November 12th, 2018

Optics Expertise: MIL and MOA Terminology Defined

Mil MOA reticle ranging PRS tactical minute angle precision rifle series
Visit PrecisionRifleBlog.com for a discussion of MIL vs. MOA.

Many guys getting started in long range shooting are confused about what kind of scope they should buy — specifically whether it should have MIL-based clicks or MOA-based clicks. Before you can make that decision, you need to understand the terminology. This article, with a video by Bryan Litz, explains MILS and MOA so you can choose the right type of scope for your intended application.

This March-FX 5-40x56mm Tactical FFP scope features 0.05 MIL Clicks.
Mil MOA reticle ranging PRS tactical minute angle precision rifle series

You probably know that MOA stands for “Minute of Angle” (or more precisely “minute of arc”), but could you define the terms “Milrad” or “MIL”? In his latest video, Bryan Litz of Applied Ballitics explains MOA and MILs (short for “milliradians”). Bryan defines those terms and explains how they are used. One MOA is an angular measurement (1/60th of one degree) that subtends 1.047″ at 100 yards. One MIL (i.e. one milliradian) subtends 1/10th meter at 100 meters; that means that 0.1 Mil is one centimeter (1 cm) at 100 meters. Is one angular measurement system better than another? Not necessarily… Bryan explains that Mildot scopes may be handy for ranging, but scopes with MOA-based clicks work just fine for precision work at known distances. Also because one MOA is almost exactly one inch at 100 yards, the MOA system is convenient for expressing a rifle’s accuracy. By common parlance, a “half-MOA” rifle can shoot groups that are 1/2-inch (or smaller) at 100 yards.

What is a “Minute” of Angle?
When talking about angular degrees, a “minute” is simply 1/60th. So a “Minute of Angle” is simply 1/60th of one degree of a central angle, measured either up and down (for elevation) or side to side (for windage). At 100 yards, 1 MOA equals 1.047″ on the target. This is often rounded to one inch for simplicity. Say, for example, you click up 1 MOA (four clicks on a 1/4-MOA scope). That is roughly 1 inch at 100 yards, or roughly 4 inches at 400 yards, since the target area measured by an MOA subtension increases with the distance.

one MOA minute of angle diagram

MIL vs. MOA for Target Ranging
MIL or MOA — which angular measuring system is better for target ranging (and hold-offs)? In a recent article on his PrecisionRifleBlog.com website, Cal Zant tackles that question. Analyzing the pros and cons of each, Zant concludes that both systems work well, provided you have compatible click values on your scope. Zant does note that a 1/4 MOA division is “slightly more precise” than 1/10th mil, but that’s really not a big deal: “Technically, 1/4 MOA clicks provide a little finer adjustments than 1/10 MIL. This difference is very slight… it only equates to 0.1″ difference in adjustments at 100 yards or 1″ at 1,000 yards[.]” Zant adds that, in practical terms, both 1/4-MOA clicks and 1/10th-MIL clicks work well in the field: “Most shooters agree that 1/4 MOA or 1/10 MIL are both right around that sweet spot.”

READ MIL vs. MOA Cal Zant Article.

Permalink - Videos, Optics, Tech Tip No Comments »
January 13th, 2017

How to Use Mil-Dot Scope Reticles to Estimate Range

NRA Video Milrad MIL mil-dot range reticle

MIL-system scopes are popular with tactical shooters. One advantage of MIL scopes is that the mil-dot divisions in the reticle can be used to estimate range to a target. If you know the actual size of a target, you can calculate the distance to the target relatively easily with a mil-based ranging reticle. Watch this helpful NRA video to see how this is done:

(more…)

Permalink - Videos, Optics 5 Comments »
November 21st, 2012

Leupold Mark-4 FFP 12-40x60mm Spotting Scopes on Sale

Webyshops.com just let us know about a very special deal — FFP Mildot Spotting Scopes priced way below the original U.S. Army contract price. This is an excellent deal for guys looking for a spotter with mildot ranging ability. Webyshops’ buyer tells us: “We picked up a limited number of Leupold spotting scopes (it was originally a military order and they decided not to take all or did not get the budget approved for all). It has a First Focal Plane Duplex Mil Dot Reticle. Normal retail price is $2800.00. We have them available on a first come, first serve basis for $999.” CLICK HERE for more info.

Leupold Mark 4 Mark IV spotting scope

The rugged, waterproof Leupold Mark 4 Tactical spotting scope is currently in service with several branches of the U.S. military. The LEUPOLD Mark-4 12-40×60 Tactical Spotting Scope, Duplex Mil-Dot Reticle (67180) utilizes a front focal Duplex Mil-Dot Reticle. With the reticle located in the front focal plane, the reticle magnifies with the image, so you can calculate range at any power setting.

LEUPOLD Mark-4 12-40×60 Tactical Spotting Scope
Duplex Mil-Dot Reticle
  • Xtended Twilight lens system provides high definition and superior luminance.
  • Lightweight (37 ounces).
  • Very compact design (12.4″ long).
  • Ranging capability at ALL power settings.
  • Universal 1/4-20 thread tripod attachment mount
  • Includes soft-side protective case which remains on the scope during use.
Permalink Hot Deals, Optics No Comments »
April 9th, 2012

Mil Radian Defined and Mildot Scope Use Demonstrated

Mildot scope reticleIn this NSSF Video, Ryan Cleckner, a former Sniper Instructor for the 1st Ranger Battalion, defines the term “MilliRadian” (Milrad) and explains how you can use a mildot-type scope to range the distance to your target. It’s pretty simple, once you understand the angular subtension for the reticle stadia dots/lines. Cleckner also explains how you can use the milrad-based reticle markings in your scope for elevation hold-overs and windage hold-offs.

Even if you normally shoot at known distances, the hold-off capability of milrad-reticle scopes can help you shoot more accurately in rapidly-changing wind conditions. And, when you must engage multiple targets quickly, you can use the reticle’s mil markings to move quickly from one target distance to another without having to spin your elevation turrets up and down.

GOOD RESOURCE: If you want to learn more about using Milliradians and Mildot scopes, we suggest the excellent article The Truth about Mil Dots by Michael Haugen. This article explains, in considerable detail, the use of U.S. Army and U.S.M.C. Mildot scopes. Haugen begins with basic definitions: 1 radian = 2 PI; 1 Milliradian (Milrad or ‘Mil’) = 1/1000th of a radian; 1 Milliradian = .0573 degrees.

Permalink - Videos, Optics 5 Comments »
December 26th, 2011

March Unveils New 5-40x56mm FFP Tactical Scope for 2012

Here’s a sneak preview of the new March FX 5-40x56mm tactical scope from Kelbly.com. This FFP scope features a 34mm main tube, side focus adjustment (10 yards to infinity), and 24 milrads elevation travel (about 94 inches at 100m), with 0.05-milrad click values. The March FX will be offered in both a non-illuminated basic version (weight: 860gm or 30.3 oz.), and a higher-priced illuminated version (weight: 890gm or 31.4 oz.), with four brightness levels. So how much will these babies cost? MSRP for new March FX has not yet been announced, but we expect to get pricing info at SHOT Show in January.

March FX 5-40X scope

First Focal Plane Reticle and Huge Magnification Range
Yes the FX features a First Focal Plane (FFP) milrad-type Reticle. This means that the ranging stadia (hash marks) remain constant relative to the target at all magnifications. So, you can range your targets using the milrad system at any power settings. That’s a big deal for tactical shooters. This new FX scope also offers an 8 times power range — the highest magnification ratio in any FFP rifle scope made to date. Is that valuable? Our tactical shooting buddies say yes.

March FX 5-40X scope

On some tactical courses of fire, you can definitely use the full 40X magnification on precision targets at 800-1000m. However, for target spotting and close-range multiple target courses of fire, the 5X magnification, with its wide field of view, definitely comes in handy. AccurateShooter.com’s “Master Fabricator” Mark LaFevers currently uses a 12-42X Nightforce NXS in tactical matches. He likes the Nightforce but he tells us that: “The NXS I’m using with its minimum 12X does not open up enough for some of the close, multiple-target stations.” Overall, Mark was very intrigued by the new March FX: “I like the March’s 34mm tube and first focal plane design which allows ranging at all magnifications. Depending on the price, this scope would be a contender for the kinds of unknown distance, tactical competitions I’ve been doing. For benchrest, on the other hand, you really need a more finely-graded MOA-based adjustment system, in my opinion.”

March FX 5-40X scope

March FX 5-40X scope

March FX 5-40X scope

Story Tip by EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.
Permalink New Product, Optics 8 Comments »
December 13th, 2011

Bushnell 5-15x40mm Elite 3200 on Sale for $349.00

Here’s a great December Deal from Webyshops.com. Right now, until supplies run out, Webyshops is offering Bushnell’s Elite 3200 5-15×40 AO Riflescope (item 325154T), for just $349.00 — that’s one hundred bucks cheaper than Webyshops’ regular low price. This is a very popular scope and Webyshops’ #2 top seller. It has excellent glass.

Bushnell Elite 3200 Mildot

The Bushnell Elite 3200 5-15×40 AO Riflescope is a quality hunting and target scope. It’s also great for rimfire guns because the front adjustable objective can focus all the way down to 10 yards. The Elite 3200 5-15×40 features Target Turrets with 1/4-MOA clicks, Mildot reticle, 1″-diameter maintube, and it ships with a sunshade. Stated elevation range is 50 MOA (so you may need an angled base for 1000-yard shooting). The scope is NOT a Front Focal Plane, so the ranging capabilities of the Mildot Reticle are limited to one magnification.

Here’s a review from a recent purchaser: “Great scope for the money. This is my 6th Bushnell Elite Scope, and the glass is as clear as more expensive scopes. The impressive thing about this scope is that the parallax can be adjusted down to 10 yards…between that and the target turrets, it was an easy decision to buy it for my CZ 452 American.” — Sam H., Pennsylvania

Permalink Hot Deals, Optics 1 Comment »
November 27th, 2011

Review of Vortex PST 4-16x50mm FFP Mildot Scope

Mike of CS Tactical has released a good video review of the Vortex Viper PST 4-16×50 FFP (first focal plane) rifle scope. Mike praised many of the scope’s features, and he believes it is a good value for the money (about $850.00 street price.)

The Viper PST 4-16×50 PST (Precision Shooting Tactical) FFP riflescope offers a lot of features for the money, including low-dispersion XD Glass, glass-etched illuminated reticle, ArmorTeck scratch-resistant, anti-reflective lens coatings, and a zero-stop turret system. Vortex delivers all this with a street price around $850.00. The hard-anodized one-piece 30mm tube, machined from 6061-T6 aluminum, offers ample adjustment — 21 millirads both elevation and windage. First Focal Plane subtensions remain consistent throughout the magnification range — that’s important if you use the scope to range objects at unknown distances. Vortex claims its argon-filled scope is waterproof, shockproof, and fogproof (O-ring seals prevent moisture, dust, and debris from getting inside the tube). The 4-16×50 PST comes fully equipped with 4-inch sunshade, CR2032 battery, and CRS shims.

Vortex 4-16x50mm First Focal Plane Scope

Vortex 4-16x50mm PST Specifications
Magnification: 4-16X
Objective Lens Diameter 50 mm
Eye Relief: 4 inches
Field of View: 27.4-7.4 feet/100 yards
Tube Size: 30 mm
Turret Style: Tall Uncapped – CSR Zero Stop
Reticle: Milrad type in First Focal Plane (FFP)
Adjustment Graduation: 0.1 mrad
Max Elevation Adjustment: 21 mrads
Max Windage Adjustment: 21 mrads
Parallax Setting: 50 yards to infinity
Length: 13.7 inches
Weight: 22 ounces

Permalink - Videos, Gear Review, Optics 2 Comments »
February 7th, 2011

Exclusive Package Deals on Leupold Mark 4 Scopes and Rings

Leupold’s Mark 4 riflescopes are highly respected for their quality of glass, user-friendly tactile turrets, and durability backed up by Leupold’s lifetime warranty. These scopes are favored by police and military shooters. Because of their popularity, Mark 4 scopes are in high demand and retailers maintain pretty high prices. We’ve worked with one of our sponsors to create a very attractive special discount on Mark 4 6.5-20x50mm LR/T M1 scopes, just for our readers.

Leupold 6.5-20x50mm Mark 4 with Leupold Tactical Rings for just $1375.99
Our sponsor DogHouse Outdoors has created a special package with a Leupold Mark 4 LR/T 6.5-20x50mm scope, plus Leupold tactical 30mm rings at a super-low price. These rings have an MSRP of $224.00. Through this special offer for AccurateShooter.com readers, you can get the Mark 4 scope, plus genuine Leupold Mark 4 30mm rings (either aluminum or steel), for just $1375.99. And shipping is FREE! Go ahead and comparison shop and you’ll see what a good value this is.

Leupold Mark 4 Scope Sale

Choose either a mildot reticle or Leupold’s TMR® (Tactical Milling Reticle). Most tactical shooters seem to prefer the TMR, which has fine hash marks. However, in low light, some shooters say the older Mildot Reticle is easier to see.

This is a limited-time offer. DogHouse Outdoors plans to offer this $1375.99 pricing for the next three weeks, through the end of February, 2011. If you have been looking for a high-quality Leupold tactical scope, you should definitely check out this offer.

Leupold Mark 4 Scope Sale

CLICK HERE for Leupold 6.5-20x50mm LR/T with Rings Package

First Focal Plane, Mil-Mil Version Also Offered
Because most shooters actually are better served with a second focal plane reticle, and the vast majority of American shooters prefer MOA adjustments, the Mark 4 $1375.99 LR/T package scopes come with 1/4-MOA windage and elevation clicks with a second focal plane reticle. However, for those shooters who need a First Focal Plane (FFP) Reticle (for ranging at all magnifications), and mil-based clicks, DogHouse Outdoors is also offering a Mark 4, ER/T M5 6.5-20x50mm package. This features a FFP reticle, and turrets with 1/10 milrad clicks. The price, including Leupold Mark IV 30mm rings, is $1,775.99. That’s 24% off the normal list price (with the $224 rings). Again, this offer is limited in time. Get your orders in before 2/28/2011.

Leupold FFP ER/T scope sale

Permalink Hot Deals, Optics 1 Comment »
September 22nd, 2010

New 34mm-tube Mark 4 Scope with Horus Reticle for M24E1

Our readers were very interested in the recent announcement that Remington Arms was selected to build the new M24E1 Sniper Weapon System, the successor to the venerable M24 Sniper Rifle used by the U.S. Army for many years.

Leupold MK 4 ERT M24E1

Leupold MK 4 ERT M24E1New Leupold Scope for M24E1
A key component of the M24E1 system is the new Leupold Mark 4 6.5-20x50mm Extended Range/Tactical (ER/T) M5 riflescope (34mm locking version). This scope features First Focal Plane (FFP) Horus ranging reticles (H27 or H58), side parallax adjustment, and a beefy 34mm maintube.

Other key features of the new ER/T include M5 windage and elevation adjustment dials with audible, tactile 1/10 (0.1) milrad clicks to match the mil-based Horus reticles. An elevation zero-stop helps prevent under-rotation in high-stress situations. The eyepiece offers long eye relief and it employs a “lockable” fast-focus design to ensure that the reticle remains in sharp focus. The scope has an auto-locking elevation adjustment.

Horus H-37 mil ranging reticleWith either a Horus H27 or H58 reticle in the front focal plane, the scope can accurately range at all magnification settings (the reticle magnifies with the image). The 34mm maintube allows for ample windage and elevation adjustment — a full 100 MOA of elevation and 100 MOA of windage adjustment.

The Mark 4 6.5-20x50mm ER/T M5 Locking Adjustment riflescope is waterproof, fog proof and shock proof. With its M5 Locking Adjustment, the scope’s platform is unique in the Mark 4 ER/T line. It is controlled under International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) and limited to domestic and international government sales only.

Permalink New Product, Optics 3 Comments »
June 30th, 2010

New Mil-Dot Rangefinder App for Apple iPhone and iPod

Mil-dot Ranging AppMany of our readers are now using smart-phones for ballistic calculations. Now there is a new App for the iPhone which makes mildot target ranging simple and easy. Mil-Dot Rangefinder 2.0 does all the math for you. Just input the size of the target, and the program calculates range instantly, in yards and meters. The standard edition costs just $1.99 while the “Pro” version is $9.99. We think that, if you’re going to really use this program in the field, it’s well worth paying ten bucks for the Pro version. The Pro edition gives you a full-featured ballistics calculator with windage/elevation corrections. That calculator alone is worth the extra money, and the Pro version offers many other features, which are listed below:

  • Target ranging (yards and meters)
  • US Army and USMC mil-dot reticles
  • Target Info display
  • Advanced ballistics calculator
  • Fast windspeed/direction adjustment
  • Range card (ballistics chart)
  • Point of impact indicator
  • Bullet drop compensator
  • Windage/elevation corrections
  • Time to target
  • Shot energy/velocity at target
  • Multiple Ballistic Profiles

This is a very powerful program. We suspect it will take most users a few days before they really understand all its functions and options. To see a more detailed demonstration of the Mil-Dot Rangefinder App, click on the YouTube video below. There’s no voice-over, so the video can be hard to follow. But at least the video showcases the flexibility of the program and the wide variety of functions it offers. Credit The Firearm Blog for spotlighting this useful App.

YouTube Preview Image
Permalink - Videos, New Product, Tech Tip 5 Comments »
May 24th, 2010

MidwayUSA Introduces Weaver-Made 3-10x40mm Mildot Scope

MidwayUSA has released a new 3-10x40mm MIL/MIL Tactical Grand Slam scope, made exclusively for MidwayUSA by Weaver. The scope features 1/10 mil radian (MIL) clicks, with a claimed 56 MOA (16.5 MIL) of BOTH windage and elevation adjustment. On sale through May 31, 2010 for just $299.00, the scope is regularly priced at $399.00. Even at the $400.00 mark, the scope is one of the most affordable optics combining a mildot reticle with mil-based clicks — a smarter system than what you find on so-called “tactical” scopes combining mildot reticles with 1/4-MOA clicks.

With the MIL/MIL arrangement you can directly translate what you see in the scope to click values. For example, with a MIL/MIL scope, a shot 1.5 mils low would require an elevation turret adjustment of 1.5 mils (15 clicks). This eliminates MOA conversions and allows the shooter to make adjustments quickly without having to do any math.

MidwayUSA Weaver Tactical Grand Slam

This tactical scope features Weaver’s Micro-trac® adjustment system, resettable 1/10 mil radian (MIL) windage and elevation turrets and a Mil-dot reticle. The scope has a one-piece tube and is claimed to be waterproof, fogproof and shockproof. The new Grand Slam 3-10X boasts a fast-focus eyepiece adjustment, and Weaver claims the multi-coated, Japanese-made lenses afford 94% light transmission. That’s a pretty tall claim regarding light transmission; if it’s true, then this scope should have very good low-light performance. We suspect the true average light transmission (across all visible wavelengths) is quite a bit lower. 94% transmission would put the new scope on a par with premium optics costing $1200.00 or more — which is unlikely. As noted above, the new 3-10x40mm scope is on sale for $299.00 for the rest of May, 2010. The scope is covered by Weaver’s Lifetime Warranty.

Permalink New Product, Optics 1 Comment »
February 4th, 2010

Long-Range Scope Comparison: Schmidt & Bender, Leupold, Zeiss

Forum member Thomas Haugland (aka “Roe”) from Norway has created an excellent video comparing the features on four long-range scopes: Schmidt & Bender PMII 3-12x50mm, Schmidt & Bender PMII 12-50x56mm, Leupold MK IV, and Zeiss Diavari Victory 6-24x56mm. Thomas shows how the adjustments function, he records the available vertical elevation, and he takes apart the turrets to show how the weather seals work. While the Leupold MK IV has MOA clicks, the three Euro scopes tested by Thomas have mil-based or mil/cm adjustments. These mil-based clicks work well with first focal plane reticles that have mil or half-mil hash marks.

YouTube Preview Image

Thomas explains:

These films emphasize the shooter’s Point of View (POV) and ‘user friendliness’. ALL these scopes get the job done, but they have some similarities and differences in the details and your own personal preferences would decide what scope can be labeled ‘best’. The perfect scope doesn’t exist, you’ll have a compromise somewhere — be that economy, magnification, reticle, turret, optical quality, sturdiness…

In these films I’ve set the Schmidt & Bender PMII 3-12×50 as the benchmark for comparison. Not because it is ‘best’ (it isn’t!) but because S&B is one of the manufacturers which first recognized the needs of professional Long Range shooters and put together products [optimized to work well] in high stress environments. The features that are important are: First focal plane, MIL reticles and MIL turrets, plenty of adjustment and suitable magnification.

Note that S&B and Zeiss scopes are also available in the USA with MOA-based turrets and/or second focal plane (SFP) reticles, for those shooters who prefer the MOA system, and SFP. A first focal plane reticle is best for ranging, but a target shooter working at known distances will probably prefer a second focal plane reticle that doesn’t change in size with magnification.

Permalink - Videos, Gear Review, New Product, Optics 3 Comments »
January 25th, 2010

SHOT Show Report: Sightron's New 10-50x60mm and Rear-Parallax Fixed-Power Tacticals

At SHOT Show, Sightron rolled out its much-awaited 10-50x60mm, and it looks good. Currently available in either a Fine-Cross-Hair (FCH) reticle, or FCH with target dot, the new unit has 1/8 MOA clicks and 50 MOA of windage and elevation. Priced under $1000.00, this is a good value compared to other premium optics with similar max magnification.

YouTube Preview Image

Affordable High-Magnification Long-Range Optic
With a “street price” under $995.00, the Sightron 10-50 could become hugely popular in 600/1000-yard benchrest and F-Class shooting. The big new zoom features a jumbo 60mm objective, 30mm maintube, and 1/8 MOA clicks. Nearly 17″ long and weighing 28.9 ounces, make no mistake, this is a BIG piece of glass. If the new 10-50×60mm SIII Sightron is as good as the 8-32×50mm LR SIII we tested in 2009, this should be a fantastic scope for the money.

Sightron 10-50x60mm long range scope

New Tactical Scopes with Rear Parallax Control
Sightron had another much smaller, but equally impressive, scope on hand. It was the 10X model from the new SIII Tactical series which includes 16X and 20X versions also. The new SIII fixed-power Tactical Sightrons feature a modified mildot (MMD) reticle with 1/4 MOA clicks. These scopes (10X, 16X, and 20X) all boast an amazing 150 MOA of total elevation (and windage). We repeat: 150 MOA of total up/down travel. That allows you to shoot well past 1000 yards without needed an angled scope base. The parallax control is at the back, where you’d normally find a zoom ring. The position is actually very handy. With the parallax (focus) control near the rear eyepiece, you can easily set the parallax with your firing hand without moving out of position. These new fixed-power Tactical Scopes will retail for about $550.00.

Sightron 10-50x60mm long range scope

Permalink - Videos, New Product, Optics 6 Comments »
January 12th, 2010

Litz Adds Metric/MILs Options to MOBALL Ballistics Computer

Bryan Litz, a skilled long-range shooter and ballistician for Berger Bullets, has created a “deployable” ballistics computer, MOBALL, based on the versatile Texas Instruments Voyage 200 graphing calculator. The MOBALL unit lets shooters input a wide variety of environmental variables. It delivers very precise ballistics solutions, and can run for months on a set of ordinary AAA batteries.

MOBALL ballistics calculator
CLICK HERE for full description of MOBALL Ballistics Calculator.

When Bryan released the MOBALL unit late last year, it was set up to use English system measurements for most of its functions. That worked great for most users, but some shooters with mildot scopes wanted the ability to use Mils and meters instead of MOA and yards. Well, Bryan listened to these requests — he’s upgraded the MOBAL to provide metric range inputs and both metric and Mil drop outputs as an option.

Bryan tells us: “I’ve added the option to use meters/MILS in MOBALL. After consulting with several shooters who requested metric, it turns out that most of them didn’t want complete metric (caliber in mm, bullet weight in grams, temp in Celsius, etc) but only the range and drop in meters and MILS. So, I’ve updated the program functions accordingly. MOBALL has been upgraded to accept range in meters (as well as yards) and output drop in cm and MILS (as well as inches and MOA).”

The MOBALL Unit Retails for $290.00 and is available from AppliedBallisticsLLC.com.

Permalink New Product 5 Comments »
December 3rd, 2009

Weaver Introduces New 3-15 and 4-20 FFP Tactical Scopes

Weaver Optics, now owned by ATK, offers a new line of tactical riflescopes with First Focal Plane(FFP) mildot reticles, zero-reset turrets, and 5X zoom ratio. Weaver’s 4-20x50mm version (MSRP $994.49), delivers all those features for around $725.00 street price (SWFA.com). The smaller 3-15x50mm Weaver tactical scope (MSRP $890.95) sells for about $650.00 street price (SWFA.com).

Weaver Tactical Scope

These Weavers are attractive new options for tactical shooters. The pricing is very competitive considering these scopes have all the “right stuff” for tactical shooting: FFP, Mildot Reticle, Side Focus, and wide zoom range. We also like the new Weavers’ reset-to-zero turrets.

The new waterproof/shockproof/fogproof Weaver Tactical scopes feature one-piece construction, argon-purged tubes and multi-coated lenses with extra hard exterior coatings. For Tac Comps, the 5 times zoom ratio offers a very wide field of view for close-range or moving targets, yet plenty of magnification is “on tap” for long-range targets. The first focal plane reticle stays constant relative to the target at all magnification levels. This allows targets to be quickly ranged with mildots at any magnification setting.

Permalink New Product, Optics 7 Comments »
March 29th, 2009

Quick Review: Sightron SIII 6-24×50 LR Mildot

Review by LARRY BANEY

The Sightron 6-24×50mm Mildot is the latest in Sightron’s SIII line-up of side-focus, 30mm riflescopes. This follows the hot-selling 8-32×56mm SIII, which we reviewed last fall. While our 6-24x50mm test sample has a Mildot reticle, Sightron’s new 6-24x50mm scope is also offered with a fine cross-hair (FCH) with target dot reticle. Both Mildot and FCH versions are 14.96″ overall with a near-constant 3.6-3.8 inches of eye relief. Clicks are 1/4 MOA (15 MOA per revolution), and total elevation (and windage) adjustment is listed as 100 MOA (50 MOA on either side of center). That’s a class-leading amount of elevation, which should make the new 6-24×50mm popular with long-range shooters.

Sightron SIII Mildot

Shown above is the Sightron 6-24×50mm Mildot, flanked by a Leupold 8-25×50mm LRT and the Sightron 8-32×56mm. The controls on the 6-24 Sightron are identical to those of its big brother, but it is shorter, with a smaller objective. The shorter length and 50mm front objective allow a 2.8 ounce weight savings over the larger model (21.9 oz. vs. 24.7 oz.).

Sightron SIII Mildot

Sightron 6-24x50mm Quick Review
Assistant Editor Jason Baney has been evaluating the optical qualities of the new Sightron 6-24 Mildot scope. Jason also had a chance to test the scope’s real-world performance in a tactical match. Here is Jason’s report:

“When the new 6-24x50mm mil-dot Sightron SIII arrived, it looked like the little brother of the Sightron 8-32x56mm. Controls and “styling” are similar. This family relationship was made clear as my review of its performance progressed. It shared the same ergonomics, same superior glass, and same unbeatable tracking.

Sightron SIII MildotI had a Leupold 8.5-25x50mm LRT for comparison purposes. The Leupold, which is actually 24.3x at max power, is a popular scope with a good reputation for clarity and sharpness. However, the new 6-24x50mm Sightron seemed better in many respects than the Leupold LRT. The Sightron’s glass appeared superior, giving better color rendition, a brighter field of view, and better contrast.

Also, with the Sightron, there was no noticeable parallax lash in the side-focus system. There was no need to start the side-focus at a travel stop every time. You could simply dial the side parallax adjustment and get the observed target in sharp focus with minimal parallax. This has been a problem with some Leupolds (i.e. you can’t get minimal parallax and best focus at the same time.) While observing bullet holes in different colored targets at 300 yards, the Sightron also appeared to show slightly better resolution than the Leupold and therefore better ability to locate individual bullet holes in the paper.”

Field Testing at the Allegheny Sniper Challenge (ASC)
In any competition riflescope, precise, repeatable tracking is absolutely vital. When you crank-in elevation and/or windage you want the reticle to move the exact value you dialed. Then you want the scope to repeat exactly when you return to the original zero. To test the Sightron’s tracking, Jason did more than a simple range test. He tested the scope’s tracking in the “real world”, during a two-day tactical comp.

Jason reports: “The 6-24 was thrown into action right away at the Allegheny Sniper Challenge (ASC) in Seneca Rocks, WV in August 2008. This was a team match that I shot with my father. ASC entails interesting weather, and even more interesting shots. In a matter of two days, over 100 shots are expended and a scope’s adjustments are REALLY put to the test. Maintaining zero is very important, because there are no sighters to check your zero. Shots range from less than 100 yards to nearly 1200 yards, and in the end, everyone has clicked their scope up-and-down 40 times or more. This means 40+ up/down repetitions on the elevation knob. This is as tough a test of a scope’s tracking ability as you’ll find.”

Great Tracking Ability, Excellent Value
So how did the Sightron’s tracking rate? The new Sightron 6-24×50 returned from ASC with the EXACT same 100-yard zero as when it started. This scope maintained its zero as well or better than any other scope out there, including those costing $3000.00+. The scope’s great elevation range was also much appreciated. Jason reports: “With 100+ MOA of elevation available and a 20 MOA base on the rifle, I had enough ‘up’ to shoot all the way out to 1200 yards with no problem.”

Sightron SIII Mildot

In Jason’s opinion this scope will be very hard if not impossible to beat in its price range in many aspects. The new Sightron 6-24 certainly rivals the overall optical quality of the Sightron 8-32×56, and that’s saying a lot. But since it is a Mildot scope there is another level of scrutiny needed. This scope is not a purpose-built tactical scope, but it represents a good base on which to build if Sightron offers enhancements in the future. If a shooter wishes only to use the mil-dots for holdover, he will be well served, but a Front Focal Plane (FFP) reticle would be more useful for serious tactical work. An illuminated reticle would also be welcome, and Jason would like to see a different reticle design with half-mil markings.

Also, some tactical shooters would prefer to have mil-based click values, rather than 1/4 MOA clicks. In raising these points, we need to stress that the $800.00 Sightron 6-24x50mm Mildot is affordable and works well as a general-purpose scope with reticle marks that allow hold-overs. This scope was not designed to compete with a $2700.00 Schmidt & Bender PMII. Jason explains: “I just want the serious tactical guys to understand that the Sightron won’t give you all the features of a dedicated FFP mildot optic with mil-based clicks. However, at about $800.00 average retail, the Sightron 6-24x50mm costs less than a third of what you’ll pay for high-end tactical scopes from S&B or U.S. Optics.”

Permalink Gear Review, New Product, Optics No Comments »
July 24th, 2008

NEW Sightron 6-24×50 Mildot Scope

Sightron just delivered to Jason Baney an SIII 6-24×50 Mildot, the latest in the new SIII line-up of side-focus, 30mm Sightron scopes. This follows on the hot-selling 8-32×56, which was the subject of our recent Scope Test. Jason will be testing the scope’s optical qualities soon and using it in an upcoming tactical match.

The new 6-24×50 scope is also offered with a fine cross-hair with target dot reticle. Both mildot and FCH versions are 14.96″ overall with a near-constant 3.6-3.8 inches of eye relief. Clicks are 1/4 MOA (15 MOA per revolution), and total elevation (and windage) adjustment is listed as 100 MOA (50 MOA on either side of center). That’s a class-leading amount of elevation which should make the new 6-24×50 popular with long-range shooters.

Shown above and below is the Sightron 6-24×50 Mildot, flanked by a Leupold 8-25×50 LRT and the Sightron 8-32×56. The controls on the 6-24 Sightron are identical to those of its big brother, but it is shorter, with a smaller objective. The shorter length and 50mm front objective allow a 2.8 ounce weight savings over the larger model (21.9 oz. vs. 24.7 oz.).

Below are reticle specs for Fine Cross-Hair + Target Dot Version

Permalink Optics 2 Comments »