June 14th, 2017

Make Your Own Lanolin-Based Case Lube

DIY yourself lanolin case lube lubricant One Shot Ultimate Reloader Gavin Gear 6.5 Guys

In the YouTube video embedded below, our friend Gavin Gear of UltimateReloader.com shows how to make your own case lube using simple, inexpensive ingredients. As recommended by the 6.5 Guys, this Liquid Lanolin + Isopropyl Alchohol mix works well and is very cost-effective. You can make a pint of this home-brew Lanolin case lube for a fraction of the price of commercial aerosol spray lubes.

Complete Case Lube Instructions on UltimateReloader.com »

Gavin tells us: “Per the 65guys instructions, I ordered the same components and spray bottles, and these worked out great”:

1. Swan Isopropyl Alcohol, 99%, Pint, 16 Ounce (2-pack)
2. Home Health Liquid Lanolin, 4 Ounce
3. Chemical Guys ACC_121.16HD-3PK Chem. Resistant Heavy Duty Bottle/Sprayer (16 oz.)

Gavin describes the exact mixing process on his Ultimate Reloader website. Gavin says this lube mix is a good complement to the Hornady One-Shot (pistol) and Dillon DCL (rifle) lubes he has used for pistol and rifle reloading sessions. CLICK HERE to read more.

Permalink - Videos, Gear Review, Reloading 4 Comments »
February 7th, 2017

Lube Choices for Case Sizing — Reviewing the Options

Cartridge Case lubrication imperial Die wax case sizing reloading

Sinclair International has a good article on Case Lubrication which shows the various products and application methods available. Part of Sinclair’s Step-By-Step Reloading series, the article shows how to apply Spray Lube, Die Wax, or conventional lube from a Pad. The story also explains how to use dry lube to slick up the inside of your case necks.

Spray Lubes
High-volume reloaders often turn to spray-on lubricants such as the RCBS Case Slick (#749-001-341) or the Hornady One Shot (#749-001-065) to quickly lubricate large numbers of cases at once. An indispensable piece of gear that helps make spray lubing easy is a lube rack (#749-011-550) — a polymer block that holds cases upright and arranged to maximize their exposure to the spray.

Hornady spray cartridge case Lube

Editor’s Note: Ballistol Aerosol is other good spray product for regular full-length sizing (not heavy case-forming). It goes on clear (no chalky residue), it is ultra-slippery, and it will remove the carbon from your case necks as you apply Ballistol with a patch. This is my primary spray lube — but many folks dislike the distinctive Ballistol smell. Try before you buy.

diewax1601Sizing Die Wax
Over the years, many benchrest shooters have come to trust Imperial Sizing Die Wax (#749-001-052) for their case lube needs. It offers high lubricity and easily wipes off with a paper towel. In fact, its lubricity makes it a popular choice for case forming, for those wildcat folks who need to form their own unique or obsolete cartridges. Unlike lube pads or spray lubes, sizing wax is applied more naturally. You just put a little on your fingers and transfer it to the cases by handling them. As simple and easy as Imperial Sizing Die Wax is to use, it’s probably best for low-volume applications.

Dry Lubricant
Redding’s Imperial Application Media (#749-001-166) is a dry neck lube used to lube the inside of the neck, whether you’re full-length sizing or neck-sizing only. It consists of ceramic spheres coated with a fine graphite-based powder. You simply dip the neck into the container for a second to pick up the right amount of lube. This lube enables the expander ball to work smoothly throughout the case neck –instead of “grabbing” or “chattering” — to minimize case neck stretching.

Cartridge Case lubrication imperisal Die wax case sizing reloading

Editor’s Note: Dry Lube is also very useful if you ultrasonically clean your cases. After the ultrasound process, the inside of the case neck can be so “squeaky clean” that bullets don’t seat smoothly. A quick application of dry lube will help bullets slide into the neck easier and the neck “grip” on the bullets should be more consistent from round-to-round. Consistent neck tension is key to accuracy and uniform velocities.

Story Tip from EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.
Permalink Gear Review, Reloading 8 Comments »
June 4th, 2014

Sinclair Int’l Guide to Cartridge Case Lubrication

Sinclair International has a good article on Case Lubrication which shows the various products and application methods available. Part of Sinclair’s Step-By-Step Reloading series, the article shows how to apply Spray Lube, Die Wax, or conventional lube from a Pad. The story also explains how to use dry lube to slick up the inside of your case necks.

Spray Lubes
High-volume reloaders often turn to spray-on lubricants such as the RCBS Case Slick (#749-001-341) or the Hornady One Shot (#749-001-065) to quickly lubricate large numbers of cases at once. An indispensable piece of gear that helps make spray lubing easy is a lube rack (#749-011-550) – a polymer block that holds cases upright and arranged to maximize their exposure to the spray.

Hornady spray cartridge case Lube

Editor’s Note: Ballistol Aerosol is other good spray product for regular full-length sizing (not heavy case forming). It goes on clear (no chalky residue), it is ultra-slippery, and it will remove the carbon from your case necks as you apply Ballistol with a patch. This is my primary spray lube — but many folks hate the distinctive Ballistol smell. Try before you buy.

Sizing Die Wax
Over the years, many benchrest shooters have come to trust Imperial Sizing Die Wax (#749-001-052) for their case lube needs. It offers high lubricity and easily wipes off with a paper towel. In fact, its lubricity makes it a popular choice for case forming, for those wildcat folks who need to form their own unique or obsolete cartridges. Unlike lube pads or spray lubes, sizing wax is applied more naturally. You just put a little on your fingers and transfer it to the cases by handling them. As simple and easy as Imperial Sizing Die Wax is to use, it’s probably best for low-volume applications.

Cartridge Case lubrication imperisal Die wax case sizing reloading

Dry Lubricant
Redding’s Imperial Application Media (#749-001-166) is a dry neck lube used to lube the inside of the neck, whether you’re full-length sizing or neck-sizing only. It consists of ceramic spheres coated with a fine graphite-based powder. You simply dip the neck into the container for a second to pick up the right amount of lube. This lube enables the expander ball to work smoothly throughout the case neck –instead of “grabbing” or “chattering” — to minimize case neck stretching.

Cartridge Case lubrication imperisal Die wax case sizing reloading

Editor’s Note: Dry Lube is also very useful if you ultrasonically clean your cases. After the ultrasound process, the inside of the case neck can be so “squeaky clean” that bullets don’t seat smoothly. A quick application of dry lube will help bullets slide into the neck easier and the neck “grip” on the bullets should be more consistent from round-to-round. Consistent neck tension is key to accuracy and uniform velocities.

Story Tip from EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.
Permalink Reloading 5 Comments »
June 20th, 2011

First-Ever Eastern Cooper One-Shot Competition in August

Cooper one-shot competitionCooper’s One-Shot Competition has grown into a nationally-recognized event and this year Cooper Firearms of Montana has added a second shoot to be held at the Capitol City Rifle and Pistol Club in Augusta, Maine. East Coasters can now find out why Cooper owners have returned year after year for the popular One-Shot Event in Montana.

The inaugural Eastern One-Shot Competition will be held August 19-20, 2011 in Augusta, Maine. The Rimfire event will be held on August 19 while the Centerfire competition will be August 20th. Centerfire prizes include money, paintings, and a Cooper rifle awarded to the top shooter. Note: Interested Cooper owners should register early, using the Entry Form. The event is limited to the first forty (40) registered applicants, and entry deadline is July 1, 2011. If you have questions about the event, contact Gary at babydogham[at]gmail.com or 207-629-9163; or, contact Joe at Joe[at]cooperfirearms.com or 406-777-0373.

Cooper one-shot competition

Cooper One-Shot Competition — How It Works

The Money Shoots
The day begins at 10 am with four and eight person group competitions for cash prizes. A separate, per shot, entry fee of $5 for the eight-shooter groups and $10 for the four-shooter groups is collected with a 100% pay out to each winner. This shoot is designed to allow the competitors to familiarize themselves with the range, zero their weapons and get to know one another before the afternoon’s painting shoot.

The Main Event
Shooters get one shot at a dot the size of a pencil eraser at 150 yards. No sighters. No spotting scopes to dope the wind while other shooters succeed or fail. The closest shooter wins the target to take home to put on his wall and a chance to compete for a new rifle. What makes this competition unique is that the target is on a painting. The names of eight shooters will be assigned to each painting and written around its rim along with a number. That number indicates the order that competitors will shoot. The target will be a ¼ inch dot on a paper paster target that measures about 2 inches in diameter. This target is then taped to the painting. One at a time, competitors will get a shot at their paster. After the shooting flight is finished, the paster’s will be recovered and new ones put in their place. Shooters will be evaluated by the bullet strike relative to this target, not the symbolic target added to the painting as a reference point. The bullet hitting closest to the paster’s center will win the painting. The top two shooters on each painting will be given a chance to compete for the grand prize, a M56 Jackson Game Rifle in .264 Winchester Magnum.

Entry fee is $165.00 for the centerfire One Shot Event. That fee covers lunch at the range and a steak & lobster dinner with an open bar at the after-shoot party. There will also be a Friday 22LR competition using IR 50/50 rules. The entry fee for the rimfire shoot is $50.00 with 100% payout and lunch is on us. CLICK HERE for 2011 Eastern One-Shot Entry Form.

Permalink Competition, News No Comments »