May 16th, 2017

GEAR News: CMP Announcement RE Shooting Jacket Rules

CMP Civilian Marksmanship Shooting coat jacket monard rules

The great shooting coat controversy has been quelled — at least for the next few months. The CMP will not be banning any brands of commonly-used jackets for now. On Monday, May 15th, the CMP announced that it would halt “strict enforcement” of shooting jacket rules for the remainder of 2017, until new, clear standards can be adopted. Here is the CMP’s statement:

Moratorium on Strict Enforcement of Shooting Jacket Rules
The Civilian Marksmanship Program has declared a moratorium on strict enforcement of rules on design and construction of shooting jackets for 2017 until specific procedures and measurement tools are developed to determine the maximum amount of support coats may provide to competitors.

“The CMP 2018 Rules will contain further clarifications concerning jacket design and construction specifics going forward,” said Mark Johnson, CMP’s Chief Operating Officer. “The CMP strives to institute rules that promote true marksmanship skill and those that resist the equipment race (gamesmanship) facets of our sport.”

“The CMP’s matches are being developed to enhance competitor learning and increasing their own personal marksmanship skill set, not who can buy the best gadget for means of additional support or easier access to higher point totals,” Johnson said.

In 2017, the primary emphasis of the shooting jacket rule, 6.6.1 in the CMP Highpower Rifle and Pistol Competition Rules, 21st Edition – 2017, still applies. The rule states, in part, “Shooting jackets made of flexible material may be worn in CMP Rifle events. Shooting jackets may have shoulder, sling and elbow pads providing those pads are not constructed so as to provide rigid artificial support. Jacket constructions that use back braces (…) or other non-flexible materials are prohibited.”

For 2018, it is the CMP’s intent to provide a clear and concise definition of “flexibility” as it relates to support materials used in shooting jackets and a simple measurement process capable of passing or failing jackets across the entire spectrum of highpower rifle jackets in the marketplace.”

Jacket Rules Not Abandoned Completely
We commend readers to look at the second-to-last paragraph in the CMP statement above. The CMP says Rule 6.6.1 still applies, requiring shooting jackets to be made of “flexible materials” without “rigid, artificial support”. Keep that in mind. While the CMP is halting “strict enforcement” of jacket rules, you still can’t show up with a bionic exo-skeleton.

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June 9th, 2014

Monard HP Ultimate Shooting Jacket — Great Fit with 29 Panels

Monard HP Ultimate Shooting Coat JacketEditor: Our friend Shawn McKenna is a talented High Power competitor. A few years back Shawn ordered a Monard custom-fitted shooting coat. He found the jacket helped him shoot higher scores with less fatigue. He liked Monard coats so much he decided to sell them. Here is his report.

By Shawn McKenna
For years and years, like most High Power shooters, I used an “off the rack” shooting jacket and thought I was happy with it. There may have been one or two adjustments the supplier would accommodate during ordering, but by and large it was like wearing a suit that you bought without the benefit of having it tailored.

I’m always looking to improve my scores, and in 2008 I set out to find a better shooting jacket. I happened across Monard during a web search and was surprised to learn that they took an astounding 19 different measurements during the fitting process. I thought, “This has to be much better than an off the rack coat.”

The custom coat that Monard offers to High Power shooters is called the “HP Ultimate” coat. Consisting of 29 different sections or panels, it offers customization of the composition, thickness and type of material used in each panel. And the 19 different measurements include separate right and left shoulder profiles and separate front and back profiles.

Monard HP Ultimate Shooting Coat Jacket

The measurements are entered into a computer program where the ratios between various points are checked against a historical database of similar measurements. Any ratios that fall outside these typical ranges are double-checked or re-measured before confirming the order to insure the fit is right the first time. This measuring process produces a custom-fit coat with the right balance of support and comfort in each position, be it for across the course, long range, or Palma shooting.

How to Get a Monard HP Ultimate Shooting Coat
Order Monard High Power Ultimate shooting jackets from McKenna Shooting Sports. Call Shawn McKenna personally at (719) 322-3127 to talk about options, measurements, and pricing.

Shawn says: “At first glance, the order form seems daunting. But don’t worry, I can guide you through each part of the order form and explain the many different options. I’m not just the owner of McKenna Shooting Sports and a Monard-trained rep, but an experienced rifle competitor who can explain the features desirable for across the course vs. prone shooting coats (i.e. higher arm orientation, shorter torso options for prone) as well as the many different choices within those two basic options.”

McKenna Shooting Sports, LLC
1826 E Platte Ave, Suite 110
Colorado Springs, CO 80909
Ph: 719-322-3127
shawn [at] mckennasports.com

GET 10% OFF
Mention this Accurateshooter.com article and get 10% off of your order placed by June 30th. Also, see Shawn on Commercial Row at Camp Perry for 10% off Camp Perry orders.

Monard HP Ultimate Shooting Coat Jacket

Monard HP Ultimate Shooting Coat JacketTestimonials from Monard Customers:
“The level of support, fit and comfort of my Monard is far superior to anything else available. My old coat feels like a sweatshirt by comparison. Shooters have to try one to fully appreciate the difference. All the Monard shooters with whom I talk agree – there’s no going back once you get one.”
–Jeff Lindblom, 2013 Missouri State Champ (in photo)

“Shooting offhand in a Monard is a much-needed upgrade; the support in the lower back you get with a profile matching your lower back is great! While shooting prone it is comfortable and easy to buckle all the way down.”
–Laura Monturi, Colorado State Rifle team

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February 13th, 2012

Shooter Profile: Rodrigo Rosa — A Rising High Power Star

Rodrigo RosaRodrigo Rosa is a rising star in the world of High Power shooting. Though he’s been shooting competitively for only four years, he is already a top contender at the national level. In 2011, the young marksman, who now lives and works in New Hampshire, was right up with the leaders at the NRA National High Power Championships. At Perry, Rodrigo finished second in the Across-the-Course phase and finished third in the Long Range National Championship. He was also on the winning 2d Amendment match team with Norm Houle. Over the last couple of years, Rodrigo has lead the field at New England High Power events. He was New Hampshire State Champ in 2010 and 2011, Massachusetts State Champ in 2011, and Mid-Range (and Across-The-Course) Vermont State Champion in 2009. Rosa is also a two-time NE Regional Across-the-Course Champion, winning titles in 2008 and 2011. That’s an impressive shooting resume for a young man who shot his first High Power match in 2008, and had to borrow money to get his first real match rifle.

Rodrigo tells us: “I had a good year in Camp Perry in 2011. My goal was only to perform well in the across-the-course event, so taking second place after Carl Bernosky by only 3 points and taking third place in the Long Range event was a real treat.”

What was the “secret” of Rosa’s meteoric rise from rookie shooter to podium performer at Camp Perry? Rodrigo replied: “Key factors? I would have to say dry-fire practice, and working on consistency and the ‘mental game’. I spent many hours dry-firing last winter, particularly working on my off-hand position. Despite such training my technique was still flawed at the beginning of the year. I could dry-fire very well but the results did not show on target. I believe that my ability to finally build a mental sequence that allows me to perform the same movements time-and-time again, on demand, made the greatest difference on my results.”

Interview with Rodrigo Rosa — Born to Shoot

We had the opportunity to chat with Rodrigo. He told us how he got started in competitive shooting. He then discussed his shooting techniques and his reloading methods. At our request, Rodrigo offers some tips for new sling-shooters. Rosa also revealed his preferences in hardware and shooting gear.

Rodrigo Rosa

AccurateShooter: Rodrigo, tell us about your background. How did you get involved in shooting?

Rosa: I grew up on a farm in Brazil. When I was about 11 years old my mom bought me an air rifle, and I later inherited my grandpa’s Winchester .22LR. I hunted many rabbits and ducks with that rifle until I was 17 years old when my studies became more important. I traveled to the USA in late 2004 to finish my Veterinary clinical training at Cornell University, where I met my wife-to-be. We got married in 2005 and moved to California for internships. It wasn’t until early 2007 when I decided to buy a rifle and join a gun club. All I could afford was a simple .308 hunting rifle. With the .308, I tried (with limited success) to hit small metal silhouettes at 600 yards. Despite my limited success I decided to educate myself about the shooting sports, predominantly by reading books by David Tubb and Nancy Tompkins, as well as foreign publications.

My wife Kate and I moved to New Hampshire in 2007, when I decided to take a personal loan to buy a better rifle, suited for High Power competition. I joined the Nashua NH Fish and Game Association and started to work on my skills. In late 2010 I met Norm Houle who became a good friend and gave me extra motivation to stay in the game.

AccurateShooter: What are your strengths and what are the areas where you need improvement. What training methods do you use to improve those weak points?

Rosa: My strengths are my ability to concentrate, attention to detail and perseverance. The areas I tend to work on the most are my mental systems. I know I am able to shoot a perfect score in any yard line and shooting position, so I spend most of my time coming up with ways to make my shooting sequence as meticulous and repetitive as possible. I believe I still have a lot of work to do….

AccurateShooter: What are the best and worst things about competing at Perry?

Rosa: 2011 was my second year competing in Perry (I also started the match in 2009 but had to leave early for a family issue). I had one of the best weeks of my life! Perry is a wonderfully beautiful and challenging range, and the friends I had the pleasure to share my time with were the highlight of the trip. From previous experience, I would say that the heat and humidity are the worst things
about Perry, but 2011 gifted the competitors with amazingly pleasant weather.

Rodrigo Rosa
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AccurateShooter: Rodrigo, do you have any tips for novice High Power shooters?

Rosa: Start by investing in good equipment — buy quality and you will buy it only once. Seek the advice of successful shooters. All truly good shooters will be glad to share their “secrets”, for it is only worth winning when all competitors can shoot their best. Develop a safe, reasonably good load for your cartridge and quit messing with it! If you already have an accurate rifle your time is much better spent working on your hold than on developing loads. Be ready! Develop checklists, plans, mental sequences. The less you can worry about, and the more prepared you are for adverse situations at the firing line, the better your chances will be.

AccurateShooter: Speaking of load development, tell us what load you shoot, and what methods you use to create accurate ammo.

Rosa: I shoot the 6mmXC cartridge Across-the-Course and Long-Range (except for Palma, of course). I use Federal 210M primers, Norma brass, Hodgdon 4350 powder, Sierra 70gr bullets for 200 yards and DTAC 115gr bullets from 300 to 1000 yards. My loads are: 39.5 grains H4350 with the Sierra 70gr; 37.5 grains H4350 with DTAC 115gr for 300 yards; and lastly, for Mid-Range and Long-Range, I use a stout H4350 load with the DTAC 115s. (Editor: Start at 37.0 grains H4350 and work up with the 115s; Rodrigo’s long-range load is near max).

The most important steps of my reloading are accurate load weighing (I weigh ALL loads) and bullet selection. I select all the bullets I shoot from 600 to 1000 yards by bearing surface and length. I do not spend any time doing elaborate load testing (and re-testing). All I care about is having a reasonably accurate load that functions smoothly in my rifle.

Rodrigo Rosa
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Rodrigo RosaAccurateShooter: Tell us about your shooting coat and sling. Do you have any advice concerning coat fit and sling adjustment?

Rosa: I currently wear a Monard shooting coat. Proper fit is fundamental for anyone who wishes to be competitive in any category of position rifle shooting, and the folks at Monard certainly have got that down. My advice to anyone who is going to invest hard-earned money in a coat is to make sure that the maker uses at least 15 different measurements of his/her body. Anything less than that is not acceptable in my opinion. I also prefer the stiffness and coolness of canvas over leather. Leather tends to mold better to ones body but softens and shrinks when wet. Since High Power shooters must often shoot in the rain I believe that canvas is a more durable and stable material. For a sling I always used the Superior Shooting Systems Heart Breaker Sling. This is an extremely well-made sling crafted to last many decades. It is important to cut the new sling to fit one’s arm diameter so that the “hinge” is located between the arm and the hand. I did not know this important “trick” for the longest time until David Tubb called my attention to it at Perry last year.

Rodrigo Rosa

AccurateShooter: You shoot a Tubb 2000 match rifle. Tell us the features of the T2K you really like, and explain how you set up the sights and buttstock for different positions.

Rosa: The Tubb 2000 rifle is the only rifle I have ever shot Across-the-Course. It is an extremely user-friendly gun that truly allows the shooter to extract all that a competitive target rifle can offer. I used to have only one buttstock and was therefore forced to make adjustments between shooting positions. Now I have three buttstocks individually set up for each position — a major asset in my opinion. My off-hand buttstock is probably the least orthodox of the three. It has a good deal of added weight to help balance the gun and a very narrow buttplate. I like the narrow buttplate because it fits my small shoulder better. This plate is, however, kept mostly flat (very shallow curvature) in order to comply with NRA rules (less than 1/2 inch depth).

Canting — I truly enjoy the ability to cant the T2K rifle to fit my body. Anyone who watches me shooting seated will notice that I use a great amount of canting in that seated position. Canting is a major asset and can greatly improve most shooter’s position by increasing comfort. The key thing with canting is you must be consistent with the amount of cant you use (hint: learn how to use a bubble level).

Forearm — I have shortened the tubular handguard/fore-end of my rifle in order to improve balance as well. People occasionally ask me: Didn’t you get nervous about cutting such an expensive rifle? (I had taken a loan to buy the rifle and it wasn’t even paid for yet). My answer was “Not at all!” My philosophy is that if something does not fit you or does not do the job for which it was intended, then you MUST act on it. It is pointless to have a rather costly piece of machinery if it does not lead to 10s and Xs.

Sights — I use a Warner #1 rear sight and a “Right Sight” in the front. I currently use the “Houle Tube” sight extension tube (bloop tube) made by Norm Houle. This bloop tube has been a major improvement. It lets me have a short, balanced gun for off-hand and a long gun for sling-supported positions. I must admit that I did not believe these extension devices would repeat zero until I tried one. The Houle Tubes are incredible. These extensions come in 2″, 4″ and 6″ lengths and repeat zero flawlessly every time.

Gunsmithing — Dick Beaudoin from Derry, NH has done most of the customization work on my rifle. I want to give him credit. His patience and attention to detail has made all the difference.

Editor’s Comment: We thank Forum member Rodrigo Rosa for taking the time to share his knowledge with our readers. He is a very talented, yet humble young shooter who works diligently on his game. We have no doubt that one day we will see Rodrigo standing on top of the podium at Camp Perry. Boa sorte Rodrigo, we wish you 10s and Xs and continued success…

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November 21st, 2011

Hardback Shooting Coats $50.00 Off at Creedmoor Sports

As part of its Holiday Sale Promotion, right now Creedmoor Sports is offering a big discount on its famous Hardback shooting coats. You can save $50.00 on all three models of the Hardback: Heavy Cordura Nylon, Heavy Cordura Nylon with Leather Sleeves, and the All-Leather Traditional Hardback. CLICK HERE to visit Creedmoor Sports’ webstore. There you’ll also find many other Holiday Sale Items.

Creedmoor Sports Sale Hardback Coats

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February 1st, 2011

ISSF Steps Up Regulation of Super-Stiff Shooting Clothing

The ISSF has issued new Rule Interpretations regarding shooting coats, pants, shoes, and headgear. Existing ISSF Rules limit how thick and stiff clothing can be. Shooting outfits have gotten progressively thicker over the years, and for 2011 the ISSF has adopted new procedures for policing clothing standards. In addition, the ISSF ruled that use of body taping (such as ankle taping) is illegal.

ISSF Clothing

ISSF Statement Concerning Shooting Clothing
The ISSF urges all National Federations to study these rule interpretations carefully to ensure that their athletes and coaches who will compete in the 2011 World Cups are prepared for them. For rifle shooters whose shooting jackets, trousers and boots were in full compliance with ISSF Rules during 2010 competitions, these rule interpretations should not require them to make any significant changes.

For shooters who try to use jackets and trousers that measure at or near the maximum stiffness of 3.0mm, they will need to make sure their clothing is somewhat more flexible since stiffness measurements below 3.0mm and thickness measurements greater than 2.5mm are not acceptable. The small percentage of rifle shooters who have persisted in walking stiff-legged and flat-footed must learn to walk normally when they wear their trousers and boots. Competitors with any clothing item that has small panels or large pads that make it impossible to find a 60mm area to measure stiffness must be aware that measurements of those panels will now be made over the pads, seams or letters if necessary. Any athletes who may have tried taping techniques need to know that this is illegal and will be checked.

ISSF Clothing Standards:

1. Stiffness Rule — Jackets and trousers will be tested for stiffness both before competitions and after matches. The amount of flexibility must measure 3.0mm or higher in 60 sec. Clothing with stiffness factors below 3.0 will be rejected.

2. Thickness Rule — During Equipment Control jacket and trouser thickness testing, both before competitions and in post-competition checks, all clothing panels must measure 2.5mm or less in thickness. No measurements above 2.5mm will be accepted.

3. Trouser Limits — The top of the trousers’ seat pads must be at least 150mm below the top of the waistband/trousers. Stiffness may be measured over the seat pad if necessary. There can be a maximum of 7 belt loops with at least 80mm between belt loops.

4. Shoe Flexibility — A walking test to demonstrate the flexibility of the shooting shoes and trousers will be enforced by Juries anywhere on the range. Violators will first receive a warning, then a 2-point penalty for a second offence and disqualification for a third offence.

5. Body Support Taping Prohibited — Kinesio taping and medical taping is contrary to ISSF rules and is not permitted. Shooters will be subject to post-competition testing to ensure compliance.

6. Headgear — No part of a cap or visor may touch or contact the rifle sight or rifle.

Related Article: New Rifle Clothing Rule Enforcement for 2011 and 2012

Story sourced by Edlongrange.
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April 25th, 2010

Sneak Preview of NEW 2010 Creedmoor Sports Catalog

Creedmoor Sports 2010The Creedmoor Sports 2010 catalog will be mailed out to Creedmoor’s customer list next week. Want a sneak peek? The complete, 88-page 2010 catalog, in digital format, is available online. CLICK THIS LINK to browse through the pages, search for products and zoom in for details.

There are many new products in the 2010 Creedmoor Catalog, such as a new fullbore prone coat, with special features for belly shooters. Creedmoor worked with Dennis Flaherty, U.S. Palma Team Captain, to develop this product. $50.00 from the sale of each coat goes to support the U.S. Palma Team. Also new this year is a “No-Pulse” sling, item NPS-01, $81.95. The 2″-wide sling is made of synthetic material so it won’t stretch or shrink, no matter what the weather. Special “grippy” backing stabilizes the sling on your arm, while a unique dual-strap connection on the cuff dramatically reduces pulse effects. In addition, Creedmoor has a new, deluxe spotting scope mounting head (“Polecat” series) which comes in three versions, so it can fit 5/8″, 3/4″, or 1″ stands.

Creedmoor Sports 2010

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