December 21st, 2016

John C. Garand’s Garand — Springfield M1 Number One Million

John Jean C. Garand M1 NRA Allan Cors Springfield Armory
NRA President Allan Cors’s favorite firearm is this unique M1 Garand, originally given to John C. Garand by the Springfield Armory. Images courtesy NRA Museum (top) and NRA Publications.

NRA President Allan Cors has a very special M1 Garand in his firearms collection. This unique M1 rifle was originally owned by none other than its inventor, John C. Garand. This historic Springfield Armory M1 rifle bears the serial number 1,000,000. This rifle, which came complete with a walnut-fitted case, silver-plated clip and gold-plated cartridges, was originally presented to its designer John C. Garand as a retirement gift in 1953. Remarkably, this gift was the only reward the famous gun designer received for his contribution to the Allied victory in the Second World War.

Read Full Story on NRABlog.com.

Upon his passing, Garand’s family offered the rifle for sale. As the M1 was one of his passions and realizing the extraordinary historic significance of this particular gun, Allan Cors made an offer on the M1. The Garand family accepted.

“I felt very good that they trusted me to do the right thing. Let’s face it: we are only temporary custodians of these things,” Cors said. “They are here in our hands for a while, and then they are passed on to the next generation.”

About John C. Garand
Jean Cantius Garand (January 1, 1888 – February 16, 1974), also known as John C. Garand, was a Canadian designer of firearms who created the M1 Garand, a semi-automatic rifle that was widely used by the U.S. Army and U.S. Marine Corps during both World War II and the Korean War. Garand’s fondness for machinery and target shooting blended naturally into a hobby of designing guns, which however took a more vocational turn in 1917. That year the United States Army took bids on designs for a light machine gun, and Garand’s design was eventually selected by the War Department. The U.S. government employed Garand as an engineer with the Springfield Armory from 1919 until he retired in 1953.

John Jean C. Garand M1Credit: NPS Photo, public domain

In Springfield, Massachusetts, Garand was tasked with designing a basic gas-actuated self-loading infantry rifle and carbine that would eject the spent cartridge and reload a new round based on a gas-operated system. Designing a rifle that was practical in terms of effectiveness, reliability, and production, stretched over time; it took fifteen years to perfect the M1 prototype model to meet all the U.S. Army specifications. The resulting Semiautomatic, Caliber .30, M1 Rifle was patented by Garand in 1932, approved by the U.S. Army on January 9, 1936, and went into mass production in 1940. It replaced the bolt-action M1903 Springfield and became the standard infantry rifle known as the Garand Rifle. During the World War II, over four million M1 rifles were manufactured. The Garand Rifle proved to be an effective and reliable weapon and was praised by General MacArthur. General Patton wrote, “In my opinion, the M1 rifle is the greatest battle implement ever devised.” Source: Wikipedia.com.

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December 21st, 2016

Stocking Stuffers — Budget Gift Items for Gun Guys

stocking stuffers christmas gift guide

Christmas is just four days away, so today we’re featuring a hand-picked collection of “stocking stuffers” for precision shooters. So as not to bust your holiday budget, all of our selections are priced under $10.00. These items are handy tools that you’ll use over and over again at the range and/or at your loading bench (so you’re allowed to buy them for yourself, even after Christmas). Our AccurateShooter staffers use most of these items, including the Surveyors Tape, 10X Loupe, Ballistol, Mirage Shades, Crocogators, and Barrel Bags.

Gifts $1 to $5 

Shooting Glasses S&W Safety
Safety Eyewear
$1.50

Surveyors Tape
$1.99
Sinclair Barrel Mirage Shade
Barrel Mirage Shade
$4.95
Carson 10X Magnifier Loupe Loup
Carson 10X Loupe
$4.99

Safety Eyewear ANSI Z87.1. Yes you can get ANSI-approved Safety Eyewear for under two bucks. At that price you should pick up a half-dozen sets, just so you have extras. We recommend that shooters wear eye protection at all times when handling firearms. This eyewear special is offered by CDNN Sports. Call 800-588-9500 to order.

Surveyors’ Tape. Always watch the wind when you shoot. Inexpensive, Day-Glo Surveyors’ Tape (aka “Flagging Tape”), attached to a stake or target frame, makes a good wind indicator. It will flutter even in mild breezes, alerting you to both angle and velocity shifts. This should be part of every range kit. Don’t leave home without it.

Sinclair Barrel Mirage Shade. For high-volume varminters, and competitors who shoot fast in warm weather, a mirage shield is absolutely essential. This prevents hot air rising off the barrel from distorting the image in your scope. The aluminum Sinclair shield can be trimmed to fit, and comes with stick-on Velcro attachments. Two lengths are available: 18″ for short BR barrels, and 24″ for longer barrels.

Carson 10X Loupe. You’ll find dozens of uses for this handy 10X magnifier. Use this Carson 10X Loupe to check for burrs on case mouths, inspect bullet tips, find rifling marks on bullet jackets when setting seating depth, and look for potential separation lines on cases. There are dozens of other uses. In our reloading room, this inexpensive magnifier is one of our most valuable tools.

Gifts $6 to $10 


Dewey Crocogator
$6.50
Ballistol multi-purpose gun lube
Ballistol Aerosol Lube
$8.99
Sinclair Barrel Storage Bag
Benchrite Barrel Bag
$9.50
stalwart wood sinclair loading block
Stalwart Load Block
$9.99

Dewey Crocogator. The Crocogator tool, with knurled “teeth” at both ends, is simple, inexpensive, and compact. Yet nothing zips though primer-pocket gunk faster or better. Unlike some cutter-tipped primer pocket tools, the Crocogator removes the carbon quick and easy without shaving brass. One end is sized for large primer pockets, the other for small.

Ballistol Aerosol Lube. Ballistol is a versatile, non-toxic product with many uses in the reloading room. We have found it is ideal for lubricating cases for normal full-length sizing. It is clear, not gooey or chalky like other lubes. It is very, very slippery, yet is easy to apply and just as easy to wipe off. As you lube your cases, the Ballistol will also clean powder fouling off the case necks. For heavy-duty case forming and neck expansion, we’ll still use Imperial die wax, but for every-day case sizing, Ballistol is our first choice. It also helps prevent your dies from rusting and it even conditions leather. Ballistol is a favored bore cleaner for Black Powder shooters because it neutralizes acidic powder residues.

Santa Christmas Stocking giftsBenchrite Barrel Bag. If you run a switch-barrel rig, or take spare barrels to a big match, this simple but effective barrel bag will protect your valuable steel. The bag is moisture-resistant vinyl on the outside with a soft, quilted interior to protect the barrel’s finish and delicate crown. There are two sizes: one for barrels up to 26 inches, the other for barrels up to 31 inches. Both sizes are priced at $9.95 per bag. That’s cheap insurance for those priceless barrels.

Stalwart Wooden Loading Block. These handsome wooden loading blocks, sold by Sinclair Int’l, feature chamfered holes properly sized for the particular case you reload. Stalwart blocks are stable on the bench, and the hardwood material feels nice to the touch. These “Stalwart” loading blocks have the same machined fit as Sinclair’s popular white “Poly” blocks. Each Stalwart block is machined from select hardwood and has 50 holes (except for model #LB-9 with 32 holes). Finger grooves are machined into the sides for a sure grip.

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December 21st, 2016

Aiming Techniques for Long-Range Competition

F-Class Aiming Long Range Score Shooting
The movie “The Patriot” gave us the phrase “Aim small, miss small”. While that’s a good mantra, aiming strategies for long-range competition are a bit more complicated, as this article explains…

In our Shooters Forum, one newcomer wanted some advice on selecting a reticle for F-Class optics. He wondered about the advantage of Front (first) Focal Plane (FFP) vs. Second Focal Plane scopes and also wondered if one type of reticle was better for “holding off” than others.

In responding to this question, Forum regular Monte Milanuk provided an excellent summary of aiming methods used in F-Class. For anyone shooting score targets, Monte’s post is worth reading:

Aiming Methods for F-Class (and Long-Range) Shootingby Monte Milanuk

600-yard F-Class TargetF-Class is a known-distance event, with targets of known dimensions that have markings (rings) of known sizes. Any ‘holding off’ can be done using the target face itself. Most ‘benefits’ of Front (first) focal plain (FFP) optics are null and void here — they work great on two-way ranges where ‘minute of man’ is the defining criteria — but how many FFP scopes do you know of in the 30-40X magnification range? Very, very few, because what people who buy high-magnification scopes want is something that allows them to hold finer on the target, and see more detail of the target, not something where the reticle covers the same amount of real estate and appears ‘coarser’ in view against the target, while getting almost too fine to see at lower powers.

Whether a person clicks or holds off is largely personal preference. Some people might decline to adjust their scope as long as they can hold off somewhere on the target. Some of that may stem from the unfortunate effect of scopes being mechanical objects which sometimes don’t work entirely as advertised (i.e. one or two clicks being more or less than anticipated). Me personally, if I get outside 1-1.5 MOA from center, I usually correct accordingly. I also shoot on a range where wind corrections are often in revolutions, not clicks or minutes, between shots.

Some shooters do a modified form of ‘chase the spotter’ — i.e. Take a swag at the wind, dial it on, aim center and shoot. Spotter comes up mid-ring 10 at 4 o’clock… so for the next shot aim mid-ring 10 at 10 o’clock and shoot. This should come up a center X (in theory). Adjust process as necessary to take into account for varying wind speeds and direction.

John Sigler F-Class

600-yard F-Class TargetOthers use a plot sheet that is a scaled representation of the target face, complete with a grid overlaid on it that matches the increments of their optics — usually in MOA. Take your Swag at the wind, dial it on, hold center and shoot. Shot comes up a 10 o’clock ‘8’… plot the shot on the sheet, look at the grid and take your corrections from that and dial the scope accordingly. This process should put you in the center (or pretty close), assuming that you didn’t completely ignore the wind in the mean time. Once in the center, hold off and shoot and plot, and if you see a ‘group’ forming (say low right in the 10 ring) either continue to hold high and left or apply the needed corrections to bring your group into the x-ring.

Just holding is generally faster, and allows the shooter to shoot fast and (hopefully) stay ahead of the wind. Plotting is more methodical and may save your bacon if the wind completely changes on you… plotting provides a good reference for dialing back the other way while staying in the middle of the target. — YMMV, Monte

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