February 1st, 2018

How Scopes Work — Understanding Lenses and Light Paths

Accurateshooter.com optics rifle scope Swarovski

The Swarovski Optik website features a blog with interesting technical articles. In the “On Target” series of blog stories, Swarovski has provided a handy explanation of how optics systems work, with exploded diagrams of rifle scopes, spotting scopes, and binoculars. CLICK HERE for Swarovski Optics Blog.

Accurateshooter.com optics rifle scope Swarovski

Scope Terminology
Focusing Lens
The focusing lens is an adjustable lens inside the optical system for focusing the image at different distances…. In the case of rifle scopes, apart from focusing, the focusing lens also facilitates parallax compensation.

Diopter Adjustment
For rifle scopes, the reticle can be focused using the diopter adjustment on the eyepiece, thereby correcting any visual impairment. [Editor’s Note: Movable eyepiece diopter adjustment is not offered on all rifle scopes. It is a useful feature on Swarovski and other premium scopes. This allows shooters who need eyeglasses to get a sharply focus image even without wearing corrective lenses. Of course shooters should always wear ANSI-certified eye protection. With the diopter, folks who need correction can use inexpensive, non-Rx safety eyewear instead of expensive prescription safety glasses.]

Reversal System
The purpose of the reversal system is to reverse the image by means of prisms in binoculars and telescopes, and lenses in rifle scopes….The lens reversal system is needed in rifle scopes to control the variable magnification and move the exit pupil[.]

Parallax Explained
What is Parallax? What problems can Parallax create when you are shooting? Many novice shooters can’t answer those questions easily. Likewise, many folks don’t understand how to use their front or side-focus parallax controls most effectively. Yes the parallax control basically sharpen focus at different target distances — but there’s more involved. This video offers helpful insights.

Resource tip by EdLongRange. We welcome reader submissions.
Permalink - Videos, Optics 4 Comments »
July 18th, 2015

Swarovski Tech Blog Reveals How Scopes Work

The Swarovski Optik website features a blog with interesting technical articles. In the “On Target” series of blog stories, Swarovski has provided a handy explanation of how optics systems work, with exploded diagrams of rifle scopes, spotting scopes, and binoculars. CLICK HERE for Swarovski Optics Blog.

Accurateshooter.com optics rifle scope Swarovski


Accurateshooter.com optics rifle scope Swarovski

Scope Terminology
Focusing Lens
The focusing lens is an adjustable lens inside the optical system for focusing the image at different distances…. In the case of rifle scopes, apart from focusing, the focusing lens also facilitates parallax compensation.

Diopter Adjustment
For rifle scopes, the reticle can be focused using the diopter adjustment on the eyepiece, thereby correcting any visual impairment. [Editor’s Note: Movable eyepiece diopter adjustment is not offered on all rifle scopes. It is a useful feature on Swarovski and other premium scopes. This allows shooters who need eyeglasses to get a sharply focus image even without wearing corrective lenses. Of course shooters should always wear ANSI-certified eye protection. With the diopter, folks who need correction can use inexpensive, non-Rx safety eyewear instead of expensive prescription safety glasses.]

Reversal System
The purpose of the reversal system is to reverse the image by means of prisms in binoculars and telescopes, and lenses in rifle scopes….The lens reversal system is needed in rifle scopes to control the variable magnification and move the exit pupil[.]

Resource tip by EdLongRange. We welcome reader submissions.
Permalink Optics, Tech Tip 3 Comments »
September 6th, 2011

Swarovski Introduces New ‘EL Range’ Laser-Equipped Binoculars

Swarovski EL RangeSwarovski has released a new binocular product with built-in laser rangefinder, and angle compensation. Designed on the popular “open-bridge” EL binocular body, the EL Range comes in two configurations: 8x42mm and 10x42mm. Weighing just 910grams (32 ounces), both versions are lighter than other premium rangefinding binocs. The shape and size (6.5″L x 4.6″W) of the EL Range are basically the same as the non-laser EL Binocular — all the additional electronics are housed in two small belly extensions, one on each side (see photo). These curved extensions fit comfortably into your palms, so the the EL’s good ergonomics have been maintained.

Swarovski EL Range

Max Range is 1375 meters (1504 yards)
The EL Range is rated to 1375m or 1504 yards — that’s comparable with the latest Leica LRFs. Swarovski claims that its ranging laser can measure with an accuracy of +/- 1m over the entire measurement range (30–1375m). Ranging options (reticle brightness, angle compensation etc.) are controlled by a small button under the bridge. This can easily be accessed by your thumb while glassing. You don’t have to remove the EL away from you head to find or operate the digital controls. The EL Range is comfortable in the hand, and it is noticeably easier to hold the EL Range steady on a small target than the ultra-compact, pocket-sized rangefinders.

With the Swaro EL Range, you get great glass along with a very accurate laser. The transmission in both binocular halves is 91%. They are equipped with a 61° wide-angle eyepiece which supports a field of view of 137m (8×42) or 110m (10×42). The large eye relief offers four positions, to which the eyecup can be adjusted individually. This means that even spectacle wearers can enjoy the full benefit, with a crystal-clear vision and great comfort. Diopter compensation is an ample -7/+5. Interpupillary distance is 2.2 – 2.9 inches (that’s enough to fit all adults). The exit pupil on the 8X version is 5.3mm, while on the 10X version it is 4.2mm, still plenty big.

Swaro-Aim Angle Compensation Aids Hunters
The newest “SWARO-AIM” technology features an integrated gradometer to show the precise and correct shooting distance and angle. Designed with electronic readout of yards and meters, brightness levels and angle compensation, the display offers 5 individually adjustable brightness levels on an easy-to-read LCD screen with a simple and intuitive menu operation.

Swarovski EL Range

VIEW EL Range Techical Data | DOWNLOAD EL Range Specifications

Release Date and Price: MSRP on the EL Range laser-equipped binoculars is $3077.00 for the 8×42, and $3188.00 for the 10×42. We expect “street price” to settle around $2770.00 for the 8X and $2870.00 for the 10X. That’s quite a bit more than the 8×42 Leica Geovid Rangefinder binocular, which retails for $2349.00 (street price). On the other hand, Swarovski’s standard (no laser) EL 8.5×42 Swarovision binocular costs about $2350.00 (street price), so that means you’ll pay about $420.00 more for the ranging capability. For someone who can afford the standard (non-laser) EL binoculars, it probably makes sense to spend a few hundred more for the EL Range. Vendors expect to receive the Swarovski EL Range in late October, but Swarovski tells us that “quantities will be very limited before the end of the year”.

Permalink New Product, Optics 3 Comments »