April 14th, 2018

Zeiss Offers “Tax Refund Days” Promo on Conquest V4 Scopes

Zeiss Sports Optics Conquest V4 Tax Refund Promotion Discount saving

Here’s a good deal if you are looking for a new optic for your hunting or match rifle. For the next month, April 15 through May 15, 2018, Zeiss is running a great promotion on its latest Conquest V4 optics line. The Zeiss annual “Tax Refund Days” promotion cover the entire Conquest V4 family of riflescopes. These are 1-4x24mm, 3-12x56mm, 4-16x44mm, and 6-24×50 models, which range from $799.99 – $1199.99 MSRP. Purchase any of these Conquest V4s and receive a $100.00 immediate in-store accessory credit at time of purchase. Take advantage of this promotion through participating Zeiss Authorized Sports Optics retailers throughout the United States. This applies to online purchases as well — you just apply the $100.00 credit to other products the online seller offers.

“The Conquest V4 riflescopes are getting lots of attention and praise” says Barton Dobbs, Director of Sales for Carl Zeiss SBE, LLC Sports Optics. “We listened to our customers as to what they want and demand from a scope in this price category, and we enjoy hearing how much these customers like the modern features and the high level of performance the V4’s provide.” NOTE: Quantities are limited. To locate a participating retailer, or to find out more about Zeiss products, visit Zeiss Sports Optics.

Zeiss Sports Optics Conquest V4 Tax Refund Promotion Discount saving

Positive Feedback from Canadian Customers on Zeiss Conquest V4 Riflescopes
Precision Optics, a Canadian scope vendor, says buyers been very pleased with Conquest V4 scopes: “We have placed a LOT of the Conquest V4 and V6 riflescopes recently and can report overwhelmingly positive feedback.”

Accoring to Precision Optics, customers who have field-tested Conquest V4 scopes have consistently reported the following:

The scopes are lighter than expected, considering they have a 30mm tube and are very robust.

The optical performance is outstanding, and compares directly with the Zeiss Victory products, and indeed the Conquest V4/V6 products utilize the same coatings. Users report that … the V4 glass is clearer and brighter than Nightforce SHV/NXS products.

The V4 and V6 turrets track and are repeatable. Customers have run side-by-side tests and report that the V4/V6 scopes track just accurately as a Nightforce NXS[.]

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November 18th, 2012

Feature Story on Varmint and Hold-Over Reticles

In our articles collection, you’ll find a story of interest to varminters and game hunters. Choosing And Using Modern Reticles, by author John Barsness, reviews the many “hold-over” reticle options currently available for hunting scopes. The latest “hunting hold-over” reticles, such as Leupold’s Varmint Hunter Reticle, offer both vertical marks (for hold-over) and horizontal bars or dots (for wind compensation). The idea is to allow the shooter to move quickly from one target distance to another, without having to dial elevation changes with his scope turrets. Likewise, the horizontal wind-hold markings give the shooter reference points for winds of specific velocities. That makes the process of “holding-off” for wind much more predictable.

In the Barsness article, which originally appeared in Varmint Hunter Magazine, the author traces the history of ranging/hold-over reticles starting with the Mildot reticle. Barsness explains how to use the mildot reticle, noting how it is best used with a First Focal Plane scope design.

First Focal Plane vs. Second Focal Plane Designs
If nothing else, you’ll want to read this article just to improve your understanding of First Focal Plane (FFP) vs. Second Focal Plane (SFP) optics operation. If you want to use the markings on a reticle to range at various magnification levels, then you want the FFP design, preferred by the military. If, on the other hand, you prefer the viewed appearance of your reticle to stay constant at all power levels, then you’ll probably prefer the SFP design.

Barsness explains how the modern “Christmas Tree” design reticles, such as the Zeiss Rapid Z, evolved, and he explains how to use these reticles to adjust your point of aim for different target distances. These hold-over reticles can be very handy, but you must remember that the yardages which correspond to the stepped vertical markings are determined by the ballistics of your cartridge. Thus, if you change your cartridge, or even change your load significantly, your hold-over yardage values will change. You will then need to field-test to find the actual value of the reticle’s hold-over points.

Even if you are not a hunter, you can benefit from reading the Barsness article. For anyone shopping for a varmint scope, the article is a “must-read”. And Barness clears up some common misconceptions about FFP vs. SFP optics. Barsness also offers good, common-sense advice. We agree with Barsness when he says that some reticle designs have become too complicated. Barsness writes:

These days there are reticles with everything from a few extra dots along the vertical cross hair to reticles that cover the bottom third of the scope’s field of view, providing an aiming point for every blade of grass in North Dakota. Here we run into the basic fact that simpler reticles are easier to use, if not quite so versatile.

Personally, I particularly like simple reticles in shorter-range varmint rifles, whether rimfires or small centerfires such as the 22 Hornet. These aren’t likely to be used at extended ranges, or in any significant amount of wind. Hence, something like the Burris Ballistic Plex reticle provides about all the information we can realistically use — the reason there are Burris Ballistic Plex scopes on most of my rimfire or small centerfire varmint rifles.

CLICK HERE to Read ‘Choosing and Using Modern Reticles’, by John Barsness.

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