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February 8th, 2023

The .244 Remington — Why and How It Failed to Succeed

6mm Remington .244 Rem .243 Winchester .308 Cartridge AccurateShooter Chuck Hawks Sierra Bullets

What we now know as the “6mm Remington” was originally called the .244 Remington. The cartridge was renamed because it was not a commercial success initially, being eclipsed by the .243 Winchester. The .244 Remington and the 6mm Remington are identical — only the name was changed. Why was the .244 Remington an “also-ran” to the .243 Win? Sierra Bullets Ballistics Technician Paul Box provides some answers…

Was Anything Wrong With The .244 Remington?

by Ballistic Technician Paul Box for Sierra Bullets Blog

The year was 1955. A time of carhops, drive-in movies, and Buffalo Bob. It was also the year that Winchester introduced the .243 Win and Remington counter-punched with the .244 Remington (now more commonly known as the 6mm Remington). The .243 Win was based off the time-proven .308 Win case while Remington chose the old war horse, the 7×57.

We’ve all read countless times how Winchester chose the 1:10″ twist, while Remington adopted the 1:12″ twist for their .244 Rem rifles. The first complaint in the gun magazines of that era was how the faster twist Winchester could handle 100 grain bullets, while Remington’s [12-twist factory rifles were supposedly limited to 90 grain bullets].

The first complaint I remember reading was that the 100-grainer was better suited for deer-sized game and the 1:12″-twist wouldn’t stabilize bullets in this weight range. Now, let’s look at this a little closer. Anybody that thinks a 100-grainer is a deer bullet and a 95-grainer isn’t, has been drinking too much Kool-aid. In all honesty, it’s all about bullet construction and Remington had constructed the [90s] with light game in mind. In other words, Remington got it right, but due to a lack of knowledge at the time on both bullet construction and stability, the .244 never gained the popularity it deserved. At that time, Sierra had the 100gr SMP and Hornady offered a 100gr RN that would both stabilize in the slower 1-12″ twist. The .244 Remington provides another classic example of how the popularity of a cartridge suffered due to a lack of knowledge.

.244 Rem vs. .243 Win — What the Experts Say
Respected gun writer Chuck Hawks says the .244 Remington deserved greater acceptance: “The superb 6mm Remington started life in 1955, the same year as the .243 Winchester. It was originally named the .244 Remington. Although the 6mm lost the popularity contest to the .243, it is one of my favorite rifle cartridges, and much appreciated by reloaders generally. The .244 Rem and 6mm Rem cartridges are completely interchangeable, and anyone with a .244 Rem rifle can shoot [6mm Rem] ammunition in complete safety (or vice-versa). Remington .244 rifles made from 1958 on can stabilize all 6mm bullets, while those made in 1955 through 1957 are limited to loads using spitzer bullets not heavier than 90 grains for best accuracy.”

Nathan Foster, author of The Practical Guide to Long Range Hunting Cartridges, states: “In 1963 Remington attempted to regain ground by releasing .244 rifles with a new 1:9″ twist to handle heavier bullets. The cartridge was renamed the 6mm Remington and new ammunition was loaded giving the hunter the choice of either an 80gr bullet for varmints or a 100gr bullet for deer. In comparison to the .243 Win, factory loads for the .244/6mm Remington are slightly more powerful while hand loads increase this margin further.”

6mm Remington .244 Rem .243 Winchester .308 Cartridge AccurateShooter Chuck Hawks Sierra Bullets

Was the .244 Remington Actually Better than the .243 Winchester?
The .244 Remington (aka “6mm Remington”) has a velocity advantage over the .243 Winchester due to a slightly larger case capacity. The longer case neck of the .244 Remington is considered desirable by handloaders. We like the added capacity and long neck of the original .244 Remington. As renamed the “6mm Remington”, the cartridge HAS developed a following, particularly with varmint hunters looking for a high-velocity 6mm option. But it never achieved the success of the .243 Winchester for many reasons. As a member of the .308 family of cartridges, the .243 Winchester has certain obvious advantages. First, you can simply neck down .308 Win brass, which was available at low cost from many sources. Moreover, a .308 Win or 7mm-08 full-length sizing die could be used for body sizing. Still the .244 Remington (6mm Remington) presents an interesting “what if?” story…

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February 7th, 2023

The 22 BR — Versatile, Ultra-Accurate Varmint Cartridge

6mmBR 22BR 22 BR BRA varmint cartridge
6mmBR 22BR 22 BR BRA varmint cartridge

22 BR Dasher 22BRAThe 6mmBR Norma cartridge has spawned many great variants in multiple calibers: 6mm Dasher, 6BRA, 22 BR, 22 Dasher, 30 BR and others. This article is about a handsome 22 BR Rem-action varmint rig.

Richard Franklin (who operated Richard’s Custom Rifles prior to his retirement), has built scores of varmint rifles, in many different calibers. One of Richard’s all-time favorite varmint rifles is a 1:14″-twist, 22 BR built on his Model 11 stock in laminated Black Walnut and fiddleback maple. Richard says the rifle is versatile and deadly accurate out to 400 yards. Richard uses a Leupold 8.5-25x50mm LRT with varmint reticle.

Richard’s 22 BR Varmint Rifle with Lilja Barrel
Richard tells us: “[Shown above] is my light walking varminter. It’s built on a blue-printed Stainless Steel Remington 700 short action and chambered as a no-turn 22 BR for Lapua brass. The bolt handle is a Dave Kiff replacement and I’ve fitted a Jewel BR trigger with bottom safety. The barrel is a Lilja, 1:14″ #6 contour with a muzzle diameter of .750″. I shoot the 40gr V-Max bullets in the rifle at 4000 FPS. It’s tough on hogs if you don’t try them too far. 400 yards is about the max with it.

Accuracy is outstanding and with Roy, Mike, my grandson and myself shooting this rifle I don’t believe it has missed more than three hogs out of over 100 we shot at one summer. This rifle is carried in a ceiling rack in the truck where it’s handy and is used by the first person that grabs it when a hog is sighted if we are moving between setups. The Varmint reticle on the Leupold (shown below) is nice for quick hold-overs as you change distances.”

At right is a another Franklin Model 11 stock in Birdseye maple. That photo shows the details of the thumbhole stock.

Editor’s Note: We have shot a 1:8″-twist 22 BR in varmint matches and it was very accurate with 80gr bullets. It actually shot flatter out to 500 yards than our 6mmBR running 105-grainers. If we were to build a new long-range, bolt-action varmint rifle it would probably be a 22 BRA, essentially a 22 BR with 40° shoulder. That gives you a very stable cartridge with a bit more capacity. The 22 BRA retains a longer neck compare to the 22 Dasher, which is also an excellent cartridge — versatile and accurate.

22 BR Rivals 22-250 Performance
With bullets in the 40gr to 60gr weight range, the 22 BR gives up very little in velocity to a 22-250, despite burning quite a bit less powder (30-32 grains for the 22 BR vs. 35-38 grains for the 22-250). With a match-quality chamber, the 22 BR will probably have an edge in accuracy over a 22-250, and you should experience longer barrel life. Here are some recommended 22 BR loads for 40-60gr bullets:

For more info on the 22 BR for varminting, read our 22BR Cartridge Guide


This article is copyright 2023 AccurateShooter.com. Any site republishing this article agrees to pay royalties and/or liquidated damages.

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February 6th, 2023

BargainFinder 385: AccurateShooter’s Deals of the Week

AccurateShooter Deals of the Week Weekly Bargain Finder Sale Discount Savings

At the request of our readers, we provide select “Deals of the Week”. Every Sunday afternoon or Monday morning we offer our Best Bargain selections. Here are some of the best deals on firearms, hardware, reloading components, optics, and shooting accessories. Be aware that sale prices are subject to change, and once clearance inventory is sold, it’s gone for good. You snooze you lose.

NOTE: All listed products are for sale to persons 18 years of age or older. No products are intended for use by minors.

1. EuroOptic — Trijicon Scope Sale, Save $609 to $1578

trijicon scope sale
Excellent scopes with savings over 50% — grab these deals

Trijicon makes excellent optics with features and lens quality found on much more expensive scopes. If you’ve been considering a Trijicon Scope here’s a great opportunity. Right now at EuroOptic.com you can save from $600 to $1500+ with these close-out specials. Get a top-quality optic for less than half the cost of another major brand. With Trijicon scope prices more than 50% off, grab one soon before they sell out.

2. Sportsman’s Warehouse — Winchester .22 LR Wildcat, $239.99

sportsmans warehouse winchester wildcat rimfire .22 LR 22LR rifle sale

Removable lower receiver, Picatinny rails, good trigger, great price

Here is a fun little semi-auto .22 LR rifle at a crazy low price — $239.99 at Sportsman’s Warehouse. The Winchester Wildcat takes Ruger 10/22 mags, and has some great features, such as field-removable lower receiver, ambidextrous controls, integral Picatinny rails and rear barrel access. It has a good trigger and shoots well. In many respects the Wildcat beats the Ruger 10/22 while costing a lot less. The lower receiver assembly is easily removed from the upper assembly by pushing a button — no tools required.

3. Walmart — Fingerprint Access Gun Safe, $268.99

gun safe sale
Good price on Rapid Access Gun Safe (fingerprint, keypad, key)

Need to store a few rifles or shotguns with secure yet rapid access? Consider this 5-Gun Safe with Fingerprint Access. With a $453.30 MSRP, it is now just $268.99 on sale. It has five locking bolts on the door sides plus an internal locking compartment. Sized 13.8″ x 11.8″ x 57″, this 74-lb safe can hold multiple long guns and pistols, along with other valuables. The main door can be opened instantly with fingerprint recognition, or use the digital keypad (there is also an emergency keyhole). The interior has anti-static protective fleece, plus three pistol pouches on the door. NOTE: We do NOT recommend this as a primary gun safe. But it can be a good secondary safe, offering rapid access to defensive weapons.

4. Creedmoor Sports — Ammo, Bullet, and Brass Sale

creedmoor sports sale
Major SALE at Creedmoor Sports, save on components and ammo

Here’s your opportunity to get top-tier ELEY, Lapua, and Berger products at significant discounts. Creedmoor Sports is running a big sale right now with ELEY .22 LR ammo, Lapua Brass, and Berger Ammo on sale (along with other products).

5. Brownell’s — Smith & Wesson Gun Sale with $50-$100 Rebates

smith wesson sale
Save with $50, $75, and $100 Rebate on S&W pistols and rifles

Smith & Wesson makes some of the finest firearms on the market but they’re rarely on sale. However, right now Brownells has discounted a variety of popular S&W guns. Plus, now through 4/2/2023, you can get a S&W Factory Rebate up to $100 on a variety of S&W pistols and rifles. For max savings, choose a qualifying S&W pistol or rifle on sale at Brownells and then apply for the $50, $75, or $100 manufacturer’s rebate.

6. Bruno’s Shooters Supply — Kelbly Rifle Actions In Stock

kelbly rifle action sale
Get superb Kelbly custom actions with no long wait

Kelbly rifle actions are some of the best on the market. Kelbly’s Panda, Nanook, Prometheus, and Atlas actions offer great quality and smooth functionality. With these superb actions, expect excellent results on target. These actions have set records and won matches. By ordering these in-stock actions through Bruno’s you can save money and get your gun project underway without delay.

7. Graf’s — FREE Outers Cleaning Kit with $100 of Tula Ammo

tula ammo sale
Get a great cleaning kit with bargain-priced Tula Ammo

Here’s a nice bonus if you shoot .223 Rem, 7.62×39, or 7.62×54 rifles. If you purchase at least $100.00 of reliable Tula ammunition from Grafs.com you’ll get a very good Outers cleaning kit for free. The kit includes brushes, mops, and jags to fit multiple cartridge types. The kit also comes with solid brass rods plus 50 patches. All the cleaning gear is contained in an nice aluminum case with slotted interior. NOTE: This is steel-cased Tula ammo which is NOT reloadable.

8. Amazon — 4-Pack of Ammo Carrying Bags, $22.99-$26.99

ammo pack sale
Nice four-pack of secure ammunition carriers good for range trips

For handy transport of ammunition and small gear items, consider Savior Equipment 4-Pack Tactical Ammo Pouches. Seven different colors are offered including two camo styles. Choose the regular 7.75″ size or the smaller 6.75″ version — both in 4-packs, starting at $22.99. When you need to carry ammo, medical supplies, or other accessories, these Savior “Loose Sac” pouches can do the job at low cost.

9. Amazon — Folding Ammo Ranging Card, $39.99

prs range cards
Good system for showing elevation scope settings

Have you attended PRS/NRL matches only to find you’re writing your distances and dopes on your arm or random pieces of paper? This UUC X-Ring RDS Tactical Shooting Range Cards can hold your come-up data securely on your rifle, in an easy to read format. Ballistic data can be recorded on the provided blank DOPE cards, or written directly on the vinyl protective sleeve with either a wet erase pen, map pen, or grease pencil. This Range Card conveniently folds inward when not in use. The Card will fit under low optics even when retracted.

10. Graf’s — Lapua Cloth + Ammo Can w/ Lapua Ammo Purchase

sk rimfire ammo sale
Freebies offered with purchase of superb Lapua ammo

Lapua makes some of the highest-quality competition and hunting ammo available. Purchase at least $75 of any Lapua rimfire or centerfire ammunition at Graf’s and receive a free MTM Ammo Box plus a nice Lapua Silicone Cleaning Cloth. That cloth helps protect your guns from corrosion, and the modern polymer ammo box is great for carrying ammunition and/or accessories to the range. The ammo box can hold your earmuffs and eye protection, along with boxes of ammo.

This article is copyright 2023 AccurateShooter.com. No entity shall republish this article in whole or in part without payment of licensing fees and/or liquidated damages.

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February 6th, 2023

How to Create A Dummy Round to Aid Barrel Chambering

Gre Tannel GreTan, Gre-Tan Rifles dummy round chambering gunsmith reamer chamber

How and Why to Create a Dummy Round
When you have a new custom rifle built, or a new barrel fitted to an existing rifle, it makes sense to create a dummy round. This should have your preferred brass and bullet types, with the bullet positioned at optimal seating depth. A proper dummy round helps the gunsmith set the freebore correctly for your cartridge, and also ensure the proper chamber dimensions.

Respected machinist, tool-maker, and gunsmith Greg Tannel of Gre-Tan Rifles explains: “I use the dummy round as a gauge to finish cut the neck diameter and throat length and diameter so you have [optimal] clearance on the loaded neck and the ogive of the bullet just touches the rifling.” He recommends setting bullet so the full diameter is just forward of the case’s neck-shoulder junction. “From there”, Greg says, “I can build you the chamber you want… with all the proper clearances”.

Greg Tannel has created a very helpful video showing how to create a dummy round. Greg explains how to measure and assemble the dummy and how it will be used during the barrel chambering process. Greg notes — the dummy round should have NO Primer and No powder. We strongly recommend that every rifle shooter watch this video. Even if you won’t need a new barrel any time soon, you can learn important things about freebore, leade, and chamber geometry.

Must Watch Video — This has been viewed over 782,000 times on YouTube:

This has been a very popular video, with 782,000 views! Here are actual YouTube comments:

That is the best explanation I’ve ever seen. Thank you sir. — P. Pablo

Nice video. You do a very good job of making this easy for new reloaders to understand. I sure wish things like this were available when I started reloading and having custom rifles built. Once again, great job, and your work speaks for itself. — Brandon K.

Beautiful job explaining chambering clearances. — D. Giorgi

Another Cool Tool — The Stub Gauge

When you have your gunsmith chamber your barrel, you can also have him create a Stub Gauge, i.e. a cast-off barrel section chambered like your actual barrel. The stub gauge lets you measure the original length to lands and freebore when your barrel was new. This gives you a baseline to accurately assess how far your throat erodes with use. Of course, as the throat wears, to get true length-to-lands dimension, you need take your measurement using your actual barrel. The barrel stub gauge helps you set the initial bullet seating depth. Seating depth is then adjusted accordingly, based on observed throat erosion, or your preferred seating depth.

Stub Gauge Gunsmithing chamber gage model barrel

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February 5th, 2023

Sunday GunDay: Cartridge Showcase — .17 to .50 Caliber and Up

caliber cartridge video showcase reviews cgi .22 LR flat-shooting

For today’s Sunday Gunday Feature, we provide a selection of videos showcasing rifle and pistol cartridge types — from tiny .17 caliber cases to 30mm cases (and a few even bigger rounds). Two of the videos use advance computer animation to provide 3D views of dozens of cartridge types. Then there are some expert commentaries by Jerry Miculek and Ron Spomer discussing the characteristics and performance of various cartridge types. Finally, we provide two videos that discuss rimfire cartridges and show how .22 LR rounds are produced in a modern CCI factory.

90 Different Rifle Cartridge Types in Computer Animation

In this rifle ammunition comparison animation there are 90 different cartridge types, from very small (.22 Flobert) to very, very big (20mm Vulcan). This video employs sophisticated, 3D CAD animation to showcase 90 different rifle cartridges, one after the other, in sequence. It covers from .17 Caliber up to 20mm. Obviously a lot of time and effort went into this video, but it really is cool to see so many different cartridge types in one 3.5-minute video.

caliber cartridge video showcase reviews cgi .22 LR flat-shooting

After the full line-up is complete at 1:41, the video then provides other smaller comparison, such as multiple large hunting cartridges (2:15) and .22 Caliber cartridges (2:45, see above). All the cartridge models are made using Autodesk Inventor software, and then the “line-up” animation was completed with Autodesk Showcase.

Cartridge Types Included (in Caliber Order, then Metric Order):

1) .17 HM2
2) .17 HMR
3) .204 Ruger
4) .218 Bee
5) .22 Flobert
6) .22 Hornet
7) .22 LR
8) .22 Magnum
9) .22 PPC
10) .22 Short
11) .220 Jaybird
12) .223 Rem/5.56x45mm
13) .223 WSSM
14) .224 Weatherby Magnum
15) .225 Winchester
16) .240 Weatherby Magnum
17) .243 Winchester
18) .25 Remington Auto
19) .250 Savage
20) .25-06 Remington
21) .256 Winchester Magnum
22) .257 Roberts
23) .260 Remington
24) .264 Winchester Magnum
25) .270 Weatherby Magnum
26) .270 Winchester
27) .280 British
28) .280 Remington
29) .284 Winchester
30) .30 Carbine
31) .300 H&H Magnum
32) .300 Rem Ultra Magnum
33) .300 Savage
34) .300 Winchester Magnum
35) .300 Win Short Mag (WSM)
36) .30-06 Springfield
37) .303 British
38) .30-30
39) .308 Norma Magnum
40) .308 Winchester
41) .32 Winchester Special
42) .325 WSM
43) .338 Lapua Magnum
44) .35 Whelen
45) .350 Remington Magnum
46) .375 H&H Magnum
47) .376 Steyr
48) .408 Cheyenne
49) .416 Remington Magnum
50) .416 Weatherby Magnum
51) .444 Marlin
52) .450 Marlin
53) .450 Nitro Express
54) .458 Win Magnum
55) .45×70
56) .460 Weatherby Magnum
57) .465 H&H Magnum
58) .470 Nitro Express
59) .50 BMG / 12.7×99 NATO
60) .500 jeffery
61) .505 Gibbs
62) .577 Nitro Express
63) .577 Tyrannosaur
64) .600 Nitro Express
65) .700 Nitro Express
66) .950 JDJ
67) 4.6×30 mm
68) 4.6x30mm
69) 5.6×50 Magnum
70) 5.7x28mm
71) 5mm/SMc
72) 6mm LEE
73) 6.5×55 Swedish
74) 6.5×6 mm Schuler
75) 6.8mm Remington SPC
76) 6mm PPC
77) 6×45 mm
78) 7mm Weatherby Magnum
79) 7mm Remington Magnum
80) 7mm Rem Ultra Magnum
81) 7.62×39 mm FMJ
82) 7.7×58 Arisaka
83) 7.95×57 Mauser
84) 8mm Remington Magnum
85) 9.3x62mm
86) 9.3×64 Brenneke
87) 14.5x114mm
88) 20mm Vulcan
89) 25mmx137mm
90) 30mmx173mm

Ammunition Size Line-Up — from Tiny to Massive

This animation video shows the size comparison of ammunition from a 2.34mm rimfire caliber to the massive 800mm caliber shell of the Schwerer Gustav railway cannon used by German forces in World War II. This video includes many common rifle and pistol cartridges/calibers, but also includes large artillery ammunition. This video has very good CGI Graphics. Below is part of the line-up from the .17 Remington Fireball (far left) to the famed .50 BMG (far right):

caliber cartridge video showcase reviews cgi .22 LR flat-shooting

Ammunition Types Showcased in this video:

2.34mm rimfire
2.7mm Kolibri
3mm Kolibri
4.25 mm Liliput
.17 Hornady Mach 2
.17 Remington Fireball
.17 Hornady Magnum Rimfire
.22 Long Rifle
.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire
HK 4.6×30mm
4.6×36 Loffelspitz
5.45mmx18 MPTs
5.7×28mm SS190
.280 British 7×43
.297/230 Morris Short
.297/230 Morris Long
.30 Pedersen 7.65×20mm
7.92×33mm Kurz
.300 Winchester Short Magnum
8×50mmR Mannlicher
.499 LWR
.577/450 Martini–Henry
.600 Nitro Express
.470 Nitro Express
.50 Beowulf
.50 BMG
20×102 M55A3
25×137 M793
30×173 CPIC
30×211 vz.53
35×228 Oerlikon KD
L43 40x311mmR
L/70 40×365mmR
L/70 57mm
84×618mmR QF 20-PDR
120mm DM53
100mm TK APFSDS
Obusier de 400 modèle
BL 18-inch railway howitzer
Obusier de 520 modèle
600mm Karl-Gerät
800mm Schwerer Gustav

Popular Cartridges/Calibers for Self-Defense and Hunting

This video focuses on popular calibers/cartridges used for self-defense and hunting. It provides a quick but informative overview of the capabilities (and intended uses) of many types of pistol, rifle, and shotgun ammunition. The video discusses the pros/cons of various cartridge types and explains how you would select ammo for a particular purposes (e.g. skeet loads vs. defense shotshells). If you are considering buying a carry pistol and are undecided about caliber choice, this is a good video to watch.

Flattest-Shooting Cartridges by Caliber (Ron Spomer)

In this 15-minute video, hunting expert Ron Spomer examines a variety of standard and wildcat cartridges from .17 caliber all the way to .338 caliber. For each caliber, Ron picks a flat-shooting “winner” and provides some ballistics comparison tables. This video is quite popular, with over 550,000 views on YouTube.

Ammo Types and Calibers — Jerry Miculek Explains the Basics

In this video, legendary shooter Jerry Miculek talks about popular types of pistol and rifle ammunition and the various bullet options used for plinking, competition, and self-defense. Jerry, one of the greatest pistol shooters on the planet, provides useful insights on cartridge selection and bullet choices. Jerry notes: “There are a TON of different types of ammunition” so he explains the basics. And Jerry answers common questions such as: “What is the difference between ball and hollow-point bullets?” and “What type of gun takes rimmed cartridge versus rimless?”.

.22 Caliber Rimfire Cartridges — Some Key Facts Revealed

We recommend all .22 rimfire shooters watch this video from Old English Outfitters. It explains some important facts and clarifies some common misconceptions about to .22 caliber ammunition. To learn more about modern .22 LR rimfire ammo, we also recommend the video below, which shows how CCI .22 LR ammunition is manufactured, start to finish.

BONUS Video — How .22 LR Ammunition Is Made

22 .22 Plinkster Youtube Video CCI Speer Rimfire Ammo Ammunition plant Lewiston Idaho

YouTube host 22Plinkster toured the CCI/Speer production facility in Lewiston, Idaho. While touring the plant, 22Plinkster was allowed to capture video showing the creation of .22 LR rounds from start to finish. This is a fascinating video, well worth watching.

This revealing video shows all phases of .22 LR ammo production including cupping, drawing, annealing, washing, drying, head-stamping, priming, powder charging, bullet seating, crimping, waxing, inspection, and final packaging. If you’ve got ten minutes to spare, we really recommend you watch the video from start to finish. You’ll definitely learn some new things about rimfire ammo.

The text in this article is Copyright 2023 by AccurateShooter.com. No text shall be republished on any other site without authorization and payment of license fees.

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February 5th, 2023

G1 vs. G7 Ballistic Coefficients — What You Need to Know

G1 G7 BC drag models

Over the past 12 months, this article was one of the TOP 20 most-read Daily Bulletin features. We’re reprising it today for those who may have missed it the first time. The above diagram comes from a TiborasurasRex YouTube Video comparing G1 and G7 BC models. CLICK HERE to watch the video.

The better, up-to-date ballistics programs let you select either G1 or G7 Ballistic Coefficient (BC) values when calculating a trajectory. The ballistic coefficient (BC) of a body is a measure of its ability to overcome air resistance in flight. You’ve probably seen that G7 values are numerically lower than G1 values for the same bullet (typically). But that doesn’t mean you should select a G1 value simply because it is higher.

Some readers are not quite sure about the difference between G1 and G7 models. One forum member wrote us: “I went on the JBM Ballistics website to use the web-based Trajectory Calculator and when I got to the part that gives you a choice to choose between G1 and G7 BC, I was stumped. What determines how, or which one to use?”

The simple answer is the G1 value normally works better for shorter flat-based bullets, while the G7 value should work better for longer, boat-tailed bullets.

G1 vs. G7 Ballistic Coefficients — Which Is Right for You?
G1 and G7 refer both refer to aerodynamic drag models based on particular “standard projectile” shapes. The G1 shape looks like a flat-based bullet. The G7 shape is quite different, and better approximates the geometry of a modern long-range bullet. So, when choosing your drag model, G1 is preferable for flat-based bullets, while G7 is ordinarily a “better fit” for longer, boat-tailed bullets.

G1 G7 Ballistic coefficients

Drag Models — G7 is better than G1 for Long-Range Bullets
Many ballistics programs still offer only the default G1 drag model. Bryan Litz, author of Applied Ballistics for Long Range Shooting, believes the G7 standard is preferrable for long-range, low-drag bullets: “Part of the reason there is so much ‘slop’ in advertised BCs is because they’re referenced to the G1 standard which is very speed sensitive. The G7 standard is more appropriate for long range bullets. Here’s the results of my testing on two low-drag, long-range boat-tail bullets, so you can see how the G1 and G7 Ballistic coefficients compare:

G1 BCs, averaged between 1500 fps and 3000 fps:
Berger 180 VLD: 0.659 lb/in²
JLK 180: 0.645 lb/in²

The reason the BC for the JLK is less is mostly because the meplat was significantly larger on the particular lot that I tested (0.075″ vs 0.059″; see attached drawings).

For bullets like these, it’s much better to use the G7 standard. The following BCs are referenced to the G7 standard, and are constant for all speeds.

G7 BCs:
Berger 180 VLD: 0.337 lb/in²
JLK 180: 0.330 lb/in²

Many modern ballistics programs, including the free online JBM Ballistics Program, are able to use BCs referenced to G7 standards. When available, these BCs are more appropriate for long range bullets, according to Bryan.

[Editor’s NOTE: BCs are normally reported simply as an 0.XXX number. The lb/in² tag applies to all BCs, but is commonly left off for simplicity.]
This article is copyright 2023 AccurateShooter.com. No 3rd Party republication of this article is allowed without advance approval and payment of licensing fees.

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February 5th, 2023

How To Craft a Modified Case for Measuring Length to Lands

Hornady Stony Point Tool OAL O.A.L. gauge bullet seating length ogive checker

Our friend Gavin Gear has just released an excellent video showing how to make a threaded Modified Case for use with the Hornady Lock-N-Load Overall Length Gauge. You can watch Gavin make a Modified Case start to finish in the video below:

Video Shows How to Drill and Tap Modified Case

Gavin has some clever tricks. First he uses a sizing die to hold the cartridge case during the threading process. Second he uses two drill bits in sequence — a smaller bit to ream out the primer pocket, and then a larger “M” bit to increase the hole diameter before threading the brass. Finally he leaves the threading tap IN the brass, locks the tailstock, and then “gently pulls on the quill” to remove the brass from the die held in his lathe (See 5:46 timemark).

Modified Case Gavin Gear Ultimate Reloader

Get the Correct 5/16″-36 RH Tap
Unfortunately, Hornady has selected an uncommon thread type for OAL Gauges. You probably won’t be able to buy the correct 5/16″ – 36 RH HSS Tap at your local hardware store. However you CAN order this special tap from Amazon for $9.99.

Modified Case Q & A — TECH TIPS

Why do I need a Modified Case?
Every serious reloader should have a Modified Case for each cartridge type they shoot. The reason is that this allows you to get very precise measurements of the length-to-lands in your chamber. When used with the Hornady OAL Gauge, with some practice, you should be able to get repeatable length-to-lands measurements within about 0.015″. We generally do 4-5 measurements with the OAL Gauge and usually 3 or 4 will be “on the money”. NOTE: We recommend a gentle, easy pressure on the plastic pusher rod. Don’t push too hard or you will jam the bullet hard into the lands, which produces inconsistent results.

Can’t I Just Buy a Modified Case?
Hornady makes a variety of Modified Cases sold on Amazon and through retailers such as Midsouth. While Hornady makes modified cases for many standard cartridges, if you shoot a wildcat such as the 6mm Dasher or .284 Shehane, you’ll need to create a custom modified case. And even if you shoot a standard cartridge such as the .308 Win, you can get more consistent measurements with a custom Modified Case.

If you do decide to make your own modified case, you’ll want to start with a case that’s been fired in your rifle. That way you get the best fit to YOUR chamber. Also, you won’t need to expand the neck to provide bullet clearance. Then you need to drill out the primer pocket and tap the base of the case to match the threads on the Hornady OAL Gauge tool. Make at least two modified cases, as you’ll probably misplace one at some point.

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February 3rd, 2023

Four Vital Ammo Checks You Should Always Do Before Shooting

Sierra Bullets Reloading Blog Matchking Carroll Pilant

Here’a useful article by Sierra Bullets Media Relations Manager Carroll Pilant. This story, which originally appeared in the Sierra Bullets Blog, covers some of the more common ammo problems that afflict hand-loaders. Some of those issues are: excessive OAL, high primers, and improperly-sized cases. Here Mr. Pilant explains how to avoid these common problems that lead to “headaches at the range.

Sierra Bullets Reloading Blog Matchking Carroll Pilant

I had some gentlemen at my house last fall getting rifle zeros for an upcoming elk hunt. One was using one of the .300 short mags and every 3rd or 4th round would not chamber. Examination of the case showed a bulge right at the body/shoulder junction. These were new cases he had loaded for this trip. The seating die had been screwed down until it just touched the shoulder and then backed up just slightly. Some of the cases were apparently slightly longer from the base to the datum line and the shoulder was hitting inside the seating die and putting the bulge on the shoulder. I got to thinking about all the gun malfunctions that I see each week at matches and the biggest percentage stem from improper handloading techniques.

One: Check Your Cases with a Chamber Gage

Since I shoot a lot of 3-gun matches, I see a lot of AR problems which result in the shooter banging the butt stock on the ground or nearest solid object while pulling on the charging handle at the same time. I like my rifles too well to treat them that way (I cringe every time I see someone doing that). When I ask them if they ran the ammo through a chamber gage, I usually get the answer, “No, but I need to get one” or “I didn’t have time to do it” or other excuses. The few minutes it takes to check your ammo can mean the difference between a nightmare and a smooth running firearm.

A Chamber Gauge Quickly Reveals Long or Short Cases
Sierra Bullets Reloading Blog Matchking Carroll Pilant

Size Your Cases Properly
Another problem is caused sizing the case itself. If you will lube the inside of the neck, the expander ball will come out a lot easier. If you hear a squeak as the expander ball comes out of a case neck, that expander ball is trying to pull the case neck/shoulder up (sometimes several thousandths). That is enough that if you don’t put a bulge on the shoulder when seating the bullet … it can still jam into the chamber like a big cork. If the rifle is set up correctly, the gun will not go into battery and won’t fire but the round is jammed into the chamber where it won’t extract and they are back to banging it on the ground again (with a loaded round stuck in the chamber). A chamber gage would have caught this also.

Bad_Primer_WallsOversizing cases also causes problems because the firing pin doesn’t have the length to reach the primer solid enough to ignite it 100% of the time. When you have one that is oversized, you usually have a bunch, since you usually do several cases at a time on that die setting. If the die isn’t readjusted, the problem will continue on the next batch of cases also. They will either not fire at all or you will have a lot of misfires. In a bolt action, a lot of time the extractor will hold the case against the face of the breech enough that it will fire. The case gets driven forward and the thinner part of the brass expands, holding to the chamber wall and the thicker part of the case doesn’t expand as much and stretches back to the bolt face. If it doesn’t separate that time, it will the next time. When it does separate, it leaves the front portion of the case in the chamber and pulls the case head off. Then when it tries to chamber the next round, you have a nasty jam. Quite often range brass is the culprit of this because you never know how many times it has been fired/sized and in what firearm. Back to beating it on the ground again till you figure out that you have to get the forward part of the case out.

Just a quick tip — To extract the partial case, an oversized brush on a cleaning rod [inserted] and then pulled backward will often remove the case. The bristles when pushed forward and then pulled back act like barbs inside the case. If you have a bunch of oversized case that have been fired, I would dispose of them to keep from having future problems. There are a few tricks you can use to salvage them if they haven’t been fired though. Once again, a case gage would have helped.

Two: Double Check Your Primers

Sierra Bullets Reloading Blog Matchking Carroll Pilant

Another thing I see fairly often is a high primer, backwards primer, or no primer at all. The high primers are bad because you can have either a slam fire or a misfire from the firing pin seating the primer but using up its energy doing so. So, as a precaution to make sure my rifle ammo will work 100% of the time, I check it in a case gage, then put it in an ammo box with the primer up and when the box is full, I run my finger across all the primers to make sure they are all seated to the correct depth and you can visually check to make sure none are in backwards or missing.

Three: Check Your Overall Cartridge Length

Trying to load the ammo as long as possible can cause problems also. Be sure to leave yourself enough clearance between the tip of the bullet and the front of the magazine where the rounds will feed up 100%. Several times over the years, I have heard of hunters getting their rifle ready for a hunt. When they would go to the range to sight in, they loaded each round single shot without putting any ammo in the magazine. On getting to elk or deer camp, they find out the ammo is to long to fit in the magazine. At least they have a single shot, it could be worse. I have had hunters that their buddies loaded the ammo for them and then met them in hunting camp only to find out the ammo wouldn’t chamber from either the bullet seated to long or the case sized improperly, then they just have a club.

Four: Confirm All Cases Contain Powder

No powder in the case doesn’t seem to happen as much in rifle cartridges as in handgun cartridges. This is probably due to more handgun ammo being loaded on progressive presses and usually in larger quantities. There are probably more rifle cartridges that don’t have powder in them than you realize though. Since the pistol case is so much smaller internal capacity, when you try to fire it without powder, it usually dislodges the bullet just enough to stick in the barrel. On a rifle, you have more internal capacity and usually a better grip on the bullet, since it is smaller diameter and longer bearing surface. Like on a .223, often a case without powder won’t dislodge the bullet out of the case and just gets ejected from the rifle, thinking it was a bad primer or some little quirk.

Sierra Bullets Reloading Blog Matchking Carroll Pilant

For rifle cases loaded on a single stage press, I put them in a reloading block and always dump my powder in a certain order. Then I do a visual inspection and any case that the powder doesn’t look the same level as the rest, I pull it and the one I charged before and the one I charged after it. I inspect the one case to see if there is anything visual inside. Then I recharge all 3 cases. That way if a case had powder hang up and dump in the next case, you have corrected the problem.

On progressive presses, I try to use a powder that fills the case up to about the base of the bullet. That way you can usually see the powder as the shell rotates and if you might have dumped a partial or double charge, you will notice as you start to seat the bullet if not before. On a progressive, if I don’t load a cartridge in one smooth stroke (say a bullet tipped over sideways and I raised the ram slightly to reset it) Some presses actually back the charge back adding more powder if it has already dumped some so you have a full charge plus a partial charge. When I don’t complete the procedure with one stroke, I pull the case that just had powder dumped into it and check the powder charge or just dump the powder back into the measure and run the case through later.

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February 3rd, 2023

Excellent, Informative Cartridge Diagrams — Download for FREE

Winchester centerfire rimfire pistol shotshell ammo ammunition cartridge diagram illustration

Winchester’s new “Introduction to Ammunition — Ammo 101” is a four-part series including custom illustrations and information for four major ammunition categories: rifle, pistol, rimfire, and shotshell. The Ammo 101 series provides a detailed overview of centerfire rifle, centerfire pistol, rimfire, and shotshell ammunition, showcasing ammunition construction, components, calibers, and common usage. The Ammo 101 resource is free to download from Winchesters.mediaassets.com. Or, simply click one or more diagrams below. Each image will launch a large PDF which you can print or download.

TIP: Click Each Image for Full-Screen Printable PDF

Shown below are the first four ammunition information sheets prepared by Winchester. These show all the key components of cartridges and shotshells, and explain the functions. These diagrams are useful for training, and for persons getting started in reloading.

Ammo 101 Centerfire Rifle Cartridge Diagram (click for PDF)

Winchester centerfire ammo ammunition cartridge diagram illustration

Ammo 101 Rimfire Cartridge Diagram (click for printable PDF)

Winchester centerfire ammo ammunition cartridge diagram illustration

Ammo 101 Pistol Cartridge Diagram (click for printable PDF)

Winchester centerfire ammo ammunition cartridge diagram illustration

Ammo101 Shotshell Diagram (click for printable PDF)

Winchester centerfire ammo ammunition cartridge diagram illustration


CLICK HERE for ALL FOUR Diagrams in SINGLE LARGE PDF »

About the Ammo 101 Series
The FREE Ammo 101 resources can help instructors nationwide who introduce new entrants to the shooting sports and hunting. Instructors can incorporate these resources into their training presentations, use them as handouts, or have them printed locally.

“The basics of ammunition… is what we want to deliver with the Ammo 101 series,” said Matt Campbell, Winchester V.P. of Sales & Marketing. “With millions of people across the United States starting their journey in the shooting sports as new firearm owners, providing easy-to-understand information on ammunition types is one way we can help educate our customers.”

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February 2nd, 2023

Western Hunting EXPO February 2-5 in Salt Lake City

western hunting expo salt lake utah deer sheep elk

The 2023 Western Hunting and Conservation EXPO opens today at the Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake City, Utah. The Western Hunting and Conservation Expo is the largest hunting convention open to the public in the Western USA. The EXPO features daily seminars, waterfowl and elk calling championships, auctions, drawings and more. Exhibit halls open 10:00 AM to 7:00 PM, Thursday through Saturday and 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM on Sunday. A partnership between the Mule Deer Foundation, Sportsmen for Fish and Wildlife, and Utah Office of Tourism. With over 400 hunting and outdoor business vendors, this year’s event should attract over 55,000 attendees.

western hunting expo salt lake utah deer sheep elk
CLICK HERE to register for the EXPO. Various packages are offered. There is a basic 4-day Hall Pass, and other deluxe packages including banquets and entertainment.

western hunting expo salt lake utah deer sheep elk

New Elite Hunter Bullets from Berger
Berger Bullets will attend the 2023 Western Hunting EXPO this year in Utah. Berger’s hunting bullets — VLD Hunting, Elite Hunter, and Classic Hunter –are designed for controlled expansion and extreme hydrostatic shock at both short- and long-range distances. These bullets are available for handloaders, and these bullet options are also offered used in quality factory ammo.

New for 2023, Berger has expanded its successful Elite Hunter ammunition with the following offerings: 6mm Creedmoor 108 Grain Elite Hunter, 6.5 Creedmoor 140 Grain Elite Hunter, 6.5 PRC 140 Grain Elite Hunter, and 300 PRC 245 Grain Elite Hunter.

This article, as published in AccurateShooter.com, contains copyrighted content. It shall not be republished in whole or in part without advanced permission in writing. The act of republishing constitutes legal consent to licensing fees.

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February 1st, 2023

Get FREE Bullets with Hornady Get Loaded 2023 Promotion

hornady get loaded 2022 promotion free bullet reloading press

Back by popular demand, Hornady is now running its 2023 Get Loaded® promotion. With this promo you can get up to 500 FREE BULLETS with qualifying purchases of Hornady reloading products.

The 2023 Get Loaded program begins on February 1, 2023 and continues through December 31, 2023. Customers who purchase from the qualifying Hornady lineup of reloading presses and reloading tools will receive free bullets after submitting official redemption forms. Depending on the products purchased, customers can get 500 or 100 free bullets, valued up to $234.33.

hornady get loaded 2022 promotion free bullet reloading press

hornady get loaded 2022 promotion free bullet reloading press

Qualifying bullets include:

• 22 CAL .224 55 GR SP W/C

• 6MM .243 100 GR BTSP

• 6.5MM .264 129 GR SP

• 7MM .284 139 GR BTSP

• 30 CAL .308 150 GR SP

• 9MM .355 115 GR XTP®

• 10MM .400 155 GR XTP®

Some restrictions apply.

For complete details of the promotion and to submit redemptions, visit Hornady.com/getloaded2023.

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January 31st, 2023

Shooting on a Spinning Planet — Explaining the Coriolis Effect

Whittington Coriolis Effect
Photo by Dustin Ellermann at Whittington Center Range.

The Coriolis Effect comes into play with extreme long-range shots like this (2100 yards at Raton, New Mexico). The rotation of the earth actually moves the target a small distance (in space) during the long duration of the bullet’s flight.

Coriolis Effect Bryan Litz Applied BallisticsWhen you’re out at the range, the Earth seems very stable. But it is actually a big sphere zooming through space while spinning around its axis, one complete turn every 24 hours. The rotation of the earth can create problems for extreme long-range shooters. During extended bullet flight times, the rotation of the planet causes an apparent deflection of the bullet path over very long distances. This is the ballistics manifestation of the Coriolis Effect.

Bryan Litz of Applied Ballistics discusses explains the Coriolis Effect in his Ballistics Books and Seminars. Bryan notes that Coriolis is “a very subtle effect. People like to make more of it than it is because it seems mysterious.” In most common shooting situations inside 1K, Coriolis is not important. At 1000 yards, the Effect represents less than one click (for most cartridge types). Even well past 1000 yards, in windy conditions, the Coriolis Effect may well be “lost in the noise”. But in very calm conditions, when shooting at extreme ranges, Bryan says you can benefit from adjusting your ballistics solution for Coriolis.

Bryan explains: “The Coriolis Effect… has to do with the spin of the earth. You are basically shooting from one point to another on a rotating sphere, in an inertial reference frame. The consequence of that is that, if the flight time of the bullet gets significantly long, the bullet can have an apparent drift from its intended target. The amount [of apparent drift] is very small — it depends on your latitude and azimuth of fire on the planet.”

Coriolis Effect Bryan Litz Applied Ballistics

Coriolis is a very subtle effect. With typical bullet BCs and velocities, you must get to at least 1000 yards before Coriolis amounts to even one click. Accordingly, Bryan advises: “Coriolis Effect is NOT something to think about on moving targets, it is NOT something to think about in high, uncertain wind environments because there are variables that are dominating your uncertainty picture, and the Coriolis will distract you more than the correction is worth.”

“Where you could think about Coriolis, and have it be a major impact on your hit percentage, is if you are shooting at extended range, at relatively small targets, in low-wind conditions. Where you know your muzzle velocity and BC very well, [and there are] pristine conditions, that’s where you’re going to see Coriolis creep in. You’ll receive more refinement and accuracy in your ballistics solutions if you account for Coriolis on those types of shots. But in most practical long-range shooting situations, Coriolis is NOT important. What IS important is to understand is when you should think about it and when you shouldn’t, i.e. when applying it will matter and when it won’t.”

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January 30th, 2023

BargainFinder 384: AccurateShooter’s Deals of the Week

AccurateShooter Deals of the Week Weekly Bargain Finder Sale Discount Savings

At the request of our readers, we provide select “Deals of the Week”. Every Sunday afternoon or Monday morning we offer our Best Bargain selections. Here are some of the best deals on firearms, hardware, reloading components, optics, and shooting accessories. Be aware that sale prices are subject to change, and once clearance inventory is sold, it’s gone for good. You snooze you lose.

NOTE: All listed products are for sale to persons 18 years of age or older. No products are intended for use by minors.

1. Sportsman’s WH — Gun Sale + $100 Smith & Wesson REBATE

smith wesson firearm frenzy 2023 $100 rebate discount sportsman's warehouse
Get $100 S&W Factory Rebate on top of discounts

Right now you can get a $100 Rebate on dozens of popular Smith & Wesson Firearms (and there are lesser rebates on other S&W guns). When you combine this $100 S&W Factory Rebate with the already discounted prices at Sportsman’s Warehouse you have some exceptional bargains. Here are three examples of the great deals : M&P 9mm M2.0 Optics Ready pistol $499.99 after rebate; M&P 45acp M2.0 Compact pistol $489.99 after rebate; M&P15 Sport II 5.56mm NATO 16″ AR type rifle $669.99 after rebate.

2. Midsouth — LEE Breechlock Challenger Press Kit, $144.99

Lee press sale
Heck of a deal on a good press and complete reloading system

For under $150 you can get pretty much everything you need to reload, except dies. This LEE Breech Lock Challenger Kit includes Press, Powder Dispenser, Scale, Hand Primer Tool, Funnel, Chamfer Tool, Primer pocket tool, and more. We like the press — the handle is adjustable and the primer-catching system sends spent primers into a receptacle for no mess cleanup. This $144.99 LEE Kit comes complete with the Breechlock Quick Change die system. If you are looking to get started in handloading, or want a back-up second press with accessories, this is a great deal.

3. Amazon — Dragon AR600 Steel Gongs, $12.99-$76.99

Dragon steel AR500 gong targets reactive Amazon
High-quality 4″, 6″, 8″, 10″, 12″ AR500 steel gongs

Shooting steel is fun — you get instant gratification from hearing the “clang” and seeing the gong swing. Shooting steel is also good practice for PRS/NRL events and ground-hog matches. Right now, you can get some great deals on quality AR500 steel targets. These Dragon Target Gongs start at just $12.99 for a 4″-diameter, 3/8″-thick gong. Larger 6″, 8″, 10″, and 12″ gongs are offered in 3/8″ and 1/2″ thicknesses, and a 3-pack of 8″ gongs is available. A 6″-diameter gong is $18.99 (3/8″ thick) or $23.99 (1/2″ thick). The largest 12″-diameter gong in the heavy 1/2″ thickness is $57.99. NOTE: All these Dragon gongs have a center hole allowing more hanging options.

4. KYGUNCO — Complete Radical Firearms AR-15 Rifle, $399.99

kygunco ar15 ar-15 radical socom 5.56.
Complete AR-15 rifle for less than you might pay for assembled upper

You can’t beat this price for a complete AR-15 — $399.99 from KYGUNCO with Free Shipping. You could easily pay MORE for an assembled upper alone. The Radical Firearms RPR AR-15 rifle features MIL-STD upper and lower receivers along with 15″ RPR rail system. The 16″ 1:7″-twist barrel is 4140 Chrome Moly Vanadium. The lower is forged 7075 T6 aluminum with Type III anodizing. The buttstock is adjustable and there is a long rail on the top of the aluminum forearm for mounting optics and accessories.

5. Palmetto SA — CCI 9mm 115gr FMJ 1000 Rounds, $299.99

9mm luger 9x19mm CCI
Quality, reliable CCI 9mm ammo, 1K case works out to $15 for 50 rounds

This is reliable, made-in-USA 9mm ammo, with good brass and quality CCI FMJ bullets. The $299.99 case price works out to just $15.00 per 50 rounds — a great value. This isn’t much more expensive than remanufactured 9mm ammo, and you have the assurance of NEW brass and major brand quality control. Note: This is a loose pack with all 1000 rounds in a single large, heavy-duty box.

6. Powder Valley — 500 Sierra 9mm Bullets with Can, $99.99

Sierra 9mm bullets bargain sale Powder Valley
Great price on 9mm bullets with bonus Sierra Ammo Can

A 500-ct can of Sierra 9mm 115gr FMJ bullets is on sale now for $99.99 at Powder Valley Inc.. You get 500 FMJ bullets PLUS a sturdy polymer ammo can at a $50 savings off the normal price. Act soon as this $50 savings ends at 11:59 pm on Friday 2/03/23, or while supplies last. Replenish your 9mm bullet stock and take advantage of this Sierra Bullets + Ammo Can Sale.

7. Midsouth — A-Zoom Snap Cap Sets, $7.15 and up

rifle tool sale
Snap Caps for dry-fire training — big selection of cartridge types

All shooters can benefit from dry-fire training. And for that you definitely need Snap Caps. A-Zoom offers a wide range of Snap Cap Kits for rimfire and centerfire rifles and pistols. There is even a jumbo Snap Cap for 12ga shotguns. For semi-auto pistols we recommend the orange StrikerCaps ($7.15 2-pack). These stay in place in the chamber — just rack the slide to reset the trigger. For a large pistol collection, try the $21.96 Pistol Variety Pack with five different cartridge types: .22 LR, .380 ACP, 9mm Luger, .40 S&W, .45 ACP. There’s also a $31.37 Military/LE Variety Pack with 9mm Luger, .40 S&W, .45 ACP, .223 Rem, .308 Win, and 12 Gauge shotshell.

8. Amazon — Walkie Talkies with LED Flashlight, $23.99

walkie talkie radio pair led flashlight bargain
Popular 22 Ch FRS radio set with built-in flashlights

Campers, hunters, and hikers can all use this budget-priced MOICO Walkie-Talkie Set, now just $23.99 on Amazon. These offer 22 FRS channels, with a max 5 mile range (in open country). These work well when communicating between the shooting line and target pits downrange. One great feature is a built-in-LED flashlight — making these Walkie-Talkies great for camping and night-time use.

9. Amazon — Real Avid 19-in-1 Multi-Tool, $39.99

rifle tool sale
Versatile Multi-Tool with great features for gun owners

We’re big fans of multi-tools and this 19-in-1 Real Avid Multi-Tool is one of the best for gun guys. This compact 19-in-1 handgun multi-tool is a “must have” for any handgun owner. This tool can handle a multitude of tasks — e.g. changing grips, mounting accessories, field disassembly, adjusting laser sights, and even gunsmithing repairs. This tool does it all.

10. Amazon — Field Dressing Kit, $69.97

Field Dressing knife kit
Must-have kit for game hunters — very useful

For the hunters out there, here’s a nice kit to prepare game meat. The versatile Knine Outdoors Field Dressing Kit offers a great selection of tools for a low price. This very complete Dressing Kit includes: 12″ Boning Knife, 9-1/2″ Gut-Hook Skinner, 8-1/2″ Hawkbill blade knife, 8-1/2″ Caping Knife, 12″ Gut-Hook Butcher Axe, 10-1/2″ Skinning Cleaver, 8-1/2″ Bone Saw, Ribcage Spreader (7″ to 12″), 9-1/4″ Game Shear, 11-7/8″ x 7-7/8″ Cutting Board, Knife and Shear Sharpener, and Cleaning Gloves.

11. AAF Nation — T-Shirt or Hoodie, $23.95 or $39.95

t-shirt hoodie shooter bargain
Popular hoodie and/or shirt with great message for older shooters

Let’s face it, many of us are not so young anymore… but we still can shoot! That’s the message of these clothing items. Against a background of a bullseye target, the illustration reads: “Too old to fight, too slow to run, but I can still shoot pretty darn good.” Choose either a hoodie version for $39.95, a regular T-shirt for $23.95, or long sleeve shirt for $29.95. Purchasers report the items are sized properly. One hoodie buyer posted: “This hoodie is warm and comfortable. It is well-made and has a good print job!”

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January 29th, 2023

Sunday GunDay: Beyond .223 Rem — Alternative AR Cartridges

AR15 AR AR-15 cartridge alternative

Instead of using the standard .223 Remington or 5.56x45mm NATO round, you have many options for an AR-15. Dozens of cartridge variants have been tried in AR-15s. Some of the most noteworthy and popular alternative chamberings for AR-15s are:

20 Practical — This is simply the .223 Rem necked down to .204 caliber. Requires new barrel. Same bolt, same magazines. Best bang for the buck.
.224 Valkyrie — A necked-down version of the 6.8 SPC, the .224 Valkyrie was introduced by Federal a few seasons back. It has better ballistics than the .223 Remington, if used with a suitable barrel.
6mm ARC — Relatively new cartridge that works well for varminting, self-defense, tactical competitions, and deer hunting. Good selection of bullets and factory-loaded ammunition.
6.5 Grendel — Accurate and proven across the course, the 6.5 Grendel requires a new barrel, bolt, and magazines. Most use the 6.5 Grendel for competitive shooting and/or hunting.
.300 Blackout — Moderately expensive, the .300 Blackout requires a barrel change. This is used for home defense, and hunting. WARNING — with some bullets this round can be chambered in a .223 Rem barrel, with disastrous consequences.
.458 SOCOM — Pretty expensive, requires new barrel and bolt. The .458 SOCOM round is typically used for hunting though it was originally designed for Close Quarters Battle (CQB).

Of these six options, our favorite is the 20 Practical, followed by the 6mm ARC and 6.5 Grendel. The 20 Practical is a great varminting round. Check out our featured 20 Practical AR Rifle Report. This 20 Practical cartridge is highly effective on small varmints, and has shown outstanding accuracy in AR-platform rifles crafted by Robert Whitley.

20 Practical — High-Velocity, Affordable Alternative

The 20 Practical is simply a .223 Remington necked down to .204 caliber. This efficient little cartridge can launch 32-grainers at over 4200 fps, with impressive results on P-Dogs. This makes the 20 Practical a great choice for an AR-based varmint rifle.

20 Practical20 Practical Ultimate Varminter
A decade ago, as a “proof-of-concept”, AccurateShooter.com created a 20 Practical AR15 Ultimate Varminter with a custom 20-caliber upper from Robert Whitley of AR-X Enterprises, LLC. That project rifle was ultra-accurate — every 5-shot group out of the gun was less than the size of a dime. That gun was auctioned off, but Robert Whitley continues to produce custom 20 Practical AR15 uppers. (The 20 Practical cartridge is simply the .223 Rem necked down to 20 caliber — you can use standard .223 brass and load with standard .223 Rem dies. Just swap in a smaller expander and use smaller neck bushings.)

6mm ARC — Popular New SAAMI Cartridge Promoted by Hornady

In June 2020, Hornady introduced the 6mm ARC, a new SAAMI cartridge optimized for AR-platform rifles*. The new 6mm ARC is basically a 6.5 Grendel necked down to 6mm, with the shoulder moved back around .030″. That pushed-back shoulder does reduce case capacity (and velocity), but we assume Hornady did that to create a shorter, proprietary chamber so people could not simply neck-down Lapua 6.5 Grendel brass, as has been done for years with Robert Whitley’s outstanding 6mm AR wildcat.

CLICK Image for official SAAMI Specifications:
6mm ARC brownells bolts cartridge loaded ammunition hornady

If you are intrigued by the 6mm ARC, you’ll find the products you need at Brownells — uppers, barrels, bolts, and magazines. Brownells also sells Hornady-made 6mm ARC factory-loaded ammo but most is out-of-stock currently. MidwayUSA currently has Hornady 108gr ELD Match 6mm ARC ammo in stock. For general information, see 6mm ARC Info Page.

What Is the 6mm ARC Cartridge?
6mm ARC brownells bolts cartridge loaded ammunition hornadyThe 6mm ARC cartridge is a modern SAAMI-spec cartridge based on the 6.5 Grendel case necked down for 6mm bullets, with the shoulder moved back 0.030. Yes it is designed to run in AR15-platform rifles. You’ll need a new barrel, bolt, and mags. If you already have an AR chambered in 6.5 Grendel, the ONLY thing you need to change is the barrel. Everything else — bolt, magazines, gas system – is compatible with 6mm ARC.

▶ Official SAAMI Cartridge (not wildcat)
▶ Fits standard AR15-platform rifles
▶ Fits Short/Mini action bolt rifles
▶ Efficient short, fat case design
▶ 30-degree case shoulder

For more INFO, see 6mm ARC Info Page.

What Do I Need To Shoot the 6mm ARC?
Faxon and Ballistic Advantage are already producing barrels, with more manufacturers sure to follow. All the other required components are already on the market for 6.5 Grendel rifles. Aero Precision already offers complete 6mm ARC uppers.

If you’re converting a standard 5.56×45 mm (.223 Rem) AR15 upper to shoot 6mm ARC, you’ll need a 6mm barrel, a Type II 6.5 Grendel bolt carrier group, and new magazines. Some folks have suggested standard AR mags will work, but trust us, you want the magazines that have been designed for 6.5 Grendel. All the hardware you need is currently available at Brownells.

6mm ARC brownells bolts cartridge loaded ammunition hornady

While 6-6.5 Grendel shooters are known to run stout pressures, the new 6mm ARC cartridge has a relatively moderate Maximum Average Pressure (MAP) rating of 52,000 psi according to the official SAAMI specifications. For a variety of reasons, is wise to keep pressures in a semi-auto rifle moderate. Don’t chase the velocities you might get in a bolt-action gun.

The 6.5 Grendel — Accurate, Plus Good for Hunters

The 6.5 Grendel round is one of the most accurate cartridges for the AR-15 platform. The 6.5 Grendel round offers a larger-diameter, .264-caliber (6.5mm) bullet running at good velocities. This provides ample energy for smaller game and deer. The 6.5 Grendel is often used for hunting deer up to 300 yards.

6.5 Grendel

History of the 6.5 Grendel Cartridge
The 6.5 Grendel originated as a 6mm PPC necked up to 6.5 mm. After Alexander Arms relinquished the “6.5 Grendel” Trademark, the 6.5 Grendel was standardized as an official SAAMI cartridge. It has become popular with target shooters and hunters alike because it is accurate, efficient, and offers modest recoil. Good for small to medium game, the 6.5 Grendel has been offered in lightweight hunting rifles, such as the Howa 1500 Mini Action.

6.5 Grendel Saami Hornady Brass

.224 Valkyrie Cartridge — Impressive with Heavy .22-Cal Bullets

224 .224 Valkyrie barrel cut-down test velocity 90gr Sierra MatchKing Fusion SP TMK

The new .224 Valkyrie was introduced in 2019 as a Hot Rod cartridge that will work in AR15s. Basically a 6.8 SPC necked down to .22 caliber, the Valkyrie has a shorter case than the .223 Remington (and 5.56×45 NATO). This allows you to load the longest, heaviest .224-caliber bullets and still feed reliably from an AR15-type magazine. Designed to rival the .22 Nosler while still running well in ARs, the .224 Valkyrie offers excellent long-range performance when loaded with modern, high-BC bullets. We expect some bolt-action PRS shooters might adopt the .224 Valkyrie. Why? Reduced recoil. With the 90gr SMK, the .224 Valkyrie offers ballistics similar to the 6.5 Creedmoor but with significantly less felt recoil. It can also be a viable alternative to a .22-250 for varminters using an AR platform.

22 valkyrie .22-250
Image from Social Regressive .224 Valkyrie Youtube Video.

Our friend Gavin Gear of UltimateReloader.com found a superbly accurate load with Berger 80.5gr bullets. Watch this video to learn more:

Sierra Bullets has published extensive load data for the .224 Valkyrie. This covers over a dozen powder types — many more than the Hodgdon database. Sierra’s .224 Valkyrie load data covers projectiles from 50 grain all the way up to 95 grains. With the 90 to 95 grain bullets, the little Valkyrie can give 6mm match cartridges a real run for their money — offering similar ballistics with less recoil. When selecting a barrel for the long .224-cal bullets, specify a fast enough twist rate: “Sierra recommends a 1:6.5″-twist barrel for the #9290 22 cal 90 gr HPBT bullet. However, for cartridges like the Valkyrie, that can push them over 2650 fps muzzle velocity, a 1:7″-twist barrel will stabilize the bullet correctly.”


CLICK HERE to DOWNLOAD Complete Sierra .224 Valkyrie LOAD DATA.

.224 Valkyrie vs. .22-250 Remington
The Social Regressive explains: “There are two key reasons why the .224 Valkyrie is unique and desirable. First, it is specifically designed to fit the limitations of the AR-15 platform. It does so even when loaded with gigantic bullets, like the 90-grain SMK that Federal announced. The .22-250 Rem is too long and too fat to work in the AR-15 platform; it needs an AR-10 bolt and magazine.”

The .224 Valkyrie has been marketed as a low-recoil round that can stay supersonic to 1300 yards and beyond (with 90gr Sierra MatchKings). Here a Sniper’s Hide duo shots an AR-platform .224 Valkyrie at distances out to 1550+ yards. To be honest, the accuracy wasn’t that impressive. However this test confirms that the .224 Valkyrie does launch the long, heavy projectiles at high enough velocities to prove superior to the standard .223 Rem. Frank Galli (aka “Lowlight”) teams up with Brian Whalen of Colorado Precision Rifle at the Blue Steel Ranch in New Mexico.

The .300 Blackout — Risky Business

The .300 Blackout appeals to folks who want a .30-caliber defense round. This can be loaded at various velocities. Loaded at subsonic speeds and shot with a suppressor, the .300 BLK offers very low sound levels. Unfortunately, that .300 Blackout cartridge can fit in a .223 Rem chamber. Shooting a .308-caliber bullet in .223 bore is a recipe for disaster.

.300 AAC Blackout 300 BLK kaboom accident blowup cartridge failure barrel .223 Rem 5.56

.300 AAC Blackout 300 BLK kaboom accident blowup cartridge failure barrel .223 Rem 5.56The .300 AAC Blackout aka “300 BLK”, is a compact 30-caliber cartridge designed to work in AR-15 rifles. It has a shorter cartridge case to accommodate the bigger 30-caliber bullet while still fitting in a standard AR-15 magazine. Unfortunately, that’s the danger. A careless shooter can toss a .300 Blackout cartridge in with .223 Rem rounds without noting. And because the case-head size is the same as the .223 Rem (5.56×45) the rifle’s bolt assembly will happily chamber and fire the .300 BLK round. Problem is, that forces a .308 diameter bullet down an undersized .223-caliber bore. Not good!

This images were provided by Tactical Rifle Shooters on Facebook. The message was clear: “Don’t try to run 300 Blackout in your .223/5.56mm. It won’t end well. The problem is identical rifles and identical magazines but different calibers.”

Image from Accurate Shooter Forum. Cutaway shows the jammed .30-Cal bullet:
.300 AAC Blackout 300 BLK kaboom accident blowup cartridge failure barrel .223 Rem 5.56

For those who MUST have a .300 Blackout, here are some things you can do:

1. Use different colored magazines for .300 Blackout vs. .223 Remington.
2. Mark .223 Rem upper handguards with the caliber in bright paint.
2. Fit all your uppers with caliber-labeled ejection port covers.
4. Mark all .300 BLK Rounds with heavy black marker.

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January 28th, 2023

Saturday at the Movies: 5.7x28mm Handguns and Ammo Tests

5.7x28mm five seven pistol video reviews movie saturday handgun test

5.7x28mm five seven pistol video reviews movie saturday handgun testThis Saturday Movie showcase features four handguns chambered for the modern, high-velocity 5.7x28mm cartridge. In a 5″-6″ barreled pistol, the 5.7x28mm round can achieve very high velocities compared to a 9x19mm (9mm Luger) or .40 SW. The bottle-necked 5.7×28mm cartridge weighs roughly two-thirds as much as a typical 9mm Luger cartridge, allowing more rounds to be carried for the same weight. The cartridge can produce considerable muzzle flash when fired from a pistol, but it has roughly 30% less recoil than the 9mm Luger cartridge, improving controllability. Thanks to its high velocity, the 5.7×28mm has a flatter trajectory than most pistol ammo types.

Today we showcase videos of four different 5.7x28mm pistols — the new S&W M&P 5.7, the PSA 5.7 Rock, the Ruger-5.7, and the FN Five-SeveN Mk3 MRD. If you are looking for the best deal on a 5.7 pistol, check out the the PSA 5.7 Rock. You can buy one today for $599.99 including Holosun Red Dot Sight.

Smith & Wesson M&P 5.7 with 22-Rd Magazine


Chambered for the high-velocity, flat-shooting 5.7x28mm, the Smith & Wesson M&P 5.7 features S&W’s new TEMPO barrel system. This is a two-part, lock-breech barrel with a proprietary gas system for improved cycling and extraction. The new M&P 5.7 includes a 1/2×28 threaded barrel to mount a muzzle device or suppressor, optics-cut slide, flat-face trigger, and forward, frame rail for mounting accessories.

PSA 5.7 Rock — Best Value in a 5.7x28mm Handgun


5.7x28mm five seven pistol video reviews movie saturday handgun test

The Palmetto State Armory (PSA) 5.7 Rock is the best value in a 5.7x28mm pistol. Right now PSA offers it complete with a mounted Holosun Red Dot sight for just $599.99 with two 23-rd mags. A full-sized, polymer-framed pistol, the PSA 5.7 Rock has threaded carbon steel fluted barrel and 416 stainless steel slide with QPQ finish for corrosion protection. Chambered in 5.7x28mm, the PSA 5.7 Rock is fed from a 23-round magazine and operated by a smooth, single-action, striker-fired trigger mechanism. While sold with a Holosun 407k optic, the 5.7 Rock slide accepts other Shield footprint optics.

Ruger-5.7 Pistol Review by Hickok45

In the video above, popular YouTube host Hickok45 reviews the Ruger-5.7, which was introduced in late 2019. This gun has proven reliable and when it hit the market it was much less expensive than its main competitor made by FN. Ruger’s 5.7x28mm pistol is blow-back operated with an internal hammer and ambidextrous thumb safety. The pistol is offered with a 20+1 capacity magazine and an adjustable rear sight paired with a fiber-­optic front. Current MSRP is $899.00. If you’re interested in the Ruger-5.7, read the On-Target Magazine Full Review.

FN Five-SeveN Mk3 MRD Review

In this episode of TFBTV, James Reeves reviews the new FN Five-SeveN Mk3 MRD. At $1,449.00 MSRP, this is the most expensive 5.7x28mm pistol on the market, but might it also be the best? James takes the new Five-seveN Mk3 MRD to the range and to the table to tell you if FN’ lastest, high-tech 5.7x28mm pistol is worth the spend.

Ruger-5.7 vs. PSA 5.7 Rock

Ruger-5.7 vs. FN 5.7

Comparison Between 5.7x28mm and 9x19mm

In this video James Reeves compares the performance of the 5.7x28mm round with the 9mm Luger. The 5.7x28mm round certainly offers higher velocity and greater penetration than the legendary 9mm round. Plus common 5.7 magazines hold over 20 rounds. James discusses the advantages of this modern 5.7x28mm cartridge, as well as a few of its shortcomings — such as high cost per round. There is another insightful comparison between the two ammo types on the Ammo-to-Go website. Editor John Lewis notes: “5.7×28 is lighter and faster than 9mm ammo” while the 9mm had a “slight advantage in energy [and was] much better in gel”.

5.7x28mm vs 9mm Penetration Test

In this video the tester shot both 9mm and a 5.7x28mm bullets into horizontal stacks of paper plates. The smaller-diameter 5.7mm bullet penetrated about 40% more paper plates than the 9mm bullet (See video at 3:10-3:35). The 5.7mm bullet basically retained its dimensions in this test, while the hollow-point 9mm spread out slightly. Just mere horizontal penetration can’t tell you the actual effectiveness of the round based in a defensive situation. In a different test using Ballistic Gel, both rounds penetrated adequately but the 9mm created a bigger wound channel. SEE: AmmotoGo.com 5.7x28mm Test.

Short History of 5.7x28mm Guns and Ammo

The FN 5.7×28mm (designated as the 5.7×28 by the C.I.P. and FN 5.7x28mm NATO) is a small-caliber, high-velocity, rebated rim, bottle-necked centerfire cartridge designed for handgun and personal defense weapon uses. It is similar in length to the .22 WMR and somewhat similar to the .22 Hornet or .22 K-Hornet. Unlike many new cartridges, it has no parent case — it was developed from scratch by FN.

5.7x28mm five seven pistol video reviews movie saturday handgun test

The 5.7×28mm was developed in conjunction with the FN P90 PDW and FN Five-Seven pistol in response to NATO requests for a replacement for the 9×19mm Parabellum cartridge (9mm Luger). In 2002 and 2003, NATO conducted a series of tests with the intention of standardizing a PDW cartridge as a replacement for the 9×19mm. The tests compared the relative merits of the 5.7×28mm cartridge and the 4.6×30mm cartridge, which was created by Heckler & Koch.

By 2006, FN’s 5.7×28mm firearms — the P90 PDW and Five-Seven pistol — were in service with military and police forces in over 40 nations worldwide. In the USA, 5.7×28mm firearms are currently used by many law enforcement agencies, including the U.S. Secret Service.

Along with use in military and law enforcement firearms, in recent years the 5.7×28mm cartridge has become popular for handguns in the USA. In December 2019 Ruger unveiled the Ruger-5.7 semi-automatic pistol chambered in this cartridge. In January 2021 Kel-Tec introduced its P50 handgun, which uses horizontal 50-round FN P90 magazines. In January 2021 Palmetto State Armory (PSA) introduced its Rock 5.7 pistol. And this year, Smith & Wesson has released its new M&P 5.7, featured above.

The 5.7×28mm cartridge itself is produced by multiple ammunition makers including Federal, Fiocchi, FN, and Speer. 5.7x28mm ammunition is PRICEY — the cheapest 5.7x28mm ammo we found with a quick search was 40gr Federal American Eagle at $0.77 round. By comparison, you can currently find bulk CCI 9mm Luger ammo for $0.30/round.

Some still images and text shared from Wikipedia: CC BY-SA 3.0

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