November 11th, 2017

Veterans Day — November 11th — Honor All Who Served

Memorial Veterans Day Vet Army Navy Marines WWII

On that day, let us solemnly remember the sacrifices of all those who fought so valiantly, on the seas, in the air, and on foreign shores, to preserve our heritage of freedom, and let us reconsecrate ourselves to the task of promoting and enduring peace so that their efforts shall not have been in vain.

– 1954, President Dwight D. Eisenhower, Veterans Day proclamation.

On the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month of 1918, bugle calls signaled the ‘cease fire’ ending the First World War. (The official Armistice was signed earlier that morning.) To those who endured it, WWI was the “Great War”, “the War to End All Wars.” Tragically, an even greater conflict consumed the world just two decades later.

Today, 99 years after the end of WWI, Americans mark the anniversary of the WWI Armistice as “Veterans Day”. In Canada it is known as Remembrance Day. On this solemn occasion we honor all those who have served in the military in times of war and peace.

Memorial Veterans Day Vet Army Navy Marines WWII

While more WWII veterans pass away each year, there are still over 21.8 million veterans in the United States. Take time today to honor those soldiers, sailors, and airmen who have served their nation with pride. Today we remember that… “All gave some, and some gave all.”

Former Secretary of Veterans Affairs Dr. James Peake asked Americans to recognize the nation’s 21.8 million living veterans and the generations before them who fought to protect freedom and democracy: “While our foremost thoughts are with those in distant war zones today, Veterans Day is an opportunity for Americans to pay their respects to all who answered the nation’s call to military service.”

On Veterans Day we especially need to remember the seriously wounded combat veterans. These men and women summon great courage every day to overcome the lasting injuries they suffered in battle. Some of these soldiers have lost limbs, yet volunteered to return to combat duty. That is dedication beyond measure.

CLICK HERE for List of Regional Veterans Day Ceremonies.

National Veterans Day Ceremony
The Veterans Day National Ceremony is held each year on November 11th at Arlington National Cemetery. The ceremony commences precisely at 11:00 a.m. with a wreath laying at the Tomb of the Unknowns and continues inside the Memorial Amphitheater with a parade of colors by veterans’ organizations. The ceremony is intended to honor and thank all who served in the U.S. Armed Forces. Major regional ceremonies and events are also held throughout the country.

Memorial Veterans Day Vet Army Navy Marines WWII

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April 12th, 2017

CMP Announces Repatriation of 86,000 M1 Garands

CMP M1 Garand philippines shipment

Big news for M1 Garand fans. The CMP recently announced that it should be receiving 86,000 M1 Garand rifles from the Phillipines. These WWII-era battle rifles were originally loaned to the Phillippines government through a Military Assistance Program. As “loaners”, they could eventually be repatriated to the United States. It looks like these old rifles will finally be coming home.

The return of the surplus Garands was disclosed last week by Gina Johnson, Gen. Mgr. of CMP South (Alabama). Posting on The M-1 Garand Enthusiasts Group Facebook Page, Ms. Johnson wrote:

“ … CMP will be receiving the rifles once the Phillipines prepares them for shipment. CMP reimburses the Army transportation costs of getting these rifles back as they have with every other shipment sent to us. We do not know when these rifles will be shipped back, but they have been approved.”

This was later confirmed by Mark Johnson, Chief Operating Officer of the CMP. Johnson stated that the rifles could be shipped back for distribution to American civilian shooters: “There are 86,000 or so M1s hopefully coming back to the Army,” he said. “We hope to see them in the future.”

CMP M1 Garand philippines shipment

These historic rifles can be returned to the USA and the CMP because the rifles were originally loaned to the Phillipines government through the Military Assistance Program, a more modern version of the “Lend Lease” program that provided arms and assistance to U.S. allies during WWII. Alloutdoors.com explained: “Since these rifles were loaned, not purchased outright, they are eligible for return to the U.S. Army and then the CMP”.

CMP M1 Garand philippines shipment

Condition and Price “To Be Determined”
As the CMP has not yet seen or graded the M1 Garands, the typical condition of the rifles remains unknown. But with so many rifles coming back the the USA, we can expect there will be some in very fine condition. It make take a long time for the CMP to inventory all 86,000 Garands and eventually list them for sale on the CMP Store.

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March 18th, 2017

An American Icon — The M1 Garand Lives On…

John C. Garand Match CMP Camp Perry
M1 Garand Springfield Armory July 1941 production. Facebook photo by Shinnosuke Tanaka.

My father carried a Garand in WWII. That was reason enough for me to want one. But I also loved the look, feel, and heft of this classic American battle rifle. And the unique “Ping” of the ejected en-bloc clip is music to the ears of Garand fans. Some folks own a Garand for the history, while others enjoy competing with this old war-horse. Around the country there are regular competition series for Garand shooters, and the CMP’s John C. Garand Match is one of the most popular events at Camp Perry every year. This year’s Perry Garand Match will be held Saturday, 22 July 2017.

John C. Garand Match CMP Camp Perry

The CMP also has a John C. Garand Match each June as part of the D-Day Competition at the Talladega Marksmanship Park. Here’s a video from the inaugural Talladega D-Day Event in 2015.

Watch Prone Stage from the Inaugural Talladega D-Day Match in 2015

M1 Garand Manual

Recommended M1 Garand Manual
Among the many M1 Garand manuals available, we recommend the CMP’s U.S. Rifle, Caliber .30, M1: ‘Read This First’ Manual. This booklet covers take-down, reassembly, cleaning, lubrication, and operation. The manual, included with CMP rifles, is available for $3.25 from the CMP eStore. The author of Garand Tips & Tricks says: “It’s one of the best firearms manuals I’ve seen. I highly recommend it.”

M1 Garand match instruction video War Department

M1 Garand Slow-Motion Shooting Video

What really happens when an M1 Garand fires the final round and the En-Bloc clip ejects with the distinctive “Ping”? Well thanks to ForgottenWeapons.com, you can see for yourself in super-slow-motion. The entire cycling process of a Garand has been captured using a high-speed camera running at 2000 frames per second (about sixty times normal rate). Watch the clip eject at the 00:27 time-mark. It makes an acrobatic exit, spinning 90° counter-clockwise and then tumbling end over end.

2000 frame per second video shows M1 Garand ejecting spent cartridges and En-bloc clip.

M1 Garand History

Jean Cantius Garand, also known as John C. Garand, was a Canadian designer of firearms who created the M1 Garand, a semi-automatic rifle that was widely used by the U.S. Army and U.S. Marine Corps during World War II and the Korean War. The U.S. government employed Garand as an engineer with the Springfield Armory from 1919 until he retired in 1953. At Springfield Armory Garand was tasked with designing a basic gas-actuated self-loading infantry rifle and carbine that would eject the spent cartridge and reload a new round. It took fifteen years to perfect the M1 prototype model to meet all the U.S. Army specifications. The resulting Semiautomatic, Caliber .30, M1 Rifle was patented by Garand in 1932, approved by the U.S. Army on January 9, 1936, and went into mass production in 1940. It replaced the bolt-action M1903 Springfield and became the standard infantry rifle known as the Garand Rifle. During the World War II, over four million M1 rifles were manufactured.

John Jean C. Garand M1

Credit: NPS Photo, public domain

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November 11th, 2016

Honor All Who Served on This Veterans Day

Memorial Veterans Day Vet Army Navy Marines WWII

On that day, let us solemnly remember the sacrifices of all those who fought so valiantly, on the seas, in the air, and on foreign shores, to preserve our heritage of freedom, and let us reconsecrate ourselves to the task of promoting and enduring peace so that their efforts shall not have been in vain.

– 1954, President Dwight D. Eisenhower, Veterans Day proclamation.

On the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month of 1918, bugle calls signaled the ‘cease fire’ ending the First World War. (The official Armistice was signed earlier that morning.) To those who endured it, WWI was the “Great War”, “the War to End All Wars.” Tragically, an even greater conflict consumed the world just two decades later.

Today, 98 years after the end of WWI, Americans mark the anniversary of the WWI Armistice as “Veterans Day”. In Canada it is known as Remembrance Day. On this solemn occasion we honor all those who have served in the military in times of war and peace.

Memorial Veterans Day Vet Army Navy Marines WWII

While more WWII veterans pass away each year, there are still over 21.8 million veterans in the United States. Take time today to honor those soldiers, sailors, and airmen who have served their nation with pride. Today we remember that… “All gave some, and some gave all.”

Former Secretary of Veterans Affairs Dr. James Peake asked Americans to recognize the nation’s 21.8 million living veterans and the generations before them who fought to protect freedom and democracy: “While our foremost thoughts are with those in distant war zones today, Veterans Day is an opportunity for Americans to pay their respects to all who answered the nation’s call to military service.”

On Veterans Day we especially need to remember the seriously wounded combat veterans. These men and women summon great courage every day to overcome the lasting injuries they suffered in battle. Some of these soldiers have lost limbs, yet volunteered to return to combat duty. That is dedication beyond measure.

CLICK HERE for List of Regional Veterans Day Ceremonies.

National Veterans Day Ceremony
The Veterans Day National Ceremony is held each year on November 11th at Arlington National Cemetery. The ceremony commences precisely at 11:00 a.m. with a wreath laying at the Tomb of the Unknowns and continues inside the Memorial Amphitheater with a parade of colors by veterans’ organizations. The ceremony is intended to honor and thank all who served in the U.S. Armed Forces. Major regional ceremonies and events are also held throughout the country.

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June 19th, 2016

Make This Father’s Day Something Special

fathers day 2016 father

On Father’s Day, time spent together is more important than any gift that comes in a box…

Father Father's DayToday is Father’s Day, a special Sunday when we acknowledge our patriarchs and show our gratitude for all their hard work and sacrifice on our behalf, and the love they have shown us over the years. If you’re lucky, you’re reading this after having spent a day at the shooting range (or the local fishing hole, or golf course) with your Dad. The important thing is to be together with “Pops” and do something you both enjoy together. If you haven’t finalized your Father’s Day planning, here are some suggestions:

1. Hand-wash and wax your father’s truck or car.

2. Clean your dad’s rifles, or help him put together some handloads.

3. Take your dad out to a live music concert, go to a ball game, or maybe head down to the local fishin’ hole.

4. Go for a hike together or just a drive in the country.

5. Head down to Sears or the local hardware store and let you Dad pick out some new tools.

6. Sit down with your dad, bring a note pad, and ask him to tell you some stories about his youth, or his military experience. Your Editor learned some amazing things about my own father this way.

Whatever you choose to do with your father, use your time wisely. Turn off your computer, and go be with your father today. Do something with him that makes him smile. The time spent together is more important than any gift that comes in a box. And, if he lives far from you, give him a call and let him know how important he is to your life. Remind him of the old adage: “Good fathers make good sons”.

When my father, a disabled WW2 Army vet, passed away I received the flag that was draped on his coffin. On most days I fly one of those nylon flags that you can pick up at hardware or department stores. But on holidays, like today, and his birthday, Dad’s flag is out there snapping in the breeze on top of the pole. I find myself talking to him as it gets put up in the morning and comes down at sunset. Hope when the time comes one of my boys will fly my flag.
— Bill Slattery Jr.

My father used to play with my brother and me in the yard. Mother would come out and say, “You’re tearing up the grass”! “We’re not raising grass,” Dad would reply, “We’re raising boys”.
— Harmon Killebrew.

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June 6th, 2014

D-Day Was 70 Years Ago Today

D-Day DDay 1944 Normandy WW II

Forum member Robert Chombart posted this message from his home in Normandy, France: “On the occasion of the 70th anniversary of D-Day, I … salute the memory of the thousands of American soldiers who sacrificed their youth to liberate France, with … particular [respect] for those who rest in Normandy ground.”

Today we should remember those who crossed the Channel to begin the liberation of Europe. Thousands of soldiers, sailors, and aviators gave their lives on June 6, 1944. Their sacrifice on “The Longest Day”, allowed people throughout Europe to enjoy freedom. We should remember those brave warriors, and never forget that freedom is not free — it requires continuing vigilance and sacrifice.


CLICK HERE for Many More Stunning Photos from D-Day, 1944.

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November 11th, 2013

Honor All Our Veterans Today…

On the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month of 1918, bugle calls signaled the ‘cease fire’ ending the First World War. (The official Armistice was signed earlier that morning.) To those who endured it, WWI was “the War to End All Wars.” Tragically, an even greater conflict consumed the world just two decades later.

Today, 95 years after the end of WWI, Americans mark the anniversary of the WWI Armistice as “Veterans Day”. In Canada it is known as Remembrance Day. On this solemn occasion we honor all those who have served in the military in times of war and peace. Take time today to honor all those soldiers, sailors, and airmen who have served their nation with pride. Today we remember that… “All gave some, and some gave all.”

Brothers (and Sisters) in Arms — The Bonds Between Those Who Served
What is it that makes a person decide to potentially give their life for this country of ours? The answer to that question is as varied as the backgrounds and ethnicities of all military personnel. The reasons can be very personal, and in some cases may come out of necessity. Particularly at a time when the economy no longer offers young people the variety of work options after high school that it once did. For some, the choice was not theirs at all but a result of the Draft. A common thread I have found, however, is that we all support each other, like family, and learn through our experience just how unique we are as Active Duty Military, Reservists and Veteran citizens, whatever the reasons we joined.

As young adults, today’s new recruits or volunteers took that first fearful step, of signing their commitment to paper and giving several years of their lives to the service of our country, not knowing with any certainty what job they would be assigned, where they would go, what battle they would fight, and whether or not they would be alive at the end of that commitment. As Service members, we don’t quite realize, until we make it through boot camp and that first assignment, that serving our country is an honor, that this unique experience is something our friends back home cannot relate to, no matter how we try to explain it. It is a camaraderie, an everlasting imprint, and, for some, a never-ending nightmare that cannot be understood by those who have not served.

As a female Veteran, having served only four years in the early 1980s, I was fortunate, and served in a relatively peaceful era. I am amazed, however, at how much influence and impact the military has had on my whole life since then. A bond like no other exists between those of us who proudly wore a U.S. Military uniform and, each time I meet a fellow Veteran, we instantly connect and share a story or two. We stop what we’re doing and take some time to give back to each other.

Something that is not commonly known is that so many Veterans continue to serve long after leaving active duty. Members of organizations such as the VFW, American Legion, Marine Corps League, and many others, volunteer their time and energy to serving communities, service families, wounded warriors, and new Veterans. These organizations are made up of Veterans, young and old, working together as comrades in arms, to continue giving what they can to the country they love.

On this Veteran’s Day, take a moment to think about the lives of our brave, whether fallen or still alive, as well as those Veterans suffering from trauma, who are desperately needing to get their lives back. Perhaps you can give a little time to help or thank our brave.

Tania R.
Former Captain, US Army
USAFSA, Augsburg, Germany

Former Secretary of Veterans Affairs Dr. James Peake asked Americans to recognize the nation’s 23.4 million living veterans and the generations before them who fought to protect freedom and democracy: “While our foremost thoughts are with those in distant war zones today, Veterans Day is an opportunity for Americans to pay their respects to all who answered the nation’s call to military service.” Major Veterans Day observances are scheduled at more than 50 sites in 29 states.

On Veterans Day we especially need to remember the seriously wounded combat veterans. These men and women summon great courage every day to overcome the lasting injuries they suffered in battle. Some of these soldiers have lost limbs, yet volunteered to return to combat duty.

National Veterans Day Ceremony
The Veterans Day National Ceremony is held each year on November 11th at Arlington National Cemetery. Major regional ceremonies are also held throughout the country. CLICK HERE for list of regional Veterans’ Day events.

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November 11th, 2011

WWII Veteran Recounts his Battle of the Bulge Experiences

The NRA, with sponsorship from Brownells, has crafted a Veterans’ Day web video that covers the experience of a WWII American soldier. World War II paratrooper Walter Hughes was only 18 years old when he jumped behind enemy lines in Holland, during Operation Market Garden. In this Veterans Day tribute video, Walter shares his experience from the Battle of the Bulge – the largest and bloodiest battle for American forces in WWII. CLICK HERE to Watch Special Presentation — Veteran’s Memories.

NRA Veterans Day

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February 18th, 2010

'Old Sniper' Meets USAMU in Shooting USA Episode

A touching episode of Shooting USA aired yesterday on the Outdoor Channel. Luckily, it will be repeated this Saturday, February 20th. In this show, 84-year old WWII veteran Ted Gundy, who served as a U.S. Army sniper in the Battle of the Bulge, meets with the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit (USAMU) at Fort Benning. For a week, the “old sniper” (and his son) were honored as VIP guests of the USAMU at Fort Benning. This story was broadcast on the “Impossible Shots” segment of Shooting USA. CLICK HERE for Full Story with details.

Shooting USA Old Sniper

Gundy, who lost his right leg to an artillery shell, can still wear his WWII uniforms. He regularly puts on his “dress greens” when attending funeral services of Army veterans, a service he renders as a member of the Missouri Honor Guard.

Shooting USA Old Sniper Shooting USA Old Sniper

At the end of the show Bundy received a new replica of the 1903 Springfield A4 Sniper rifle. The rifle, complete with vintage-type scope, was presented by Val Forgett of Navy Arms. Then, shooting from a rucksack rest, Bundy proceeded to hit steel at 300 yards.

Shooting USA Old Sniper

This Shooting USA Special broadcast helps viewers remember our remaining WWII veterans, while showing the dedication and hard work of the modern-day USAMU. The show can be pretty emotional at times, but it’s well worth watching. If you missed the Feb. 17th broadcast, the show will be repeated on Feb. 20th at the following times: 4:30 PM EST, 3:30 CST, 2:30 MT, 1:30 PT (check your local listings). You can also purchase a DVD of the Old Sniper broadcast for $9.95.

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