April 14th, 2018

Zeiss Offers “Tax Refund Days” Promo on Conquest V4 Scopes

Zeiss Sports Optics Conquest V4 Tax Refund Promotion Discount saving

Here’s a good deal if you are looking for a new optic for your hunting or match rifle. For the next month, April 15 through May 15, 2018, Zeiss is running a great promotion on its latest Conquest V4 optics line. The Zeiss annual “Tax Refund Days” promotion cover the entire Conquest V4 family of riflescopes. These are 1-4x24mm, 3-12x56mm, 4-16x44mm, and 6-24×50 models, which range from $799.99 – $1199.99 MSRP. Purchase any of these Conquest V4s and receive a $100.00 immediate in-store accessory credit at time of purchase. Take advantage of this promotion through participating Zeiss Authorized Sports Optics retailers throughout the United States. This applies to online purchases as well — you just apply the $100.00 credit to other products the online seller offers.

“The Conquest V4 riflescopes are getting lots of attention and praise” says Barton Dobbs, Director of Sales for Carl Zeiss SBE, LLC Sports Optics. “We listened to our customers as to what they want and demand from a scope in this price category, and we enjoy hearing how much these customers like the modern features and the high level of performance the V4’s provide.” NOTE: Quantities are limited. To locate a participating retailer, or to find out more about Zeiss products, visit Zeiss Sports Optics.

Zeiss Sports Optics Conquest V4 Tax Refund Promotion Discount saving

Positive Feedback from Canadian Customers on Zeiss Conquest V4 Riflescopes
Precision Optics, a Canadian scope vendor, says buyers been very pleased with Conquest V4 scopes: “We have placed a LOT of the Conquest V4 and V6 riflescopes recently and can report overwhelmingly positive feedback.”

Accoring to Precision Optics, customers who have field-tested Conquest V4 scopes have consistently reported the following:

The scopes are lighter than expected, considering they have a 30mm tube and are very robust.

The optical performance is outstanding, and compares directly with the Zeiss Victory products, and indeed the Conquest V4/V6 products utilize the same coatings. Users report that … the V4 glass is clearer and brighter than Nightforce SHV/NXS products.

The V4 and V6 turrets track and are repeatable. Customers have run side-by-side tests and report that the V4/V6 scopes track just accurately as a Nightforce NXS[.]

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February 13th, 2018

Tall Target Test — How to Verify Your Scope’s True Click Values

Scope Click Verify Elevation Tall Target Bryan Litz NSSF test turret MOA MIL

Have you recently purchased a new scope? Then you should verify the actual click value of the turrets before you use the optic in competition (or on a long-range hunt). While a scope may have listed click values of 1/4-MOA, 1/8-MOA or 0.1 Mils, the reality may be slightly different. Many scopes have actual click values that are slightly higher or lower than the value claimed by the manufacturer. The small variance adds up when you click through a wide range of elevation.

In this video, Bryan Litz of Applied Ballistics shows how to verify your true click values using a “Tall Target Test”. The idea is to start at the bottom end of a vertical line, and then click up 30 MOA or so. Multiply the number of clicked MOA by 1.047 to get the claimed value in inches. For example, at 100 yards, 30 MOA is exactly 31.41 inches. Then measure the difference in your actual point of impact. If, for example, your point of impact is 33 inches, then you are getting more than the stated MOA with each click (assuming the target is positioned at exactly 100 yards).

Scope Click Verify Elevation Tall Target Bryan Litz NSSF test turret MOA MIL

How to Perform the Tall Target Test
The objective of the tall target test is to insure that your scope is giving you the proper amount of adjustment. For example, when you dial 30 MOA, are you really getting 30 MOA, or are you getting 28.5 or 31.2 MOA? The only way to be sure is to verify, don’t take it for granted! Knowing your scopes true click values insures that you can accurately apply a ballistic solution. In fact, many perceived inaccuracies of long range ballistics solutions are actually caused by the scopes not applying the intended adjustment. In order to verify your scope’s true movement and calculate a correction factor, follow the steps in the Tall Target Worksheet. This worksheet takes you thru the ‘calibration process’ including measuring true range to target and actual POI shift for a given scope adjustment. The goal is to calculate a correction factor that you can apply to a ballistic solution which accounts for the tracking error of your scope. For example, if you find your scope moves 7% more than it should, then you have to apply 7% less than the ballistic solution calls for to hit your target.


CLICK HERE to DOWNLOAD Tall Target Worksheet (PDF) »

NOTE: When doing this test, don’t go for the maximum possible elevation. You don’t want to max out the elevation knob, running it to the top stop. Bryan Litz explains: “It’s good to avoid the extremes of adjustment when doing the tall target test.I don’t know how much different the clicks would be at the edges, but they’re not the same.”

Should You Perform a WIDE Target Test Too?
What about testing your windage clicks the same way, with a WIDE target test? Bryan Litz says that’s not really necessary: “The wide target test isn’t as important for a couple reasons. First, you typically don’t dial nearly as much wind as you do elevation. Second, your dialed windage is a guess to begin with; a moving average that’s different for every shot. Whereas you stand to gain a lot by nailing vertical down to the click, the same is not true of windage. If there’s a 5% error in your scope’s windage tracking, you’d never know it.”

Scope Tall Test level calibrationVerifying Scope Level With Tall Target Test
Bryan says: “While setting up your Tall Target Test, you should also verify that your scope level is mounted and aligned properly. This is critical to insuring that you’ll have a long range horizontal zero when you dial on a bunch of elevation for long range shots. This is a requirement for all kinds of long range shooting. Without a properly-mounted scope level (verified on a Tall Target), you really can’t guarantee your horizontal zero at long range.”

NOTE: For ‘known-distance’ competition, this is the only mandatory part of the tall target test, since slight variations in elevation click-values are not that important once you’re centered “on target” at a known distance.

Permalink Optics, Tech Tip No Comments »
May 24th, 2017

Schmidt & Bender 5-25×56 PM II 2FP Scope Review

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Schmidt & Bender 5-25×56mm PM II SFP Review
Test conducted by RifleShooter.com
For police and military use, the Schmidt & Bender PM II (Police Marksman) is the gold standard of extreme use rifle optics. Other high end scopes aspire to the PM II’s level of durability, optical clarity, repeatability, and performance. With our assistance, RifleShooter.com recently conducted an in-depth test of Schmidt & Bender’s 5-25×56 PM II, Second Focal Plane (SFP) version. Here are the results…

» READ FULL 5-25x56mm PM II Scope Review (LONGER VERSION)

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

The test scope is a 5-25×56 PM II (SKU: 677-911-995-A8-A2) with a Second Focal Plane (SFP) P4FL2-MOA reticle; double-turn elevation with rotation indicator; single turn windage; 1/4-MOA click values; illuminated reticle; and side adjustable parallax from 10 meters to infinity. This is an impressive beast — a big, sturdy, well-made optic.

Schmidt & Bender scopes have sophisticated features and a wide array of available options. The many options and features of the 5-26x56mm PM II are explained in this Schmidt & Bender video:

Second Focal Plane (SFP) Reticles
The Second Focal Plane (SFP) reticle design works well for long-range target shooters, benchrest shooters, hunters, and law enforcement. Often, SFP reticles are associated with Minute of Angle/MOA-based reticles. For target shooters who like to dial-in the elevation corrections, frequently SFP is the preferred reticle type. Also, these reticles are offered with thinner lines and markings to aid in target shooting, by not covering up as much of the target area, which is absolutely necessary in such cases as F-Class and Benchrest shooting. With a SFP reticle the size/width of the reticle lines stay constant at all magnifications.

Tall Target and Box Tests

Commentary by Rifleshooter.com Editor
To get an idea of how the PM II tracked I wanted to conduct a tall target and box test. I set up a couple of ISPC targets at 100 yards (below).

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

The target on the left is for the tall ladder test, the target at the right is for the box test.

With the scope zeroed* I set up a tall target test at 100 yards. I placed a 1″ orange dot on a pair of targets (above, left). We then used a four foot level to draw a plum line moving up from the dot and fired the three shot group below.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

I dialed 30 MOA of elevation on the scope and fired another group. Measuring the distance between the two groups, would indicate how well the scope is tracking.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Since 1 MOA is 1.047″ at 100 yards, 30 MOA would be 31.41″ (30 x 1.047″ = 31.41″), looking at my tape measure, everything checked out (above).

Next I conducted a quick box test and set up an IPSC target with a orange paster at 100 yards. To do this I first Fired one round with the scope zeroed, then…

Dialed 6 MOA left, fired one round
Dialed 15 MOA up, fired one round
Dialed 6 MOA right, fired one round
Dialed 6 MOA right, fired one round
Dialed 15 MOA down, fired one round
Dialed 6 MOA left and fired one round

After this, you want to see two holes close to each other on the first target, as well as the correct spacing dialed in between each hole, so how did the PM II do?

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Well, it worked like a champ! The rest of my time with the PM II has been equally impressive.

SUMMARY — Our Assessment of the 5-25×56 PM II

Here are our key conclusions from testing the Schmidt & Bender PM II 5-25×56 SFP:

— It’s a lot of scope. The PM II is pretty much the best scope you’ll be able to buy anywhere in the world. There is a reason they are in such widespread Military and Law Enforcement use, it has earned its reputation.

— Great zero stop. The PM II has the easiest-to-adjust turret and zero stop system I have ever used. On the PM II, Schmidt & Bender’s exclusive “Sub Zero Stop” system allows movement below zero. On the test scope it was 1.75 MOA. This is a great feature if you switch ammunition or elevation and need to bump your zero down.

— Tracks well. This was to be expected with its widespread use by military units throughout the world.

— Crisp, precise adjustments. The tactile feel of the knobs is exceptional.

— Crystal clear glass. Great light transmission and reticle.

This Schmidt & Bender catalog page shows reticle options for the 5-25×56 PM II:

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review
Click image to zoom

Turrets and Controls — How They Work

On the right side of the optic, you’ll notice a .250 MOA single-turn windage adjustment knob. On the top you’ll note the .250 MOA elevation adjustments. The tactile feel of each “click” is impressive — crisp and precise. A large parallax knob is located on the left side of the turret. The smaller knob located closer to the eyepiece is the adjustment knob for the illuminated reticle.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Here the view from behind the scope. Note the DT (double turn) elevation turret. At its current setting in the photo above, it is still on the first revolution (.250 MOA below 0) and as adjustments within the first revolution are made, you’d read the white numbers. During the second revolution, the windows in the top of the turret turn yellow, as shown below.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Test Rifle — .300 Win Mag in Accuracy International AICS AX Chassis
For testing and evaluation purposes I mounted the PM II in Spuhr ISMS mount on a custom made .300 Winchester Magnum rifle. Testing was done with handloaded ammo: Sierra’s 195-grain Tipped MatchKings over Norma brass and Hodgdon H4831SC powder.

This is the test rifle I used. It was built primarily with parts from Brownells.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

  • Stiller action
  • Accuracy International AICS AX Chassis
  • Shilen Select Match barrel, #7 1:10″ twist
  • Badger Ordnance FTE brake
  • Spuhr ISMS mount
  • Jewel HVR trigger
  • Aimpoint T1 micro sight
  • Sierra 7 bipod
  • Here is the Schmidt & Bender 5-25x56mm PM II SFP (foreground) alongside three other S&B products:
    5-25×56 PM II FFP (Desert Tan), 12-50×56 PM II, 3-20×50 PM II

    Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

    Better Pricing, Better Warranty, Better Availabilty
    In addition to increased production and availability, Schmidt and Bender has reduced retail pricing on PMII models 14-19% depending on the model. S&B Marketing Director Kyle Brown commented, “S&B improved its warranty in the USA for 2017, and now offers a USA 20-Year Transferable Limited Warranty. We have reduced our pricing to be competitive; and have greatly increased our on-hand inventory levels to supply our customers with complete and on-time deliveries.”

    Schmidt & Bender has made an effort to support the Precision Rifle Series (PRS). Brown said “for 2017 we have made a very hard push to become more active in PRS with our brand and with our products.”.

    To learn more about Schmidt & Bender optics, CLICK HERE.


    * Zeroing Process for PM II: The zero stop and turret settings are controlled by set screws. Zeroing is a breeze. You don’t have to move caps, insert shims, move clutch mechanisms, and so on. Simply loosen the screws, swing the turret back to “0” and you are all set. To establish a 100-yard zero, I hung a target at 50 yards, fired one round, dialed a correction, fired a confirmation shot and moved back to 100 yards. I fired one round at 100, made a correction and was zeroed. That’s it, three rounds, done.

    Permalink - Videos, Gear Review, Optics 8 Comments »
    July 10th, 2016

    Sightron SIII 10-50x60mm Under $980.00 — Sales Help Forum

    Sighton 10-50x60 scope optic competition target dot mildot MOA riflescope sale

    Need a high-magnification scope for long-range competition? Among quality scopes with 40+ power, we think the Sightron SIII 10-50x60mm scope may be the best value on the market right now. For a limited time, these scopes are available through Amazon.com for under $980.00. That’s less than half the price of a Leupold 7-42x56mm VX-6, and about 42% of the cost of a Nightforce 15-55X competition model. The Sightron is a good product with a lifetime manufacturer’s warranty.

    Half the Cost of Leupold 7-42x56mm
    Proceeds from Each Sale Help Support Shooter’s Forum

    MOA-2 Reticle

    Target Dot Reticle

    Fine X-Hair Reticle

    Mil-Dot Reticle

    NOTE: There are a variety of reticle options and both 1/4-MOA and 1/8-MOA click versions are offered. Read the product description carefully when ordering to be sure you’ve selected your preferred reticle type and click value.

    (more…)

    Permalink Hot Deals, Optics 4 Comments »