July 8th, 2019

X-Ray Views Show How Rem 700 and AR Actions Work

3d firearms modeling gun CGI software encylopedia gun disassembly

Ever wish you could look inside your rifle, to see how the trigger and fire-control system work? Well now that is possible with the magic of 3D computer graphics. Modern software allows detailed “cutaway” side-views (see below), as well as 3D views with 360° rotation. The software can also provide X-Ray-type views into the gun’s internals — as you can see above. And computer animation can show the complete firing process from trigger pull to chambering of the next round.

Rem 700 Cutaway View from Right Side
3d firearms modeling gun CGI software encylopedia gun disassembly

This article covers two different animations — a bolt-action, and a self-loading “gas gun”. The first video features the popular Rem 700 action, probably the most successful American bolt-action ever created. The second video offers a lengthy exploration of the AR15/M16 platform.

READERS — Take the time to watch these videos! The Rem 700 animation is really outstanding! EVERY bolt-action shooter should watch this video all the way through.

Cutaway 3D Animation of Rem 700 Action — Watch Video

The Model 700 series of bolt-action rifles have been manufactured by Remington Arms since 1962. All are based on basically the same centerfire bolt action. They are typically sold with an internal magazine depending on caliber, some of which have a floor-plate for quick-unloading, and some of which are “blind” (no floor-plate). The rifle can also be ordered with a detachable box magazine. The Model 700 is a development of the Remington 721 and 722 series of rifles, which were introduced in 1948.

3d firearms modeling gun CGI software encylopedia gun disassembly

The Rem 700 is a manually-operated bolt action with forward, dual opposed lugs. It features “Cock On Opening”, meaning the upward rotation of the bolt when the rifle is opened cocks the firing pin. A cam mechanism pushes the firing pin’s cocking piece backward. The bolt face is recessed, fully enclosing the base of the cartridge. The extractor is a C-clip sitting within the bolt face. The ejector is a plunger on the bolt face actuated by a coil spring. The bolt is of 3-piece construction, brazed together (head, body. and bolt handle). The receiver is milled from round cross-section steel.

3d firearms modeling gun CGI software encylopedia gun disassemblyThis video was made with the help of the World of Guns: Gun Disassembly interactive encyclopedia with 3D rendering. This remarkable web-based software allows users to view the inner workings of hundreds of different rifles and pistols — everything from a .22 LR Ruger to a .55-caliber Boys Anti-Tank rifle. There are also 25,000+ parts diagrams. This is a remarkable technical resource. SEE MORE HERE.

Cutaway 3D Animation of AR15/M16 Action — Watch Video

The AR platform rifles are a semi-automatic version of the M16. These feature distinctive upper and lower receivers which can be readily separated via front and rear pins. The upper includes the barrel, handguard, forward gas tube, and bolt assembly, while the lower contains grip, trigger group, fire selector, and mag well. In addition the lower is attached to the stock which encloses the buffer assembly.

3d firearms modeling gun CGI software encylopedia gun disassembly

The original ArmaLite AR-15 was a select-fire, air-cooled, gas-operated, magazine-fed rifle designed by American gun manufacturer ArmaLite in 1956. It was based on Armalite’s AR-10 rifle chambered for the 7.62×51 NATO (.308 Win). In 1959, ArmaLite sold its rights to the AR-10 and AR-15 to Colt. Some key modifications were made — most notably, the charging handle was re-located from under the carrying handle to the rear of the receiver. The redesigned rifle was adopted by the U.S. military as the M16 carbine, which went into production in March 1964.

These videos found by Boyd Allen. We welcome reader submissions.

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January 27th, 2017

ARchaeology Lesson — The Original AR-10 That Started it All

AR-10 Armalite Jerry Miculek

Today, AR-platform rifles are hugely popular. Dozens of manufacturers sell AR-type rifles, in a wide variety of configurations and calibers. But before there were M16s and AR-15s, ArmaLite produced a 7.62×51 caliber rifle, the AR-10. Yes before there were millions of 5.56 black rifles, there was a .30-caliber big brother with reddish-brown furniture. Invented by Eugene (‘Gene’) Stoner for the Armalite company in the late 1950s, this is the father of all of today’s AR-platform rifles. Way ahead of its time, this remarkable, select-fire battle rifle weighed just 7.25 pounds as first developed.

If you’re curious about the AR-10, in this video, Jerry Miculek puts an original 1957-vintage AR-10 through its paces on the range. This extremely rare, early-production rifle was provided by Mr. Reed Knight and the Institute of Military Technology. (The gun in the video was actually produced in the Netherlands under license, see video at 4:40.) This AR-10 is the direct ancestor of the AR-15, M16, and many of the modern sporting rifles that we use today.

The AR-10 was slim and light, weighing in at around 7 pounds. Some folks might argue that the original “old-school” AR10 is actually better that some of today’s heavy, gadget-laden ARs. The AR-10’s charging “lever” was under the carry handle — that made it easier to manipulate with the gun raised in a firing position.

AR-10 Armalite Jerry Miculek

You’ll notice there is no “forward assist”. Inventor Gene Stoner did not believe a separate “bolt-pusher” was necessary. The forward assist was added to solve problems encountered in Viet Nam. Some critics say the forward assist “only takes a small problem and makes it a big problem.” For today’s competition ARs (that are never dragged through the mud) the forward assist probably is superfluous. It is rarely if ever needed.

AR-10 Armalite Jerry Miculek

Note also that the handguards are fairly slim and tapered. Today, six decades after the first AR-10 prototypes, we are now seeing these kind of slim handguards (made from aluminum or lightweight composites) used on “full race” ARs campaigned in 3-gun competition.

History of the AR-10
The AR-10 is a 7.62 mm battle rifle developed by Eugene Stoner in the late 1950s at ArmaLite, then a division of the Fairchild Aircraft Corporation. When first introduced in 1956, the AR-10 used an innovative straight-line barrel/stock design with phenolic composite and forged alloy parts resulting in a small arm significantly easier to control in automatic fire and over one pound lighter than other infantry rifles of the day. Over its production life, the original AR-10 was built in relatively small numbers, with fewer than 9,900 rifles assembled.

In 1957, the basic AR-10 design was substantially modified by ArmaLite to accommodate the .223 Remington cartridge, and given the designation AR-15. ArmaLite licensed the AR-10 and AR-15 designs to Colt Firearms. The AR-15 eventually became the M16 rifle.

AR-10 photos from Arms Izarra, a Spanish company specializing in de-militarized, collectible firearms. Interestingly, this particular AR-10 was produced in the Netherlands under license.

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December 17th, 2014

Man vs. Machine — Comparative Rifle Accuracy at 600 Yards

Man versus machine USAMU AR15 M16 High Power National Record

Can a human being, hand-holding a rifle, out-shoot a mechanical test rest? Who would win in this battle between man and machine? You might just be surprised. At 600 yards, with an AR-platform rifle, the results can be remarkably close, based on targets provided by the USAMU. When clamped in a test rig, a USAMU M16A2 produced a 200-18X group with handloads. The USAMU says this was “one of our better 20-shot groups at 600 yards, testing ammo from a machine rest”. Can a human do better?

Man versus machine USAMU AR15 M16 High Power National Record

Remarkably, a human soldier came very close to matching the group shot from the machine rest. The photo below shows a 20-shot group shot by a USAMU marksman with sling and iron sights, using USAMU-loaded ammunition. The score, 200-16X, was nearly the same. As you can see, the USAMU rifleman didn’t give up much to the machine rest, even at 600 yards!

Man versus machine USAMU AR15 M16 High Power National Record

In fairness, this was no ordinary human performance. The 200-16X score was a new National Record set in December, 1994. This was fired by PFC Coleman in an Interservice Match at Okeechobee, Florida. Nice shootin’ soldier!

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August 25th, 2014

AR Ejector Mod For Improved Reliability with Larger Cartridges

TECH TIP by Robert Whitley, AR-X Enterprises LLC
Over the years, while working with various AR-15 cartridges that require a larger bolt-face bolt (i.e. bigger than a 5.56 NATO/.223 Rem bolt-face, like those cartridges that use a 6.8 SPC bolt or the bolt face suitable for the 6.5 Grendel-based cartridges), I have found that there is an increased potential for a certain type of jam if a modification to the standard “Mil-Spec”, square-edged ejector is not made.

The original AR-15 square-edged ejector design was made for a much smaller-diameter bolt face and the smaller diameter 5.56 NATO/.223 Rem case, and it works perfectly in that application. However, as people have adapted the AR-15 platform to shoot bigger cartridges, some parts have been modified to accept the larger cartridges (i.e. bigger bolt-face bolts for the 6.8 SPC and the 6.5 Grendel, and different extractors), yet other parts have been all but ignored. One of these “ignored” parts has been the ejector. Most of the larger-bolt-face AR-15 bolts still use the standard “Mil-Spec”, square-edged 5.56 NATO/.223 Rem. ejector. That’s the problem. But there is a simple, reliable fix!

Robert Whitley AR-X Enterprises AR AR15 Bolt jam fix ejector mod

Chamfering AR Ejector for Improved Reliablity with 6mm, 6.5mm and 6.8mm Cartridges
With the larger bolt face and the larger-diameter AR cases, the old-style “Mil-Spec” ejector can cause infrequent but still annoying jams if the ejector is not modified. The jam can occur when a cartridge case feeds up and out of the right side of the magazine, and as it does so, the back of the case must slide across the bolt face and sideways over top of the ejector if it is to center up to the chamber and feed in. If the side of the case catches on the sharp-edged ejector you can get a jam. (See picture above).

Fortunately there is an easy fix for this. One way is to take the ejector out and spin it in a lathe or cordless drill and machine or grind it and round or chamfer the sharp edge. (See picture of rounded ejector next to square edged ejector).

Robert Whitley AR-X Enterprises AR AR15 Bolt jam fix ejector mod

Quick Fix Alternative — Bevel Your Ejector
Another “quick fix” is to leave the ejector in the bolt and chamfer the sharp edge with something like a Dremel tool. (See picture). This fix is easy to do and permanently resolves this potential feeding jam issue. There are no downsides to this modification if done right and I would recommend this modification for the ejectors in all larger bolt-face AR-15 bolts.

Robert Whitley AR-X Enterprises AR AR15 Bolt jam fix ejector mod

Robert Whitley AR-X Enterprises AR AR15 Bolt jam fix ejector mod

This gunsmithing tip provided by Robert Whitley of AR-X Enterprises LLC, 199 North Broad Street, Doylestown, PA 18901. Phone: (215) 348-8789. Website: 6mmAR.com.

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September 1st, 2013

New AR-Platform D-CAT Multi-Tool Performs Variety of Key Tasks

Compared to bolt-action rifles, direct gas impingement AR-platform rifles tend to be filthy, maintenance-intensive beasts, requiring regular disassembly and cleaning of the innards. Op-rod style AR variants run cleaner and cooler, but they still require regular maintenance. Now there is a versatile, compact multi-tool that performs a variety of critical servicing/maintenance tasks for AR-platform rifles.

Brownells D-CAT multi tool

Weighing just 6 ounces, the new D-CAT from Space Age Weaponry fits in the storage compartment of a standard AR-15 fixed butt stock. Brownells says the D-CAT (“Deployable Compact Armorer’s Tool”) is the “only tool necessary to assemble the AR-15/M16 from component parts, or perform a complete disassembly”. The video below explains the feature and functions of the $149.99 D-CAT.

The D-CAT is made from quality materials: 6061-T6 Aircraft Aluminum, 303 Stainless steel, and H13 Tool Steel. Bits, punches, and other small parts are located in the tool magazine, within the torque handle. Simply rotate the magazine gate to expose the individual compartments. Within the magazine you will find a 1/8″ punch, a flat blade driver, front sight adjustment tool, and a 3/16″ and 9/64″ hex driver. There is also a spare punch pocket and a Hammer/Trigger pin pocket. This is also the mode in which the D-CAT is used as a screwdriver. The driver makes use of a standard ¼” hex well so the tool can be augmented to serve as a general purpose driver for any bit you choose to carry.

Tool Tip from EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.
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March 21st, 2011

New 2011 CMP Rulebook Issued — Download for Free

CMP 2011 Rulebook 15th EditionThe 2011 15th Edition of the CMP Competition Rules is now available. These Rules govern Service Rifle, Service Pistol, and CMP Games shooting events. CLICK HERE to download the complete 2011 CMP Rule Book as a digital PDF file.

Here are highlights of the Rule changes:

NEW Vintage Sniper Rifle Team Matches
Rules for the new Vintage Sniper Rifle Team Match for two-person teams are now available in the 2011 edition of the CMP Competition Rules. This year, Vintage Sniper Rifle Team Matches will be fired at the Eastern CMP Games on 10 May, the National Matches on 3 August and the Western CMP Games on 18 October. In addition, any CMP-affiliated club that has 300- and 600-yard firing distances on their club range may now apply to conduct a Vintage Sniper Rifle Team Match as a CMP-sanctioned competition.

This match is for two-person teams. One team member shoots while the other serves as a spotter. After ten shots at either the 300- or 600-yard distance, the two change roles for another ten shots. Each shooter fires a total of 20 shots and team rankings are based on their 40-shot totals.

Vintage Sniper CMP

All teams are required to use as-issued rifles employed for military sniping purposes in 1953 or earlier. The M1903A4, the M1C, M1D and many foreign military sniper rifles are legal for this match. Rule 6.4.3 includes a Table with a complete list of the permitted rifles, which may be either originals or replica rifles. The Table also lists the allowed original scopes and permitted replica (non-issue) optics such as the Lyman Alaskan, Weaver K2.5 and K4 and Stith-Kollmorgen.

Micro-SightService Rifle Rear Sight Inserts, Rule 6.1.2 (3)
The CMP approved two commercial rear sight inserts that serve as visual aids especially for older shooters for use in Service Rifle competitions. The rectangular rear aperture insert produced by ShootingSight LLC and the SR MicroSight produced by Stallings Machine are both now legal for use in CMP-sanctioned Service Rifle matches.

Bullet Button Magazine Locks, Rule 6.2.3 (15)
California residents only are now authorized to use AR-type service rifles equipped with Bullet Button or similar magazine locks that replace the standard magazine catch.

Quad Rails on M16/ARs, Rule 6.2.3 (14)
Service Rifle competitors must use rifles similar to weapons issued to military personnel. Since quad rails are now common on M16s used by military personnel, M16/AR competition rifles will also be allowed to have quad rails. This authorization is limited to the standard 12-inch military quad rail or its commercial equivalent. NOTE: the front sling swivel must still be attached to the front of the hand guard.

Repaired Stocks, Rule 6.3.1 (11)
Shooters of As-Issued Military Rifles frequently have to deal with cracked or broken stocks. Under previous rules no glue, epoxy or synthetic substances could be used anywhere in the stock due to concerns over the use of epoxy or fiberglass for bedding. This restriction has now been modified so that shooters can use “epoxies or other chemical adhesives” to repair cracked or broken stocks as long as this material is not used to bed the action or barrel.

How to Get 2011 CMP Rulebook
Download the new CMP Rulebook at http://www.odcmp.com/Competitions/Rulebook.pdf. You can also order printed copies ($3.00 each) from the CMP E-Store or contact: CMP Competitions Department, P.O. Box 576, Port Clinton, Ohio 43452, phone (419) 635-2141, ext. 1122.

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