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May 30th, 2015

High Power Champ Carl Bernosky Explains How to Shoot Standing

Some folks say you haven’t really mastered marksmanship unless you can hit a target when standing tall ‘on your own hind legs’. Of all the shooting positions, standing can be the most challenging because you have no horizontally-solid resting point for your forward arm/elbow. Here 10-time National High Power Champ Carl Bernosky explains how to make the standing shot.

Carl Bernosky is one of the greatest marksmen in history. A multi-time National High Power Champion, Carl has won ten (10) National High Power Championships in his storied shooting career, most recently in 2012. In this article, Carl provides step-by-step strategies to help High Power shooters improve their standing scores. When Carl talks about standing techniques, shooters should listen. Among his peers, Carl is regard as one of the best, if not the best standing shooter in the game today. Carl rarely puts pen to paper, but he was kind enough to share his techniques with AccurateShooter.com’s readers.

If you are position shooter, or aspire to be one some day, read this article word for word, and then read it again. We guarantee you’ll learn some techniques (and strategies) that can improve your shooting and boost your scores. This stuff is gold folks, read and learn…


Carl Bernosky High PowerHow to Shoot Standing
by Carl Bernosky

Shooting consistently good standing stages is a matter of getting rounds down range, with thoughtfully-executed goals. But first, your hold will determine the success you will have.

1. Your hold has to be 10 Ring to shoot 10s. This means that there should be a reasonable amount of time (enough to get a shot off) that your sights are within your best hold. No attention should be paid to the sights when they are not in the middle — that’s wasted energy. My best hold is within 5 seconds after I first look though my sights. I’m ready to shoot the shot at that time. If the gun doesn’t stop, I don’t shoot. I start over.

2. The shot has to be executed with the gun sitting still within your hold. If the gun is moving, it’s most likely moving out, and you’ve missed the best part of your hold.

3. Recognizing that the gun is sitting still and within your hold will initiate you firing the shot. Lots of dry fire or live fire training will help you acquire awareness of the gun sitting still. It’s not subconscious to me, but it’s close.

4. Don’t disturb the gun when you shoot the shot. That being said, I don’t believe in using ball or dummy rounds with the object of being surprised when the shot goes off. I consciously shoot every shot. Sometimes there is a mistake and I over-hold. But the more I train the less of these I get. If I get a dud round my gun will dip.* I don’t believe you can learn to ignore recoil. You must be consistent in your reaction to it.

Carl Bernosky High Power5. Know your hold and shoot within it. The best part of my hold is about 4 inches. When I get things rolling, I recognize a still gun within my hold and execute the shot. I train to do this every shot. Close 10s are acceptable. Mid-ring 10s are not. If my hold was 8 inches I would train the same way. Shoot the shot when it is still within the hold, and accept the occasional 9. But don’t accept the shots out of the hold.

6. Practice makes perfect. The number of rounds you put down range matter. I shudder to think the amount of rounds I’ve fired standing in my life, and it still takes a month of shooting standing before Perry to be in my comfort zone. That month before Perry I shoot about 2000 rounds standing, 22 shots at a time. It peaks me at just about the right time.

This summarizes what I believe it takes to shoot good standing stages. I hope it provides some insight, understanding, and a roadmap to your own success shooting standing.

Good Shooting, Carl


* This is very noticeable to me when shooting pistol. I can shoot bullet holes at 25 yards, but if I’ve miscounted the rounds I’ve fired out of my magazine, my pistol will dip noticeably. So do the pistols of the best pistol shooters I’ve watched and shot with. One might call this a “jerk”, I call it “controlled aggressive execution”, executed consistently.

Permalink - Articles, Competition, Shooting Skills 4 Comments »
May 28th, 2015

Tube TECH: How to Configure Eliseo Tubegun for Prone Shooting

Salazar tubegun

This 2010 story is reprinted at readers’ request.
In the past few years, tubeguns have really taken over in high power circles. At many matches you’ll see more tubeguns than conventional prone rifles, and a high percentage of those tubeguns will have been built using an Eliseo (Competition Machine) CSS chassis kit.

Step-By-Step Guide to Stock Set-Up
If you are a new tubegun shooter, or if you are planning a tubegun build this winter, our friend “GS Arizona” has prepared a comprehensive set-up guide for Eliseo tubeguns. Eliseo’s CSS chassis system affords a myriad of adjustments. Initially, one can be overwhelmed by all the variables: Length of Pull, Length to Sights, Length to Handstop, Cheekpad Height, Buttstock Offset, Buttstock Cant Angle, Handstop Angle, and Forearm Rotation.

Salazar tubegun

(more…)

Permalink - Articles, Competition 1 Comment »
December 18th, 2013

Fully Adjustable, ‘Customizable’ Smallbore Match Rifles

Report based on Lars Dalseide story in NRAblog

Anschutz smallbore position rifleIf you watched the position and prone shooters at the 2012 London Olympic Games, you couldn’t help but notice the exotic rifles competitors were shooting. There were wood stocks, metal stocks, off the shelf rifles and customized specials. Why are there are so many different design features and stock types? To answer this question, the NRAblog’s editors called on Jessie McClain of the NRA Competitive Shooting Division.

“The customized rifles, like the Anschütz you showed me, can make a real difference in a shooter’s performance,” explained McClain. “I went from a decent shooter to making the varsity shooting team my freshman year because of the rifle.” As Jessie explained, one new feature out there is the adjustable stock, which she called the Porsche of the shooting world. Fully adjustable from the butt plate to the check piece to the hand stop and risers and bolt knobs, this component is fully customizable to the athlete … which can be a huge advantage. “Every person is different … a customizable rifle fits anyone. A rifle team can purchase four of these and field a shooting team for years.”

Not for Novices
The one warning she did have is that these are not for the novice shooter. Get a couple of years of shooting under your belt and then think about moving on to a customized rifle. That way, you can learn the basics before investing in the high dollar equipment. “You wouldn’t give your 16 year old a Ferrari for his first car, would you?”

The Modern Anschütz Position Rifle
Smallbore match rifle makers are using modern materials in response to the need for greater adjustability (and enhanced accuracy). One of the popular new designs is the Anschütz model 1913 position rifle with a “1918 ALU Precise” brushed aluminum stock. This looks like it has been crafted in an aircraft plant.

Anschutz 1913 rifle smallbore

Anschutz 1913 rifle smallbore

Anschutz 1913 rifle smallbore

Story by Lars Dalseide, courtesy the NRA Blog.

Permalink Competition, Gear Review 6 Comments »
July 25th, 2013

Kempley Wins Iron Sights Prone Championship with Perfect Score

Story based on report by Lars Dalseide for NRABlog.
This week prone shooters are competing at the NRA National Smallbore Rifle Championships at Camp Perry. First on the agenda was the Metallic Sights Match. Shot at distances of up to 100 yards, the Metallic Championship is the aggregate of six separate matches fired over a two-day period. Courses of fire include a Dewar course (20 shots at 50 yards and 20 shots at 100 yards), 40 shots at 50 meters, and 400 shots at 100 yards.

NRABlog Archive Photo of Reya Kempley in an “Any Sights” Prone Match at Camp Perry.
Reya Kempley of New York wins NRA's 2013 Prone Smallbore Rifle Metallic Sights Championship

Coming out on top, with a score of 2400-202X (‘X’ stands for bullseyes) was New York’s Reya Kempley. This talented young lady beat all the men, including top marksmen from the USAMU. Congrats to Reya for an outstanding performance. Here are the top five smallbore metallic sights competitors:

NRA Smallbore Prone Rifle
Metallic Sights

Place Name Score
1 Reya Kempley 2400-202x
2 Eric Uptagrafft 2399-194x
3 Michael Seery 2399-187x
4 Michael Mcphail 2399-186x
5 Joseph Hein 2398-193x

Smallbore 3P Photo Gallery

Earlier this week the Smallbore Three-Position Matches were held at Camp Perry. Here are 3P “any sights” and metallic sights event photos from the GOnraMedia Archive:

Camp Perry smallbore three position 3P championships

Camp Perry smallbore three position 3P championships

Camp Perry smallbore three position 3P championships

Camp Perry smallbore three position 3P championships

Camp Perry smallbore three position 3P championships

Camp Perry smallbore three position 3P championships

Camp Perry smallbore three position 3P championships

Camp Perry smallbore three position 3P championships

Permalink Competition, News 3 Comments »
June 20th, 2013

USAMU Article Explains Sight Pictures for Metallic Sights

In an article for the CMP Online Magazine, SSG Tobie Tomlinson of the USAMU Service Rifle Team explains the various sight alignments employed by iron sights shooters. Tobie writes: “There are a myriad of sight picture options that shooters have used to great effect over the years. The sight picture that allows you to consistently shoot the smallest group, with a minimal shift in zeros, is the correct one. Remember, for any shooter to be successful, consistent sight picture must be complemented by front sight focus and sight alignment.”

CLICK HERE to read FULL ARTICLE

Center Hold
The front sight is placed directly in the center of the target. A center hold is great in different light conditions. On a bright day the target appears small. On a dark day the target appears large. In [any] light conditions the center of the target is always in the center. A shooter who has problems with elevation shots in various light conditions may benefit from a center hold.

6 O’Clock Hold
With the 6 O’Clock hold the front sight is placed at the bottom of the aiming black. For many shooters, this hold allows precision placement of the front sight. The ability to accurately call your shots will come with time and experience. Light changes, which alter the appearance of the target, may affect shooters who utilize the 6 O’Clock hold.

Sub 6 Hold
The sub 6 is just like the 6 O’Clock hold, only there is a small line of white between the front sight and the aiming black. Many shooters have a problem determining the exact 6 O’Clock position with their front sight, but by using a sub 6 or line of white they may be able to better estimate their hold.

Frame Hold
With the frame hold, just like with the other holds, the front sight is in the center of the rear sight. The front sight can then be placed at the 6 or 12 O’Clock position on the frame when there is no visible aiming point. This hold is typically reserved for foul weather and poor light conditions. By placing the front sight at the top or bottom of the frame, a shooter may hold better when there is little target to see. It can be difficult to hold a tight group this way, but it may add more hits in bad conditions. This technique is normally applied when shooting longer ranges such 600 or 1000 yards.

CLICK HERE for more articles from The FIRST SHOT, CMP Online Magazine.

Permalink - Articles, Competition, Shooting Skills No Comments »
October 27th, 2012

Gear Review: Houle Bloop Tubes for Match Rifles

Houle Bloop Tube (Sight Extension) Gear Review by Robert Whitley
As a competitive shooter and a builder of custom AR-15 accuracy competition uppers, one of the frequent requests I have from shooters is for a recommendation for a good bloop tube. What people want is a bloop tube that is light and strong, one that has no detrimental effect on accuracy, one that works well with many of the existing front sights, and can be removed and re-attached quickly and easily with no loss of zero. For years finding a bloop tube that fulfills all these requirements has been a somewhat elusive exercise. I am pleased to report that I have found the Houle Bloop Tube to meet all my requirements. In my opinion, this is the best bloop tube on the market, by far. You can order a Houle tube from Norm’s Website, TopGunRI.com or e-mail Norm at topgunngh [at] verizon.net.

Norm Houle High Power Bloop Tube
Zoom picture

Norm Houle High Power Bloop TubeBloop Tubes Designed by a National Champion
Norm Houle is a High Power and long-range shooter who has used these tubes to win National High Power Rifle Championships multiple times in past years. This past summer at Camp Perry, Norm’s bloop tubes were used by top “podium level” shooters in various events, including David Tubb, who won the National Long Range Championship using one of Norm’s tubes. Rodrigo Rosa also used Houle tubes this year to place second in the National High Power Rifle Championship and third in the Long Range National Championship.

Norm Houle High Power Bloop Tube

I have a couple of Norm Houle’s bloop tubes that I have used with a couple of rifle projects. Here are some of my thoughts on installation and use of the Houle Bloop Tubes:

  • Accuracy with the tubes in place is excellent!
  • The tube assemblies are two piece clamp-on tube assemblies, and the bloop tubes can be removed and re-attached with no loss of zero (and I mean no loss of zero). This is a big one! Over the years I have had quite a few clamp on tubes, but few of them repeated like these.
  • The tubes are very light but also very strong and low profile. Some of the clamp-on bloop tubes I have had over the years were huge, heavy and provided a large side profile (crosswind sail factor for offhand, etc.).
  • Norm offers 2″, 4″, and 6″ bloop tube lengths. The tubes are made to work with a .750″ dia. muzzle turn down and both of the ones I have work perfectly with a minimum turndown of 1.625″ long which provides enough “front-back” distance to permit the locating ring and bloop tube to be properly mounted on the barrel at the same time and work as they should. The tubes are also set up to use front sights set up to mount on a .750″ diameter mounting.
  • Each tube assembly has a clamp-on locating ring plus a clamp-on bloop tube that positively indexes off a tapered pin that protrudes from the locating ring. The locating ring is light but very strong and absolutely stays put when you clamp it on the barrel end (clamps on with one screw using a common 7/64″ Allen wrench). The bloop tube part of the assembly has two clamp-on screws (use a common 7/64″ Allen to put on, mount and take off).

Norm Houle High Power Bloop Tube

Using Different-Length Tubes for Different Applications
You can buy one tube with two or more locating rings and set multiple rifles up so you can move your bloop tube (with front sight attached) from rifle to rifle. You can also use two different bloop tubes to mate up with one locating ring on the same rifle. Norm uses a 2″ tube (with a front sight attached) for offhand and rapid sitting at 200 yards (short tube minimizes crosswind sail factor). For 300-yard rapid prone and 600-yard slow prone, Norm takes off the 2″ tube and mounts a 6″ tube on the rifle (with a front sight attached to it). Norm switches back and forth as needed from match to match (a 4″ tube is also offered). Norm noted that Rodrigo Rosa also used the same Houle bloop tube set-up with two different tubes this year at Perry to take second overall.

The price of a Houle bloop tube assembly with locating ring is $125.00. That’s more than some other brands, but a good value considering the design, features, and high-quality construction of Norm’s bloop tubes. Just as with all sights and optics… you get what you pay for.

Permalink Competition, Gear Review, Optics 4 Comments »
August 14th, 2012

David Luckman Wins 2012 NRA Long Range Championship

Breaking News from Camp Perry – Based on preliminary score tabulations, David Luckman of Great Britain is the 2012 NRA National Long Range Champion. Luckman finished with a 1246-74X.

David Luckman 2012 ChampionAs reported on NRABlog.com, Luckman topped a very competitive field, with a strong final day showing: “After a practically perfect performance in today’s Palma Individual Trophy Match (449-31X), it appears that David Luckman of the Great Britain Rifle Team will be crowned tonight as the NRA’s 2012 Long Range High Power Rifle Champion. A veteran of the International Long Range Rifle world, Luckman’s list of accolades includes the 2010 World Individual Long Range Rifle title as well as seventeen consecutive UK Grand Aggregate crosses.”

David started shooting with Sedgemoor Target Shooting Club. He became an Atheling in 1994 and has since toured with the GB team to Canada, the USA, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Australia, New Zealand and Malaysia. A truly great marksman, in 2010 Luckman shot 4 international matches in four consecutive days (National, Kolapore, Mackinnon and Australia) without dropping a single point.

David works for Clerical Medical in Bristol as an Actuary. In his spare time he is an avid sports player and qualified tennis coach. He competes in triathlons and half marathons as well as enjoying mountain biking, surfing, swimming and other sports.

Permalink Competition, News 3 Comments »
July 19th, 2012

Team Lapua’s Nancy Tompkins wins Metric Smallbore Nationals

Already respected for her High Power and Long-Range shooting, Nancy Tompkins added the 2012 NRA National Metric Prone Smallbore Rifle National Championship to her impressive shooting resume.

The weather was very hot and breezy for the 2012 Metric Prone National Championships conducted at the Wa-Ke’-De Rifle Range, Bristol, Indiana. Forty-two competitors were on hand for this third Annual Metric Prone Nationals. On Monday the 1200-point Iron Sights Aggregate was held, followed by the Any Sight Aggregate on Tuesday. Winds began mild and built throughout the day. The range is sheltered by high trees, but as the wind increases, it swirls, making this range a very difficult place to shoot (especially given the use of the more difficult Olympic metric targets). The 100-yard stage of each day was the determining factor!

Metric Nationals Nancy Tompkins

Tompkins won the Iron Sight Aggregate with a score of 1172-55X to beat young Garrett Spurgeon by four points and Katie Bridges by 13. Kevin Nevius said: “Nancy was amazing — her 100-yard performance was some of the best shooting I have ever seen.”

Fellow Team Lapua member Kevin was shooting great himself. In the Any Sight competition, Kevin captured the National Title with an aggregate score of 1176-56X. Runner-up was Ron Wigger with 1169-54X, while Tompkins was High Woman at 1165-46X.

Tompkins’ consistency paid off as she captured the National Title with a total score of 2337-101X to narrowly defeat Spurgeon (2333-115X) and Nevius (2328-96X). “I was able to visit the new Lapua Service Center in Mesa, AZ about two weeks ago and found the perfect Lapua ammunition for my rifle,” reported Tompkins. Nancy was shooting Lapua Midas+ ammo, while Kevin Nevius competed using Lapua’s X-ACT ammunition. For additional information on the NRA Metric Smallbore Rifle National Championship visit http://www.nrahq.org/compete/nm_metric-prone.asp. To learn more about Lapua products and the Lapua Service Center contact Adam Braverman at abraverman [at] lapua.us.

Kevin Nevius metric championship

National Metric Smallbore Championships Results

GRAND AGGREGATE
Nancy Tompkins: Winner, 2337-101X
Garrett Spurgeon: Second, 2333-115X
Kevin Nevius: Third, 2328-96X
Joe Farmer: High Senior, 2318-112X
Michelle Bohren: High Lady, 2310-91X
Katie Bridges: High Junior, 2320-108X
Virginia McLemore: High Senior Lady, 2306-91X

IRON AGGREGATE
Nancy Tompkins: Winner. 1172-55X
Garrett Spurgeon: 1168-60X
Dempster Christenson: 1156-50X
Katie Bridges: High Lady, 1159-55X
Joe Farmer: High Sr., 1153-47X
Amanda Luoma: High Jr., 1138-43X
Virginia McLemore: High Sr., 1148-41X
Sarah Nakata: High Jr. Lady, 1139-36X
Samantha Peterson: High School Jr., 1123-31X

ANY SIGHT AGGREGATE
Kevin Nevius: Winner, 1176-56X
Ron Wigger: Second, 1169-54X
Garrett Spurgeon: Third, 1165-55X
Nancy Tompkins: High Lady, 1165-46X
Joe Farmer: High Sr., 1165-51X
Katie Bridges: High Jr., 1161-53X
Virginia McLemore: High Sr. Lady, 1158-50X

Permalink Competition, News 2 Comments »
July 3rd, 2012

Diopter Devices Aid Older Eyes

Those of us over-40 types can use some help when shooting iron sights. As one gets older, your eyes lose the ability to rapidly adjust to different points of focus. In practice, when shooting a rifle, this means the target image may be sharp but the sights are blurry, or vice-versa. Or you may be able to see the target and front sight reasonably well, but the rear sight is a complete blurr. (That is this Editor’s problem when shooting a rifle, such as a Swedish Mauser, with a notched blade rear sight.) Even if you are using a rear peep sight, you may see a blurry rear circle (or two circles if you have astigmatism). Placing a diopter on your shooting glasses can help many people see open sights better, when shooting both handguns and rifles.

Merit Corp. in Schenectady, NY, offers an adjustable metal diopter that attaches to shooting glasses with a rubber cup. Though primarily intended for pistol shooters, the Merit diopter can also be helpful when shooting rifles with open sights, such as military bolt actions. Priced at $65.00, the Merit device features a shutter-style adjustable aperture iris.

Merit explains: “The human eye, whether or not prescription glasses are required, cannot focus on both sights and the target at the same time. The eye will constantly shift focus from the sights to the target trying to ensure proper alignment. Unfortunately, as we age, the eye loses the flexibility which allows it to do this; thus, sights and target begin to grow fuzzy. There is a simple way to combat this by increasing your eyes’ depth of field (range of focus). If you look through an aperture or pinhole of the correct size, you will be able to see both sights clearly, and the target will be clearly defined as well.”

In addition to diopters for eyeglasses, Merit produces a variety of adjustable iris sight products for rifles, including the Variable Iris Aperature for AR15s. Visit MeritCorporation.com or call (518) 346-1420.

Cheaper Diopter from Lyman
If you can’t afford a Merit adjustable diopter, Lyman offers a similar all-plastic device for under $20.00. The Lyman Hawkeye Shooting Aid mounts directly to your eyeglass lens with a rubber suction cup. The diopter section is made of plastic, and aperture diameter is non-adjustable.

Though it is simple and inexpensive, the Lyman Hawkeye works for many shooters, if positioned properly. (Don’t think this is anything close to the Merit Diopter in quality though!) Currently, Cabelas.com has the Lyman Hawkeye on sale for just $12.88, item # IK-229094. MidwayUSA sells the Lyman Hawkeye for $18.99, item # 936878. One MidwayUSA customer reports:

“This thing really works! I have it on my shooting glasses, and it has made a significant improvement in my ability to keep the front sight and target in focus at the same time. If you are older and find that you are having a hard time keeping the target in focus over ‘iron sights’, then this may be the answer to your problem. Mine works equally well for both pistol and rifle, although I do have to change the device’s position on my shooting glasses when changing weapon types.”

Permalink Optics, Shooting Skills 3 Comments »
January 28th, 2011

MicroSight Approved by CMP for Service Rifle Competition

The CMP has now approved two commercial rear sight inserts for use in Service Rifle competitions: the SR MicroSight, and the ShootingSight. The SR MicroSight produced by Stallings Machine of Senoia, GA is now legal for use in CMP-sanctioned Service Rifle matches beginning with the 2011 shooting season. The CMP also approved a rectangular rear aperture insert produced by ShootingSight of Ohio.

Only the SR Micro-Sight employs the Phased Zone Plate technology that keeps both front sight and target in sharp focus. READ MORE about Micro-Sight.

Formalizing the CMP’s action on sight inserts, the following two rule changes will be incorporated into the 2011 CMP Competition Rules that are due for release in March. Anyone with questions should contact CMP Headquarters at Camp Perry.

6.1.1 (4) Front and rear sights: Must be of U.S. Army design (either service or match). Front sights must have square-topped posts. Any modifications to the front sight, rear sight or rear sight hood must be specifically authorized in Rule 6.1.2.

6.1.2 (3) The dimensions of the rear sight aperture (internal diameter) and the front sight post (width) may vary from standard military dimensions. The rear sight hood diameter may not be longer than 0.70″ or larger than 0.50″ in diameter. The rear sight aperture may have a fixed, non-adjustable round, square or rectangular aperture insert. A corrective lens or multi-focal lens system may be inserted in the rear sight hood.

Micro-SightMicroSight Inventory Sells Out Quickly — But More Coming
The SR MicroSight is available through Creedmoor Sports. Creedmoor has been quickly selling through its inventory. However, Creedmoor will have another 100 delivered by the supplier on February 1st. If you want a MicroSight, order soon, because they won’t be in stock long!

Creedmoor Item# MS-1 — Price: $139.95

CLICK HERE to order

Thanks to E. Kennard for this news item.
Permalink Competition, New Product, News No Comments »
January 14th, 2011

Creedmoor Sports Has First-Ever Micro-Sight for Service Rifles

The new Micro-Sight was developed by scientists at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This revolutionary optical insert for iron sights allows you to see BOTH the target and your front sight in sharp focus. The Micro-Sight employs Phased Zone Plate technology to improve focus of both close and distant objects.

Creedmoor Sports Micro-Sight

Creedmoor Sports Micro-SightCreedmoor Sports Now Selling Production Micro-Sight
This summer we reported that the Micro-Sight was in development. Now Creedmoor Sports has the first-ever production Micro-Sight, a special hood for AR and service rifle rear sights. The Micro-Sight hood sold by Creedmoor replaces a standard AR-15 hood (1/4-32 threads) as found in most NM AR-15 rear sights. The Micro-Sight element is positioned in the center of the hood, where it is shielded from moisture and impacts. Licensed by INL, the new Micro-Sight for ARs will be followed in the spring by inserts for popular rear match sights. The new SR Micro-Sight insert for ARs, item MS-1, costs $139.95. Order soon — Creedmoor has sold nearly 100 sights in just two days! Click HERE or call 800-273-3366 to order.

Creedmoor Micro-Sight

The Micro-Sight really works, and it makes a huge difference, particular for “older eyes” that have trouble focusing on both the target and the front sight. For the first time you’ll have a sight picture where the front sight and the target are both in focus. Creedmoor’s Dennis DeMille, a former National Service Rifle Champion, tells us: “This is one of the most game-changing products to come out in years!”

WATCH the VIDEO below to see the Micro-Sight in Use and to learn how it works…

YouTube Preview Image

Disclosure: Creedmoor Sports Advertises with AccurateShooter.com

Permalink Gear Review, New Product, Optics 4 Comments »
October 18th, 2010

Glare-Cutting Donut Filters for Front Globe Sights

Gear Review by Germán A. Salazar, Contributing Editor
All of us have at one time or another struggled with glare in the front sight at certain ranges and certain times of year. There are a lot of ways to deal with glare, shade tubes being the most commonly seen. I prefer to avoid any type of extension on the front or rear sight, especially anything that hangs past the muzzle where the muzzle blast can cause damage and in any event, I haven’t found those tubes to be very effective. However, the need to do something about the glare at our south-facing range at the Phoenix Rod & Gun Club has become essential for me. At this time of year, the sun is directly in front at this range and I really struggle to get a clear sight picture.

iron sights glare filter

The photo above, taken on 10/16/2010 clearly illustrates the problem at PRGC as the early morning sun is from the left and front. Note the backlit flag and the direction of the shadows. As the sun continues to rise, it aligns itself right down the range towards the shooters. Apart from the glare, the bull is hard to see on the targets once they’re up because the light is coming from behind the target, not from the front. A very challenging set of light conditions which will worsen from now through February as the sun stays lower in the sky month by month.

glare filter NeergaardAnti-Glare Filters from Art Neergaard
I recently spoke to Art Neergaard about this problem. Art manufactures a number of innovative products for rifle sights through his company ShootingSight LLC and he had an idea for me. The idea was simple in concept, a “donut” filter for the front sight with a hole in the middle so as not to darken the already dim bull and yet, it would cut the glare that otherwise enters the front sight. The picture at left shows the filter mounted on the sight. When you’re looking through the sights, there isn’t the large gap around the aperture, it’s actually a very close match. Sticking the camera right into the sight obviously changes the perspective a bit.

I wanted to evaluate the Centra Goliath 30mm sight on my new Palma tubegun. Since Art intended to make the filters for the 30mm size, this was a good time to begin that evaluation as well. My last match score with this rifle, five weeks ago before the light got bad, was a 600-42X, since then, I’ve had a couple of poor matches with other rifles as the light and glare have really troubled me. With the 600-42 as a “good condition baseline” with this rifle I was eager to see how the filters would work.

Art sent me a few items: two filters (one gray, one orange), and one filter-holder for them, as well as a fixed aperture cut in the same material as the filters, with a beveled edge like the ones available for many years for smaller sights. The filters are interchangeable in the holder and can be changed in a minute or so. The aperture, however, is fixed as the hole is drilled in a lathe after mounting the disc in the holder — this ensures perfect concentricity for the aperture.

glare filter Neergaard

glare filter NeergaardGray Filter Preferred
Arriving at the range, I mounted the high-contrast orange filter first and looked through it. Frankly, although it cut glare well, I hate the look of an orange world! A quick change of filter and another look through the sights showed a good, glare-free and natural-looking sight picture with the gray filter. At right is a photo that shows the relative glare-cutting effect of the gray filter.

Scores Improved with Anti-Glare Filtration
Shooting a good mid-range .308 load with Winchester brass, Federal primers, IMR 4064 (manufactured in 1960, just like me) and moly-coated Sierra 190 gr. bullets, the rifle showed it’s good breeding giving me a 200-12X, 200-15X and 200-14X for a 600-41X, my 22nd score of 600! Well, quite a dramatic improvement over the last couple of weeks when I struggled to shoot 590, and back to the score I shot five weeks ago when the light was still good. Hooray! So yes, I’m very satisfied with the concept of the filter with a hole in it. All the extraneous glare that was hurting my sight picture was gone and the bull remained unimpaired. Not that the bull was too good to begin with as all I can see is a fuzzy gray blob out there, but keeping the center unfiltered was better than some solid filters I’ve tried in the past.

Clear Rain Filters for Front Sights
Art plans to make clear donut filters to use as rain shields for shooters with a front lens in their sight. That would keep raindrops off the lens — especially the middle of the lens where a drop could destroy the shooter’s ability to see the bull properly.

glare filter NeergardFilter Works with Fixed & Variable Apertures
Although I intended to try the fixed aperture also, I ended up shooting the entire match with the filter and the Centra variable aperture. I’ll try to use the fixed aperture (photo at left) next week. The value of a fixed aperture shouldn’t be underestimated. It provides a lower cost way to use a 30mm sight, an important consideration given the current $175 price of the adjustable aperture. Perhaps just as important, the fixed aperture is something that should be in every high-end shooter’s kit in case of failure of the adjustable, which has been known to happen. If I were traveling across the country or around the world to a match, you can be sure there would be a set of fixed apertures of various sizes in my kit to back up the adjustable iris.


Art Neergaard
ShootingSight LLC
www.ShootingSight.com
eMail: shootingsight@nuvox.net
Phone: 513-702-4879

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August 19th, 2010

New Record Set at Camp Perry Palma Team Match

A new NRA record in the team Palma event was set yesterday at Camp Perry by the Litz-Gallagher team. The new record of 1796-119X was set by Brian Litz (Captain and Shooter), Michelle Gallagher (Coach and shooter), Nancy Tompkins (Coach and shooter), Bob Gustin (shooter). Shooting the Palma course of fire at 800, 900, and 1000 yards, these four beat the 1796-112X mark set in July at Raton, NM by an all-female ‘dream team’ of shooters coached by Steve Conico. (Both Michelle Gallagher and her mother Nancy Tompkins were member of the Raton ‘Dream Team’). Bryan Litz reports: “At Perry, Michelle and Nancy did an outstanding job shooting, and coaching Bob and myself to very high scores especially at the 1000-yard-line where the conditions were extremely difficult.”

Team Palma Record

Team member Bob Gustin also won the Individual Palma match with a 450-33X, not dropping a point. That’s remarkable considering Bob shoots right-handed while sighting with his left eye through off-set rear and front sights. Congrats to Bob and all the team members. Bryan Litz won’t take any time off after his team’s record-breaking performance. Bryan reports: “I’m on my way to Canada now for the America Match this Sunday — a bi-annual international fullbore match.” Good luck Bryan.

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August 4th, 2010

2010 CMP Rimfire Sporter Match Report from Camp Perry

CMP Rimfire Sporter Matchby Steve Cooper, CMP Online
The CMP Rimfire Sporter Match is now one of the most popular events at Camp Perry, drawing hundreds of entries. The Rimfire Sporter Match, first held in 2002, was designed to accommodate a novice shooter with nothing more than a store-bought .22 caliber rifle (and no fancy competition gear). The Rimfire Sporter Match is a recreation-oriented, 3-position competition using off-the-shelf .22 caliber sporter rifles. Rifles may be manually operated or semi-automatic and competitors are broken into three classes: open sights, telescopic sights, and tactical rifle. Read AccurateShooter.com’s detailed Guide to Rimfire Sporter Matches

Blustery Conditions Challenge Rimfire Sporter Shooters
While some shooters dealt with a driving rain, wildly-fluctuating crosswinds and the accompanying delays, others enjoyed bright sun and calm conditions during the 9th annual Rimfire Sporter Match on Sunday, July 25th. Chalk it all up to “The Camp Perry Experience”. Veteran shooters know that weather is almost always a factor here and newcomers received received a classic introduction to it Sunday. Nonetheless, the shooters battled through the conditions to post some fine scores.

CMP Rimfire Sporter Match

Command Sergeant Major (CSM) Steven Slee, 46, U.S. Army Reserve, won the Open Sights class with an aggregate score of 578-23X out of 600 possible. Charles Opalewski II, 20, was second in open sights with an aggregate score of 574-14X. Opalewski was also the high ranking overall junior and 4-H junior shooter. Nick Takacs, 61, was the high senior competitor in open sights class with an aggregate score of 569-17X. In Telescopic Sights class (T-class), Lucas Boord, 20, finished first, using a Kimber Hunter to score 593-27X. Placing second in T-class was CSM Steven Slee with a 592-31X. Natalie Harper was the High Woman, High Junior and High 4-H Junior shooter in the Telescopic Sights Class with an overall score of 588-14X. The top senior shooter in T-class was Steve Gossage, 63, with an aggregate of 586-32X. READ More …

CMP Rimfire Sporter Match

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July 30th, 2010

SSG Shane Barnhart Wins Nat’l Smallbore Prone Championship

SSG Shane BarnhartShooting an impressive 4790-355X, SSG Shane Barnhart earned the title of National Smallbore Rifle Prone Champion, while competing this week at Camp Perry, Ohio. Finishing second and third, respectively, were 1LT Christopher Abalo, and Charles Kemp. Abalo and Kemp had identical 4786 scores, but 1LT Abalo had the higher X count. Abalo scored 344X compared to Kemp’s 338X.

Army Shooters Top the Field
Story by Danielle Sturgis, The NRA Blog
SSG Shane Barnhart has been to Camp Perry since 1992, minus two years. This year is his best smallbore rifle performance. Did he come expecting to win? “I was hoping (to place in top 3),” he said. “I knew going into Any Sight that I had Abalo and Kemp, both very fine shooters, to keep up with.” What was the biggest challenge of the week? “Battling the wind,” Shane said. When asked if he had any advice for young people thinking about shooting competitively, Barnhart responded: “You can get a free ride to college,” he said.

First Lieutenant Christopher Abalo practiced for the national smallbore prone championships for just one month, yet still managed a strong second-place finish. “I took a two-year break from competitive shooting, so this feels good,” he said. “I feels great, actually. I expected to shoot well, and I would say I met my expectations.” Below are photos from the 2010 Smallbore Prone Championships.

Gunny Zins Wins his 10th Pistol Championship
In related news, retired Gunnery Sergeant Brian Zins of Poland, Ohio, was named national champion at the NRA National Pistol Championships held July 13-17 at Camp Perry. This was Zins’ 10th National Championship. Zins shot consistently high scores throughout the event, winning the .22 Caliber Championship and placing in the top three for both the Center Fire and .45 Caliber Championships. Zins’ Aggregate score of 2650-134X placed Brian at the top of the leader board for the tenth time in his shooting career — a record number of National Pistol Championships. CLICK HERE to learn more about Zins and other pistol competitors.

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July 9th, 2010

Dennis DeMille Offers High Power Training Tips

Dennis DeMille is a past Camp Perry National Champion, and one of the nation’s top High Power shooters. Since retiring from the U.S. Marine Corps, Dennis has served as the General Manager of Creedmoor Sports in Oceanside, California. With his decades of competitive experience, Dennis has a wealth of knowledge. In this three-minute interview, Dennis shares insights into the High Power shooting game. He discusses the most effective ways to train for competition, the fundamentals of good marksmanship, and how to recognize and perfect your natural point of aim. Dennis also offers solid advice on how to get the best “bang for your buck” when choosing shooting accessories for High Power and Across the Course competition.

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Creedmoor Sports Now Carries Phoenix Sights and Accessories
Phoenix Precision builds high-quality, affordable sight systems for iron sights competitors. Phoenix products have become popular as they deliver excellent precision and repeatability, while costing considerably less than some other premium sights.

Phoenix sight mountThe Phoenix Precision rear sight, offered as either top-mount or side mount, costs $379.95. This unit offers three (3) minutes per knob revolution, with quarter-minute clicks, 70 minutes of elevation adjustment and 60 minutes of windage. It features stainless guide pins and lead screws, with a black anodized aircraft aluminum body. The Phoenix rear sight accepts Anschutz and Gehmann accessories.

Phoenix offers a companion front sight system in three different heights: ultra-high for T2K and Eliseo tubeguns, medium-high for AR spaceguns, and low for traditional prone rifles. The $184.95 Phoenix front sight features a fully adjustable 360° leveling bubble which may be positioned either above or below the aperture. The front sight mounts on any barrel with an end diameter of .750″ (call for .812″ or .920″), and accepts all standard 22mm inserts. As shown below, Phoenix also offers extra clamp-mounts for $59.95, and a 2″-long Delrin front shade for $17.50 that easily attaches to any 22mm iris.

Phoenix ultra-high sight tower Phoenix sight mount Phoenix sight shade
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June 28th, 2010

Amazing New MicroSight Technology Moves into Production

Microsight Rifle lens Zone PlateIn May, we reported on the new MicroSight invented by engineer (and shooter) David Crandall of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The MicroSight keeps both near and far objects in sharp focus, simultaneously imaging two distinct focal planes. This break-through technology allows the shooter to see a sharp image of the target and a sharp image of his iron sights at the same time.

The MicroSight is not a lens per se. Rather it is a phased Zone Plate that focuses light beams through diffraction. Zone Plates, first studied by Frenchman Augustin-Jean Fresnel in the 1800s, focus light via a set of concentric rings that alternate between transparent and opaque. The transparent sections let some light waves pass through unchanged, focusing objects that are far away (basically, at infinity). But light passing the edges of the opaque rings gets diffracted, which brings nearby objects into focus. This produces a seemingly impossible result — sharp images of distant and near objects, simultaneously.

Microsight Rifle lens Zone Plate

The MicroSight is not just a laboratory experiment. Prototype versions have been crafted and placed on test rifles. INL has licensed the technology to Apollo Optical Systems which is right now working with gunsight manufacturers to adapt the MicroSight design to a variety of products. In the future, some MicroSight-equipped products might add refractive power to the Zone Plate, allowing target magnification as well as focusing.

WATCH the VIDEO below to see the MicroSight in Use and to learn how it works…

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Microsight Rifle sight Zone Plate

Permalink New Product, News, Optics 11 Comments »
May 11th, 2010

Breakthrough MicroSight Technology Improves Iron Sights

INL Microsight FresnelNew optical technology from the Idaho National Laboratory could make a big improvement in non-telescopic iron sights. INL’s new “MicroSight” uses a Zone Plate design to focus light so that BOTH front sight-blade AND the target appear in sharp focus. This technology could be a major breakthrough for iron sights shooters, particularly older shooters whose eyes have difficulty focusing at multiple distances. The INL MicroSight’s wafer-thin optical element is only about 1/4″ in diameter, and it has been successfully adapted for match-type rear iris sight systems. Initial tests show the MicroSight can help iron sights users shoot better scores, with less eye fatigue. The technology could aid hunters and soldiers, too, either as a primary aiming device or as a lightweight backup for other types of sights.

By Mike Wall, INL Communications and Governmental Affairs
The human eye has trouble focusing on both a firearm’s front sight blade and the much more distant target at the same time. Idaho National Laboratory’s innovative gunsight technology, the MicroSight, helps the eye solve this problem. The MicroSight, a disc smaller than a dime, brings both the target and the iron sight into simultaneous focus, giving marksmen a better sight picture. The new sight has national-security applications, as it could improve safety and performance for American soldiers. Millions of target shooters and hunters should also benefit.

INL Laboratories MicroSight

“The MicroSight gives you much of the performance you’d get out of a holographic or telescopic sight,” says INL engineer David Crandall, who developed the technology. “But it’s more reliable, much lighter-weight and much cheaper.” The alternating rings on zone plates bring faraway and nearby objects into focus simultaneously.

The Magic of Zone Plates — Concentric Rings Using Diffraction
Crandall is not an optics specialist. Most of his past work tended toward infrastructure engineering, like nuclear projects with INL’s Advanced Test Reactor. But Crandall is a highly accomplished target shooter — he’s a member of the U.S. national long-range rifle team — and he’s come up with several other shooting-related inventions. He patented a rifle-stabilizing shooting sling, and a small, powerful breaching shotgun that could help law-enforcement personnel storm buildings more effectively.

INL Laboratories MicroSight

One day, Crandall was leafing through an optics textbook, and he stumbled across a section on “zone plates.” Zone plates are optical devices that resemble lenses. But whereas lenses focus light using refraction — essentially, changing the direction of light waves by changing their speed — zone plates use diffraction. Diffraction describes how waves bend, break up, spread out and interfere with each other as they encounter obstacles. The diffraction of sound waves, for example, explains how you can hear someone’s voice from around a corner.

Zone plates focus light via a set of concentric rings that alternate between transparent and opaque. The transparent sections let some light waves pass through unchanged, focusing objects that are far away (basically, at infinity). But light passing the edges of the opaque rings gets diffracted, which brings nearby objects into focus. The seemingly impossible result: sharp images of distant and near objects, simultaneously.

INL Laboratories MicroSight

Zone plates aren’t new. Frenchman Augustin-Jean Fresnel worked out their underlying scientific principles in the early 1800s. [Editor’s NOTE: A.J. Fresnel also invented the Fresnel lenses used in light-houses and theatrical spotlights.] But it took Crandall, with his shooter’s eye, to recognize the potential zone plates held for improving gunsights. “Competitive shooters are always looking for an edge, for something better,” Crandall says. “You have to, when you’re going against the best in the world.”

Crandall took his idea to INL’s technology transfer division, which also saw the promise and agreed to fund his research. He eventually found his way to phased zone plates. Phased zone plates replace the opaque rings with transparent glass of varying thickness. This accomplishes the same goal — diffraction — but does so without losing as much light, yielding brighter images. After much tinkering, Crandall came up with the MicroSight. CLICK HERE for giant-sized photo of MicroSight element.

A Smaller, Cheaper, More Robust Sight
Without help from zone plates, the human eye cannot focus on two different planes at the same time. So shooters using only standard-issue iron sights see either a blurry target or a blurry sight. The MicroSight isn’t the only gunsight technology that can overcome this problem, of course. Telescopic sights magnify targets, bringing them into close, crisp focus. And holographic sights project a red dot onto an image of the target, showing clearly where the shot will land.

But telescopic and holographic sights have their drawbacks. For one thing, they tend to be bulky. Both types of sight can add one or two pounds to the weight of a rifle — not a trivial concern for hunters or soldiers who must lug their weapons for miles over rough terrain. Further, both are complex instruments with fragile components. They can break, especially if dropped or banged against a rock or tree. Red-dot sights require batteries, which can die. And neither one is cheap: most red-dot sights cost more than $100, and high-quality telescopic ones can run $1,000 or more.

INL MicroSight AudioMicroSight Should Be Versatile and Affordable
The MicroSight, on the other hand, is tiny — its zone plate is thin and only about 1/4″ in diameter — and relatively cheap. Crandall says the sight should cost significantly less than red-dot and telescopic sights when Apollo Optical Systems, which licensed the technology, takes it to market. The company is currently working with gunsight manufacturers to design and develop various MicroSight versions. In the future, some of these versions might add refractive power to the zone plate, achieving some level of target magnification. Crandall foresees other possible applications as well, such as in handguns and night-vision goggles. In any situation that requires taking the long and the short view at the same time, this new INL technology could provide a major advantage.

Article and graphics courtesy Idaho National Laboratory (INL), www.inl.gov.

Permalink New Product, Optics, Shooting Skills 16 Comments »
March 23rd, 2010

Affordable Aperture Sight Upgrade for CZ 452 and Ruger 10/22

In everyone’s inventory of rifles, we think there should be at least one basic utility rifle with decent iron sights. Tech-SIGHTS, a small company in Hartsville, South Carolina, produces high-quality, yet affordable front post/rear aperture sights that fit popular rifles such as the Ruger 10/22, Marlin 60, SKS, and the CZ 452. We were particularly impressed with the new CZ200 sight set for the CZ 452, a very popular .22LR and 17HMR training and varmint rifle.

For CZ 452s sold without iron sights, the $69.00 CZ200 sight package provides both an easily-adjustable rear aperture sight and a durable, hooded front sight. The Tech-SIGHTs, designed to fit the dovetail on top of the CZ receiver, can be quickly fitted to CZ 452s. Both the rear aperture and the front post (with protective ears) can be installed easily with no drilling or tapping. For CZ 452s equipped with factory iron sights, the Tech-SIGHTs will replace the rear tangent sight with a more precise micro-adjustable aperture sight, increasing sight radius by 6.5 inches.

Ruger 10/22 Tech-SIGHTS

Ruger Sight Set Features AR-style Front Sight
The Ruger 10/22 Tech-SIGHTs mount on the rear of the receiver utilizing the existing, tapped scopebase holes. Two versions are offered, the TSR100 with dual leaf (flip-adjust) apertures, and the TSR200 with a single (non-flip) aperture with enhanced elevation adjustment. Both TSR100 ($59.00) and TSR200 ($69.00) sight sets come with a front sight tower fitted with AR15-spec detent-adjustable post. This allows the shooter to swap in a variety of front sight posts made for ARs.

Ruger 10/22 Tech-SIGHTS

For more information, close-up product photos, mounting instructions, and user testimonials, visit www.tech-sights.com. The Tech-SIGHT website has a secure shopping cart system so you can order direct from the manufacturer.

Permalink Gear Review, Optics 2 Comments »
September 2nd, 2009

Phoenix Rear Sights Impress Match Shooters

Phoenix Precision, based in Elk River, MN, crafts precision target sights for long range target shooters. Known for their outstanding reliability and repeatability, Phoenix rear sights are gaining popularity among competitors in prone, Palma, and High Power disciplines. Some of the top “sling and irons” shooters in the country have switched to Phoenix sights.

Gary LaValley, owner of Phoenix Precision, crafts his rear sights using advanced CNC machinery. The sight housings are anodized, aircraft-grade aluminum. For precise repeatability, the sights feature stainless guide pins and lead screws, plus oil-impregnated bronze guide and thread bushings. The sights offer 70 MOA of elevation, 60 MOA of windage, with 1/4-MOA clicks. Knob rotations for elevation and windage are either NRA match rifle (Counter-CW) or service rifle (CW). Quarter-minute clicks are standard, but on request for the Palma shooters, 1/2-MOA windage detent plates are available at no extra charge. Phoenix sights accept both Anschutz and Gehmann accessories.

Phoenix Precision micrometer rear sights are offered in two basic models: top mount ($380.00), and side mount ($355.00). Both types are available in either right- or left-hand configuration (no extra charge for lefties). Top mount models are designed for use on rail-equipped AR flattops, tube guns, Tubb 2000s, and Gary Eliseo stocks. Side mount models are most commonly used on bolt action rifles, but they also work on Picatinny or Weaver-style rails with the use of an adaptor. So, if you have both an older-style Palma rifle and a new, rail-topped tube-gun, you can use the sight on both rigs. Many shooters do use the same Phoenix rear sight on multiple rifles, as shown in the video below. In the video, when real competitors talk about their Phoenix sights, you hear two things time and again: “quality” and “repeatability”.

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For more information about Phoenix Target Sights and Scope Rails, visit www.PhoenixPrec.com, or call Gary LaValley at (763) 263-3327.

Permalink Gear Review, New Product, Optics 7 Comments »