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May 26th, 2021

Moly Bullet Coating — Wet Moly Application Method

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Tech Report by B. Walker, owner of The Urban Rifleman LLC
I have been moly coating since I started shooting rifles nearly 26 years ago. I have always moly-coated my bullets. I figured if it was good enough for Walt Berger, it was good enough for me (Walt still moly coats his bullets to this day, if recent match pictures are any indication). I had always used the typical dry method (without the wax) and I had the same jar of moly (molybdenum disulfide) for many years.

I had tried all kinds of methods over the years. But then AccurateShooter Forum member “Bowfisher” sent me a message about moly-coating bullets using water. After his suggestion, I did several batches using the moly-in-the-water method. I was stunned with the great results. This Wet Moly method is the cleanest, easiest, and best coating method I have ever tried. I strongly believe Wet Moly should be the recommended method.

Traditional Dry Moly Coating Process is Dusty and Messy
Before I started the Wet Moly process, I always coated my bullets in small containers in my big Dillon tumbler. I would put the bullets in old EMPTY 1-lb powder containers and add the moly. I would place the powder containers in my big Dillon tumbler and tumble for at least three hours. I would then throw rice in with the bullets to soak up any excess moly dust and shine the bullets. Then I would shake out the rice using a lid with holes drilled in it. My coated stuff came out beautiful if I do say so myself even dry. However, there was always dust and moly mess (there was always some on my fingers when I would handle the bullets after). I only liked to doing coating in big batches to get it over with because it was a chore (by all means don’t get moly on the bottom of your shoes and track the carpet)!

Wet Moly Method — Tumbling in Bottles with Moly and Water

The new wet method entails adding water to the bullets during the tumble in the bottle, and it is way easier and cleaner. The final product is totally dust free and will not come off on your fingers as there is no dust or residue. I think they shoot better too, and the moly works as it is supposed to. I won’t get into the debates over the merits of moly. Some folks believe it works for them. This article is intended for those guys — it is not intended to convert handloaders who are happy with shooting uncoated bullets.

Editor: None other than John Whidden, Multi-Time National Long Range Champion, moly-coats his bullets. Whidden also uses a Wet Moly application method. He agrees that applying moly in a water solution delivers the best results, and doesn’t leave dusty residues.

Here is the basic outline of the Wet Moly application method. In addition to this outline, I created an instructional video that shows my entire process. [Editor: Definitely WATCH the video. It is important to see the post-tumbling rinsing and buffing processses.]

1. Use old 1-lb powder containers. Work over a sink. Add the bullets in reasonable batches to the containers (lets say 2-3 inches of bullets). I try to use use only enough water to cover the bullets and I use a little more moly than I used to with a dry application. I suggest using half a teaspoon of moly per two inches depth of bullets.

2. Tumble for four hours (at least). I tape the container lids shut before placing them in the tumbler. Then, simply place the powder container in your vibratory tumbler.

3. After the elapsed time, take the bottle to the sink and, dump contents into a plastic strainer. I use an old spaghetti strainer that I save just for moly. IMPORTANT: BE SURE you have a strainer that won’t let the bullets fall out! Stream water (from faucet) gently over the bullets to thoroughly clean excess residues off the bullets. Shake strainer to get all the water out. See video time 6:00-10:00.

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4. Sift out the bullets onto a paper towel inside an old baking pan and shake to buff. Repeat until the bullets are completely dry and buffed to a high shine. The bullets are clean, dust-free and the moly is gorgeous! Leave for several days before storing or put them in your oven at about 130 degrees for 30 minutes to remove the last bit of any moisture. (WARNING: DO NOT use excessive oven heat or cook too long — set a timer!).

If you follow these instructions, the result should be the best moly coating you have ever seen!

urban rifleman online store, bag riders, Revolution stocks, Remington prefit barrels
Before and AFTER Wet Moly. Note how uniform the moly coating is on the bullets. The Wet Moly process also leaves a perfect glossy finish after rinsing and drying. And the bullets are totally dust-free! These are Sierra #1380 .224 69gr HPBT MatchKings.

urban rifleman online store, bag riders, Revolution stocks, Remington prefit barrelsBe sure to visit our online store at TheUrbanriflemanstore.com. We have a full compliment of front and rear bag riders for various rifles that we designed and produce in-house. We also stock Revolution laminated benchrest stocks, and we sell stainless steel Remington prefit barrels (which are getting rave reviews from customers). Also available are Wilson dies, Timney and Triggertech triggers, Berger and Sierra bullets, Magpul and Accuracy International chassis, and lots more.

urban rifleman online store, bag riders, Revolution stocks, Remington prefit barrels

urban rifleman online store, bag riders, Revolution stocks, Remington prefit barrels

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, News, Reloading, Tech Tip 2 Comments »
April 7th, 2019

Sierra Secrets — How MatchKings Are Made

Sierra Bullets Carroll Pilant MatchKing Bullet SMK Bullet-making Jacket

The Making of MatchKings — How Sierra Produces SMKs
All Sierra bullets begin life as a strip of gilding metal, an alloy consisting of 95% copper and 5% zinc. To meet Sierra’s strict quality requirements, the gilding metal requires three times more dimensional and quality control standards than is considered standard in the copper manufacturing industry.

A blanking press stamps out a uniform disc and forms the cup that will be drawn into the MatchKing jacket. The cup is then polished and sent to a draw press to be drawn into a jacket that is longer than needed for the future MatchKing, thus allowing for the trim process. Press operators constantly check concentricity to make sure we have only quality jackets. The jackets then go to a trimmer where they are visually inspected again.

Sierra Bullets Carroll Pilant MatchKing Bullet SMK Bullet-making Jacket

After being polished a second time, the jacket travels to the bullet press. In the meantime, 80-pound lead billets are being extruded into lead wire for the cores where great care is taken so that the core wire is not stretched. The core wire is lightly oiled before continuing to the bullet press to be swaged.

The lead core wire and trimmed jacket meet at the bullet press where the first stage forms a boattail on the jacket. The lead core is then formed on top of the bullet press and fed down into the jacket. In one stroke of the press, the MatchKing is formed.

Sierra Bullets Carroll Pilant MatchKing Bullet SMK Bullet-making Jacket

Quality control technicians pull samples from each lot of MatchKings to make sure they meet Sierra’s stringent standards. Samples are then sent to Sierra’s 300-meter underground test range (shown below) to be shot for accuracy on mechanical mounts referred to as “unrestricted return to battery rests” that Sierra designed and built in-house.

Sierra Underground Tunnel test facility Sedalia, Missouri

Sierra bullet sale Clarus Corporation

After inspection, the bullets are placed in the familiar green box along with reloading labels. They are then shrink-wrapped and shipped all over the world.

Permalink - Articles, Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Tech Tip 1 Comment »
January 13th, 2019

6.5 Creedmoor Cartridge Reloading INFO — Load Data from Sierra

Sierra Load Data 6.5 Creedmoor

Sierra Bullets has released very complete load data for the popular 6.5 Creedmoor cartridge. This medium-sized cartridge has become one of the most popular chamberings for tactical and PRS shooters. The 6.5 Creedmoor combines excellent accuracy, good mag-feeding, good barrel life, moderate recoil, and reasonable component cost. That’s why this cartridge has caught on quickly.

Sierra Load Data 6.5 CreedmoorDeveloped in 2007 by Dennis DeMille and Dave Emary, the 6.5 Creedmoor is a shortened and improved 30 TC cartridge case that was inspired by the .308 Winchester design. This short action design was created to maximize case capacity and a wide range of loading lengths, while still fitting in standard short action magazines. With the correct twist barrel, the versatile 6.5 Creedmoor can take advantage of the wide range of bullet weights available in 6.5 mm (i.e. .264 caliber). Reloaders should keep in mind that the 6.5 Creedmoor works best with medium to medium-slow powders such as H4350, Varget, Win 760, and RE-17. The light recoil and adaptability of the efficient 6.5 Creedmoor cartridge has already proven itself in high power, precision rifle series and benchrest competitions. Couple that with respectable barrel life and its intrinsic accuracy potential and you have a recipe for success which should insure its legacy for decades to come.

Sierra 6.5 Creedmoor Load Data Manual reloading .264

Here are three tables from the Sierra Bullets Reloading Manual (5th Edition). IMPORTANT — This is just a sample!! Sierra has load data for many other 6.5mm bullet types, including FB, Spitzer, SBT, HPBT, and Tipped MK from 85 grains to 142 grains. To view ALL 6.5 Creedmoor DATA, CLICK HERE.

Sierra Bullets 6.5 Creedmoor Load Data MatchKing Tactical
INDICATES MAXIMUM LOAD – USE CAUTION
LOADS LESS THAN MINIMUM CHARGES SHOWN ARE NOT RECOMMENDED.

Sierra Bullets 6.5 Creedmoor Load Data MatchKing Tactical
INDICATES MAXIMUM LOAD – USE CAUTION
LOADS LESS THAN MINIMUM CHARGES SHOWN ARE NOT RECOMMENDED.

Sierra Bullets 6.5 Creedmoor Load Data MatchKing Tactical
INDICATES MAXIMUM LOAD – USE CAUTION
LOADS LESS THAN MINIMUM CHARGES SHOWN ARE NOT RECOMMENDED.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading 7 Comments »
October 13th, 2017

NEW — Ultra-High BC 150-Grain 6.5mm MK from Sierra

Sierra Bullets MatchKing 150 grain 150gr high BC G1 G7 6.5 Creedmoor

Up until now, 147 grains was the high end of 6.5 mm (.264 diameter) match bullets offered by major bullet-makers. Now Sierra has “raised the bar” — releasing a 150-grainer with a killer 0.713 G1 Ballistic Coefficent (BC). You read that right — 0.713! Compare that to the 0.626 G1 BC for Sierra’s well-known 142gr MatchKing, 0.697 for the Hornady 147gr ELD Match, and 0.607 for the Berger 140gr Hybrid Target. To increase (and uniform) the BC, Sierra’s new 150-grainer is pointed at the factory. Recommended barrel twist rate is 1:7.5″.

Sierra Bullets MatchKing 150 grain 150gr high BC G1 G7 6.5 Creedmoor

CLICK HERE for 6.5 Creedmoor LOAD DATA for this new 150gr Matchking.

Sierras’ product announcement states: “Shooters … will appreciate the accuracy and extreme long range performance of our new 6.5 mm 150 grain HPBT (#1755). A sleek 27-caliber elongated ogive and a final meplat reducing operation (pointing) provide an increased ballistic coefficient for [reduced wind drift] and velocity retention. To ensure precise bullet-to-bore alignment, a unique bearing surface-to-ogive junction uses the same 1.5-degree angle commonly found in many match rifle chamber throats. This bullet requires a twist rate of 1:7.5″ or faster to stabilize.”

Sierra’s new 6.5 mm 150 grain HPBT MatchKing bullet is available in 100-count boxes (#1755) for $50.98 MSRP, and 500-count boxes (#1755C) for $226.45 MSRP.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, New Product 11 Comments »
January 16th, 2017

Sierra Offers New Ultra-High-BC 197gr 7mm (.284) MatchKing

Sierra 197gr MatchKing High BC F-Open Closed Meplat

Get ready for a revolution in the F-Open, ELR, and Long-Range Benchrest games. Sierra just introduced a new 7mm bullet with a stunning 0.780 G1 BC. This new 197-grain HPBT MatchKing is one of the highest-BC, jacketed .284-caliber projectiles ever offered to the public. By comparison, Sierra’s own advanced 183-grain 7mm Matchking has a .707 G1 BC. That means the new 197-grainer has a 10% higher BC than the already slippery 183-grainer. That’s an impressive achievement by Sierra.

We expect top F-Open and long-range shooters will be trying the new 197-grainer as soon as they can get their hands on this new projectile. They may need new barrels however, as Sierra states: “This bullet requires a barrel twist rate of 1:7.5″ or faster”. Sierra expects to start shipping these slippery 7mm 197s very soon. You can order directly from Sierra’s website, stock code #1997, $54.20 for 100 bullets.

Sierra 197gr MatchKing

Factory Uniformed Bullet Tips
Sierra has officially announced that the 197gr SMK will come “pointed” from the factory. These impressive new 197s will have a “final meplat reducing operation” (pointing). This creates a higher BC (for less drag) and also makes the BC more uniform (reducing vertical spread at long range). Our tests of other factory-pointed Sierra MKs have demonstrated that Sierra does a very good job with this pointing operation. The “pointed” MatchKings we’ve shot recently had very nice tips, and did hold extremely “tight waterline” at 1000 yards, indicating that the pointing process does seem to enhance BC uniformity. Morever, radar-derived “real-world” BCs have been impressively uniform with the latest generation of pointed Sierra MKs (such as the new 110gr 6mm MatchKing).

Here is the statement from Sierra about the new bullets:

Shooters around the world will appreciate the accuracy and extreme long range performance of our new 7mm 197 grain HPBT (#1997). A sleek 27-caliber elongated ogive and a final meplat reducing operation (pointing) provide an increased ballistic coefficient for optimal wind resistance and velocity retention. To ensure precise bullet to bore alignment, a unique bearing surface to ogive junction uses the same 1.5 degree angle commonly found in many match rifle chamber throats.

While they are recognized around the world for record-setting accuracy, MatchKing® and Tipped MatchKing® bullets are not recommended for most hunting applications. Although MatchKing® and Tipped MatchKing® bullets are commonly used for varmint hunting, their design will not provide the same reliable explosive expansion at equivalent velocities in varmints compared to their lightly jacketed Hornet, Blitz BlitzKing, or Varminter counterparts.

New product tip from EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.
Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, New Product 13 Comments »
August 3rd, 2013

Bargain Sierra 175gr MatchKings from Grafs.com

Need inexpensive .30-caliber major-brand bullets? Graf & Sons has you covered. Grafs.com just made available a large number of pull-down Sierra 175gr HPBT MatchKing bullets at a cost of just $21.99 per 100 bullets. This price includes shipping, but there is a single $6.95 handling fee per order. These .308 Sierra bullets are pulled down from Lake City LRM118 millitary ammo. Note, since these are pull-down bullets (taken from dismantled ammo), the bullets may exhibit scratches or pull marks. Still, if you are looking for a supply of .30-caliber bullets available right now at a great price, check out this current offer.

Product tip from EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.
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