product, News 3 Comments »
November 22nd, 2017

Strasser Straight-Pull Hunting Rifles Now Available in USA

Strasser RS14 rifle

There is a new straight-pull hunting rifle coming to the USA. No, it’s not a Blaser, it’s a Strasser, made in Austria (not Germany like the Blaser). The new Strasser RS-14 is a premium hunting rifle with some very remarkable features. The trigger exchanges as a module, without tools. The entire barrel assembly can be swapped out in five minutes — and you can easily change bolt head so this rifle can shoot everything from small varmint cartridges all the way up to .30-Caliber Magnums.

The new RS14 Evolution, specially designed for the U.S. market, is a straight-pull, bolt-action rifle that features a removable trigger pack and the ability to easily adjust trigger weight without tools.

Strasser RS14 rifle

The quick-change bolt face allows users to quickly and easily switch between small, standard, and magnum bolt face. It comes with an integrated Picatinny rail on the receiver. USA buyers will be offered two different RS-14 models, one with grade E Walnut stock or the Tahr model with a grey, laminate stock. The first 100 of each model will be serial numbered to signify a special edition just for America. This rifle is a premium product — we expect the asking price to be in the $2500.00 range. For orders and inquiries, contact the U.S. importer, International Firearms Corporation (IFC).

Click the image below to see LARGE Version
Strasser RS14 rifle

You’ll find a detailed review of the Strasser RS-14 on TheTruthAboutGuns.com.
Here are highlights:

“A user can swap Strasser’s barrel and bolt face in under five minutes to accommodate new calibers, from short-action plinkers like .223 Remington to full-belted magnum loads like .300 Win Mag. You can choose your favorite calibers and different barrel and muzzle profiles.

Straight pull bolts are the quickest to operate. A traditional bolt-action rifle requires four movements: up, back, forward, down. The RS-14 requires only two: straight back and forward. That ‘extra’ speed could make all the difference in the field…

The RS-14’s bolt is a thing of beauty. Perfectly machined with a satin-smooth finish, it glides back and forth in the action’s channel. The over-sized bolt handle gives the operator a large target to grab when reloading.”

Strasser RS14 rifle

Read FULL REVIEW on TheTruthAboutGuns.com »

Permalink Gunsmithing, Hunting/Varminting 1 Comment »
September 28th, 2017

PT&G — Howa 1500 Barreled Actions with Trigger, $250.00

Howa 1500 Barreled Action HACT Trigger discount sale

GREAT DEAL — Complete Howa Barreled Actions (With Trigger) for $250.00
Howa makes excellent, smooth-running actions, and the Howa HACT 2-stage trigger is WAY better than most domestic factory triggers. Right now you can save big bucks on Howa 1500 barreled actions, complete with HACT trigger and trigger-guard. Pacific Tool & Gauge (PT&G) sourced a truckload of Howa barreled actions, which are now on sale. Available at $250.00 are: .204 Ruger, .223 Rem, .22-250. All these chamberings are offered with either light- or heavy-barrel contours. There is no extra charge for factory camo finishes.

Guys, this is an incredible deal — you can get a complete high-quality barreled action for less than the cost of a custom barrel. If you’re looking to put together a varmint rifle project this is a great option — just add the stock and scope of your choice.

Howa 1500 Barreled Action HACT Trigger discount sale

These barreled actions would be great for custom hunting/varmint rifle projects — many have factory camo finishes. Howa barrels typically deliver easy sub-MOA accuracy (and often much better). NOTE: Some of these barreled actions may carry Weatherby or Nosler markings, but they were all made at the Howa factory in Japan.

Howa 1500 Barreled Actions Have Excellent 2-Stage Hact Triggers

Howa HCR Chassis Rifle PRS Tactical Aluminum stock HACT TriggerPT&G’s Howa 1500 barreled actions feature the very nice Howa HACT trigger. This is an adjustable, two-stage trigger, set for about 3 pounds (combined stages). Crisp and repeatable, this is an excellent trigger for a factory gun. In our opinion, the HACT trigger is clearly superior to the trigger on the Ruger RPR, as well as the Savage AccuTrigger. And there is no annoying Glock-style safety lever in the middle of the trigger blade. The 2-stage design and pull weight range works well for a hunting rifle or a rig for PRS competition.

Writing for the Western Outdoor News, WONews.com, Steve Comus has field-tested the new HACT Trigger. Steve writes: “I always liked two-stage triggers, because of the way I could take-up the slack and then actually know when the rifle was going to go off. The take-up on the [HACT] trigger was fast and easy. The crisp, positive release when pressure was put on during the second stage [reminded me] of some of the target rifles I shot through the years.”

Permalink Gunsmithing, Hot Deals, Hunting/Varminting 2 Comments »
September 20th, 2017

Ten More Days to Save $100 on Browning Hunting Rifles

Browning Bucks rebate 2017 hunting rifle A-Blot

Hunting season is coming soon. Here’s a rifle with a smooth three-lug action and good trigger that can take any game in North America. The Browning A-Bolt III is justifiably respected as a solid hunting rifle. This AB3 model with wood stock normally retails for $700.00+. Now it’s on sale for under $549.99 in a choice of five chamberings: .243 Win, .308 Win, 7mm Magnum, .30-06 Springfield, and .300 WSM. What’s more, Browning is currently offering a $100.00 Browning Bucks Rebate for qualifying Browning firearm purchased before September 30, 2017. That drops your net cost for this hunting rifle to just $449.99. But to get this rebate, you have to act soon — you have just ten (10) more days to purchase.

CDNN Sports Browning Bucks Abolt AB3 A-Blot III Composite Stalker Realtree Xtra hunting rifle

You can also purchase this rifle with a “tupperware” black synthetic stock for $349.99 after rebate. Available chamberings at this price include: .243 Win, 6.5 Creedmoor, .270 Win, 7mm-08, 7mm Rem Mag, .308 Win, .300 WSM, .30-06 Sprg, 300 Win Mag. The .270 Win and .30-06 versions are also available with Realtree Xtra Camo (above) for the same $349.99 after-rebate price.

Permalink Hot Deals, Hunting/Varminting 1 Comment »
August 10th, 2017

Killer Deal on Winchester XPR Hunting Rifle with Factory Rebate

Winchester Arms Hunting rifle rebate bargain XPR Vias Camo Camouflage

Are you or a friend/family member looking for a good hunting rifle at a great price? Check out this promotion for the Winchester XPR. This is a fine-handling rig with a smooth bolt and some of the best camo finishes you can get. Right now at Cabelas.com the Winchester XPR in Vias Camo is on sale for $399.99. But here’s the kicker, Winchester is offering a $100.00 Mail-In Rebate. That drops your net cost to just $299.99. That’s an insanely good deal.

Winchester Arms Hunting rifle rebate bargain XPR Vias Camo Camouflage

You’ll also find other versions of the Winchester XPR on sale at other vendors. Here are some of our favorite XPR variants (and there are a dozen others):

Winchester Arms Hunting rifle rebate bargain XPR Vias Camo Camouflage

The Winchester Rebate is good through September 30, 2017. It also applies to Winchester SX3, SX4, and SXP Shotguns. CLICK HERE for Rebate Form.

Winchester Arms Hunting rifle rebate bargain XPR Vias Camo Camouflage

Permalink Hot Deals, Hunting/Varminting No Comments »
February 24th, 2017

Great Deal on Vias Camo Winchester XPR Hunters

Winchester XPR rifle tactical deal Vias camo

Here’s a very sweet deal on a handsome Winchester hunting rig with detachable box mag. Right now Cabelas.com is offering $170.00 off a Winchester XPR. Plus there’s a $50.00 Mail-in Rebate. That reduces your net cost for the rifle to $349.99. That’s a great deal for a rifle with a smooth bolt action (with 60° lift), nice trigger, and detachable box magazine. This XPR is offered is a wide variety of chamberings including: .243 Win, 7mm-08, .270 Win, .308 Win, .30-06 Springfield, .300 WSM. The rifle has nice controls — two-position safety, bolt-release button, and cocking indicator. The action comes drilled and tapped for scope mounts. GO TO DEAL PAGE.

  • Button-rifled, free-floating steel barrel with recessed target crown
  • Smooth nickel-Teflon-coated bolt
  • Vias camouflage composite stock with textured panels
  • M.O.A. adjustable trigger system

QUICK REVIEW: We’ve shot this rifle, and we like it much better than most entry-level hunting rigs from other USA manufacturers. The ergos are good, the action runs smoothly and feeds reliably. A verified buyer states: “No frills hunting rifle that is extremely accurate. Winchester wanted their piece of the pie in the entry level rifle market and they seemed to nail this one. Shoots sub-MOA with cheap factory ammo. I would put this a step ahead of the Ruger American and the Savage Axis and a step below the Tikka T3, but it’s also cheaper than the T3.” We agree 100% with that assessment. If you’re looking for a basic hunting rig, this is a very good buy at $349.99 (after rebate).

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October 29th, 2016

Titanium Actions Coming Soon from Borden Accuracy

Borden Accuracy Rifles Titanium Action Alpine Magnum Jim

Jim Borden of Borden Accuracy tells us that he will soon offer Titanium actions: “The Alpine and Timberline family of actions will soon be available for sale with Titanium action bodies. Stay tuned!”

Jim provided this photo of a prototype Alpine Magnum Titanium action body on the scale. Note it is just a bit over one-half pound without bolt. That’s light-weight. Jim said he will “send bolt body, action body, recoil lug, bolt stop and bolt shroud for PVD treatment next week”. Jim hopes to be shooting the finished prototype Titanium Alpine action in two weeks.

AccurateShooter.com will provide a full report on the Borden Titanium actions when they reach final production stage. The reduced weight benefits game hunters who have to carry their rifles far afield all day long. We also like the idea of a Titanium action in a small-caliber, carry-around varmint rifle. With a low-recoiling cartridge such as the 20 Vartarg or .223 Remington, it makes sense to have a light-weight rifle that’s easy to pick up and move around.

Borden Accuracy Rifles Titanium Action Alpine Magnum Jim

Permalink Gunsmithing, New Product 9 Comments »
September 26th, 2013

Colt Offers Precision Bolt-Action Rifles with Cooper Actions

Colt Mfg. Co. (Colt) is bringing out two new bolt-action rifles with actions from Cooper Firearms of Montana. (So maybe we should call these “Colpers” or “Coolts”?) Two different versions of the new Colt M2012 solid-stocked bolt-action rifles have been announced: a .308 Win with a Manners composite stock (MT308T), and a laminated stock version chambered in either .308 Win (LT308G) or .260 Remington (LT260G). All versions feature fluted barrels, detachable box magazines, and single-stage Timney triggers. All new M2012 MTs and LTs ship with signed, numbered, and dated Colt test targets.

These rifles will be pricey for a factory rifle. The M2012MT308T in .308 Winchester carries a $3,195.00 MSRP. That puts you pretty close to the cost of a custom tactical build. The laminated-stock LT versions list for $2,795.00, making those considerably more affordable. So what do you get for your money with a M2012 bolt-action “Coolt”?

The M2012MT308T features a 1:10″-twist, 22″ fluted stainless barrel with factory muzzle brake. All-up weight, even with the lightweight Manners carbon/fiberglass composite stock, is 10.25 pounds. Overall length is 44″, making the rifle fairly compact, good for tactical games and hunting.

The laminated LT models (offered in .308 Win or .260 Rem), weigh just 8.5 pounds, making them nearly two pounds lighter than the Manners-stocked models. We presume the weight saving comes from the use of lighter-contour barrels. The LT308G features a 22″ chrome-moly 1:10″-twist fluted barrel, while the LT260G sports a 22″ chrome-moly 1:8″-twist fluted barrel. This enables the .260 version to shoot popular 138-142 grain 6.5mm match bullets. Again, muzzle brakes come fitted to the laminated guns, just like the composite-stock variant.

Will these new Cooper-actioned rifles find favor with shooters? We think that depends on how well they shoot. Given the asking prices ($2,795 for Laminated, $3,195.00 for Composite) these rifles are close in price to a gunsmith-built, custom rig with a super-premium barrel. Such a custom should deliver 1/2-MOA or better. Can the M2012 “Coolts” match that? Hard to say…

These new Colt M2012s might be a decent starter platform for an F-TR rifle, but the fore-arm is pretty short (for optimal bipod use) and the shooter might need to retro-fit some kind of raised cheekpiece for prone shooting. It may be that the real market for these rifles will be hunters who want the security of a factory warranty, in a product that is a step-up from a basic Remington 700, Howa, or Savage.

Permalink New Product, News 3 Comments »
August 23rd, 2013

Browning Introduces Value-Priced AB3 (A-Bolt III) Hunting Rifle

Browning is jumping into the “value-priced” rifle market. Browning has introduced a new bolt-action rifle, the AB3 (A-Bolt III) which will compete price-wise with Ruger, Savage, and Howa rifles. The AB3’s $599.99 sticker price is notable, because Browning’s regular X-Bolt and A-Bolt rifles cost hundreds of dollars more. Despite the low price, the new-for-2013 AB3 has some nice features. The button-rifled barrels are all “individually finished with a hand-reamed chamber for tighter tolerances and more precise headspace.” The trigger has a 3.5-lb pull — just about right for a hunting gun. A clever bolt-unlock button lets you unload the gun even with the safety engaged.

Browning AB3 A-Bolt Hunting Rifle

Browning announced: “Browning is pleased to announce the introduction of the AB3 bolt-action rifle. For 2013, the AB3 will be available in a Composite Stalker model in four different calibers. The new AB3 features a bolt-lock-override button that allows shooters to unload the firearm while leaving the top-tang safety in the on safe position. The steel receiver has a matte blue finish and is drilled and tapped for scope mounts. A free-floating, hand chambered barrel with target crown is featured. The AB3 also has a removable box magazine. The composite stock is matte black and features textured grip areas. An Inflex recoil pad reduces felt recoil. Sling swivel studs are included.”

Designed as a durable, affordable hunting rifle, the AB3 Composite Stalker model comes in four popular hunting chamberings: 270 Win, 7mm Rem Mag, .30-06 Springfield, and 300 Win Mag.

Video Shows Features of Value-Priced AB3

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March 29th, 2013

New Sauer 101 Hunting Rifle from J.P. Sauer & Sohn

J.P. Sauer & Sohn has released an all-new hunting rifle, the Sauer 101. This new rifle features a six-lug bolt that locks directly into the barrel, along with a new, sophisticated safety system that positively blocks the firing pin. The Sauer 101 also has a patented “Ever-Rest” bedding system featuring a metal block surrounding the front action screw. The Sauer 101 comes with either a black synthetic stock (“Classic XT”), or a quality walnut stock (“Classic”). MSRP has not been revealed, but the Sauer 101 is designed to fall in the “mid-class price range”, making it much more affordable than the Sauer 202. CLICK HERE to visit Sauer 101 dedicated website.

Sauer 101 hunting rifle
Sauer 101 hunting rifle

Sauer 101 Features
Smooth-running bolt with 60° lift
6-lug bolt locks directly into the barrel
Dual ejectors provide reliable 90° extraction
Safety system directly blocks firing pin
Crisp 2-lb trigger pull
22″ barrel for standard calibers
24″ barrel for Magnums
Adjustable open sights optional

Sauer 101 Technical Features Video (with Amazing Computer-Generated 3D Animations)
Sauer has provided some fantastic 3D-style cutaway animations that show the features of the new rifle. You can see 3D “exploded” renderings of all the gun’s components. As well, the animation shows the function of the safety system, the six-lug bolt, and the dual-ejector system. Watch this video!

Sauer 101 hunting rifle

Barrel Attachment Technology
Sauer boasts that the barrel is heat-pressed into the receiver, with the bolt locking up directly into the barrel. That may sound good, but in reality, this engineering solution makes it extremely difficult to fit a new after-market barrel to the gun. We talked with two highly-respected custom gunsmiths. Both agreed that it would be “very difficult to find a smith who would tackle the task of re-barreling this gun (starting with a barrel blank).” One smith observed that “machining the lug recesses directly into the barrel is not a procedure that 95% of gunsmiths are capable of doing.” So, when your Sauer 101 barrel wears out (or if you want to change calibers), presumably you have to send the gun back to the factory.

Sauer 101 hunting rifle
Sauer 101 hunting rifle

Chamberings Offered
Standard calibers: 22-250 Rem. .243 Win, 6.5×55, .270 Win, 7×64, .308 Win, .30-06, 8x57IS, 9.3×62
Magnum calibers: 7mm Rem Mag, 300 Win Mag, .338 Win Mag

Sauer 101 Intro Video (1 Minute)

Sauer 101 Pros:
1. The safety system looks very robust and sophisticated. The Sauer 101 features an integral firing pin block that allows firing only after the bolt has been fully locked into battery. That’s smart engineering.
2. Crisp, two-pound trigger pull is very nice for a factory rifle. Sauer claims trigger has “zero creep”.
3. Sauer 101 Accepts Remington 700 long action scope base mounts.
4. Stock is ambidextrous — good for both righties and lefties.

Sauer 101 Cons:
1. The pressed-in “Heat-Lock” barrel attachment system is not “gunsmith friendly”. And, because the lug recesses are inside the barrel, it will be difficult to fit after-market barrels. The machining required is much different than simply drilling a chamber as is done with “pre-fit” threaded barrels.
2. The sling swivel stud is positioned on the front of the Schnabel fore-end. To fit a Harris bipod, the owner will have to add a stud further back, or make an adapter for the forward-facing swivel stud.
3. No factory muzzle brake option.
4. No factory rail option for mounting scope rings.
5. No provision for adjusting length of pull (fixed at 14.4 inches).

Permalink - Videos, Hunting/Varminting, New Product 12 Comments »
April 5th, 2012

Browning Pays Sales Tax on Guns (Offer Ends April 30, 2012)

Browning Tax ReliefHere’s a sweet offer from Browning. Purchase a Browning firearm at retail price from April 1, 2012 through April 30, 2012 and Browning will reimburse you up to 8% in U.S. funds for the sales tax. For example, if you spend $1,000 and pay 8% sales tax, you can get $80 back from Browning — that’s like getting an 8% discount. (If you purchase your new Browning in a “no sales tax” state, send in your coupon for special consideration.)

We like Browning’s reasoning for this promotion: “Uncle Sam has picked your pocket all year long. Now is the time for some [tax relief]“. To get your sales tax refund, fill out the Browning Tax Relief Coupon and mail it in, along with a copy of your sales receipt. Participating Browning dealers should also have flyers and coupons available at their stores. NOTE: This offer is available only in the USA, and Buckmark and 1911-22 pistols are excluded.

CLICK HERE to Download and Print “Browning Tax Relief” Program COUPON.

What should you buy? Here are some suggestions:

X-Bolt Composite Stalker: Browning’s X-Bolt series is an affordable line of hunting rifles with adjustable triggers, 60°-lift bolts, and detachable rotary magazines. These guns have glass-bedded receivers and free-floating, hand-chambered barrels. Sixteen (16) different chamberings are offered, from .223 Rem all the way up to .338 Win Mag. Street price on the Composite Stalker is about $750.00.

Browning Tax Relief

T-Bolt Target Varmint: Browning makes a sweet, nice-handling rimfire varmint rifle with Browning’s unique, straight-pull T-Bolt action. This is offered in .22 LR, .22 Magnum, and 17 HMR. T-Bolts come in both right-hand or left-hand versions, with wood or synthetic stocks. Street prices on T-Bolt rifles range from about $500.00 to $650.00, depending on configuration.

Browning Tax Relief

Restrictions: Offer valid only on the consumer retail purchase of a new Browning firearm (offer excludes Buck Mark and 1911-22 pistols) purchased between April 1, 2012 and April 30, 2012. Documents must be postmarked no later than midnight, May 15, 2012. Browning employees and dealers etc., and members of their immediate families, are not eligible for this promotion. Limited to one offer per person. All purchasers must be U.S. citizens or legal residents.

Story tip by Edlongrange. We welcome reader submissions.
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August 5th, 2009

Cathy Winstead-Severin Wins Smallbore Silhouette Championships

It was “Ladies First” at the 2009 NRA National Smallbore Silhouette Championships. Cathy Winstead-Severin shot brilliantly to win both the Rifle AND Hunting Rifle titles, as well as the High Woman title for both classes. We’ve always said women can compete head to head with male shooters and win. Cathy proved that convincingly.

Silhouette Champion Cathy Winstead-Severin

This wasn’t Cathy’s first big victory. She won her first National Smallbore Silhouette title in 1998. Along with husband James Severin, Cathy operates Good Shooting Sales & Service in Joplin, Missouri, a shooting supply business specializing in rimfire and silhouette products.

Smallbore Rifle Championship Top Finishers:
First Place (and High Woman): Cathy Winstead-Severin: 111
Second Place: William Motl: 108
Third Place: Derek Greenaway: 107
High Junior: Tyler Kamp: 104
High Senior: Loren Peter: 96
Team Champions: Texas State Gold: 214

Smallbore Hunting Rifle Championship Top Finishers:
First Place (and High Woman): Cathy Winstead-Severin: 108
Second Place: William Zander: 105
Third Place: Laura Goetsch: 104
High Junior: Tyler Kamp: 98
High Senior: Bob Snyder: 85
Team Champions: Belgrade Air Shooting Sports: 205

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