June 17th, 2018

Black Rifle Blow-Ups — The Kaboom Collection

AR15 AR-15 Kaboom explosion pistol powder accident catastrophic destroyed
AR15 Kaboom big photo
This shocking photo of destroyed AR-15 bits and pieces was posted on Facebook by William Walter, a firearms instructor. William said this was “The worst AR-15 blow-up I have ever seen. The case head literally atomized …you can see the brass residue on the parts. The bolt was split in two also.”

There’s nothing inherently wrong with AR-platform rifles (well, except that they run dirty). Over the past six decades Eugene Stoner’s semi-automatic design has proven its merits in military and civilian applications. You may not know, but the original AR from 1955 was a .30-caliber. The Armalite AR-10 shot the 7.62×51 cartridge. Later, at the request of the U.S. Military, Armalite created a smaller version that became the M16/AR15. The rest was history. Now there are millions of AR “black rifles” in the hands of soldiers and sportsmen.

With so many ARs in circulation, it’s no surprise that some get used by folks who don’t know how to hand-load or otherwise fail to follow safe gun practices. The AR is actually a pretty sturdy rifle, but when it’s fed bad ammo, or abused, bad things can happen. Very bad things… commonly known as Kabooms.

Black Rifle Duplex Kaboom

The American Shooting Journal (ASJ) has compiled a set of particularly extreme AR Kabooms. Compiling the “evidence” from various web sites, ASJ has published nine (9) of the most Unbelievable AR-15 Fails. Here are two of the worst “AR-15 Fails”. CLICK HERE to see them all.

Nothing but busted parts after this catastrophic Kaboom…
AR AR16 m16 AR-10 AR-16 kaboom failure catastrophic reloads American Shooting Journal

Notice the bolt is still stuck in the barrel extension … with the rest of the gun in pieces.
AR AR16 m16 AR-10 AR-16 kaboom failure catastrophic reloads American Shooting Journal

Another view of this sad blow-up…
AR AR16 m16 AR-10 AR-16 kaboom failure catastrophic reloads American Shooting Journal

These catastrophic AR failures are eye-openers, that’s for sure. ASJ cautions: “Any weapon can fail if given the wrong ammunition, faulty reloads or a plugged barrel. Always be aware of what can happen at anytime if you fail to follow common sense and gun safety rules.”

ASJ Sources: Photobucket, Armory Blog, Pinterest, Northeastern Arms, Eric Nestor

Permalink Gunsmithing, Tactical 6 Comments »
May 2nd, 2017

Supersized BAT Sighted at Bruno Shooters Supply

BAT 50 BMG Action

BAT .50 BMG Model EX– Now That’s an Action!, by GAS
A while back, I stopped into Bruno Shooters Supply for a jug of powder and looked into the display case where the new actions are kept. Amid the usual array of BAT Machine, Kelbly and other actions, there was something unlike any action I’d seen before — all I can call it is the BIG BAT (It’s officially the BAT Model EX 2.5). I wasn’t too surprised at the weight (a beefy 13.7 lbs.), but until you lift it it’s hard to appreciate how solid, chunky, hefty, massive (pick your favorite adjective) this thing really is. The action is a 2.5″-diameter, 12″-long BAT for the .50 BMG cartridge. It is simply the biggest, slickest custom action on the planet. In order to give you some sense of scale, I photographed the action alongside a conventional BAT action for short-range Benchrest shooting and I put a .220 Russian case and a .30-06 case into the picture. I’ve handled and fired other .50 BMG actions/rifles before, but this BAT puts them all to shame, as far as fit and finish go.

BAT 50 BMG Action

The action is actually quite conventional in design and execution. The bolt is fluted and has two front lugs with a conventional, although super-sized, firing pin assembly. Any Remington-style trigger will mount by way of a normal trigger hanger, allowing for simplified maintenance or replacement in the field. The loading port is 5.5″ long and the barrel threads are 1.5″ x 16 tpi — nothing about this beast is small! There is a conventional rocker-type bolt release on the left side of the receiver body and a recoil lug is built into the bottom of the receiver. In reality, the action is very similar to any other BAT except for the size and it adheres to all of BAT’s high standards for quality of design, manufacture, fit, finish and just plain good looks. Slide that bolt back and it feels as tight as a small Benchrest action!

BAT 50 BMG Action

Given the BIG BAT’s $3,125.00 sticker price (before options), not many of us will ever have the opportunity to own or shoot one of these beauties (I certainly won’t). However, it is nice to know they exist and can be bought and enjoyed in many places. CLICK HERE for BAT EX configuration options.

Permalink Gear Review, New Product 5 Comments »
December 2nd, 2016

BAT Bargain — Save $100.00 on BAT Actions at Bruno’s

BAT Machine Actions Bruno Shooters Supply $100.00 off $100

Who wouldn’t like to save a cool hundred bucks, particularly on a BAT action? BAT Machine Co. in Idaho produces some of the most beautifully-machined, and smooth-running custom actions you can buy. There’s a reason so many world Benchrest and F-Class records have been set with BAT actions — they really are THAT good. The quality of machining, smoothness of bolt operation, precision of firing pin function, and general fit and finish are top-flight.

Right now you can SAVE $100.00 on all BAT Machine actions in stock at Bruno Shooters Supply. NOTE: This is a limited-time offer that applies to current, in-stock inventory only. All listed BAT action prices are a check or money order price. Any action purchased with a credit card will incur an additional 4% service fee. Moreover, there is an additional $40.00 for shipping per action, which must be shipped to a FFL dealer since the action itself is considered the “firearm” under Federal law.

BAT Machine Actions Bruno Shooters Supply $100.00 off $100

Permalink Gunsmithing, Hot Deals No Comments »
October 29th, 2016

Titanium Actions Coming Soon from Borden Accuracy

Borden Accuracy Rifles Titanium Action Alpine Magnum Jim

Jim Borden of Borden Accuracy tells us that he will soon offer Titanium actions: “The Alpine and Timberline family of actions will soon be available for sale with Titanium action bodies. Stay tuned!”

Jim provided this photo of a prototype Alpine Magnum Titanium action body on the scale. Note it is just a bit over one-half pound without bolt. That’s light-weight. Jim said he will “send bolt body, action body, recoil lug, bolt stop and bolt shroud for PVD treatment next week”. Jim hopes to be shooting the finished prototype Titanium Alpine action in two weeks.

AccurateShooter.com will provide a full report on the Borden Titanium actions when they reach final production stage. The reduced weight benefits game hunters who have to carry their rifles far afield all day long. We also like the idea of a Titanium action in a small-caliber, carry-around varmint rifle. With a low-recoiling cartridge such as the 20 Vartarg or .223 Remington, it makes sense to have a light-weight rifle that’s easy to pick up and move around.

Borden Accuracy Rifles Titanium Action Alpine Magnum Jim

Permalink Gunsmithing, New Product 9 Comments »
May 11th, 2016

Weaver Rail Adapters for Top-Grooved Receivers

Here’s a useful, cost-efficient product if you have a rifle with a 3/8″ dovetail on top of the action and you want to use a scope with Weaver-style rings. Kwik-Site offers three grooved receiver adapter products. The first is a two-piece set of short rails that clamp to a 3/8″-wide dovetail. Priced at just $13.50, this two-piece rail set, item KS-W22, is available in gloss black, matte black, and a stainless finish. If you prefer a one-piece rail, Kwik-Site offers the KS-W23 ($29.95) and KS-W24 ($30.95). Both are offered in matte black or silver (stainless-look) finishes. The KS-W24 will work with Romanian rifles.

These Kwik-Site products provide a low-cost solution if you want to take a scope from a rifle with a Weaver Rail and place the optic on a dove-tailed action without removing the scope from the ring set. Please note however, you’ll still need to re-zero the scope when you move it from one rifle to another. To order online, visit www.KwikSitecorp.com.

Permalink New Product, Optics 2 Comments »
May 23rd, 2015

What Makes an AR Accurate — Whitley Offers Answers

AR-X AR15 Upper

In our Shooters’ Forum, one member recently asked: “What makes an AR accurate? What parts on an AR can really affect accuracy — such as free-floating handguards, barrels, bolts, bolt carriers?” He wanted an honest, well-informed answer, not just sales pitches. Robert Whitley posted a very comprehensive answer to this question, based on his experience building and testing dozens of AR-platform rifles. Robert runs AR-X Enterprises, which produces match-grade uppers for High Power competitors, tactical shooters, and varminters.

AR-X AR15 Upper

Building an Accurate AR — What is Most Important

by Robert Whitley
There are a lot of things that can be done to an AR to enhance consistent accuracy, and I use the words “consistent accuracy” because consistency is a part of it (i.e. plenty of guns will give a couple great 5-shot groups, but won’t do a very good 10- or 20-shot groups, and some guns will shoot great one day and not so good on others).

Here are 14 key things we think are important to accuracy.

1. Great Barrel: You’ll want a premium match-grade barrel, well-machined with a good crown and a match-type chambering, true to the bore and well cut. The extension threads must also be cut true to the bore, with everything true and in proper alignment.

2. Rigid Upper: A rigid, heavy-walled upper receiver aids accuracy. The typical AR upper receiver was made for a lightweight carry rifle and they stripped all the metal they could off it to make it light to carry (which is advantageous for the military). The net result are upper receivers that are so thin you can flex them with your bare hands. These flexible uppers are “strong enough” for general use, but they are not ideal for accuracy. Accuracy improves with a more rigid upper receiver.

(more…)

Permalink Gear Review, Gunsmithing 8 Comments »
December 9th, 2012

Tuning Savage Actions Using Action Screw Torque Settings

This article originally appeared in the SAVAGE ACCURACY Blog

Stan Pate is the Captain of Savage’s National Championship F-TR Team. In this article, Stan explains how to adjust the action-screw tension on a three-screw Savage target action to achieve the best accuracy. The procedure described here can be used for any Savage action, including the two-action-screw models. However, the optimal settings for each particular rifle may vary slightly.

Match shooters need to get that extra accuracy edge from our ammunition and firearm. It is easy to get one of the Savage rifles to shoot accurately — even to match standards. If you are looking for that little bit more from your rifle, then please read a method that I have found that works for me. For those of you that are familiar with tuning a receiver (such as a match rimfire action), this article will be nothing new. For the rest of you, this might be new material. The goal here is to find the “sweet spot” for the rifle in relation to the torque settings used on the receiver screws. The proper torque settings [can vary] from rifle to rifle, but they will usually have a noticeable effect on consistent group sizes. A properly-torqued rifle will optimize the “harmonics” of the barreled action using the receiver screws so that the gun delivers peak consistency.

Here is the process I have found that works for me in tuning a Savage rifle receiver to peak accuracy. To use my process you first must already have a load that shoots accurately and consistently in your rifle, and I always use a fouled barrel like I’d be shooting in a match. This process works for me in both the model 10 (two receiver screws), and the model 12 (three receiver screws).

Seat Recoil Lug and Start with Front Action Screw(s)
On the model 12, I will first ensure that the recoil lug is seated securely against the stock by just lightly tightening up the front receiver screw then gently but firmly bumping the butt pad against the floor. Next I will tighten up the front two receiver screws to 30 inch-pounds starting at 20 inch-pounds and working up to the 30 inch-pounds in 5 inch-pound increments, and always tightening the front screw first and then the second screw. Once the front two receiver screws are torqued to the final torque setting, I will set the rear receiver screw to 5 inch-pounds and shoot a 5-shot group [to evaluate accuracy].

Increase Torque Incrementally on Rear Action Screw
After the group is shot and I am satisfied that I called all of the shots as good shots I will allow the rifle to cool off to about the temperature that the fist group was shot at. I will then add 5 inch-pounds to the rear receiver screw and shoot another five-shot group and allow the rifle to cool again. I repeat this process until I have tightened the rear receiver screw to 40 inch-pounds or have seen the groups get smaller and then start getting larger again. Once you have seen the groups decrease and then start to increase in size then you will have found the area of torque to work in. You can then can fine tune this to the exact inch-pound torque settings.

Tuning a Model 10 with Two Receiver Screws
The Savage model 10 action, which has two receiver screws, uses the same process as the three-screw model 12. Measure your group sizes and place the measurements in front of you so that you can see the bell curve showing where your best groups were achieved. NOTE — there may be a better way of doing this and if you should have one, I’d be very interested in hearing it. Good shooting and I hope to see you all on the range. – Stan Pate

This is on the Palma rifle using the torque settings of 30 inch pounds on the front two reciever screws, and 15 inch pounds on the tang screw, it is approximately 1/2″ center to center.
This is my second torque setting which for this rifle and this load is the optimal setting of 30 inch pounds on the front two reciever screws and 25 inch pounds on the tang screw, this group is approximately .180″ center to center.
This is the third torque setting which for this rifle is moving away from the optimal torque setting towards the heavy side of the scale. This torque setting results shows that you will usually see a “bell curve” of accuracy as you move into the optimal torque setting. This group is almost .7″ and the torque setting was 40 inch pounds.

This article was edited for length to appear in the Daily Bulletin.

Permalink Competition, Gunsmithing 15 Comments »
November 17th, 2012

2300-Yard Target Cam System — Components and Set-Up

Last week we featured a cool video put together by Forum Member Mark Dalzell (aka “MDSlammer”). The video shows Mark and a couple of his shooting buddies engaging a steel target at 2300 yards (1.3 miles). In order to see both hits and misses at that extreme range, Mark assembled a target-cam system that broadcasts multiple video cam feeds wirelessly to a receiver on the firing line. Down-range, Mark positioned a high-gain antenna. This was key — without the antenna the system’s useful range was less than 1000 yards. But with the hi-gain antenna Mark gets very clear signals from 2300 yards.

Mark’s video was very popular with our readers. Quite a few guys asked for technical details so they could start assembling a similar system. To explain the components and set-up of his 2300-yard target cam system, Mark has made a 10-minute video that shows the equipment and explains how all the gear is hooked up. Mark system uses a KW7305 2.4 Ghz, 8-channel A/V transmitter/receiver kit ($269.00), powered by Li-Ion batteries ($125.00 with charger) that offer about 3 hours of run-time. The video camera was a Panasonic HDC SD-60 with 35X zoom ($350.00). The antenna is a 2.4 Ghz 24 DBI Grid unit (model # HG2424EG-NG), that cost just $45.00 plus another $29.00 for cabling. To see how this all functions at long range, watch the video below.

Watch This 10-Minute Video to See Components of 2300-yard Target-Cam System

While Mark positioned his hi-gain antenna downrange near the target, you can, alternatively, set the hi-gain antenna at the firing line and point it downrange at the transmitter. Mark says that either configuration will work, as long as the hi-gain antenna is aimed carefully. You also need to elevate both Transmitter and Receiver antennas. Mark mounted his receiver on top of a 10-foot-tall Century C-Stand near the shooting station. From there he could watch bullet impacts on his 7″ Marshall color monitor placed on a portable bench.

Mark Dalzell Long Range video target camera

Mark Dalzell Long Range video target camera

Mark Dalzell Long Range video target camera

Mark tells us the whole system was affordable (under $1100.00 for everything including monitor and antenna), and it was easy to set up. Mark encourages readers who’ve been thinking about building a similar system for their long range shooting sessions: “The hardware is not difficult to configure… if I can do it, anyone certainly can.”

Permalink - Videos, New Product 1 Comment »
February 5th, 2012

SHOT Show Highlight: New Actions from Defiance Machine

There was a lot of buzz at the Defiance Machine booth at SHOT Show. The new Defiance actions are beautifully made, and they have already been used in some impressive custom rifle builds. Defiance, based in Columbia Falls, MT, has rolled out a line-up of four (4) custom actions: Rebel, Mutant (for tubeguns), Renegade (for .408 CheyTac), and Titan (for 50 BMG). These actions all feature beautiful machining, with Wire EDM-cut lug ways, advanced-design extractors, and a true one-piece bolt. All action materials are pre-hardened before machining to prevent changing tolerances during heat-treating. Southpaws will be happy that both right and left-hand versions of all four actions are offered.

The Rebel actions feature a Remington 700 footprint for ease of inletting and stock compatibility. Notably, the Rebel actions are available in four lengths. Buyers can choose Medium, X-Medium, Long, or X-Long lengths to accommodate all popular factory chamberings and extended-length handloads. Multiple magazine well cuts are available for all of today’s popular magazine types including hinged floorplates, DBMs, or single-shot. For a rock-solid optics installation, Defiance can supply Mil-spec Picatinny rails with various built-in MOA geometry. This stout rail is secured to the action with five pins and 1/4-28 X 1/2″ screws. Base price on a Rebel is $1270.00 (Medium) or $1300.00 (Long), with many available extra-cost options. Defiance says delivery will take at least 60 days from order date.

We were very intrigued by the Mutant action with its integrated recoil lug. Offered in Medium and Long action lengths, Defiance’s new Mutant receiver is made specifically for the Eliseo RTM and RTS Chassis Systems. The Mutant features an extended tenon length for increased barrel thread contact and bedding surface. (Extended tenon is optional on the Rebel). The Mutant’s integral recoil lug adds rigidity and simplifies tubegun assembly. Medium-action Mutants are typically built with a Guardian mag-well cut to accommodate AI and AW magazines, while Long-action Mutants fit AI single-stack magazines and can be of Badger length or the longer CIP length for extended-OAL cartridge loading. The starting price on a Mutant action is $1200.00 (before options), and delivery is at least 60 days out.

The beefy Titan (50 BMG) and Renegade (.408 CheyTac) actions look like they will become very popular with the big-caliber shooters. These jumbo actions share the advanced features of their smaller cousins, but they are sized up significantly to provide additional strength, stiffness, and bedding surface. On both big actions double-plunger ejectors are used in combination with M16 extractors for reliable case ejection. Both Titan and Renegade actions are offered either as a single-shot or repeater. The Titan is currently sold exclusively through Proof Research, while the Renegade is not yet in production. Defiance plans to build 600 Renegade actions later this year, after demand is filled for the Rebels and Mutants. The anticipated price for the Renegade is $1750.00.

OK, we suspect we’ve whet your appetite. For final pricing (with customer-ordered options) and availability call Defiance at (406) 756-2727. For specs, features, and lots more photos, visit DefianceMachine.com. Contact Proof Research, 406-756-9290, with order questions about the 50 BMG Titan action.

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Permalink Gunsmithing, New Product 3 Comments »
May 6th, 2011

Barnard Precision Unveils New, Updated Website

Fans of high-grade precision hardware should log on to the all-new Barnard Precision NZ Ltd. website. Barnard’s new site is easy to navigate, and you’ll find plenty of eye candy — large-size, high-quality photos. Many handsome Barnard-actioned rifles are showcased, including rifles belonging to AccurateShooter.com FORUM members. And of course there are complete, detailed specs (with weights and dimensions) for all the Barnard rifle actions.

Barnard model P action website

The new site showcases Barnard’s full line of actions, plus complete rifles, and accessories such as V-blocks and sight bases. For more than 18 years Barnard Precision has crafted some of the highest-quality actions available, and now there are more options than ever, in both Barnard P-type actions and Rem footprint actions. Click the links below to see particular action variants:

Barnard Action Types: Barnard model P action website

Barnard Offers Complete .338 Lapua Tactical Rifle — the Mighty Model ’10’
One of the highlights on the new Barnard web site is the new Barnard ’10’ Rifle. If you’re interested in a serious, heavy-caliber Tactical rig, the Model ’10’ is very appealing. The Model ’10’ is designed around the .338 Lapua case and Accuracy International 5-shot magazine.

Barnard model 10 .338 Lapua

The Model ’10’ chassis is constructed predominantly from billet 6061 aluminum, with heavy-duty, marine-grade anodizing. It can be fitted with either a Right-Hand or Left-Hand Barnard .338 actions. Both the cheekpiece and the butt plate are adjustable, and the Model ’10’ also has a combo rear buttspike/bag rider.

Story tip from Edlongrange. We welcome submissions from our readers.
Permalink Gunsmithing, New Product, News 1 Comment »
January 10th, 2011

X-Treme Shooting Products Unveils New Titanium Actions

X-treme Shooting Products TitaniumX-Treme Shooting Products will roll out a new series of Titanium-bodied receivers at SHOT Show 2011 in Las Vegas. These new repeater actions will come in three (3) sizes: Short Action (SA), Long Action (LA), and .338 Lapua Magnum. The Short Action and Long Action versions have a Rem 700 footprint so that they should fit any stock with Rem 700 inletting. The .338 version has been designed to fit the Accuracy International AICS CIP (large) chassis system — providing a perfect “drop-in” solution for tactical shooters looking to upgrade to the .338 LM.

Exclusive American-Made Titanium Custom Actions
X-Treme Shooting is currently the only US-based company offering custom Titanium actions for the general public. X-Treme Shooting’s new Ti actions feature a body CNC-milled from titanium billet, fitted with a conventional steel bolt. Even with the steel bolt, all the Titanium actions are significantly lighter than equivalent chrome-moly or stainless steel actions. The Titanium Short Action should be nearly 1/2-pound lighter than a steel action, while the Ti Long Action should be 10 oz. lighter than steel. The .338 LM action will be “much lighter than steel” according to Tom Myers of X-Treme Shooting.

X-treme Shooting Products Titanium

At SHOT Show, X-Treme Shooting will display the first production runs of titanium Short Actions and Long Actions. These will be priced at $1350.00. Price has not yet been set for the bigger .338 actions. All these actions are constructed as repeaters with bottom cut-outs for internal magazines. The Short Action and Long Action will work with standard Remington bottom metal. In the second half of 2011, X-Treme Shooting may offer solid-bottom versions of these actions for benchrest use.

TitaniumBenefits of Titanium Construction
Why Titanium? In addition to being much lighter than steel (by volume), Titanium is extremely strong, and very corrosion-resistant. That is why it is used for critical parts in jet airplanes and spacecraft. Titanium is as strong as steel, but 45% lighter. It is 60% heavier than aluminum, but twice as strong. Titanium has the highest strength to weight ratio of any common metal. Titanium does requires special milling tools and techniques for production. However, it is otherwise a near-perfect material for rifle actions because it is light, strong, and corrosion-resistant.

Future Solid-Bottom Receivers and 17-4 Stainless Actions
Weight-conscious benchrest shooters have wanted a benchrest-grade Titanium action for some time. Shedding a half a pound is huge when you’re trying to build a Light Varmint at 10.5 pounds including scope and rings. In response to this demand, X-Treme Shooting hopes to offer solid-bottom Titanium actions for benchrest use. Look for these to appear in the second half of 2011. In addition, X-Treme Shooting plans to offer a line of custom actions made from super-high-quality 17-4 stainless.

CLICK HERE for X-Treme Shooting Titanium Action Brochure (PDF).

To learn more about these new Titanium actions, or to order, call (513) 313-3464 or email ctmyers [at] x-tremeshooting.com. View other X-Treme Shooting products at X-TremeShooting.com.

Disclosure: X-Treme Shooting Products Advertises with AccurateShooter.com

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Permalink Gunsmithing, New Product 6 Comments »
January 17th, 2009

SHOT Show Report: Stiller Unveils Four New Actions

Stiller’s Precision Firearms showcased a variety of NEW custom rifle actions at the 2009 SHOT Show. Trust us, this is BIG News for builders of precision rifles, both rimfire and centerfire. Jerry Stiller has released no less than four (count ‘em FOUR) new stainless actions this year. They are all impressive, and we predict the new rimfire actions will sell like hotcakes.

Stiller Precision Actions Predator, 408, 40X

New Custom 40X-Clone Rimfire Action
Stiller Precision’s show-stopper is a new 22 rimfire action based on 40X Remington design. Called the Predator 25X, this 40X-clone will be offered both as a single-shot AND a repeater. This is a much-awaited product. We predict huge demand for Stiller’s rimfire actions. There is nothing else like it on the market. The repeater will be perfect as the basis of a rimfire silhouette action or a “tactical rimfire” gun. Stiller’s rimfire actions cost $800.00 and should be available by mid-2009.

Predator V — RBLP Ejectorless Action
The second offering, sure to be popular, is the new “Predator V” action, described by Jerry as “an affordable BR-style action aimed at the varminter.” It is offered in right bolt, left port only, with a cone bolt and no ejector. It’s optimized for bench use for precision varminting, though it certainly could be used in a 600-yard BR comp gun or F-Class rifle. Jerry tells us: “The Predator V is a RBLP version of our Predator line with a few special features. It has a Sako extractor on a coned bolt with no ejector. There is about a .003″ fit on the bolt with a pinned trigger. The main market is high-performance varminting or benchrest. Shown below is our new ‘full bling’ polished Predator V model featuring a blue-accented Picatinny rail, knob and shroud. It is also available in matte or black finish without rails.” The Predator V is IN STOCK NOW and costs $850.00 with rail.

Stiller Predator V action bling

P-1000 Long Range Action
The third new action unveiled by Jerry Stiller is the strong and versatile new P-1000 long range action. This is a RBLP, right-eject only unit with a beefy a 1.55″ diameter. The stainless P-1000 is offered in both short and long actions, with either .308 or magum bolts. The P-1000 is a very rigid action aimed at the long-range benchrest market. NOTE: the P-1000 short action will eject 284s and the long action will eject magnums such as the 300 RUM. The price for a P-1000 (with rail) is $850.00, and P-1000s should start to ship in late February, 2009.

YouTube Preview Image

New .408 Cheytac Action
Last but certainly not least is Stiller’s new TAC 408 action. This is a new long action with a .408 bolt-face. It is optimized for the .408 CheyTac and similar high-capacity, big-rim super-sized cartridges. This action should prove popular with ultra-long-range shooters. Call Jerry Stiller at (972) 429-5000 for price and availability of the TAC 408 action.

Spec, features, and options for Jerry Stiller’s other stainless and aluminum actions can be found on ViperActions.com.

Permalink Gunsmithing, New Product, News No Comments »