May 13th, 2018

Trijicon 5-50x56mm Long Range Scope — New and Powerful

Trijicon 5-50x56 scope accupower March Nightforce 10 times zoom long range optic new

At the 2018 NRA Show in Dallas last week, Trijicon unveiled a notable new scope that should interest Benchrest shooters and Long-Range competitors. The all-new Trijicon AccuPower 5-50x56mm Long Range Scope offers an impressive ten times zoom range, plus an illuminated reticle. This RS50 Series Second Focal Plane scope with 34mm main tube is offered in both MOA and MIL systems. The MOA version features 1/8 MOA clicks plus a reticle with 1 MOA subtensions at 40X power. The MIL version has 1/20 Milrad click values and a ranging style reticle with wind hold dot system. Both MOA and MIL versions have a full 100 MOA of elevation travel.

New Trijicon 5-50x56mm Scope Revealed at NRA Show in Dallas:

Credit Erik Cortina for providing this video.

With a $2700 MSRP, we expect Trijicon’s new 5-50X scope to have a “street price” of about $2400. That lines up with the NightForce 15-55x52mm Competition, now priced at $2352.00 on Amazon.

CLICK HERE for Trijicon Brochure with Full 5-50x56mm Specs »

The new Trijicon 5-50x56mm (RS50 Series) scope boasts some nice features. Employing extra-low dispersion glass, the scope offers high light transmission with minimal chromatic aberration. The magnification control lever can be moved to two different positions to suit the operator. Both MOA and MIL reticle styles are illuminated with 5 red and 5 green user-selectable brightness settings.

We hope to get our hands on one of these new Trijicon 5-50X scopes soon for testing. We’ll let you know how it stacks up against other high-magnification zoom scopes, such as the Vortex 10-60x52mm Golden Eagle, the Nightforce 15-55x52mm, and the March 5-50x56mm.

Trijicon 5-50x56 scope accupower March Nightforce 10 times zoom long range optic new

Trijicon 5-50x56 scope accupower March Nightforce 10 times zoom long range optic new

Please note, along with this 5-50x56mm scope, Trijicon has also introduced a 4.5-30x56mm RS30 Series scope. This 4.5-30X optic will be offered in both First Focal Plane and Second Focal Plane versions. SEE AccuPower Scope Brochure.

Product Tip from EdLongrange. Video and Trijicon Brochure from Erik Cortina.
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April 14th, 2018

Zeiss Offers “Tax Refund Days” Promo on Conquest V4 Scopes

Zeiss Sports Optics Conquest V4 Tax Refund Promotion Discount saving

Here’s a good deal if you are looking for a new optic for your hunting or match rifle. For the next month, April 15 through May 15, 2018, Zeiss is running a great promotion on its latest Conquest V4 optics line. The Zeiss annual “Tax Refund Days” promotion cover the entire Conquest V4 family of riflescopes. These are 1-4x24mm, 3-12x56mm, 4-16x44mm, and 6-24×50 models, which range from $799.99 – $1199.99 MSRP. Purchase any of these Conquest V4s and receive a $100.00 immediate in-store accessory credit at time of purchase. Take advantage of this promotion through participating Zeiss Authorized Sports Optics retailers throughout the United States. This applies to online purchases as well — you just apply the $100.00 credit to other products the online seller offers.

“The Conquest V4 riflescopes are getting lots of attention and praise” says Barton Dobbs, Director of Sales for Carl Zeiss SBE, LLC Sports Optics. “We listened to our customers as to what they want and demand from a scope in this price category, and we enjoy hearing how much these customers like the modern features and the high level of performance the V4’s provide.” NOTE: Quantities are limited. To locate a participating retailer, or to find out more about Zeiss products, visit Zeiss Sports Optics.

Zeiss Sports Optics Conquest V4 Tax Refund Promotion Discount saving

Positive Feedback from Canadian Customers on Zeiss Conquest V4 Riflescopes
Precision Optics, a Canadian scope vendor, says buyers been very pleased with Conquest V4 scopes: “We have placed a LOT of the Conquest V4 and V6 riflescopes recently and can report overwhelmingly positive feedback.”

Accoring to Precision Optics, customers who have field-tested Conquest V4 scopes have consistently reported the following:

The scopes are lighter than expected, considering they have a 30mm tube and are very robust.

The optical performance is outstanding, and compares directly with the Zeiss Victory products, and indeed the Conquest V4/V6 products utilize the same coatings. Users report that … the V4 glass is clearer and brighter than Nightforce SHV/NXS products.

The V4 and V6 turrets track and are repeatable. Customers have run side-by-side tests and report that the V4/V6 scopes track just accurately as a Nightforce NXS[.]

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August 31st, 2017

Vortex 15-60x52mm Golden Eagle Scope Review by James Mock

Vortex Optics Golden Eagle Scope 15-60x52mm review F-Class F-TR

Review by James Mock
If you were charged with building a scope for F-Class or long range Benchrest, what features would you want? Vortex asked that question, received feedback from many competitors, and then set out to build a new high-magnification, zoom comp scope that would set a new “performance for price” standard.

The new Vortex Golden Eagle has features that this shooter really appreciates. It has a power range of 15x to 60x with a 52mm objective lens. Vortex has attempted to keep the weight as low as possible and the cost reasonable. My initial impression is that Vortex spared no expense in developing this scope. The “street price” for this premium scope is a reasonable $1499.00. Plus it has Unconditional Lifetime Warranty. Given its features, performance, and price, I believe that this scope will sell very well.

Vortex Optics Golden Eagle Scope 15-60x52mm review F-Class F-TR

Here are the important features of the new 15-60x52mm Golden Eagle:

Quality Construction

Premium HD, extra-low dispersion glass
APO (apochromatic) objective lens system with index-matched lenses
XRP multi-coated lenses for max light transmission
ArmorTek extra-hard lens coating to protect lens from dust, dirt, and smudges
Fogproof and Waterproof (Argon gas purged)

Specifications

Field of View at 100 yards: 6.3 feet at 15X; 1.7 feet at 60X
Main Tube: One-piece 30mm
Length: 16.1 inches; Weight is 29.7 ounces
Objective Lens: 52mm
Eye Relief: 3.9 inches
Reticles: SCR-1 FCH; ECR-1 MOA

Testing the Golden Eagle

I recently tested a Golden Eagle with the ECR-1 reticle. On this model the Hash Marks subtend 1 MOA at 40X. There is also a fine crosshair reticle (SCR-1) available. Initial tests with the scope were done on June 28th and I was very impressed with what I saw. With a new scope I always shoot the square (box test) to test tracking and amount of movement. I shot the square today after shooting a 5-shot group at 250 yards (my longest available distance). Below is a picture of the box test target that I shot. Yes, shot #5 went through the exact same hole as shot #1.

Vortex Optics Golden Eagle Scope 15-60x52mm review F-Class F-TR

Below is the 250-yard target I shot before doing the box test. To get to the 100-yard target, I clicked down 14 clicks (1/8th MOA) and the scope was spot on. It is really a pleasure to use instruments that do exactly what they are supposed to do. With the Louisiana mirage, I shot this orange/white target at 40X instead of the maximum 60X. I did not have any problem seeing the 6mm bullet holes at 40X. The optics in this scope are to my old eyes are as good as any that I have used (regardless of price).

Vortex Optics Golden Eagle Scope 15-60x52mm review F-Class F-TR

Vortex Optics Golden Eagle Scope 15-60x52mm review F-Class F-TRCompetition Test Success — Golden Eagle Delivers a Win
My next use of this scope was at our monthly 600-yard match on July 15th. It was a typical mid-July day in north Louisiana — very hot and humid with light switching winds. The mirage was terrible, but I managed to squeak out a victory with a 188/5X score out of 200/20X possible. I shot the Golden Eagle at 40X all day and it performed perfectly. No one could see bullet holes today, even with the high powered premium spotting scopes. This is a quality scope and it may be a “lucky” scope in that I did not expect a win with a 6mm Dasher barrel with 2500 or more rounds through it.

Point of Aim Test with Hood Scope Checker
I also tested the Golden Eagle for holding Point of Aim (POA). For this procedure, I used the Hood scope checker (loaned to me by Bart Sauter). To use this, one mounts two scopes side by side. Ideally one scope has proven its ability to hold POA. Here I used a Valdada 36X BR model as my control scope. It has proven over an 8-year period of time to hold its point of aim. I mounted these scopes on my BAT/Leonard 6mm PPC and adjusted each to the same point on the target.

Vortex Optics Golden Eagle Scope 15-60x52mm review F-Class F-TR

As one can see in the above picture, these are big scopes. After the first shot, I noticed that the reticle dot on the Vortex seemed to be about 1/8th MOA to the right of its original position. I stopped to check for ring slippage (which I had experienced in prior tests). There was no apparent slippage, so I checked the parallax and found that there was some parallax correction needed. This was probably the source of the apparent shift in point of aim, but I cannot be sure of that. I fired three more shots (checking after each) and found no shift.

Vortex Optics Golden Eagle Scope 15-60x52mm review F-Class F-TR

After testing for POA shift, I fired the remaining rounds using different aiming points. I fired 5 rounds (upper left) using the Vortex and 3 rounds to the right of those using the Valdada scope.

CONCLUSION — A Very Fine Optic at a Reasonable Price
While testing this Vortex Golden Eagle scope, I developed a real fondness for it. I appreciate its great optics, eye relief and crispness of adjustments. If I thought that this scope did not hold POA, I would use my old Valdada in the 600-yard matches in which I participate. Further testing has shown no tendency to shift point of aim.

If I am allowed to keep this scope until the fall, I am sure that I will be able to see 6mm bullet holes in the white at 600 yards. Seeing those 6mm holes is very difficult, but that is my dream for a premium high-powered scope. During the summer months in north Louisiana, the air is much too “dirty” to spot small holes at 600 yards. By October, there should be some conditions in which one can use the premium optics to see bullet holes in the white at 600.

In summary, let me say that this scope has become one of my all-time favorites because of its bright, clear images and its great reliability. If you are looking for a great long-range scope that is reasonable in cost, try the Golden Eagle from Vortex.– James Mock

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August 25th, 2017

Creedmoor Sports Offers New “Scope Kennel” Scope Protector

Creedmoor sports scope kennel scope protector ar16 dennis demille

New Creedmoor “Scope Kennel” Padded Rifle Scope Protector
Creedmoor Sports has developed a deluxe scope protector that looks good. Made with thick padding and heavy webbing, this can definitely help shield expensive optics from impact damage or scrapes, protecting your investment.

The new Creedmoor Scope Kennel padded rifle scope protector fits any scope shorter than 13 inches, and protects your rifle scope while you’re on the range, stowing your rifle in a gun safe, or working on/cleaning your rifle. As you can see, the cover allows the use of an Empty Chamber Indicator.

The Scope Kennel is securely held in place by two heavy-duty adjustable straps, and is available with either Velcro closures or buckle closures. Made from tough 1000-dernier Cordura (with a soft, lined interior), this cover is offered in your choice of 24 different colors (e.g. tan, camo, red, blue, green) for $59.95. Made in the USA by Creedmoor’s own fabric wizards, the Scope Kennel can be customized with your name embroidered on the sides. The Scope Kennel was designed specifically for AR-platform rifles, but you can call 800-273-3366 to order for other types of rifles.

To demonstrate the strength of the Scope Kennel, Creedmoor GM Dennis DeMille did a pull-up with a red Scope Kennel hooked on a fork-lift blade.

Creedmoor sports scope kennel scope protector ar16 dennis demille

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February 11th, 2015

Revolutionary Flexible-Lens Optics Technology Zooms Instantly

Editor’s comment: The new lens technology described here is a big deal. The “flexible” polymer lens is nothing short of revolutionary — there’s never been anything like it on a riflescope (though our own human eyes have flexible lenses). In the world of optics, this is as noteworthy a development as the touch-screen was for personal computing. Flexible, “adaptive” lenses can potentially be employed for a wide variety of products, from cameras to spotting scopes. Think about the benefits of “instantaneous zoom” for security cameras.

Sandia RAZAR Rifle flexible polymer lens adaptive zoom riflescope Scope

Sandia’s RAZAR Scope Features Flexible Lenses That Can Change Focal Length Instantly
Sandia National Laboratories has developed a truly game-changing piece of optical technology at the direct request of the Department of Defense: the RAZAR (Rapid Adaptive Zoom for Assault Rifles). Fundamentally different than every other riflescope ever made, the RAZAR represents a revolution in lens design and function. Until now, all riflescopes used a set of rigid, hard lenses (usually glass). The new RAZAR utilizes an advanced set of flexible polymer lenses that allow the user to toggle between high and low magnification with the press of a button. The RAZAR can literally zoom in and out in the blink of an eye (250 milliseconds).

The RAZAR works in conjunction with a tactical-style optic, such the Leupold HAMR (top photo). This tandem (two-part) sighting system combines the conventional scope’s eyepiece and illuminated reticle with the RAZAR’s ultra-fast zooming capability. Unlike traditional eyepiece (ocular) magnifiers, the RAZAR sits in front of the primary optic.

See RAZAR Demonstrated in Sandia Labs Video

Game-Changing Technology
The RAZAR’s instant, push-button zoom capability gives soldiers the ability to change field of view and magnification without re-positioning their grip on the rifle, unlike traditional variable-power riflescopes. This capability can be invaluable to a soldier in combat.

Michael Squire, a former SFC with Special Operations Research Support Element, said the ability to zoom between near and far targets within seconds, without taking his hand off the weapon, is “game-changing.” Squire added: “The difference that can make, especially with somebody shooting back, could mean life or death…”

The secret to the RAZAR’s high performance lies within the development of the advanced technologies within the scope. A hermetically sealed, flexible polymer lens core encapsulates a proprietary polymer liquid, and this core then works in tandem with glass lenses to form the basis of the optical design.

Sandia RAZAR Rifle flexible polymer lens adaptive zoom riflescope Scope

Rapid changes in magnification are accomplished via a piezoelectric motor that changes the curvature of the lenses, achieving the correct positioning within 250 milliseconds within an accuracy level of 100 nanometers. When zooming, these electronically-controlled actuators act much like the tiny muscles that allow the human eye to change focus from near to far. Human eyes have flexible lenses controlled with muscles*. The RAZAR has flexible lenses controlled by tiny electric motors.

Sandia RAZAR Rifle flexible polymer lens adaptive zoom riflescope Scope

Sandia RAZAR Rifle flexible polymer lens adaptive zoom riflescope Scope

It’s important to highlight the reliability that Sandia was able to build into the RAZAR. The system requires very little mechanical power to operate, and can undergo up to 10,000 zoom actuations on a single set of two standard AA batteries. The ultrasonic motor draws no power unless it’s being used to bend the soft lenses, which makes the RAZAR very reliable. If the batteries do go flat, the RAZAR remains fully usable — the system simply stays at the last magnification level until the batteries are replaced.

Sandia RAZAR Rifle flexible polymer lens adaptive zoom riflescope Scope

Sandia’s RAZAR design provides a large, clear viewing aperture, without sacrificing any of the optical quality found in traditional riflescopes. The RAZAR is also shock-proof, vibration-proof and capable of operating in a very wide temperature range.

Sandia RAZAR Rifle flexible polymer lens adaptive zoom riflescope Scope

The Future of “Instant Zoom” Adaptive Lenses
Sandia Labs is developing other specialty lenses in the near-infrared, short wave-infrared and mid-wave infrared spectrum, primarily for DOD use. However, Sandia has suggested that its flexible polymer-lens technology could be adapted for other imaging applications where rapid zoom is needed, such as binoculars, spotting scopes, and even security cameras. For more information, visit the Sandia Labs website.

Sandia RAZAR Rifle flexible polymer lens adaptive zoom riflescope Scope

*Changing the curvature of the human eye lens is carried out by the ciliary muscles surrounding the lens. They narrow the diameter of the ciliary body, relax the fibers of the suspensory ligament, and allow the lens to relax into a more convex shape. A more convex lens focuses divergent light rays onto the retina allowing for closer objects to be brought into focus.


About the Author
Kip Staton is a freelance gun writer based in North Texas, and loves to blog about news within the firearms industry and his perceptions on marksmanship. Kip is a content marketer, copywriter and digital strategist for an award-winning Dallas marketing agency. To read more by Kip, visit KipStaton.com.

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January 28th, 2015

SIG Sauer Showcases All-New “Electro-Optical” Product Line

At SHOT Show 2015, SIG Sauer showcased a host of new optics products. SIG’s new Electro-Optics division will market a complete line of riflescopes, battle sights, red dot/reflex sights, rangefinders, binoculars, and spotting scopes. For ALL the new Electro-Optics products, SIG will be offering a lifetime transferable warranty. That’s impressive. SIG’s new electro-optical offerings, which are named after radio alphabet words (such as “Bravo” and “Tango”), are revealed in this video:

The “Whiskey” riflescope series is marketed as a rugged, affordable optical solution for hunters. Designed for law enforcement and tactical shooters, the “Tango” series of riflescopes feature 6X zoom ratios and meet MILSPEC requirements. Shown below is the 3-18x44mm Tango.

Sig Sauer Electro-Optical

The “Bravo” series of prismatic battle sights (illustration below) are pretty remarkable. An innovative new lens design provides an exceptionally wide field of view. SIG claims that Bravo battle sights offer a 50 percent greater field-of-view than similar battle sights.

Sig Sauer Electro-Optical

The “Romeo” series of red dot sights are designed for tactical carbines. The miniature “Romeo1″ Reflex Sight is designed to be slide-mounted on a pistol, and SIG will offer several pistols with the Romeo1 pre-installed. For big game hunting or extreme long-range shooting, SIG developed the “Kilo” rangefinder series, the “Victor” spotting scope line and the “Zulu” binocular series. The “Kilo” rangefinder (bottom photo) can reach out to 1600 yards and features an auto-dimming display. It is about the same size as a Leica CRF, but it is easier to hold. There are molded, rubberized finger grooves on the top and the whole unit has a nice feel in the hand.

Sig Sauer Electro-Optical

To learn more about other SIG Sauer products for 2015, visit the Shooter’s Log, presented by Cheaper than Dirt. For 2015, along with new handguns and rifles, SIG Sauer has rolled out a branded line of suppressors. SIG’s new cans should be popular with both tactical shooters and hunters (where suppressor use is allowed).

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February 22nd, 2014

Hot Deal: Close-Out Pricing on Premium-Quality Leica ER Scopes

If you are looking for a premium-quality hunting scope, with a wide magnification range, here is a great opportunity. Leica has just discontinued the Leica ER Scope Series. These are excellent optics that will be sold on “close-out” basis through EuroOptic.com. These Leica ER Scopes will be offered by EuroOptic for as much as $600.00 off the regular price, with target turret models available for as little as $1179.00. These scopes all include Leica’s Lifetime Warranty. According to EuroOptic: “Quantities vary and there will not be any more once they are gone”.

Leica ER Sale Eurooptic

Leica ER Rifle Scopes are rugged, bright, and precise. Each Leica ER Rifle Scope is designed for field use, with a long tube for easy mounting and eye relief to spare – perfect for large caliber hunting rifles. Choose from the Leica ER 2.5-10×42, an all around scope with a wide field of view for quick acquisition, or the Leica ER 3.5-14×42, a higher magnification scope with an optional ASV elevation turret.

Leica ER 2.5-10×42 Riflescopes | Leica ER 3.5-14×42 Riflescopes | Leica ERi Riflescopes

Leica ER Sale Eurooptic

Leica ER Sale Eurooptic

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July 2nd, 2013

Zeiss Offers Free Calibrated Elevation Turret with Some Scopes

Carl Zeiss Sports Optics recently announced the Zeiss-Kenton Industries Custom Turret Promotion. Here’s how it works. When you purchase a new CONQUEST HD5 Riflescope, you get one of two Kenton Custom Turrets calibrated for your specific load — either a LR Hunter Turret or Speed Dial Turret. Eligible models for this offer are the Zeiss CONQUEST HD5 3-15×42 #20 reticle with Lockable Target Turret, and the CONQUEST HD5 5-25×50 #20 reticle with Lockable Target Turret. The retail value for the free custom elevation turret is $125.00.

Zeiss Compensation Ballistics Turret Promotion Kenton Industries

Zeiss Compensation Ballistics Turret Promotion Kenton IndustriesMike Jensen, President of Carl Zeiss Sports Optics USA explains: “With our custom turret system, you just set the dial to the number 4 for 400 yards and you are done. No complicated math, no color codes to compensate for the bullet drop. The numbered markings on the custom turret by Kenton Industries are easy to read and intuitive. Our new CONQUEST HD5 scopes with 5x SuperZoom provide maximum brightness, image quality, and field of view[.] Now add a ‘no-hold-over’ PLEX reticle with the Kenton custom target turret and you have an extremely accurate and very robust long-range shooting setup.”

To receive a free Kenton Custom Ballistic Turret for your Zeiss scope, the qualifying CONQUEST HD5 Riflescopes must be purchased from an authorized ZEISS dealer between 07/01/2013 and 09/30/2013. Customers need to mail-in the completed order form together with a copy of the sales receipt. Once approved, the custom turret should ship within 2-3 weeks and is very easy to install. The order form requires typical ballistic information such as: cartridge, ammuntion type (factory or handload), bullet weight, zero distance. This offer is valid for U.S. customers only. To learn more about Carl Zeiss Sports Optics products visit www.zeiss.com/sports or log on to the Zeiss Sports Optics Facebook Page.

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February 3rd, 2013

Leupold Factory Tour Video — Plus Counterfeit Scope Warning

Leupold & Stevens, producer of riflescopes, spotting scopes, and laser rangefinders, offer an interesting two-part video showing the production process at Leupold’s Beaverton, Oregon manufacturing facility. Leupold is one of the world’s largest scope-makers. Each year, the Leupold factory machines over two million pounds of aluminum. Laid end to end, as extruded, this aluminum would stretch over 400 miles. That’s a lot of scopes. To see how Leupold produces its riflescopes, using high-tech machinery (as well as old-fashioned human craftsmen), watch the videos below.

Leupold Tour Part One
YouTube Preview Image

Leupold Tour Part Two
YouTube Preview Image

Leupold Issues Warning About Counterfeit MK4 Scopes
In related news, Leupold has issued a “customer alert” regarding counterfeit Leupold scopes illegally imported from the People’s Republic of China. These products bear many of the marks and trade dress of current Leupold riflescopes making them very hard to distinguish from authentic Leupold products.

Leupold MKIV Fake

Counterfeited Leupold Mark 4® riflescopes have begun to arrive with increasing regularity at Leupold’s headquarters for service. These products are not manufactured by Leupold and are not covered by the Leupold Full Lifetime Guarantee. Leupold employs serial number tracking for all its riflescopes, so if you have a suspect scope, call 1-800-LEUPOLD with the SN, and Leupold can immediately confirm whether the optic is genuine or not.

Most of the counterfeit scopes appear to originate from the People’s Republic of China, and have “Leupold Mark 4” laser engraved on the bottom of the turret in a silver etch, while the black ring on the objective is etched in white and does not include the name “Leupold.” The scopes also do not bear the Leupold medallion, a mark all Leupold scopes will always possess. An authentic Mark 4 riflescope will always be engraved black on black and have the name “Leupold” engraved on the black ring.

Identifying Marks (Click for photos): Turrets | Objective | Bottom Label

This story was originally posted in late 2010.
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August 15th, 2012

Get $80.00 Rebate on Select Leupold VX-3 Scopes

Leupold Scope RebateLeupold is now offering an $80.00 rebate on select VX-3 rifle scopes. The qualifying optics are: Leupold VX-3 3.5-10x40mm (SKUs 59260, 66090, 66110) and Leupold VX-3 4.5-14x40mm (SKUs 59270, 66215, 66220, 66225). This offer is limited in time. The scope(s) must be purchased from August 2nd through September 30, 2012.

To get your $80 rebate, complete and return the Leupold Rebate Form with the original on-line or store sales receipt, plus original UPC bar code cut from the product packaging (originals only, copies not accepted). Mail these materials to: Leupold VX-3 Riflescope Promotion, Dept. # LS12-8710, P.O. Box 472, Scottsdale, AZ 85252-0472. CLICK HERE to download Leupold Rebate Form.

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March 16th, 2012

Zeiss “No-Fault Policy” For Duralyt Scopes and Conquest HD Binos

Zeiss Sports Optics logoCarl Zeiss Sports Optics has introduced a “No-Fault Policy” to supplement its current limited lifetime transferrable warranty. This “No-Fault Policy” is being initially offered to customers who purchase new Conquest HD Binoculars or Conquest Duralyt Riflescopes from Zeiss dealers in the USA or Canada. Under this new No-Fault Policy, Zeiss will repair or replace any of these new models for free for the first five years of ownership if they are damaged during normal and intended use. NOTE: The new policy is for original owners only and is not transferrable.

“This policy is being introduced at a time when customer service expectations are at their highest level in history. Asking consumers to pay for a repair soon after they have just invested a considerable amount of money for a high quality product is simply no longer acceptable,” said Michael A. Jensen, President of Carl Zeiss Sports Optics. “Anybody who purchases equipment at this quality level always takes great care of it. However … serious hunters and birders are hard on our optics, and accidents happen. This new policy simply allows those who purchase Conquest HD or Conquest Duralyt products to pursue their passion with extra peace of mind.”

Zeiss Duralyt 3-12x50

Product Registration Required for “No-Fault” Coverage
Customers must register all new Conquest HD Binoculars and Conquest Duralyt Riflescopes with Zeiss within 60 days of purchase to qualify for the No-Fault Policy. Scope owners will then be covered for five (5) years from the initial date of purchase. Visit www.zeiss.com/register to register these products online. This No-Fault Policy is in addition to the limited lifetime transferrable warranty. To learn more about the No-Fault Policy for Conquest HD Binoculars and Duralyt riflescopes, visit www.zeiss.com/sports or call 1-800-441-3005.

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March 2nd, 2012

New Nikon 3-9x40mm EFR Scope for Rimfire and Airgun Rifles

If you’re an airgun or rimfire shooter, you need a scope with the ability to focus at short distances, since you’ll typically be shooting at targets from 10 yards to 55 yards (50m). Scopes used for centerfire shooting may not be able to focus sharply at these close ranges. That’s why various manufacturers have developed EFR (Extended Focus Range) scopes.

Add Nikon to the list of EFR scope-makers. Nikon just introduced the ProStaff Target EFR 3-9x40mm riflescope featuring an adjustable objective lens that can focus from 10 meters to infinity. That’s right, Nikon’s affordable ($189.95) new 3-9X EFR scope goes all the way down to ten meters (about 33′). That makes it very useful for Airgun and BB gun shooters.

The waterproof, fogproof, and shockproof EFR boasts Zero-Reset turrets with 1/4-inch adjustments at 50 yards (i.e. 1/2″ at 100 yards). Make note of that — if you are shooting mostly at 100 yards and beyond, you don’t want this scope — it really has been set-up for the short stuff. Total adjustment at 100 yards is 80 MOA; that give you an adjustment range of about 40″ at 50 yards. Nikon’s new ProStaff 3-9x40mm Target EFR scope comes with a matte finish, and retails for just $189.95.

Nikon EFR 3-9x40 rifle scope

Like all Nikon riflescopes, the Target EFR is optimized for use with Nikon’s Spot On™ Ballistics program. The Spot On program can be purchased for iPhone, iPad and Android or utilized for free at nikonhunting.com/spoton.
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July 23rd, 2011

$12,000 Scope Among Hendsoldt Optics Line from Carl Zeiss

We first ran this video a couple years back, but now that Carl Zeiss Sports Optics has taken over North American distribution of the super-premium Hensoldt line of optics, we thought our readers might enjoy another look at the remarkable Hensoldt 6-24x72mm SAM scope.

This optic integrates superb, ultra-bright apochromatic fluorite glass with a calculator module that provides ballistic info and weather data to the shooter. SAM stands for “Sniper Auxiliary Module”. An integrated ballistics calculator can be programmed for up to four different types of ammo. Sensors in the integrated ring mount measure weather parameters. These values, as well as scope data, are then directly projected into the visual field of the eyepiece. This provides selectable displays of elevation clicks, windage clicks, angle of fire, cant angle, temperature, and air pressure.

This 6-24x72mm Hensoldt may be the most advanced rifle scope on the planet. With a price of $11,982.00, it is certainly one of the most expensive. Take a 360° tour with this cool video:

Please enable Javascript and Flash to view this VideoPress video.

More Hensoldt Scopes — Video Review
Here’s a related video from CS Tactical, reviewing a variety of Hensoldt scopes, including the “monster” 6-24x72mm.

Hensoldt Tactical Optics Product Information Brochure.

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January 26th, 2011

SHOT Show Report: Sightron’s Upgraded 10-50X and NEW 1-7X

Alan Orr of Sightron unveiled some impressive products at the 2011 SHOT Show. The first is a fully upgraded Sightron SIII 10-50X60mm LR scope. When first introduced in 2010, Sightron’s 10-50X scope became an immediate “hit” with AccurateShooter.com readers. The 10-50X offered seriously powerful magnification with reasonable weight — all in an affordable package. With “street price” under $1000.00, the Sightron 10-50X was much less expensive than rival “big-name” scopes with comparable magnification. As first released, Sightron’s 10-50X scope was a smart choice for F-Classers and long-range benchresters. For 2011, the 10-50X scope has been made even better, yet the price has stayed pretty much the same. That’s the kind of progress we like.

As upgraded, Sightron’s 10-50x60mm scope has new target turrets, a new reticle option (hash marks with center dot-in-circle), and dual-color, selectable illumination. At around $995.00, this scope is in a class by itself. Looking at the offerings of other scope-makers, you’d have to pay hundreds more to get a comparable 50-power riflescope with reliable tracking and good glass. Yes the Schmidt & Bender 12-50X scope is better, but the S&B costs three times as much as the Sightron. The Sightron 10-50X’s price to performance ratio makes it a very attractive choice for F-Class and long-range Benchrest.

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Sightron 1-7X scopeExclusive ‘Sneak Preview’ of
New 1-7X Sightron ‘Tactical Hunter’

After showing us the updated 10-50X scope, Sightron’s Alan Orr gave us an exclusive look at Sightron’s prototype 1-7X Tactical/hunting scope. This all-new scope offers wide field of view, selectable illumination and choice of 1/3 MOA or Centimeter clicks. This versatile, illuminated riflescope can be used for everything from tactical matches to big-game safaris. We definitely expect to see this compact 1-7X illuminated optic on many multi-gun rigs in the months ahead. The “street price” for the new 1-7X is expected to be right around $950.00. Expect the first units to ship in 120 to 150 days (i.e. at the start of summer).

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May 8th, 2009

Cabela's Bargain: Burris Scope & Garmin GPS for $189.88

Here’s a sweet deal for you game hunters out there. Cabela’s is offering a FREE Garmin eTrex hand-held GPS with the purchase of a 3-9x40mm Burris Fullfield II scope. Total cost: $189.88. Typical “street price” for the 3-9×40 Fullfield II Rifle Scope by itself is $209.95, while the Garmin eTrex retails for $99.00 by itself. So, if you subtract the value of the GPS, you’re getting the Burris scope for about 90 bucks. Not bad for a scope with fully-coated lenses and the Burris No-BS “Forever” warranty. Here’s what one Cabela’s buyer said: “Great price for a scope and a free GPS. I have no problems recommending this scope it is a good quality scope with clear optics. The GPS is first generation without the features most people want but it will get you home if you are lost.”

Burris GPS Combo Sale

The Garmin eTrex GPS is considered a rugged classic. It is compact and light weight at mere 5.3 ounces with batteries, with the buttons positioned on the side for easy, one handed operation. The casing is rugged and waterproof to IPX-7 standards. The eTrex will operate for about 15 hours on two AA batteries.

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November 10th, 2008

New March 5-32×52 Scope and New March Tactical Reticle

Jim Kelbly recently let us know that a new March Scope will be entering production soon, a 5-32x52mm. This scope will be available, exclusively from Kelbly’s Inc., in December 2008. The new 5-32x52mm will be the second variable-focal-length scope in the March line-up, complementing the superb March 10-60x52mm zoom. Our friend Joe Friedrich recently received one of the 10-60X March zooms and he has compared it with Leupold comp scopes and his own 45x March. “You won’t believe it”, Joe told us “but I think this thing is brighter than my 45X March when set at the same magnification. As for the Leupolds… well, there’s no comparison. This 10-60X is a fantastic scope.”

March 5-32x52 zoom scope

The new 5-32×52 scope features 60 MOA of elevation and 40 MOA of windage adjustment, with 1/8th MOA clicks. Max field of view (at 5-power) is 4 degrees, and eye relief is near constant, at 3.34″ to 3.89″ over the entire zoom range. Three reticles will be offered: Fine Cross-Hair, Fine Cross-Hair with 1/8” OR 1/16” dot, and the new MTR-1 tactical ranging reticle. The scope has a 30mm main tube, is 16.02″ long, and weighs 25 ounces. The 5-32x52mm March will be priced at $2400.00, or $2600.00 with MTR-1 reticle. For more info, call Kelbly’s at (330) 683-4674.

CLICK HERE for March 5-32×52 Spec Sheet (Excel file).

March MTR MTR-1 scope reticleNew MOA-based MTR-1 Ranging Reticle
Kelbly’s is also introducing a new MTR-1 ranging reticle for March scopes. Though dubbed a “tactical” reticle, it does NOT have military-style mil dots (for use with milrad scope clicks). The reticle is a fairly fine black crosshair with vertical and horizontal “hash marks” at 2 MOA intervals (when set at 20X magnification). Both the horizontal and vertical directions have a total of 20 divisions each. These hash marks can be used to hold elevation and windage for long-distance target engagement.

For American shooters, who typically think in inches and MOA, the MTR-1 reticle should proove “user-friendly” for horizontal hold-offs at long range since one MOA roughly translates to 1″ per hundred yards. For example, if you are shooting at 600 yards with the scope set at 40X, and your sighter ends up 12″ wide of your point of aim, that’s 2 MOA so you can simply move over one hash mark. This is a quite different than mildot ranging, but we think many competition shooters and varmint hunters (as opposed to military snipers) will find it easy to use. (On the 10-60X52 March scopes, you can also use this reticle at 40-power. At that setting, one hash-mark span equals 1 MOA.)

CLICK HERE for March MTR-1 Reticle Information (.pdf file).

The MTR-1 reticle can also be used for ranging. For example, if a target of a known height of 12″ is seen through the scope and appears to match one hash-mark division, then you can calculate your distance as follows. Dividing 12″ by 2 MOA equals 6, which means the distance to the target is 600 yards. For benchrest shooters, the hash marks can be used to easily estimate the size of a group (provided of course, you are shooting at a known distance and can see the bullet holes).

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May 14th, 2008

FIRST LOOK: Sightron 8-32×56 Scope

Just this week, Sightron sent us one of the new Sightron SIII 8-32×56 LR D rifle scopes for evaluation. This new optic features a 30mm main tube and weighs 24.7 ounces. Clicks are set in 1/4-MOA increments. The reticle is a fine cross hair with 1/4-MOA dot. The scope comes with a 3″ sunshade, turret covers, and rubber-connected, see-thru lens caps. Jason Baney had a chance to test the scope and give his initial impressions of its optical qualities. We will follow this “First Look” report with more extensive testing of the scope’s mechanical tracking and long-range resolution.

Overall, Jason was extremely impressed with the new scope. It was very bright, with excellent color rendition and contrast. The image remained bright and sharp out all the way out to the edges, with no shadowing or distortion. Compared to a Nightforce 12-42×56 BR scope set at 32-power, Jason thought the Sightron had better contrast and more vivid colors. Jason concluded: “At this point, the new Sightron seems like a good value, and compares well with the Nightforce BR model.”

Parallax and Focus
Importantly, the Sightron’s parallax control worked perfectly. There was no lash issue and Jason was able to attain minimal parallax with the target at maximum sharpness. With some other scopes, if you set the scope to have the target in best focus, you’ll still have too much parallax.

Elevation and Windage
This is a scope you can use to 1000 yards. Jason ran the adjustments top to bottom and recorded 75 MOA of both Elevation and Windage, based on the stated 1/4-MOA click Value. (That’s 75 total MOA available from one extreme to the other.) The target knobs have 15 MOA per turn and operate VERY smoothly and positively. Jason said the clicks “feel similar to Nightforce NXS clicks, but the Sightron clicks engage with a slightly softer feel, with less resistance.”

Resolution Tests
Jason used two resolution charts, the USAF 1951 Optical Chart, and a line-width/text size chart. To judge resolution, Jason did a comparison test of the new Sightron 8-32×56 and a Nightforce 12-42×56 BR, with both scopes set at 32x with their sunshade attached. Jason looked through both scopes at the resolution test targets at 100 yards, and then at target frames, grass, and flowers at 300 yards. Viewing was done late in the day, with some shadows on the range. Keep in mind these were less than ideal conditions for viewing.

The test charts have incrementally smaller focus lines and text. Both scopes were able to resolve down to the same line/text level on the two resolution charts. The new Sightron showed comparable, but VERY slightly less resolution than the NF. Both could identify the same size of text, but the NF saw it just a bit more crisply. Jason reports: “I could go to the same resolution level with both scopes, but the last line was just a touch more crisp with the Nightforce. Still, the Sightron is very close in resolution.”

Contrast and Color Fidelity
The Sightron was the winner in this category. In fading light, the Sightron delivered better contrast. Green, yellow, red, and white colors showed more differentiation and all the colors were more vivid. Weathered target backer boards also showed more contrast through the Sightron. Jason checked this several times nearing dusk, and the Sightron always seemed more vivid and showed more contrast looking at a patch of grass and colored vegetation. In terms of color temp, the Nightforce has a more whitish tone, whereas the Sightron seemed “warmer” with more vivid colors.

Brightness/Light Transmission
Along with its superior color and contrast, the Sightron seemed to be consistently brighter through the fading light. We note, however, that manufacturers’ published light transmission factors are nearly identical for the Sightron 8-32 and the Nightforce 12-42. The greater brightness of the Sightron is Jason’s subjective perception, but he said “the Sightron definitely seemed brighter.”

View to Edge
With many zoom scopes, at high magnification, the center of the “circle of light” is bright and sharp, but the edges are faded or shadowy. The brightness attenuates (fades out) on the edges. In addition, you sometimes see some image distortion or focus loss at the edges. The Sightron showed none of these issues. At SHOT show, this editor looked through a prototype 8-32 Sightron and it was bright and sharp all the way out to the edges. Jason observed the same thing: “The Sightron was noticeably clear edge to edge, where the Nightforce showed some fading or darkening at the edges. This point was quite surprising to me.” Jason also noted that the Sightron had about a 3-4″ wider field of view at 100 yards.

Fringe Effect with Highly Reflective Subjects
With the Sightron, when looking at extremely bright, reflective objects, such as a car’s chrome trim, Jason did observe some minor fringing–what he called a “thin halo”. This also appeared around the edge of a white target paper viewed in bright light. A through-the-lens photo appeared to show edging colors (purple fringe), so this may be Chromatic Aberration*. It wasn’t a major issue and it did not affect the sharpness or contrast of the viewed object itself. This was visible only on the periphery of very bright objects.

Conclusion–Impressive Optics for $825.00
We only were able to comparison-test one sample of each scope, Sightron vs. Nightforce. As noted, the performance was very close, and it is possible that different samples might perform slightly better or worse in each optical category. In this test the Nightforce had a very slight edge in resolution, while the Sightron was brighter. We plan to do more testing, with bullet-hole targets set at long ranges. That should give us a better sense of how the Sightron can resolve bullet holes and target lines out past 300 yards. Jason will also do a box-test to check the tracking and repeatability of the Sightron. Based on what we’ve seen so far, however, the Sightron, with a “street price” of about $825.00, is a very good value. Jason concludes: “Given the 8-32 Sightron’s price point, I’d say most people will feel it is a great scope for the money.”

*Chromatic aberration occurs in a riflescope when white light, bent by the objective lens, separates into different colors (wavelengths), each color bending at a slightly different angle. When that occurs, the colors don’t focus at the same point. This most often appears as a deep blue/purple or yellow edge on the image, particularly straight black and white edges.

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