July 15th, 2017

Legends of Camp Perry: George Farr’s 71 Consecutive Bullseyes

George Farr Camp Perry Record 1903 Springfield
Firing an “off-the-rack” M1903 Springfield that he had never shot before, using GI-issue “tin-plate” ammunition, George Farr shot 71 consecutive bullseyes at 1000 yards (70 for record), setting a marksmanship record that has never been broken.

This is not the typical Daily Bulletin feature. It is an historical account of one of the greatest performances by a marksman in the history of the National Matches at Camp Perry. We think any competitive shooter will find this amazing narrative worth reading from beginning to end. This story is provided courtesy the NRA Blog with photos supplied by the NRA Museums.

An Old Man at the National Matches:
‘Dad’ Farr’s Golden Afternoon at Camp Perry

by Doug Wicklund, NRA Museums Senior Curator

It was 1921. Warren Harding was President of the United States, and “The War to End All Wars” was less than three years past. The nation was getting back to a normal routine, and for competitive shooters, that meant an annual pilgrimage through the state of Ohio to the shores of Lake Erie, where the National Matches had been held since 1907 at Camp Perry. In those lighter days of the “Roaring Twenties”, marksmen from states banded together to make the journey, housing together in tent clusters on green lawns well behind the firing points.

George Farr Camp Perry Record 1903 Springfield
The silver plate affixed to George Farr’s M1903 Springfield states: “With this rifle and using issued ammunition Mr. G.R. Farr of Seattle Wash in the Wimbleton Match, 1921, Camp Perry O., made 71 consecutive bulls eyes at 1000 yards”.

But one man at the 1921 National Matches stood out amongst the rest. George “Dad” Farr was a 62-year-old man from the state of Washington, and this was his first time heading east to shoot in the “big leagues”, as some of his fellow Evergreen State friends termed the annual competitions.

Aptly nicknamed, “Dad” was a good bit older than the average shooter during that late summer season, striding forward hesitantly clad in a khaki shirt and dungarees. He wasn’t a practiced High Power shooter — he showed up at Camp Perry without a rifle, and relied on a crude monocular for a spotting scope that he had fashioned from a pair of French opera glasses.

At the previous day’s shooting, he had experienced issues with the initial .30-06 rifle he had chosen from the rack, a Model 1903 Springfield that didn’t seem to hold a consistent zero. This day, he chose a different gun, just another off-the-rack rifle no different from the one next to it. Though he didn’t realize it, George Farr had just made the best selection of his life.

Farr readied his bolt-action and prepared a clip of five rounds of Government Issue ammunition, then went to his position. He was ready to fire on a 1,000-yard target with a rifle he had never shot before.

George Farr Camp Perry Record 1903 Springfield

Perhaps he had resigned himself somewhat to the outcome — after all, it was the last relay of the day on September 9. Off to the west, the sun was beginning its slow trip down to the horizon. But Farr shouldered his Springfield and prepared to fire. The time was 4:30 p.m. Shooters nearby were puzzled by this shooter who squirmed and shifted repeatedly, but were amazed as he made his first hits on paper. Farr was shooting Frankford Arsenal tin-plate ammunition, the standard G.I. .30-06 rounds. More experienced marksmen, like Marine Sgt. John Adkins — who had just won the Wimbledon Cup — were using commercial Remington match ammunition and had spurned the government ammo.

The Historic String of Bullseyes
At that distant 36-inch target, Farr scored two hits for his two sighters, with the last sighter being a bullseye. He then prepared to fire 20 shots for record. Each of those 20 shots went into the center. Each scored as a “5”. At the end of this amazing string, Farr gathered up his monocular and prepared to depart. His fellow shooters quickly advised that match rules required him to continue firing until he missed “the black”, the inner 5-Ring bullseye at the center of the target. Farr had only brought one box of ammunition with him to the firing line, and had run out. As he waited for more of the tin-plate ammo he had been using, the sun continued its retreat. Farr continued his shooting, racking up growing strings of bullseyes – 30, 40 50, 60 – each impact on target being carefully recorded on his scorecard in the growing darkness.

Then, at the 71st shot with daylight completely gone, the bullet strayed outside the target center, and Farr’s incredible string came to its conclusion. But counting his second sighting shot, George Farr had fired 71 consecutive bullseyes at 1,000 yards using an unfamiliar rifle plucked from an ordnance rack earlier that day. It was an amazing feat, one immediately recognized by those in attendance. His fellow shooters quickly took up a generous collection, contributing in recognition of Farr’s natural skill and enabling him to purchase that bolt-action Springfield he had worked magic with on that distant target. Enough funds remained that a silver presentation plate, inscribed with the names of the states whose competitors had contributed, was ordered and mounted on the side of the rifle’s buttstock.

George Farr Camp Perry Record 1903 Springfield
CLICK HERE to zoom image

The next year, the Civilian Team Trophy was re-designated as the Farr Trophy, and George Farr’s record, fired on the old target system, was never beaten. Farr’s rifle went home with him to Washington and remained there, never again traveling eastward to Camp Perry. In 2011, The Farr family donated this legendary piece of shooting history to the NRA National Firearms Museum collection.

In 2013, as NRA Museums curators began assembling the collection for display at the NRA National Sporting Arms Museum at Bass Pro Shops in Springfield, Missouri, the museum staff created a unique exhibit featuring George Farr’s Model 1903 Springfield rifle and its special place in competitive shooting history. Alongside the rifle rests Farr’s simple monocular, another mute witness to Camp Perry history made on that September evening in 1921.

Farr’s Springfield… is one of thousands of historically significant firearms found in the NRA Museums collections on display across three locations. To view the collection and learn more about the incredible stories behind each gun, visit the NRA Museums in person or browse the NRA Museums website.

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March 9th, 2017

Sandy Froman — NRA Past President and Lady Huntress

Sandy Froman NRA President lady hunter second amendment advocate

Sandy Froman NRA President lady hunter second amendment advocateSandy Froman is a past president of the National Rifle Association (NRA), only the second woman to ever hold that position. Froman grew up in a “gun-free” home in San Francisco, California but now lives in Arizona. Sandy, an attorney with a J.D. from Harvard Law School, is a staunch advocate of the Second Amendment and has promoted pro-Second Amendment legislation.

A member of the NRA Board of Directors since 1992, Froman served as second vice president for five years followed by two years as first vice president. In April 2005 she was elected NRA President. She completed her second term in April 2007 and currently serves as a member of the NRA Board of Directors. Froman was elected to The NRA Foundation’s Board of Trustees in 1992 and became The NRA Foundation’s first woman president. She helped establish the Foundation’s permanent endowment, which now exceeds $53 million.

Here are highlights of the Sandy Froman interview which first appeared in the NRA Foundation’s Traditions Journal, Quarter 4: 2016. These highlights appear courtesy the NRA Blog.

Women are the fastest growing segment in the shooting sports — Why is that?

Froman: Today, women have more responsibility for their day to day lives and the lives of their children than ever before. There are more women who work outside the home. There are more single women and many are single by choice. Women today have a heightened awareness of ordinary crime, of potential domestic violence, and of possible terrorism. Women are becoming more concerned about understanding their choices for personal safety and for defense of their families. This is why more women are buying guns. This is why more women are taking training. This is why more women are getting their concealed carry permits. It’s a change in the culture of our country that is reflected in women’s attitudes and their choices about firearms. I’m a big proponent of women-only firearms classes, but not because I don’t think women can compete with men-they actually compete very well. In an all-female class, women tend to ask different kinds of questions than they would in a co-ed class. Many women come to these classes because they have been a victim of a crime; they have been raped, they have been attacked, beaten, molested. They understand their physical vulnerability, and they want to do something about it. Once they master the basics of mental preparedness, gun handling and marksmanship, they quickly become more confident and go on to competing and hunting and teaching other women. I love seeing women teaching other women informally and supporting other women in the shooting sports.

What words of advice do you have for the future generation of shooters?

Froman: Exercise your Second Amendment rights. My dear friend and former NRA board member, the late David Caplan, warned that rights not exercised cease to exist. If you don’t go to the range and shoot, pretty soon there won’t be shooting ranges. There won’t be places to shoot. If there aren’t places to shoot, there won’t be guns. Guns will be collectibles — things under glass that future historians will talk about: “People actually used to shoot these things”. So I tell folks: Support ranges. Support your gun clubs and gun stores. Support The NRA Foundation. You know why the NRA is so successful? ““Each of us, one by one, together” — Wayne LaPierre says this all the time. You have to go out and do something if you want to be part of the solution.

When did you become a huntress?

Froman: When I was an officer of NRA, I met Larry and Brenda Potterfield of Midway USA. One afternoon on a break from a meeting, I went shoe shopping with Brenda. [Laughs] We were hunting for shoes! And this ties in with the Potterfields since they hosted the first Friends of NRA event in Columbia, Missouri, in 1992. Brenda and I got to know each other and she showed me photos of her family trips to Africa and the animals they hunted. I was intrigued by these pictures of this beautiful, intelligent, well-dressed woman in her hunting clothes with the exotic wild animals she had hunted. I was fascinated by this contrast-here was a cultured, sophisticated woman who loved hunting! Later Brenda invited me to her farm to go pheasant hunting. I had never shot an animal and so at first I wasn’t sure how I would feel about shooting a pheasant. Well, I shot my first pheasant, and I was immediately hooked on hunting. I was invited back to the Potterfield’s farm go wild turkey hunting with Brenda’s husband Larry. Soon after I went to one of the very first Women On Target hunts in Texas. It was a wild pig hunt, so I shot my first mammal. Hunting provides the excitement and satisfaction of being able to hunt animals and eat what you’ve harvested — and I’ve eaten everything I’ve hunted except for this one very nasty, old European mouflon sheep. After I downed the sheep, and asked my guide where I should take the meat for processing, he said, “Lady, you don’t want to eat this.” So hunting my own food has been truly an educational experience for a girl who grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area.

What role do you see the NRA playing in the next 10 years?

Froman: Broadening our base to include and grow the changing demographic of Americans — younger women and minorities. Critics say that NRA membership is only middle-aged white guys. If you look at our members and supporters you will see that is not true. While we still have our traditional membership base, the face of the NRA has changed dramatically over the past 10 years. A lot of new members are women and minorities, and the new members tend to be younger and less rural than in the past. Families are raising their kids to know that firearm ownership in America is part of our culture and we need to keep driving that.

Do you have a favorite quote?

Froman: One is by Judge Alex Kozinski of the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, regarding the Second Amendment:

“The Second Amendment is a doomsday provision, one designed for those exceptionally rare circumstances where all other rights have failed – where the government refuses to stand for reelection and silences those who protest; where courts have lost the courage to oppose, or can find no one to enforce their decrees. However improbable these contingencies may seem today, facing them unprepared is a mistake a free people get to make only once.”

Read Full Sandy Froman Interview on NRABlog.com >>

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December 31st, 2016

How Guns Work — An Inside Look

Firearms infographic NRA Blog Outdoor Hub

The NRA Blog has produced an interesting graphic guide to firearms function. This “How Guns Work” infographic shows the basics of bolt-action rifle operation and how a centerfire cartridge propels a bullet through a barrel during the “firing sequence”. There’s some good artistry here, with cutaway drawings letting you look inside an action and cartridge.

Enjoy this technical graphic. The NRA Blog says: “In celebration of cartridges big and small, we partnered with OutdoorHub to bring you a detailed look into how guns work. While the infographic will be most instructive to newcomers, we think avid shooters will find it interesting, too.”

Firearms infographic NRA Blog Outdoor Hub

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo 2 Comments »
November 24th, 2016

Wild Game Recipes for Thanksgiving from NRABlog.com

Thanksgiving recipes NRABlog.com

Looking for culinary inspiration for your holiday gatherings? The NRA Blog offers three special (and delicious) Wild Game Recipes for your family feasts: Honey Mustard Planked Wild Turkey Breast, Mushroom-Stuffed Wild Boar Roast with Black Truffle Sauce, and BBQ Brined Pigeon. These recipes come from some of the country’s best chefs, and they all seem mouth-watering. You’ll find a full list of ingredients plus step-by-step cooking tips.

One of the many advantages to hunting is the assortment of game you can gather that lasts for an extended period of time. Just because it’s Thanksgiving doesn’t mean you have to stick with a whole turkey from the store and a ham hock.

We have three unique spins on wild game recipes that will suit your dining table perfectly. Even if you’re one of those hunters who enjoys a quick hunt the morning of Thanksgiving, these recipes will make your holiday more delicious than ever. — NRABlog.com

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June 23rd, 2016

Shooting Tips from Top Lady Competitive Shooters

Lady Shooter advice NRABlog.com Tiffany Piper Julie Golob
Photo courtesy NRAFamily.org.

The NRABlog recently polled seven prominent lady shooters, asking them for tips for other lady shooting sports enthusiasts, particulary new shooters. Top female competitors such as 2016 Bianchi Cup Winner Tiffany Piper and Team S&W Co-Captain Julie Golob offer good advice on competitive shooting as well as using firearms for self-defense. Read the full article here.

Here Are Some of the Top Tips from Leading Ladies:

Tiffany Piper (Action Pistol): The best piece of advice I would give is practice makes perfect. In New Zealand, we barely get enough range time with our noise restrictions so muscle memory and technique are key.muscle memory and technique are key. Study up on shooting techniques, watch YouTube videos of other professional women shooters, and try out what you see. Don’t get intimidated thinking it’s a male’s sport[.]”

Lady Shooter advice NRABlog.com Tiffany Piper Julie Golob

Julie Golob (Team S&W, 3-Gun and Pistol): “If something isn’t clear, just ask about it! Shooters are some of the best people you’ll ever meet, but we can be confusing and use a lot of shooter slang and lingo. When in doubt, ask!”

Tori Nonaka (Team Glock): “I always recommend to new shooters to first concentrate on the basics of gun safety. That way they will be more comfortable when they next learn about the particular gun…. Their confidence will grow as they familiarize themselves with their specific weapon. Then, it’s all about practice at the range.”

Corey Cogdell (Olympic Trap Shooter): “It’s empowering for women to know how to use a firearm in a sporting atmosphere as well as for self-defense. So if you are new to firearms, check out your local gun club and take a lesson! There you’ll find instructors and other shooting sports enthusiasts who will be more than willing to help you.”

Lady Shooter advice NRABlog.com Tiffany Piper Julie Golob

Permalink Competition, Shooting Skills 1 Comment »
June 13th, 2016

Download Free Summertime Fun & Games Targets

Free game targets for Download

Summer is here, so it’s time to focus on fun and games. Here are three speciality targets with game themes: Dartboard, Billiards Table, and Bowling Alley. Each target features multiple bullseyes. Shoot the dartboard like a regular game or make up your own sequence. For the billiards target you can shoot the bulls, or the balls, or both. Click any target to load FREE higher-resolution PDF files which you can download. Then print the targets and take them to the range for a fun shooting session. A big thanks to our friends at NRABlog.com for creating these colorful “fun & games” targets. Enjoy!


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January 13th, 2015

Shades of SHOT — An Amazing 1911 Pistol Made from Wood

SHOT Show kicks off in exactly one week. What were some of the more unusual items unveiled at last year’s show? Well how about a convincingly authentic 1911-style pistol made entirely of wood. That’s right, every component — frame, barrel, slide, hammer, grips, trigger, even the functional beavertail grip safety — are made from wood. The gun shouldn’t be used with live, full-power ammunition of course, but otherwise it operates just like a real 1911. It will feed dummy rounds, the slide racks, and the trigger causes the hammer to fall — just like on a real 1911 made from metal. Somehow, we think John Moses Browning, father of the 1911, would have been proud….

Wood SHOT Show wooden 1911a1 1911 pistol nrablog

This unique all-wood pistol is a “tour de force” of craftsmanship. NRA Blog Editor Lars Dalseide was so impressed with the “all organic” wood 1911, that he named it as his favorite story subject for 2014:

#1 – A Fully Functional 1911 Pistol Made from Wood
When walking the SHOT Show floor last January I spotted what I thought was an incredible carving. But it was more than a carving – it was a fully functional 1911 pistol made out of wood.

From the Wood Caliber workshop in Davidson, Michigan, this beauty acts and feels just like a regular 1911. For the pure beauty of it, the 1911 wooden pistol is my top story for 2014.

Wood SHOT Show wooden 1911a1 1911 pistol nrablog

Permalink Handguns, News 4 Comments »
March 4th, 2014

NRAWomen.TV Spotlights Female Firearms Enthusiasts

Report by Lars Dalseide for NRABlog
There are a number of stereotypes out there when it comes to firearm ownership. Some are correct, most are wrong, and hardly any of them have anything to do with the role women play in the firearms community. That’s why the NRA came up with NRAWomen.tv.

NRA Women channel

Presented by Smith & Wesson, the NRAWomen.tv channel was made for female gun enthusiasts:

It’s a resource for news, education, events and more. And we’re telling more stories of empowered women like you. Come explore, connect, celebrate and unite with the women of NRA.

To learn what NRAWomen.tv has to offer, take a moment to watch this “New Energy” video trailer, featuring many of the USA’s top female shooters, including Julie Golob and Maggie Reese:

To view profiles of female shooters, get shooting tips from experts, watch featured videos, and access resources for lady shooters, visit the NRAWomen.tv website. It’s a modern, mobile-friendly site, with something for every female firearms enthusiast.

NRA Women channel Maggie Reese

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July 1st, 2013

Shooters Get Ready for National Championships at Camp Perry

Story by Lars Dalseide for NRABlog
The first shots of NRA’s National Rifle and Pistol Championships at Camp Perry were fired back in 1907, more than a century ago. On July 8, the National Championships open again, commencing with pistol disciplines. Next come the smallbore matches, followed by High Power competitions.

NRA National Championships Camp PerryRunning from through July and August, the the National Rifle and Pistol Championships are actually a collection of several individual competitions; Pistol, 3-Position Smallbore Rifle, Prone Smallbore Rifle, High Power Rifle, Mid-Range High Power Rifle and Long Range High Power Rifle. It all begins on July 8th at 10:00 am. That’s where Lieutenant General John S. Crosby, U.S. Army retired, will open the Championships by taking the traditional “First Shot” on the Rodriguez Range.

“It is an honor to fire a shot at Perry.” — Dennis Willing

There’s something special about Camp Perry,” said Dennis Willing, Director of NRA’s Competitive Shooting Division. “There is more than a century’s worth of shooting sports history out there on those fields. It’s a tradition every shooter aspires to.” Willing should know. For almost 35 years, Willing has been involved in the National Matches in one way or another. He’s shot in both the Pistol and High Power Rifle Championships, served as a Match Referee and was Chairman of the NRA Board of Director’s High Power Committee. He also holds four Distinguished Shooting Medals in Pistol, Rifle, PPC Revolver, and PPC Semi-Automatic Pistol.

National Championships Schedule
The first Championship is Pistol. Made up of thirteen separate events — including the .22 Caliber Fire Rapid Fire, the Center Fire Timed Fire and the .45 Caliber Slow Fire — the Championship begins on July 9 and ends on the 13th. The rest of the Championships are as follows:

Smallbore 3-Position Rifle: July 17-19
Smallbore Prone Rifle: July 20-25
High Power Rifle: August 5-9
Mid-Range High Power Rifle: August 5-9
Long Range High Power Rifle: August 10-14

If you’re signed up to shoot in the National Championships, we wish you good luck. If you can’t compete this year, visit NRAblog.com which will provide daily stories from Camp Perry with a team of reporters.

Watch Slide Show from 2012 NRA Long Range Championship

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January 27th, 2013

Kruger Premium Targets Showcased at SHOT Show

Story by Lars Dalseide for NRABlog
There were many European exhibitors at the 2013 SHOT Show, including Kruger Premium Targets from Germany. After a successful first run at the 2012 NRA National Rifle & Pistol Championships in Camp Perry, Ohio, the call for Kruger targets has been picking up steam.

“We are always surprised by how many people come to the show,” said Kruger Sales Manager Joachim Seibold. “For us it is a big advantage because so many people stop by our booth. So many orders.” Now with a state side warehouse located in Oregon, their ability to fill those orders promises to be even quicker than before.


Photo by NRABlog

After agreeing to provide the National Rifle Association with targets for the National Championships back in 2010, Kruger has experienced a rise in demand for their product. Especially from the pistol competitions. “I asked many pistol shooters at Camp Perry what they thought about the targets,” explained Seibold. “There were no complaints. Everyone said how pleased they were with the quality. They had no problems seeing the holes, easily scored the targets, and everyone was happy. That’s why the NRA asked us to be their manufacturer.”

Kruger Targets

That success has created a new demand in the American marketplace. Venturing into the archery industry has been keeping Kruger busy. And a competition target contract with USA Shooting has things humming too. Busy as it is, Kruger has even managed adjust to the strict standards surrounding NRA’s move to the Orion Scoring System. “Yes, we also print targets for the company Orion. Those are in our new Oregon warehouse too,” he concluded with a laugh.

Kruger targets can be ordered online through Kruger-US-Targets.com or you can call Kruger’s USA distributor, MK Tactical, at (503) 746-6816. MK Tactical is located in Hillsborough, OR.

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September 5th, 2012

Profile of Reya Kempley: Shooter, Pilot, Author

While on the fields of Camp Perry during the Smallbore 3-Position Rifle Championships, NRABlog editor Lars Dalseide had the opportunity to interview Reya Kempley, a very talented young lady. A past Woman’s Champion, Reya finished fourth overall in this year’s 3-Position Championships. Reya is also a trained pilot, and she has written a book on flight safety procedures.

Report Based on Story by Lars Dalseide for NRAblog.
Shooting along side her brother Tarl, Reya has enjoyed a high level of success at the National Smallbore Rifle Championships. Not only did she manage to capture the Woman’s and Civilian’s Smallbore Prone titles, she also finished 2nd overall in the Prone Championships. It was the 3-Position that proved to be more of a challenge. “For standing and prone I was a little bit nervous because this is Camp Perry, but it was under control and I felt good. For kneeling I’m hoping to still be in the hunt.”

“For me I’ve been struggling with the kneeling for a while,” explained Kempley “It’s something with my pulse, the sights move around a bit more. In standing I’m usually stiller and have a few more pauses to break the shot. That’s not how it’s suppose to be so. If I’m calm in kneeling I can shoot decent but when the nerves and the pulse gets going. That’s my challenge in 3-position right now.”

Part of the challenge could be that her time shooting 3-Position Rifle is reserved for Metrics, Perry and practice. Despite her numerous Prone victories, the it can be difficult to translate that to the 3-P field. “I wasn’t nervous during the standing portion of Metrics but it was still good practice,” said Kempley. “I try to make myself nervous, recreate the conditions, but it doesn’t always work.”

Kempley Has Written Book on Aviation Safety
Getting away from the office, recharging the batteries, is a necessity for everyone. The same could be said for getting away from the range. In addition to working with her brother on BeeSafe, an online store for smallbore barrels, gun safes and more, Reya found solace in the writing and publication of her new book Flight Emergency: Take the Left Seat in Eight Role-Playing Emergency Scenarios.

“I’m definitely into aviation, learned to fly and had an idea for an interactive adventure book about flight training with a focus on emergencies,” explained Kempley. “Thought I’d just go for it. I didn’t want to be an 80-year-old woman and regret never trying.” Her book was published last fall. Sales were encouraging enough to proceed with an eBook version. “People are more willing to give it a try electronically than with paperback,” said Kempley. “That’s just how the market is.” With 4.4 stars out of 5 on GoodReads.com and 4 out of 5 on Amazon.com, there could be a second book on the horizon. More on flying? Learning the barrel roll? Shooting Smallbore in the Camp Perry sun?

Permalink Competition, News 2 Comments »
August 14th, 2012

Long Range Records Set at Perry and Gustin Wins Wimbleton Cup

Story based on Reports by Lars Dalseide for NRAblog
Clear skies, calm winds, and superior marksmanship combined for a host of record-breaking performances at the NRA Long Range Championship yesterday Monday, 13 August, at Camp Perry. NRABlog editor Lars Delsaide reports: “Today was a day in which records were set. Records so significant that a few competitors requested their targets be brought up from the pits. Not one record. Not two records. But more than a dozen Long Range Rifle records. One small clarification — today’s record-breaking performances resulted in three new National Long Range High Power records. So why did I say that more than a dozen were set? Because the standing records to which I’m referring were broken multiple times today.”

Perry David Luckman

The records started falling in the Doc Aiken match. The previous high Doc Aiken record was 199-8X, set in 1998 by John Jackson. Amazingly, that record was topped by nine shooters before Great Britain’s David Luckman recorded the highest score of all, a 200-13X, which will be the new record.

Luckman ended the day with yet another entry in the record books — the new high mark for the Sierra Trophy. The Sierra Trophy is based on the combined scores of the Doc Aiken Match and the Andrus Memorial Trophy match. The existing Sierra Trophy record was 400-19X set by Robert Gustin a decade ago. On Monday, Norman Anderson topped that with a 400-22X, and then Brit David Luckman raised the bar even higher, setting a new mark of 400-23X. Well done David!


Perry David LuckmanGustin Wins Wimbleton Cup
The Wimbleton Cup is one of the most prestigious trophies awarded at Camp Perry. Robert Gustin earned redemption this year winning the 2012 Cup, after losing out in 1985 due to a scoring error. Wimbledon is a slow-fire, Any rifle 1000-yard match. The record was established back in 2004 by Michelle Gallagher. Qualifying for the shoot-off with a score of 200-14X, Gustin shot a near-perfect 100-9X in the shoot-off to earn victory in 2012.

Gustin’s win was doubly sweet as the California shooter lost out on the Cup decades ago through bad luck. “Back in 1985, Bob thought he won the Wimbledon Cup,” explained Nancy Tompkins. “But they couldn’t find one of his shots in the shoot off. He was devastated. Later, after everything was finalized, they pulled his target and found an X they missed. My heart just broke watching it happen. So this is great.”

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