November 25th, 2017

Gun Industry Jobs Listed on NSSF Website

NSSF gun industry jobs employment center openings hire work

Firearms Industry JobsA number of interesting jobs in the firearms industry have become available in recent weeks. The NSSF maintains a regularly-updated listing of employment opportunities with gun-makers and shooting sports organizations. On the NSSF’s job board right now there are financial openings, account manager positions, engineering jobs, sales and marketing positions, and media/digital markeing opportunities. Here are some of the jobs we found this week posted on the NSSF Website. CLICK HERE to visit the NSSF Career Center with all current listings.

Firearms Industry Jobs — Current Openings

Financial Manager — Middletown, Pennsylvania
IWI US, 5 Days Ago

Director of Sales — Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
IWI US, Inc. 1 Week Ago

Sales Representative — Phoenix, Arizona
Davidson’s, 1 Week Ago

Design/Mechanical Engineer — Phoenix, Arizona
Overwatch Precision, 1 Week Ago

Mechanical Engineer — Chicagoland, Illinois
United Tactical Systems, 1 Week Ago

Media Relations Manager/Sr. Copy Writer — Newington, New Hampshire
Sig Sauer, 2 Weeks Ago

Digital Marketing Manager/Director — Lebanon, New Hampshire
Sig Sauer, 2 Weeks Ago

Channel Manager-LEO — Fort Smith, Arkansas
Walther Arms, 2 Weeks Ago

National Accounts Manager — Fort Smith, Arkansas
Walther Arms, 2 Weeks Ago

Dealer Support Representative — Fort Smith, Arkansas
Walther Arms, 2 Weeks Ago

Account Manager — Kalispell, Montana
Kimber Mfg., 2 Weeks Ago

Operations Manager — Minden, Nevada
Franklin Armory, 3 Weeks Ago

Permalink Gunsmithing, News No Comments »
May 7th, 2017

Replacement Trigger Springs Available for Major Brands

Ernie the Gunsmith remington tikka cz browning trigger springs

Ernie The Gunsmith Replacement Trigger Springs
Ernie Paull from California was an active competition shooter for many years. However, his eyesight has declined so he has turned his attention to providing components for shooters and gunsmiths. Through his Ernie the Gunsmith website, Paull sells a variety of useful products including gun trigger springs, pillar-bedding kits, Accu-Risers, and pillar installation tools. This Bulletin post focuses on Ernie’s trigger springs. Ernie offers springs for a wide variety of rifles: Browning (A-Bolt, A-Bolt 22), CZ (m452), Kimber, Remington (XR100, XCR, 7, 700, 722, 788, 7600 and more), Ruger (77, 77-22, LC6), Tikka (T-3), Weatherby (MK-V), and Winchester (M-70).

Springs start at just $6.95. Ernie also sells springs for the Rem-compatible Shilen Benchrest trigger, as well as Rem 700 ejector springs and trigger alignment springs. For Rem 700 rifles, Paull makes a spring that fits all Remington M-7 and M-700 triggers including the early X Mark-PRO triggers. Ernie says: “On average, installation of his Model-700 spring will reduce factory triggers’ weight of pull by 1½ to 2½ lbs with no other changes. The exact amount of creep, over-travel, and weight of pull are dependent upon the type and amount of tuning accomplished by your gunsmith.”

While there is more to a good trigger job (in most cases) than just a spring swap, you need to have the proper rate spring when adjusting trigger pull weight downwards. NOTE: For safety reasons, we recommend you consult a competent gunsmith before modifying factory triggers.

Why Replacement Springs are Better than Tweaked/Modified Springs
Ernie has observed that some gunsmiths try to lighten trigger pulls by modifying factory springs in questionable ways: “I have worked with gunsmiths in the past who, when the subject turned to trigger springs, preferred to clip them, grind them, heat them, bend them, smash them, or simply back out the weight of pull screw until there was no or almost no pressure on the spring. With any of these methods, you get a spring whose rate is rapidly rising as the trigger is pulled. As the trigger is released, the spring rate rapidly decreases as it approaches full or near-full extension. A more uniform weight of pull will be achieved when the trigger spring is compressed within its normal working range throughout the entire movement of the trigger. In the long run, the benefits of saved time, plus more uniform and reliable results, will more than offset the cost of these [replacement] springs. If you want a lighter trigger pull, you need a lighter trigger spring.”

Permalink Gear Review, Gunsmithing 1 Comment »
January 19th, 2016

Media Day at the Range 2016

2016 Media Day Range

Media Day Range

Scores of manufacturers showcase their products at the SHOT Media Day event, held each year in Boulder City, Nevada. This year we saw some legendary names (such as Colt and Winchester), as well as new, 21st-century gun-makers (such as Tracking Point). Savage and Kimber had some surprising new offerings, and we saw impressive new optics from Zeiss and Minox. There were some interesting trends. Many firearms were equipped with “factory” suppressors. Ruger, much to our surprise, showcased a Ruger 10/22 takedown rifle fitted with a Ruger-branded suppressor. It was extremely quiet. Many of the handgun manufacturers, including Ruger and Walther, supplied ammunition with composite polymer matrix bullets. These bullets are significantly lighter than conventional pistol bullets of the same caliber (the reduced bullet mass did lessen felt recoil with 9mm and 45 acp pistols). The polymer bullets are lead-free, and they don’t ricochet, so they are both more “eco-friendly” and safer when used on steel targets.

New Savage 110 BA Stealth Rifle

Savage 10 ba stealth rifle

Savage unveiled a modern, “monolithic” metal-chassis tactical rifle. Designed to compete with the Ruger Precision Rifle (RPR), the new Savage 110 BA Stealth has an AR-type hand grip, skeletal buttstock, and a low-profile vented forearm. This rifle will be offered in .308 Winchester and 6.5 Creedmoor while a slightly bigger model will be offered in .300 Win Mag and .338 Lapua Magnum. Savage says that all the 110 BA Stealth models will feature “factory blue-printed actions” for improved accuracy. MSRP varies from $1200 to $1600 depending on caliber and configuration. It should be available starting next month.

The model on display, chambered in .308 Winchester, proved accurate in the hands of Ed M. of 65guys.com. Ed liked the trigger and the fact that the rifle uses PMags. The stock, based on a design by Drake Associates, is very light but also very rigid. Ed thought this stock would work well on barricades in tactical matches. Steve L. of 65guys.com said there is “pent-up demand” for a rifle like this, and he predicts the 110 BA Stealth will be a big seller for Savage.

Savage 10ba Stealth media day

New K6 Revolver from Kimber

Kimber .357 Mag Revolver

Kimber, known for its 1911-type semi-auto pistols, has introduced an all-new K6 .357 magnum carry revolver. Kimber’s hammerless wheelgun was very nicely crafted and had one of the smoothest double-action pulls we’ve tried. The trigger pull was long, but very consistent and smooth. With the Kimber, you don’t feel a series of “stages” or transitions as you do with most other double-action revolvers. The other impressive thing about the new revolver is the finish — the stainless is very smooth and shiny, the result of “much hand polishing” according to Kimber engineers.

Ruger 10/22 Takedown with Factory Suppressor

Ruger 10/22 Takedown with suppressor

The most fun we had all day was at the Ruger booth. There we got to test a Ruger 10/22 Takedown fitted with a Ruger-branded factory-made suppressor. This little rifle was a hoot to shoot, and with the suppressor in place it was amazingly quiet. We really liked this set-up and the take-down system worked brilliantly — just pull one lever, then twist and the barrel section comes off. For those states where you can own a suppressor, we strongly recommend this configuration. The “can” is sold separately and buyer must still comply with all applicable state and Federal laws.

Zeiss Victory V8 4.8-35x60mm Rifle Scope

Zeiss Victory V8

zeissv802

Zeiss showed off its impressive Victory V8 line of riflescopes. These offer an 8X zoom ratio, with handy BDC turrets — just dial the yardage indicated on the turret (you can custom-order BDC rings calibrated for your favorite load). The new V8 scopes offer many impressive features. We shot a rifle fitted with the new 4.8-35x60mm V8, which features a very beefy 36mm main tube. The glass was bright and ultra-sharp. Zeiss claims 92% light transmission. Fiber optic technology provides a very precise red dot in the center of the reticle. This was visible even in bright sunlight. Zeiss will offer three other V8 models: 1-8x30mm, 1.8-14x50mm, and 2.8-20x56mm.

APO .338 Lapua Magnum

APO Ashbury .338 Lapua Magnum

Ashbury .338 Lapua Magnum

Bigger is apparently better when it comes to serious tactical rifles. There were quite a few rifles chambered for the powerful .338 Lapua Magnum Cartridge. We tried out a .338 LM from Ashbury Precision Ordnance. With some help from a laser rangefinders, we were able to put rounds on a large steel plate at 960 yards. The trigger was nice and the suppressor reduced felt recoil. This was a nice rifle, with a comfortable cheek-piece and ergonomic grip.

Minox MD 88 Spotting Scope

minox02

We noticed a BIG front objective on a brand-new Minox spotting scope — one of only two in the country. This new spotter features low-dispersion glass and dual focusing rings — a large “fast focus” ring and a second smaller, fine focus ring. The price, including 20-60X eyepiece, will be around $1750.00. Jason Baney, who works for EuroOptics, says this new Minox spotting scope compares well with other spotters that cost considerably more.

Blaser R8 Professional Thumbhole Fancy Wood

Blaser

If there was one rifle I wanted to take home with me, it was this nice Blaser R8 “Professional Success” model with a fancy wood new thumbhole stock. This rifle was very comfortable in all shooting positions. The gun balanced well and the straight-pull Blaser action is fun to use. It can be cycled rapidly without disturbing your position on the rifle.


This is always something new and unusual on display at Media Day at the range. This tracked one-man rig provides all-terrain mobility so disabled persons can enjoy hunting and wilderness recreation.

atv disabled power sled

Permalink Handguns, New Product, News 2 Comments »
November 28th, 2015

Home Shop Project: Modifying a Kimber 82G for Benchrest Use

A while back, Roy Bertalotto acquired a budget-priced Kimber 82G rimfire target rifle from the CMP. The Kimber comes with an oiled-wood stock that works fine for three-position training, but Roy wanted to shoot the gun for the bench. The original Kimber stock, with its narrow, radiused forearm, was not ideal for this purpose. Roy wanted a wide, flat fore-end, which is much more stable in the bags. Rather that spend hundreds on a new benchrest stock, Roy modified his Kimber’s original stock by slicing a section off the bottom of the stock and then replacing this with a 3/4″ X 2 3/4″ X 15″ piece of walnut.

WATCH Project Stages in Slide-Show Below:

Roy explains: “The modification I did on my Kimber 82G stock was done using a milling machine, hand planes, files, die grinder and sand paper. It can also be done with simple hand tools — it will just take longer. The first step is removing the wood on the bottom of the fore-end. This was accomplished in the milling machine. A scrap piece of 2X8 was mounted to the milling machine’s table and the surface milled to be perfectly flat. The Kimber stock was screwed to this 2X8 with two large screws and the bottom of the stock was milled flat. Once this was done, a piece of 3/4″ X 2 3/4″ X 15″ walnut was glued using West System epoxy to the cut out area. I use West System epoxy in boat building, but any good wood glue will work.”

After gluing the new bottom piece in place, Roy milled the sides to provide side flats with a radius to transition from the wider lower section to the narrower upper part of the fore-end. As a added enhancement, Roy contoured the rear of the fore-end to blend with the rear of the stock, adding what he calls “1965 Ford Mustang side scoops”. Roy then used a Die Grinder with a 1.5″ sanding wheel to modify the wrist area to provide more thumb relief.

Following the cutting, milling, gluing, and shaping, Roy sanded with 150 grit and 300 grit sandpaper before applying multiple coats of Tung Oil. Once the main stock was completed, Roy completed the project by crafting an extended buttplate from a couple pieces of 1/8″ aluminum and two 1.5″ aluminum tubes, “all polished to a slightly less than mirror finish”. NOTE: This metal buttplate assembly was made from scratch (other than the pad). This is not an aftermarket extension kit.

Overall the gun turned out very nicely. Log on to Roy’s RVB Precision webpage to learn more about this Kimber stock modification project, and view more photos of the building process.

Permalink Gunsmithing, Tech Tip 2 Comments »
March 21st, 2015

Yes, Honey, I Need Another Pistol… (A .22 LR 1911)

Got a 1911-style centerfire pistol? Would you like to cross-train with an ergonomically-identical rimfire version that lets you shoot less-expensive .22 LR ammo and not worry about recovering your brass? Well check out Kimber’s Rimfire 1911s. We think John Moses Browning would smile at this adaptation of his classic 1911 design.

accurateshooter.com Kimber rimfire target .22 LR pistol

accurateshooter.com Kimber rimfire target .22 LR pistolGuaranteed Accuracy
Kimber’s line-up of rimfire pistols includes matte black and silver-tone Rimfire Target models ($871 MSRP), plus a deluxe, two-tone Rimfire Super model ($1220 MSRP) with Rosewood grips, front strap checkering, and KimPro II finish. Shown above, the Rimfire Super model is guaranteed to put five shots in 1.5″ or less at 25 yards. Both standard and deluxe models feature aluminum frame and slide, steel barrel, and adjustable match-type sights.

What’s That Pistol?
While viewing Panteo’s Training with a 22 DVD, we noticed a sweet-looking, silver-tone m1911-style rimfire pistol in the hands of host Michael Bane. At first, we thought this might be a new stainless version of Sig Sauer’s popular 1911-22. But, in actuality, Bane was shooting a Kimber Rimfire Target pistol. Michael’s aluminum-framed Kimber performed great in rapid-fire drills. See one in action below.

Watch Slow-Motion Video of Kimber Rimfire Target (Black Version)

accurateshooter.com Kimber rimfire target .22 LR pistol

Permalink Handguns, New Product 3 Comments »
January 20th, 2015

Industry Day at the Range — First Report

media day industry SHOT Show boulder city nevada

media day industry SHOT Show boulder city nevadaMeeting old friends, and shooting new guns. That’s what Monday was all about at the annual Industry Day at the Range, a “hands-on” preview the day before SHOT Show opens in Las Vegas. Your editor met with old buddy Jason Baney at the crack of dawn and headed out to the Boulder City (NV) range.

We were not disappointed — there was plenty to see this year. On display were a bunch of new precision rifles, a slew of new handguns, and some very exotic optics. But Jason and I both felt that the star of this 2015 Industry Range Day was a modestly-priced little Savage — the new A17 in 17 HMR. Both of us wanted to own one of these compact new rifles. With a strong steel action, the A17 is accurate, fun, and ultra-reliable.

There were big rifles on display. Here’s the new Barrett 98B Fieldcraft, a lighter-weight version of the 98B. The Fieldcraft weighs just over 9 pounds. This is definitely an accurate rifle — shooting a 7mm magnum version from bench with bipod support, Jason managed 5 straight hits at 960 yards.

media day industry SHOT Show boulder city nevada

Among the many new precision rifles, there was one particularly patriotic model. Dolled up in Stars and Stripes livery is Ashbury Precision Ordnance’s new competition rifle. This is designed for F-TR and PRS competition.

media day industry SHOT Show boulder city nevada

We saw small pistols, big pistols, and pretty pistols. Here’s a fashionable pair of 1911-style semi-autos from Kimber. Jason said he’s bought one of these for Mrs. Baney.

media day industry SHOT Show boulder city nevada

This editor is a fan of big, accurate revolvers, and you won’t find many that are bigger, or more accurate, than the new Korth competition revolver. This prototype features a 4-position quick-adjusting rear sight, plus a slick system that allows the cylinder to be completely removed from the gun in seconds. (Note the little lever to the right of the hammer). The production version of this wheelgun is guaranteed to shoot 1.5″ or better at 50 yards.

media day industry SHOT Show boulder city nevada

media day industry SHOT Show boulder city nevada

Kimber displayed an impressive tactical rifle featuring a folding Manners Composite stock. This was a nice piece of kit. The Kimber action is a Mauser style with controlled feed. The rifle is offered in three chamberings: 6.5 Creedmoor, .308 Winchester, and .300 Win Mag.

media day industry SHOT Show boulder city nevada

media day industry SHOT Show boulder city nevada

Last but certainly not least, we got a look at the final production version of the Leupold VX-6, 7-42x56mm scope. This is a winner folks. It has a nice, clear reticle with MOA-type hash marks on both cross-hairs. We zoomed it up to full 42X power and it was bright and sharp (all the way out to the edges). The main tube is 34mm allowing plenty of elevation adjustment. All controls worked smoothly. We think, once the word gets out about this scope (now at dealers), it will be very popular with F-Class shooters and long-range benchrest competitors. Street price is around $1900.00.

media day industry SHOT Show boulder city nevada

Permalink New Product, News 2 Comments »
December 16th, 2014

Ernie-the-Gunsmith Offers Wide Selection of Trigger Springs

Ernie Paull from California was an active competition shooter for many years. However, his eyesight has declined so he has turned his attention to providing components for shooters and gunsmiths. Through his Ernie the Gunsmith website, Paull sells a variety of useful products including gun trigger springs, pillar-bedding kits, Accu-Risers, and pillar installation tools. This Bulletin post focuses on Ernie’s trigger springs. Ernie offers springs for a wide variety of rifles: Browning (A-Bolt, A-Bolt 22), CZ (m452), Kimber, Remington (XR100, XCR, 7, 700, 722, 788, 7600 and more), Ruger (77, 77-22, LC6), Tikka (T-3), Weatherby (MK-V), and Winchester (M-70).

Springs start at just $6.95. Ernie also sells springs for the Rem-compatible Shilen Benchrest trigger, as well as Rem 700 ejector springs and trigger alignment springs. For Rem 700 rifles, Paull makes a spring that fits all Remington M-7 and M-700 triggers including the 2007-vintage X Mark-PRO trigger (but not the newer X Mark-PRO trigger introduced in 2009). Ernie says: “on average, installation of his Model-700 spring will reduce factory triggers’ weight of pull by 1½ to 2½ lbs with no other changes. The exact amount of creep, over-travel, and weight of pull are dependent upon the type and amount of tuning accomplished by your gunsmith.”

We often hear requests from Tikka T-3 owners asking how they can reduce their trigger pull weight. Paull offers a Tikka T-3 varmint trigger spring which can reduce the pull weight significantly. The photo at left shows the Tikka T-3 trigger assembly.

While there is more to a good trigger job (in most cases) than just a spring swap, you need to have the proper rate spring when adjusting trigger pull weight downwards. NOTE: For safety reasons, we recommend you consult a competent gunsmith before modifying factory triggers. We stress the word competent…

Ernie has observed that some gunsmiths try to lighten trigger pulls by modifying factory springs in questionable ways: “I have worked with gunsmiths in the past who, when the subject turned to trigger springs, preferred to clip them, grind them, heat them, bend them, smash them, or simply back out the weight of pull screw until there was no or almost no pressure on the spring. With any of these methods, you get a spring whose rate is rapidly rising as the trigger is pulled. As the trigger is released, the spring rate rapidly decreases as it approaches full or near-full extension. A more uniform weight of pull will be achieved when the trigger spring is compressed within its normal working range throughout the entire movement of the trigger. In the long run, the benefits of saved time, plus more uniform and reliable results, will more than offset the cost of these [replacement] springs. If you want a lighter trigger pull, you need a lighter trigger spring.”

Permalink Gear Review, Gunsmithing 7 Comments »
January 17th, 2014

More Snapshots from SHOT Show 2014

Here are some more quick highlights from SHOT Show in Las Vegas. There are some brilliantly designed new products, as well as some items that are interesting simply because they depart from the norm. Enjoy these images of interesting products (and people) we saw this week in Vegas.

Era-Tac Adjustable-Angle Scope Mount (0 to +70 MOA)
This is a unique, variable-angle scope mount (with integral rings) that adjusts from 0 MOA to +70 MOA pre-load, in precise, ten-MOA increments. Once adjusted and tensioned, there is no play in the system so your elevation is repeatable. This Era-Tac Mount, made by Recknagel (Germany) is a very advanced design that really works. CLICK HERE for details.

SHOT Show 2014 Hardware

Mossberg Gets Patriotic
Mossberg was “showing the flag” (literally) at its SHOT Show booth. Here a row of camo-dipped Mossberg shotguns and rifles are decorated with Old Glory.

shotfriday10

New Precise Micrometer-Top Bullet Seaters from Sinclair Int’l
Sinclair showed off its new dial-adjustable seating dies for use with arbor presses. Though produced by L.E. Wilson, these are a step up from the regular Wilson micro-adjusting hand dies. These new Sinclair dies eliminate the guesswork. Each hashmark actually gives you a .001″ (one-thousandth) change in bullet seating depth. There’s a tactile click as you rotate the micrometer top past each hash mark.

shotfriday07

World Champions Gather At Sands Expo
Four members of the World Championship-winning USA F-TR Team were on hand when we paid a visit to the Nightforce booth at SHOT Show. Left to right, here are four of the team that triumphed at Raton: Ray Gross, Dan Pohlabel (with rifle), Phillip Kelley, and Brad Sauve.

shotfriday03

Wow, Is There Anything PT&G Isn’t Making These Days?
Pacific Tool & Gauge had dozens of new products on hand. There were gunsmithing tools, replacement bolts (for many different action types), barrel vises, action truing tools, you name it. Heck, Dave Kiff even showed us a new aluminum rifle chassis PT&G will be manufacturing. This company is now producing a vast selection of precision metal parts and tools.

shotfriday04

300 AAC Blackout, Actually Blacked-Out
Australian Outback, backed by the folks who acquired ADI, is making a big push to sell loaded ammunition in the USA. To jazz up their new 300 Blackout ammo, the bodies of the brass cases have a distinctive black finish. So the Blackout Ammo is black… get it?

shotfriday05

Kimber SOC (Not Your Ordinary Kimber Bolt-Gun)
No, this is not an Accuracy International, or a Surgeon, or even a Colt tactical rifle. Believe it or not, this is the new Kimber “Advanced Tactical” metal-chassis rifle, dubbed the “SOC” for “Special Operations Capable”. The chassis felt stiff and strong. The bolt cycled smoothly, but the trigger pull was pretty heavy (we’re told it can be adjusted.)

shotfriday08

shotfriday09

Permalink New Product, News 1 Comment »
August 2nd, 2013

Gun Industry Jobs Available with Large Companies

Want to work for a successful, big-name gun industry business? Well there are jobs to be had. Right now, Beretta, Brownells, FNH, Glock, Kimber, and Remington are all listing good gun industry employment opportunities. The National Shooting Sport Foundation (NSSF) has listed the following engineering, production, marketing, and technical jobs in the gun industry. CLICK HERE for more info and links to specific jobs.


Permalink Gunsmithing, News No Comments »
July 16th, 2013

Kimber Rimfire Target m1911-Style .22 LR Pistols

accurateshooter.com Kimber rimfire target .22 LR pistolWhile viewing Panteo’s Training with a 22 DVD, we noticed a sweet-looking, silver-tone m1911-style rimfire pistol in the hands of host Michael Bane. At first, we thought this might be a new stainless version of Sig Sauer’s popular 1911-22. But, in actuality, Bane was shooting a Kimber Rimfire Target pistol. Michael’s aluminum-framed Kimber performed great in rapid-fire drills.

Kimber’s line-up of rimfire pistols includes matte black and silver-tone Rimfire Target models ($871 MSRP), plus a deluxe, two-tone Rimfire Super model ($1220 MSRP) with Rosewood grips, front strap checkering, and KimPro II finish. The rather pricey Rimfire Super model is guaranteed to put five shots in 1.5″ or less at 25 yards. Both standard and deluxe models feature aluminum frame and slide, steel barrel, and adjustable match-type sights.

accurateshooter.com Kimber rimfire target .22 LR pistol

Watch Slow-Motion Video of Kimber Rimfire Target (Black Version)

accurateshooter.com Kimber rimfire target .22 LR pistol

Permalink - Videos, New Product 2 Comments »
September 29th, 2012

CMP Kimber Benchrest Conversion by Roy Bertalotto

Last year, our friend Roy Bertalotto acquired a budget-priced Kimber 82G rimfire target rifle from the CMP. The Kimber comes with an oiled-wood stock that works fine for three-position training, but Roy wanted to shoot the gun for the bench. The original Kimber stock, with its narrow, radiused forearm, was not ideal for this purpose. Roy wanted a wide, flat fore-end, which is much more stable in the bags. Rather that spend hundreds on a new benchrest stock, Roy modified his Kimber’s original stock by slicing a section off the bottom of the stock and then replacing this with a 3/4″ X 2 3/4″ X 15″ piece of walnut. The finished product is in the second photo below.

Roy explains: “The modification I did on my Kimber 82G stock was done using a milling machine, hand planes, files, die grinder and sand paper. It can also be done with simple hand tools — it will just take longer. The first step is removing the wood on the bottom of the fore-end. This was accomplished in the milling machine. A scrap piece of 2X8 was mounted to the milling machine’s table and the surface milled to be perfectly flat. The Kimber stock was screwed to this 2X8 with two large screws and the bottom of the stock was milled flat. Once this was done, a piece of 3/4″ X 2 3/4″ X 15″ walnut was glued using West System epoxy to the cut out area. I use West System epoxy in boat building, but any good wood glue will work.” WATCH project stages in Slide-Show below:

After gluing the new bottom piece in place, Roy milled the sides to provide side flats with a radius to transition from the wider lower section to the narrower upper part of the fore-end. As a added enhancement, Roy contoured the rear of the fore-end to blend with the rear of the stock, adding what he calls “1965 Ford Mustang side scoops”. Roy then used a Die Grinder with a 1.5″ sanding wheel to modify the wrist area to provide more thumb relief.

Following the cutting, milling, gluing, and shaping, Roy sanded with 150 grit and 300 grit sandpaper before applying multiple coats of Tung Oil. Once the main stock was completed, Roy completed the project by crafting an extended buttplate from a couple pieces of 1/8″ aluminum and two 1.5″ aluminum tubes, “all polished to a slightly less than mirror finish”. NOTE: This metal buttplate assembly was made from scratch (other than the pad). This is not an aftermarket extension kit.

Overall the gun turned out very nicely. Log on to Roy’s RVB Precision webpage to learn more about this Kimber stock modification project, and view more photos of the building process.

Permalink - Articles, Gunsmithing No Comments »
July 16th, 2011

CMP’s “Rusty” Kimber 82Gs Offer Good Value for the Price

If you’re looking for a low-cost “entry-level” rimfire target rifle, consider a Kimber 82G from the CMP. These have been available for quite some time, but last year the CMP sorted its Kimber 82G inventory into two categories: “Rusties” and “Cleans”. Both categories are new rifles. The rusty rifles have a minor amount of surface rust which can usually be cleaned off with just some light oil and a rag. On some of the guns there is some rust in the bolt and on the sights, which may require some work with a metal brush or steel wool. The other cosmetic flaw is that many of the rifles have a thin, scored line along the buttstock, cause by the tip of the boxcutter. That can be sanded out.

Kimber 82G from CMP

Why, you might asked, would one choose one of the “Rusties”? Well, there are more in stock, and you can save 33%. The “Rusty” model Kimbers currently sell for just $400.00, $200 less than the “clean versions”. For a family on a tight budget, looking for a junior training rifle, the more affordable “Rusty” may be the better choice. Forum member Roarke says these “Rusty” Kimbers are well worth the money. Roarke writes: “I know because I bought one of these for $400, as opposed to $600 for the non-rusty, and it looks absolutely brand new.”

Kimber 82G from CMP

Forum member Michael L. (aka Chief 1018) concurs that his “Rusty” Kimber has been a great purchase: “I purchased a ‘Rusty’ from the CMP last year. No rust, but a lot of preservative. As you’ve probably read in the CMP forums, the bolt internals may be a little rusty/fouled. I immersed mine in WD-40 in a Zip-loc for a couple of days while I cleaned up the rifle. The oil turned brownish, but when I tore it down it was bright and clean. I think some of the ‘rust’ may be dried up preservative. It had the ‘signature’ box-cutter slice but that sanded out when I stripped, sanded, and tung-oiled the entire stock. The stock has very nice walnut with some dark figuring. The gun shoots great! The adjustable trigger is excellent.”

Roy Bertallato Reviews Kimber 82G
If you want to learn more about the Kimber 82Gs, Forum member Roy Bertallato has written an excellent article about his Kimber 82G from the CMP. Like many others, Roy couldn’t resist the $400.00 price, so he ordered one of the “Rusties”. Yes there was some light rust on small parts, but otherwise Roy was more than happy with his purchase:

“Sure enough, for $200 less, you can get a Kimber 82G RUSTY. I check out the qualifications and I had everything I needed in the way of qualifications so I decided to buy one. For $400, how bad could it be? Like anyone, I was VERY concerned that I’d get something that looked like it came out of the hold of a battle ship.” Roy’s fears proved unfounded: “There was just a very little bit of surface rust on the bottom [of the bolt]. Everything else you see that might appear to be rust is some type of red-yellow preservative. The action has zero rust, just some more nasty preservative. The bore is pristine! The rifle was stored with a paper straw in the bore saturated with some kind of oil.”

Kimber 82G from CMP

“The Kimber 82G is quite a rifle. It is a very heavy barrel, single shot, bolt action. It is supplied from the CMP with a fantastic set of target sights (worth a couple hundred dollars themselves), a heavy target stock with an adjustable butt plate for younger shooters, full instructions etc. Brand new, never fired rifles. I bought a beautiful Kimber sporter stock off Ebay and the action fits right into it.”

Permalink Hot Deals, New Product 1 Comment »
August 25th, 2010

Kimber Super Carry Pro — Kobra Carry Clone for $1000 Less?

This year Kimber introduced a new line of ‘Super Carry’ 1911-style pistols. Assembled in Kimber’s Custom Shop, the Super Carry Pro (4″) and Super Carry Custom (5″) feature aluminum frames with an Ed Brown Kobra-style cut-back heel and snakeskin-style serrations. The Kimber’s slide is blackened stainless, making for a very handsome two-tone handgun. By using an aluminum frame (as found on the “classic” Sig-Sauer p226 and p228), Kimber has shaved significant weight off the Super Carrys — an important factor for guns intended to be carried all day long. The Super Carry Pro, a Commander-sized 1911 with 4″ barrel, weighs just 28 ounces (with empty mag) — that’s 7 ounces lighter than an Ed Brown Kobra Carry. Kimber’s 5″-barreled, full-size Super Carry Custom is 31 ounces with empty mag. By comparison, a full-size Smith & Wesson SW1911 weighs 41 ounces. A ten-ounce difference is significant when you’re packing.

Kimber Super Carry Pro

Kimber Super Carry Pro Copies Kobra Carry
It’s obvious that Kimber copied styling features from the Ed Brown Kobra Carry, notably the slide serrations and the cut-back grip heel, which mimics Brown’s Bobtail™ frame. Kimber can’t call its frame a “Bobtail” since Ed Brown has trademarked that term, but the looks and function of Kimber’s “round-heel frame” are much the same. If you’ve every carried a 1911 right behind the hip, you know the bottom of a standard 1911 frame can dig into the kidney area. So Kimber’s adaptation of Ed Brown’s Bobtail was a smart move, as was the use of aluminum (for weight savings). What about wear? Is there a problem with steel sliding over aluminum? Well, that hasn’t been a problem with the aluminum-framed Sig Sauer pistols, and Kimber’s aluminum frames are coated with KimPro II, a proprietary coating that Kimber claims is “self-lubricating and highly durable.”

Kimber Super Carry ProAmbi-Safety Makes Sense on Carry Gun
We like the new Kimber Super Carry models, though we could live without the snakeskin treatment on top of the slide. That’s over-doing it in our book. Having shot both the Super Carry and the Ed Brown Kobra I actually prefer the feel of the Kimber’s nicely radiused grip safety and I think Kimber is wise to put an ambi-safety on the gun by default (an ambidextrous safety is $75.00 extra on the Kobra Carry). In a self-defense scenario, a right-hander might have his strong-side arm disabled, so it is important that he be able to operate the gun left-handed.

How about accuracy? I only had a chance to shoot a few rounds with the Kimber Super Carry Pro, and it didn’t group as tight at 10 yards as the Kobra Carry I’ve shot, but the difference wasn’t that great. Also the nearly-new Kimber’s trigger was a bit heavy and gritty, and I didn’t have a chance to work up a custom load. Neither gun shot as accurately as this Editor’s SW1911 with my handloads (VV N320 and Precision Bullets 200gr semi-wadcutters) which cost just $700.00 a few years ago. That SW1911 prints easy 1/2″ groups at 10 yards with handloads. So, is the Kimber Super Carry a good buy? Street price for the Super Carry Pro is about $1300.00, and that includes night sights. That’s over $1000.00 less than a Kobra Carry which costs $2445.00 with night sights. We predict those who are in the market for a Bobtail, two-tone carry gun will look very seriously at the Kimber Super Carry Pro, given the huge price savings over Ed Brown’s Kobra Carry. This Editor likes the lighter, “round-heel” aluminum frame (particularly in the 4″ model which balances well), and I like the overall feel and appearance of the gun. For $1300.00, however, I expected more from the Kimber’s trigger. As with most production 1911s it can benefit from a trigger job by a competent 1911 smith.

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