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May 19th, 2022

Make Your Own Empty Chamber Indicator for Rimfire Rifles

Medler Rimfire Empty Chamber Indicator

Larry Medler has come up with a smart little invention — a simple, inexpensive Empty Chamber Indicator for rimfire rifles. It is made from a section of plastic “weed-wacker” line and a wooden ball from a hobby shop. Larry says he was inspired by Juniors who used something similar for their 17-Caliber Air Rifles.

How to Make the Empty Chamber Indicator

Construction Method: First, drill a 7/64″ diameter hole all the way through the 1″-diameter wooden ball. Then enlarge half of that 1″-long hole using a 13/64” diameter drill. Next insert an 8″ piece of heavy duty (0.095″ diameter) weed wacker line through the ball, leaving about 2″ on the side with the bigger-diameter hole. Then, with the short end of the line, fold over the last half-inch so the line is doubled-over on itself. Then slide the line into the ball, stuffing the doubled-over section through the 13/64″ (large) hole. Finally, pull the longer end of the line until the doubled-over section is flush with the outside of the ball. This gives you a sturdy line attachment without messy adhesives. When the assembly’s complete, hold the ECI by the tail and dip the ball in yellow paint. If you’re making more than one ECI, you can drill horizontal holes in a spare block of wood and use that as a drying rack.

rimfire sporter
At a Rimfire Sporter match like this, all shooters must have an Empty Chamber Indicator.

The Empty Chamber Indicator for Smallbore Rifles
Larry explains: “At all Highpower rifle matches, silhouette matches, and other shooting events I have attended, Open Bore Indicators (OBI), or what are now called Empty Chamber Indicators (ECI) have been mandatory. The NRA’s yellow ECI for Highpower rifles is easy to use and has been well-received by the shooters. However, I had not seen a truly workable ECI for 22 rimfire rifles — until I visited Michigan’s Washtenaw Sportsman’s Club where I saw juniors using ECIs for their 17 Caliber Air Rifles. Someone at the club made the empty chamber indicators by attaching an 8″ piece of weed wacker line to a 1″-diameter wooden ball, painted bright yellow. I now make similar ECIs for the 22 rimfire silhouette matches I run.”

Permalink Competition, Tech Tip No Comments »
May 18th, 2022

CMP Training Courses at National Matches This Summer

Camp Perry CMP instruction clinic

Ready to learn more about marksmanship? This summer, the CMP will offer a wide selection of training programs at the National Matches at Camp Perry. CMP training courses serve all levels of shooters, with personalized instruction for all. During this year’s National Matches, there will be an array of educational courses taught by experts, including USAMU team personnel and coaches. Courses span from junior to advanced, delivering a little something for everyone.

Camp Perry CMP instruction clinic

Participants in CMP National Matches clinics receive one-on-one instruction. Here is a quick guide (ranked from Advanced to Beginner) for scheduled learning events at the 2022 Camp Perry National Matches, which run July 12 through August 13, 2022.

ADVANCED – Team CMP Advanced Highpower Clinic:
Led by members of CMP Gold (CMP’s own competitive Highpower squad), the Advanced Highpower Clinic offers more complex instruction in service rifle competition techniques using classroom and range discussion. Though the class traditionally utilizes only dry-fire training on the range, in 2021, a 600-yard live-fire portion was added. This course is only open to those who have attended the Advanced Small Arms Firing School at least once and have an “Expert” classification with the CMP or National Rifle Association.

CMP National Matches Camp Perry Brandon Green USAMU marksmanship training
The Advanced High Power Clinic, led by Team CMP members including Bob Gil (above), provides advanced training on wind reading, mental management and more.

INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED – Junior Smallbore and Air Rifle Camp:
The camp is open to intermediate and advanced junior athletes who shoot both three-position smallbore and standing or international air rifle. Instruction is held on CMP’s outdoor Petrarca Range and within the Gary Anderson CMP Competition Center indoor air range, both located on the grounds of Camp Perry. Participants must be between the ages of 12 to 20 and currently involved in three-position smallbore competition matches and international air rifle. Camp will cover safety and a reinforced understanding of the fundamentals, among several other points of interest. Those juniors hoping to move their marksmanship careers on to college are encouraged to sign up for this valuable course.

Camp Perry CMP instruction clinic
Camp Perry CMP instruction clinic

INTERMEDIATE – U.S. Marine Corps Junior Highpower Clinic:
The three-day clinic gives focus to more advanced training outside of fundamentals, including weather conditions, how to read wind, equipment use, shooting positions and rulebook standards. Juniors in the clinic spend one day in the classroom, followed by two days of live-fire on the range at 200, 300 and 600 yards. Those young athletes who would like to attend this clinic must first attend the Rifle Small Arms Firing School.

BEGINNER – Small Arms Firing Schools (SAFS):
One of the most popular events of the National Matches, the SAFS course is a combination of classroom education and hands-on instruction on fundamentals, competition basics and safety. Training is led by members of military marksmanship teams as well as certified CMP instructors. At the conclusion of the course, students fire real competitions on the range, with instructors nearby. Equipment is provided by the CMP, with participants only needing a willingness to learn in order to attend. Currently, the CMP offers Small Arms Firing Schools for Pistol (M9), Smallbore Rifle, .22 caliber Rimfire Sporter Rifle and Highpower Rifle (M16) during the National Matches as well as an Advanced SAFS course for further training.

small arms firing school camp perry

BEGINNER — As-Issued Military Rifle Clinics:
Any CMP Games competitors who have not previously fired in one of these matches are required to attend a clinic before they fire. All other competitors in these matches are encouraged to attend as well. These free one-hour clinics will cover the Garand-Springfield-Vintage Matches with instruction and demonstrations. Topics include match rules, shooting positions and techniques, scoring and pit pulling procedures and how to fire the courses of fire. The clinic is open to all competitors. More experienced juniors may attend the USMC clinic, taught by current marksmanship professionals.

BEGINNER — M1 Maintenance Clinic:
CMP Armorers will present this two-hour clinic on disassembly, assembly and maintenance of the M1 Garand Rifle. Special attention will be given to accurizing steps that can be taken with the rifle while maintaining its legality for CMP-sanctioned As-Issued Military Rifle Matches. Topics such as head space, barrel installation, component purpose/function, general rifle assembly, rifle/component maintenance and various other techniques will be covered during the course.

Camp Perry CMP instruction clinic

MORE INFORMATION on Camp Perry Training Programs

Learn more about these training clinics and other educational opportunities, visit the CMP website at https://thecmp.org/cmp-national-matches/clinics.

Article based on story by Ashley Brugnone, CMP Staff Writer

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May 18th, 2022

Shooting USA TV Features $75K Armaggedon Gear Cup

Armageddon Gear AG Cup Invitational Shooting USA

Fans of PRS/NRL competition should watch Shooting USA today March 16, 2022. This action-packed episode features the 2021 Armageddon Gear (AG) Cup Invitational, a major PRS event with $75,000 in cash prize awards. The show airs today, Wednesday 5/18/22 at 9:00 PM Eastern/Pacific (8:00 PM Central) on the Outdoor Channel. You can also stream the show anytime on Vimeo for $0.99.

$75,000 in cash prizes makes the AG Cup the biggest cash money match in Precision Rifle Competition. It’s an elimination format shot over three days of challenging stages of fire at K & M Precision’s ranges in West Tennessee. In this episode, match organizer Tom Fuller joins John Scoutten to narrate the action and the award of the cash in extended coverage of the match. The 2020 AG Cup showcased an all-star line-up of tactical talent with the nation’s top PRS/NRL marksmen invited to the three-day match in TN.

Highlights of 2020 Armageddon Gear Cup Tactical Match:

shooting usa armageddon gear cup 2021 tom fuller
Armageddon Gear Founder Tom Fuller competes in PRS and supervised the latest AG Cup.

SHOOTING USA TV Air Times
View Shooting USA on the Outdoor Channel Wednesdays 9:00 PM (Eastern and Pacific) + 8:00 PM Central.
NOTE: If you miss today’s 5/18/22 broadcast, you can still view the show on Vimeo for a small 99-cent fee, or just $1.99 per month unlimited. LINK HERE: Shooting USA on Vimeo.

Shooting USA Garand Presidents 100
Shooting USA is available On Demand via Vimeo.com. Watch a single episode for $0.99, or get a full-month subscription for $1.99 and watch as many shows as you like with limited commercial interruptions.

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May 13th, 2022

Five FUN FREE Printable Pistol Targets

Printable PDF Pistol Target free Jessie Harrison

While AccurateShooter.com focuses primarily on rifle disciplines, we know that most of our regular readers also own handguns. It’s fun to shoot pistols, both outdoors and indoors. With a short site radius, and the snap of pistol recoil, handguns can be challenging — but that’s part of the fun. We enjoy shooting revolvers and semi-auto pistols at distances from 25 feet to 50 yards. Here are some fun targets you can download and print for FREE. These should provide a fun challenge for your next handgun sessions.

1. Patriotic Stars Target with Three Score Values

Here’s a fun Patriotic Stars Target created by the NSSF for National Shooting Sports Month. Aim for the stars. The red stars are worth 3 points, the blue stars are 5 points, and the smallest white stars are worth 10 points. After aiming for the one-color stars, try to hit the center red, white, and blue star for added fun. You can also use this target with rifles at longer ranges.

nssf pistol stars stripes target fun PDF

2. Red Center Pistol Target

Here’s a NRA-type target for pistol shooting. The bright red center helps when shooting indoors because well-placed bullet holes are much more visible. This target includes data entry boxes to record gun type, score, and load data. This Red Center Target is one of many good free targets available at Targets4free.com.

targets4free free target NRA pistol red center rings

3. NSSF Billiards Table Target

shooting paper printable billiard cue ball stripes solids target

This Billiards Table Target offers 15 brightly-colored numbered balls with the cue ball at the bottom. Aim for the numbers, shooting 1-15 in sequence, or alternate between stripes and solids. You can also draw an “X” on the white cue ball (or attach a paster), and use that to set your zero. This target is fun for shooting outdoors with rifles at 50 or 100 yards or indoors with pistols.

4. Tic-Tac-Toe Fun Game Target

shooting paper printable fly flies target

This Tic-Tac-Toe Shooting Game Target lets you challenge your shooting buddies at the range. One player can shoot the red triangles, while the other shoots the white zones, taking turns. You proceed just like a regular Tic-Tac-Toe game, alternating shots, with the goal of getting three of the same color in a row. This is a fun game for a parent and a young family member. You’ll find other fun targets on Targets4free.com.

5. NRA Dartboard Target with Five Bullseyes

There are many dartboard-style targets available, but this one has the extra feature of FIVE notable black bullseye aiming points. That makes this NRA Dartboard Target quite good for handgun shooting. NOTE: You’ll want to set the target PDF file to print in landscape (horizontal) mode to get the best results with 8.5×11″ paper.

NRA dartboard target with bullseyes

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May 9th, 2022

How to Shoot in Standing Position — Carl Bernosky Explains

Carl Bernosky High Power

Some folks say you haven’t really mastered marksmanship unless you can hit a target when standing tall ‘on your own hind legs’. Of all the shooting positions, standing can be the most challenging because you have no horizontally-solid resting point for your forward arm/elbow. Here 10-time National High Power Champ Carl Bernosky explains how to make the standing shot.

Carl Bernosky is one of the greatest marksmen in history. A multi-time National High Power Champion, Carl has won ten (10) National High Power Championships in his storied shooting career, most recently in 2012. In this article, Carl provides step-by-step strategies to help High Power shooters improve their standing scores. When Carl talks about standing techniques, shooters should listen. Among his peers, Carl is regard as one of the very best standing shooters in the history of High Power shooting. Carl rarely puts pen to paper, but he was kind enough to share his techniques with AccurateShooter.com’s readers.

If you are position shooter, or aspire to be one some day, read this article word for word, and then read it again. We guarantee you’ll learn some techniques (and strategies) that can improve your shooting and boost your scores. This stuff is gold folks, read and learn…


Carl Bernosky High PowerHow to Shoot Standing
by Carl Bernosky

Shooting consistently good standing stages is a matter of getting rounds down range, with thoughtfully-executed goals. But first, your hold will determine the success you will have.

1. Your hold has to be 10 Ring to shoot 10s. This means that there should be a reasonable amount of time (enough to get a shot off) that your sights are within your best hold. No attention should be paid to the sights when they are not in the middle — that’s wasted energy. My best hold is within 5 seconds after I first look though my sights. I’m ready to shoot the shot at that time. If the gun doesn’t stop, I don’t shoot. I start over.

2. The shot has to be executed with the gun sitting still within your hold. If the gun is moving, it’s most likely moving out, and you’ve missed the best part of your hold.

3. Recognizing that the gun is sitting still and within your hold will initiate you firing the shot. Lots of dry fire or live fire training will help you acquire awareness of the gun sitting still. It’s not subconscious to me, but it’s close.

4. Don’t disturb the gun when you shoot the shot. That being said, I don’t believe in using ball or dummy rounds with the object of being surprised when the shot goes off. I consciously shoot every shot. Sometimes there is a mistake and I over-hold. But the more I train the less of these I get. If I get a dud round my gun will dip.* I don’t believe you can learn to ignore recoil. You must be consistent in your reaction to it.

Carl Bernosky High Power5. Know your hold and shoot within it. The best part of my hold is about 4 inches. When I get things rolling, I recognize a still gun within my hold and execute the shot. I train to do this every shot. Close 10s are acceptable. Mid-ring 10s are not. If my hold was 8 inches I would train the same way. Shoot the shot when it is still within the hold, and accept the occasional 9. But don’t accept the shots out of the hold.

6. Practice makes perfect. The number of rounds you put down range matter. I shudder to think the amount of rounds I’ve fired standing in my life, and it still takes a month of shooting standing before Perry to be in my comfort zone. That month before Perry I shoot about 2000 rounds standing, 22 shots at a time. It peaks me at just about the right time.

This summarizes what I believe it takes to shoot good standing stages. I hope it provides some insight, understanding, and a roadmap to your own success shooting standing.

Good Shooting, Carl


* This is very noticeable to me when shooting pistol. I can shoot bullet holes at 25 yards, but if I’ve miscounted the rounds I’ve fired out of my magazine, my pistol will dip noticeably. So do the pistols of the best pistol shooters I’ve watched and shot with. One might call this a “jerk”, I call it “controlled aggressive execution”, executed consistently.

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May 8th, 2022

Sunday GunDay: New Anschutz 1710 for NRL22 and PRS Rimfire

Anschutz 1710 .22 LR rimfire precision rifle creedmoor sports MDT chassis

If you are looking to compete in NRL22 or PRS rimfire tactical matches, there is a new, turnkey solution that combines the legendary Anschutz 54 rimfire action with the excellent MDT ACC chassis. Called the Anschutz Model 1710, this new competition-ready rifle is capable of winning matches right out of the box. Creedmoor Sports recently received the first set of model 1710s in the USA. At our request, Creedmoor’s Brent Books and Wayne Dayberry field-tested a new model 1710. After confirming the elevation click values for various yardages, Brent put the Anschutz through its paces, showing its superb accuracy. FYI, this 1710 came with an impressive factory test target — 10 shots at 50 meters, all in a dime-sized circle.

Shooting at the CMP Talladega Marksmanship range, Brent ran a sequence of shots, hitting steel at 100, 150, 200, 250 and 300 yards without a miss. You can see this 5-shot sequence, all in one continuous take (no edits), in the video below. As Brent observed, “it definitely shoots”. Then, later, Brent cranked in more elevation (21.1 MILs) and hit steel at 435 yards. Watch this all in the video — it’s impressive!

Anschutz 1710 at Talladega, Drilling Steel from 100 to 435 Yards

Watch Hits at 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, and 435 Yards

With RWS 100 .22 LR ammo, Brent drills hit after hit with no misses out to 300 yards.

“This video shows a run after we confirmed our dope. Brent Books and I are shooting an NRL22 match in two weeks. Although he has extensive smallbore and airgun experience, this will be his first match of this type. I thought it would be a good/fun exercise for him to run the plates fairly quickly and also showcase the performance of this rifle system at the same time on the video.” — Wayne Dayberry

Anschutz Model 1710 — Great Accuracy Right from the Start

Report by Wayne Dayberry
The Anschutz 1710 MDT ACC rifle system is purpose-built for smallbore tactical precision rifle competition. With its capabilities we went from from bore-sight to 300 yards in just 12 shots. We started with a factory-fresh .22 LR Anschutz 1710 in an MDT ACC Ghost Gray chassis. This rifle incorporates a 20-inch heavy profile threaded stainless barrel and the 5119 two-stage trigger. After a clean, lube, and inspection, we mounted up an Element 5-25x56mm First Focal Plane optic we already had in a set of rings and headed out to the CMP Talladega Marksmanship Park. In addition to traditional target ranges, the CMP range has an unknown distance steel range with targets out to 600 yards. Due to a compressed schedule, we did not have time to follow the traditional zeroing and velocity-gathering processes, so we headed straight to the unknown distance steel range. This range has steel from 75 yards to 600 yards much like you would see in PRS and NRL type competitions.

Given the compressed timeframe, we didn’t follow the traditional steps one would normally take to do a break-in process, zero, collect data, and build out rifle dope. We were essentially doing all of that on a steel target range as we were putting the first rounds down the barrel while shooting this piece. At the same time, with a quality rifle system, and following a process, it worked out well as we were able to stretch out the capability of this rifle to 435 yards very quickly.

Anschutz 1710 .22 LR rimfire precision rifle creedmoor sports MDT chassis

Anschutz 1710 Components and Specifications:
The new Anschutz model 1710 is built with premium components top to bottom. It features an Anschutz Match 54 repeater action with blued receiver, Anschutz 5119 two-stage trigger, 20″ stainless steel barrel, and MDT ACC alloy chassis with built-in rails. The chassis is adjustable for LOP and cheek height.

Receiver: Scope mount attachment with 11mm rail and drilled and tapped
Barrel Length: 20″ stainless steel heavy barrel, no iron sights
Chamber: Optimized Match Chamber
Crown: Recessed Target Crown
Muzzle Diameter: 0.90″
Trigger: New 5119 Two-Stage Trigger
Trigger Weight Range: 4 oz. to 7.5 oz. (110 to 215g)
Trigger Weight: Adjusted to 6.35 oz. (180g)
Magazine Capacity: 10
Magazine Release: Extended
Rifle Weight without scope: 10 lbs., 10 oz.

Anschutz 1710 .22 LR rimfire precision rifle creedmoor sports MDT chassis
This photo shows the Anschutz 1710 fitted with bipod and suppressor. The tripod clamps via the integral forearm ARCA rail.

Testing the Anschutz 1710 on Steel — Expedited Procedure

The closest steel on the Talladega range that day was 75 yards so we started from scratch at that distance. Brent was on the rifle, so I spotted and ran ballistics. After bore-sighting at 75 yards, and confirming zero on steel with a few rounds, we went to the ballistic solver to start a profile. For the RWS R100 ammunition we were running, I entered a G1 BC of .14 and a guess at the muzzle velocity of 1080 FPS. The call of 1.1 MILs for the 100-yard steel resulted in Brent’s shot landing .2 MILs high of center on the first round; we “confirmed” 0.9 MILs. We noted the impact and moved on to 150 yards.

Anschutz 1710 .22 LR rimfire precision rifle creedmoor sports MDT chassis

As I mentioned we were very short on time so the “confirmations” of our dope for our first pass were with a single shot and measuring in the reticle. That’s obviously not the normal process, but for us, it was good enough for this exercise, given the time we had. We were shooting on freshly-painted targets and getting excellent feedback to see POA / POI deviations and could easily measure this in the reticle, which helped. And we were shooting a top-of-the-line Anschutz which came with a confirmation test target showing a 10-shot group at 50 meters with all shots touching and within a circle the size of a dime. With a former NCAA All-American smallbore shooter running the gun, and this test target in hand, confidence was high.

Anschutz 1710 .22 LR rimfire precision rifle creedmoor sports MDT chassis

Moving to the 150-yard target, a call of 3.7 MILs hit 0.6 high on our first round so we measured and confirmed 3.1. We trued the muzzle velocity in the solver as we went. At 200 yards I called 6.0 MILs and the first round hit was .3 high. We measured and confirmed 5.7 MILs. 9.0 mils was the call at 250 yards and we hit just a bit high. After measuring, we confirmed 8.6 MILs. At 300 yards, Brent was holding about 1 mil wind as a storm started rolling in. I called 12.5 MILs elevation and the first round impact was near the top of the plate, and after measuring we confirmed a come up of 11.7 MILs.

The net result was this — we went from mounting the optic and bore-sighting, to making solid first-round impacts from 100 yards out to 300 yards, at each 50-yard increment, in just 12 rounds! That’s efficiency!

Stretching it out to 435 Yards on Steel
Later, we went on to make solid hits at 350 yards and 435 yards. I got on the gun and put two on top of each other at 350 yards — pretty cool. This just proved this gun is an absolute hammer. The 435-yard target was a bear target, which was quite a bit larger than the 12″ steel we were shooting in the video. Not a small target by any means, but we were shooting 435 yards with a rimfire rifle as a storm rolled in. I think between us, Brent and I hit 5 of 6 (at 435 yards) which was pretty good given the sporty conditions. Next stop… the 600-yard plates at the end of this range. That’s a come-up of about 36 Mils.

Anschutz 1710 .22 LR rimfire precision rifle creedmoor sports MDT chassis

Rimfire Maintenance — Tips from a Top Competitor
An NCAA All-American smallbore shooter, Brent Books knows a thing or two about rimfire rifles, and how to maintain optimal accuracy. Brent told us: “I shot on the rifle team at Jacksonville State University so 500 rounds a week was common through my Anschutz 2013. I’d clean my rifle at the end of each week before we travelled to a competition with a wet patch through the barrel, a few passes of the nylon brush (unscrewing the brush before pulling it back through), one more wet patch, and then dry patches until they came out clean. A bore guide was always used to protect my action from debris and to align the cleaning rod. After cleaning the barrel, I’d completely disassemble the bolt to clean and lube it, making sure the bolt would glide effortlessly in the action. After cleaning, I’d shoot a minimum of 50 rounds to foul the barrel with ammo I was using to compete.”

Anschutz Model 54 Action with 5119 Trigger

Anschutz 1710 .22 LR rimfire precision rifle creedmoor sports MDT chassis

The Anschutz 1710 features the competition-proven Model 54 action, running a 10-round magazine. In the 1710, the safety-equipped action is fitted with an outstanding 5119 two-stage trigger that adjusts from 4 to 7.5 ounces. First released in 1954, Anschutz Match 54 action still represents a benchmark for smallbore rifles. Match rifles fitted with Model 54 actions have captured numerous World Championships and Olympic medals. These actions are smooth, consistent, and ultra-reliable, making them a great choice for multiple smallbore rifle disciplines. Anschutz boasts that this action has: “solid, extremely reliable construction [with] a functional safety that does not fail even under the most adverse conditions.”

MDT Adjustable Core Competition (ACC) Chassis

Anschutz 1710 .22 LR rimfire precision rifle creedmoor sports MDT chassis

What’s so cool about the MDT ACC Chassis? MDT’s ACC chassis is optimized for NRL and PRS shooting formats, although it can be used in other disciplines. The ACC chassis design has been optimized with input from top PRS and NRL shooters. Key features include: full 17″ ARCA/RRS fore-end, flared magazine well, extended barricade stop, widened thumb shelf, adjustable cheek riser, adjustable length-of-pull, and adjustable MDT Vertical Grip Elite.

Anschutz 1710 .22 LR rimfire precision rifle creedmoor sports MDT chassis

The ACC boasts an integrated weight management system, allowing shooters to fine tune chassis weight and balance. Weights can be added to the buttstock, the fore-end interior or fore-end exterior. This allows the shooter to increase the chassis-only weight from 4.5 lbs up to 12.3 lbs. Complete with barreled action, scope, rings, bipod, and accessories, shooters can run 20+ lbs for the full rig.

The weight can be tuned without taking the barreled action out of the chassis. Internal fore-end weights can be inserted from the front of the fore-end and screwed in place, while external M-LOK-compatible weights can be easily attached on either side of the fore-end. This ACC weight-management system allows shooters to rapidly adjust the feel and recoil characteristics of their system.

Recommended Accessories

Creedmoor Sports stocks a large variety of products that can be used with the Anschutz 1710. Below you’ll find the Element Titan 5-25x56mm FFP MRAD scope, Soup Can Sandbag, and RWS R100 Ammunition used for the Anschutz 1710 testing featured here. Click each item below for more product information:

Element Titan 5-25x56mm Scope

titan ffp 5-25x56 scope PRS NRL

Creedmoor Soup Can Sandbag

titan soup can sandbag NRL

RWS .22 LR R100 Ammo

rws R100 .22 lr rimfire ammo

Creedmoor Sports

Permalink Competition, Gear Review, Tactical 2 Comments »
May 8th, 2022

Dance of the Aussie Windflags — Slow-Motion Windflag Videos


Photo of Aussie Wind Flags courtesy BRT Shooters Supply.

A while back our Aussie friend Stuart Elliot of BRT Shooters Supply recently filmed some interesting videos at the QTS range in Brisbane, Australia. Stuart told us: “I was shooting in an Air Gun Benchrest match here in Brisbane, Australia. I finished my target early and was awaiting the cease fire and took a short, slow-motion video of windflag behavior.” You may be surprised by the velocity changes and angle swings that occur, even over a relatively short distance (just 25 meters from bench to target).

Here are windflags in slow motion:

The flags show in the videos are “Aussie Wind Flags”, developed by Stuart Elliot. These are sold in the USA by Butch Lambert, through Shadetree Engineering.

Here is a video in real time:

Stuart says this video may surprise some shooters who don’t use windflags: “Many people say the wind doesn’t matter. Well it sure does — whether for an airgun at 25 meters or a long range centerfire at 1,000.” This video illustrates how much the wind can change direction and velocity even in a small area.

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May 2nd, 2022

SMT Electronic Targets at NRA High Power National Matches

NRA High Power National Matches Camp Atterbury Silver Mountain electronic Targets

Big news for High Power rifle shooters — Electronic Targets will be employed at the 2022 High Power Rifle National Matches at Camp Atterbury, Indiana. That means faster relays, quicker scoring, and NO PIT DUTY!

The 2022 NRA High Power National Matches will run at Camp Atterbury from July 8-28, 2022. Registration is now open. Click HERE to Register.

Silver Mountain Targets Electronic Targets at Camp Atterbury This Summer
The NRA has confirmed that the Silver Mountain Targets electronic target system will be deployed for the High Power Rifle phases of the 2022 National Matches at Camp Atterbury, Indiana. The Silver Mountain Targets (SMT) technology, the “fourth generation of Electronic Target System”, is an OPEN SENSOR system fitted to conventional wood target frames. It uses four sensors to plot shot location (and score value) with great precision. Scores are transmitted via a WiFi network to mobile devices placed at each shooting station. Along with shot location, the score values are listed and recorded on the receiving devices.

“The NRA has been working with the Indiana State Rifle and Pistol Association (ISRPA), as well as the Central Indiana High Power Rifle Shooters (CIHPRS) in order to bring electronic targets to the NRA National Matches”, said Joseph P. De Bergalis, Jr., Executive Director of NRA General Operations.

Camp Atterbury SMT electronic targets silver mountain

Over the past three years, the NRA has confirmed that Silver Mountain Targets systems have worked very effectively in rifle competition. The SMT sensor technology is now proven in competition: “In 2019, the ISRPA chose Silver Mountain Targets for our High Power matches including the ISRPA Across the Course State Championships and the Governor’s Cup match in 2019″, said ISRPA President Charles Hiltunen. “We did an extensive comparison of alternatives and Silver Mountain Targets best fit our needs. Since then we have been very happy with the targets.”

NRA High Power National Matches Camp Atterbury Silver Mountain electronic Targets

“Silver Mountain Targets is very excited to be chosen for the very first deployment of this technology at the NRA National Matches. Our advanced modular architecture represents the latest in electronic target technology,” said SMT’s David Schnelle. “The system is designed to be easily expandable and provide a high level of reliability. System components are battery-powered to simplify deployment on a military range and allows the system to even operate if there is a power outage. Communications between targets and the firing line is a highly reliable WiFi connection, utilizing any WiFi-capable device to display competitors’ shots.”

“The National Rifle Association is pleased to continue our improvements at Camp Atterbury in order to better serve the competitive shooting community and further promote the shooting sports”, said Cole McCulloch, Director of NRA Competitive Shooting.

“With the Silver Mountain Target system, we will be able to run more relays in less time and reduce demands on competitors and staff. We are also very pleased that technical representatives from Silver Mountain Targets will be on-site for the entire championship to ensure optimum performance and to train NRA staff and volunteers on the technology.”

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April 29th, 2022

Team Competition — How to Make and Use a Wind Plot

wind plot Bryan Litz FCWC Canada F-Class World Championship
CLICK HERE to see full-screen version of Wind Plot.

Team shooting is very different than individual competition. Typically a team coach makes the wind calls for the shooters. In some cases (where the rules allow), the wind coach even dials elevation and windage changes for the active shooter. For the wind coach to do his job effectively, he must follow the changes in the wind and determine what the correct wind call should have been for each shot. (In other words — what was the “right call”)

Bryan Litz, founder of Applied Ballistics and Past USA F-TR National Champion, served as wind coach for the winning 4-man F-TR Team at the 2017 Canadian F-Class Championships, which preceded the F-Class World Championships also held in Canada. Here Bryan explains how he has used a Wind Plot to make better wind calls, helping his team-mates maximize their scores.

wind calling plot log technique

Wind Plot Methodology by Bryan Litz

The wind plot I use is a running history of what the correct wind call was for every shot fired. The more you shoot, the more history you have in a condition, and I find that very useful information. This kind of plot IS NOT showing where the bullet hit, and is NOT showing what you held. It’s showing what you should have held to center each shot. IMO, this is the most valuable information to have when guessing where to hold next for each shot. Here are some key points:

1. I always look for blocks of stable conditions to shoot in and wait out the rest.

2. If the wind plot shows drastic changes, either I’m not picking the right time to shoot or it’s just a really unstable wind condition.

3. When you see many shots using the same hold (e.g. Robby’s 700m and 900m strings on plot), it can indicate very fast shooting and fast pit service.

Q. What are the numbers and Markings on this Wind Plot?
Litz: The wind plot represents the rings on the target. Left 2 for example, is the 5 line on the international target, while Left 2 is the 10 line on the USA target. F-Class shooters and coaches talk about wind holds in relation to these rings. A Left 2 hold isn’t left 2 MOA or 2 MILS, it’s the second ring from center. The vertical lines on the plot represent the rings going out from center, 4 or 5 in each direction. A left or right 5 hold is edge of black on the int’l target.

wind plot Bryan Litz FCWC Canada F-Class World Championship

Q: What Does this Specific Plot Reveal?
Litz: Looking at the plot, from left to right is 700m, 800m, and 900m that we shot progressively through the day. Top to bottom shows each shooter in sequence (shooters names are shown by their blocks). To the right I note what was on the gun for that shooter, and note when it changes. Often times we run the same wind on the gun for several shooters but if it changes, I note what the new windage is and continue on. For example if we’re settled into a condition where we’re shooting Vs with a right 3 hold, I might adjust the scope 1 MOA right because a right 3 hold is equal to 1 MOA. So we can move the scope and start shooting with a center hold.

Q. Are you Plotting Where the Bullet Hits?
Litz: Not exactly. This kind of plot IS NOT specifically showing where the bullet hit, and IS NOT showing what the shooter held. It’s showing what the shooter should have held to center each shot. IMO, this is the most valuable information to have when guessing where to hold next for each shot.

On each shot, the shooter or coach takes a guess about where to hold, and fires the shot. If the bullet hits the center, you plot the point right where you held because it was the correct hold. However, if you miss the call, you plot what hold was required to put that shot in the center. For example if you shoot a right 3 and hit where you held, the correct call would have been “center”. In this way, you’re building a history of what you should have done, which may or may not be what you actually did. This shows you the trends, and brackets which can be used to make future decisions.

Q: Is this Type of Wind Plot Something New?
Litz: I didn’t invent this method, it’s been around a long time. Vertical can be plotted the same way. In team matches, we have a plotter who is advising on elevation trends and suggesting corrections. But, as wind coach, my job is the horizontal so I only keep the wind plot. I have learned lots of strategies from my coaches Emil Praslick and Steve Hardin.

There are many ways to plot and many standard work sheets for this. They’re all tools and the key is to find something that works for you in different situations. I don’t keep a plot when I am personally behind the trigger string firing because I lose more points when I take the time to do it vs. just shooting fast. When pair firing or coaching, I can keep the wind plot without compromising the shooting.

2013 F-Class World Championships
Here Team Australia used plots and communication gear linking coaches. This helped the Aussies win the 2013 F-Open Team World Championship held at Raton, NM.

Know Your Goal — Keep It Simple
Know your goal of plotting. The simplest plot is where you write the shot number where it hit on a target face. This kind of plotting is useful for evaluating shooter performance because it shows how big the group is (in particular the vertical dispersion). However keeping a plot like this does little to help you figure out the wind. It just shows you what shots you messed up on. It does nothing to help you find the center. [Editor: That’s a whole different matter with many variables.] The wind plot I use is a running history of what the correct wind call was for every shot fired. The more you shoot, the more history you have in a condition, and I find that very useful information.

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April 28th, 2022

Cleaning Rod in Barrel Caused Catastrophic .338 LM Kaboom

Kaboom Manatee Savage .338 LM, Lapua Magnum, catastrophic, explosion, cleaning rod, obstruction
CLICK HERE to zoom image.

We first ran this story a few years back. We’re republishing it today as a reminder to our readers that safety should be their paramount concern at the range. Avoid distractions and always check your barrel for obstructions before you chamber a round or pull the trigger. A moment of inattention can result in a catastrophic kaboom.

Discharging a .338 Lapua Magnum round with a cleaning rod in the barrel — that’s a recipe for disaster. What happens when a fired .338 caliber bullet and a cleaning rod try to occupy the same place at the same time? Well you get a catastrophic kaboom, with metal pieces flying all over the place, and a shooter very lucky to escape without serious injury. This incident occurred recently in Manatee, Florida, as reported by Sniper’s Hide member Queequeg. We thank SnipersHide.com for granting permission to publish these revealing images in the Daily Bulletin. CLICK HERE for more Kaboom info from the ‘Hide.

Kaboom Manatee Savage .338 LM, Lapua Magnum, catastrophic, explosion, cleaning rod, obstruction
This story should serve as a chilling reminder to follow proper safety practices whenever you are at the range. Always check to make sure there is no obstruction in the bore BEFORE loading a live round.

.338 Lapua Magnum + Cleaning Rod + Inattention = Kaboom!

Kaboom at Manatee!
Sniper’s Hide member Queequeg recently published shocking photos of a catastrophic kaboom involving a .338 Lapua Magnum (Savage action). The action was blown off the rifle, shrapnel went through the roof, and the barrel split at the tenon before taking an excursion downrange. The action did crack in the front but the lugs remained engaged so the bolt did not slam to the rear (luckily for the shooter).

Here’s the report: “This happened [January 20, 2014] at the Manatee Gun and Archery Club. Al, Ren and myself were there with a couple other folks. Ren was at bench 12, I was at 13. The fellow at 11 was running a Savage .338 Lapua. He had a very bad day! He damn sure could have killed himself and quite likely Ren as well.”

Kaboom Manatee Savage .338 LM, Lapua Magnum, catastrophic, explosion, cleaning rod, obstruction

Queeqeg added: “After the boom, I heard Ren ask ‘Are you alright’ and then turned to look in time to see the fellow reacting in total shock — literally stunned. Ren and I went over to him and could not see any major injuries. Ren was uninjured as well but had a lot of fiberglass splinters on him. The barrel nut is what I presume punched the two holes in the roof. The shooter is a regular there[.] He had been having a problem with sticky cases though he said he was certain the loads were mild. That’s why he was content to knock the sticky ones out with the rod. He simply forgot to remove the rod after knocking out the last stuck case. You can see what happened next.”

Kaboom Manatee Savage .338 LM, Lapua Magnum, catastrophic, explosion, cleaning rod, obstruction

Kaboom Manatee Savage .338 LM, Lapua Magnum, catastrophic, explosion, cleaning rod, obstruction

Kaboom Manatee Savage .338 LM, Lapua Magnum, catastrophic, explosion, cleaning rod, obstruction

Kaboom Manatee Savage .338 LM, Lapua Magnum, catastrophic, explosion, cleaning rod, obstruction

To learn more about this incident, go to the original Snipers Hide Forum Thread. There you’ll find more details and four pages of related discussions.

The Important Lesson Here
What did the .338 LM shooter do wrong here? You will say — “Well that’s obvious, he left a cleaning rod in the barrel and then shot a round.” Yes, that was a potentially fatal error. But that was his second mistake — one that occurred only because he made a more fundamental judgment error first.

The FIRST mistake was not acknowledging the problem with his ammo. Had he heeded the warning signs, he would still have a rifle (and an unsoiled pair of trousers). When he first observed that he was having problems with extracting cases, a warning light should have gone off in his head. Presuming his extractor was not broken (and that the chamber was cut properly) he should have been able to extract his brass if he was running safe loads. The lesson here we all need to learn is that if you observe a serious ammo-related issue, it is time to stop shooting. Don’t try to invent work-arounds just to extend your range session, when there are clear signs that something is wrong, very wrong.

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April 27th, 2022

Accurate Shooter Humor — Wisecracks Heard at the Range

Accurateshooter.com Range Humor joke funny quote

Shooting can be a frustrating sport at times, prompting shooters to say some funny things in the heat of the moment. Here’s a collection of humorous range ripostes, supplied by Shooters’ Forum members (who are listed after each quote). Enjoy. (CLICK HERE for full Forum Funny Saying Thread).

“I paid to use all of the target and I’m getting value for money on all of the real estate!” (Macropod)

“At 65 years of age, 1000-yard benchrest is better than sex, because a relay lasts 10 minutes!” (The Viper)

“How did I do?” “Well the gun went off and nobody got hurt, we can build on that….” (Mr. Majestic)

“Treat that trigger likes it’s your first date, not like you’ve been married to it for 20 years.” (Jet)

“It’s a good thing broad sides of barns aren’t at many shooting ranges.” (Rocky F.)

Accurateshooter.com Range Humor joke funny quote
Target photo by Forum member RyanJay11.

“It was an 0.2″ group! Well, err, except for that flyer….” (Dsandfort)

“It’s not the arrow, it’s the Indian.” (Rocky F.)

“I can’t understand it. That load worked good in my other barrel”. (Hogpatrol)

“You bakin a biscuit?” Said to me as I was sitting at the bench ready to shoot with a cartridge in the chamber of a hot gun, taking longer than necessary. (Ebb)

“Shooting groups is easy. Just put the last three between the first two.” (Uthink)

Accurateshooter.com Range Humor joke funny quote

“There is no Alibi for Stupid” (Seen at Berger SWN — Erik Cortina)

Shooter 1: “Hey you cross-fired on my target!”
Shooter 2: “Well you cross-fired on mine first!”
Shooter 1: “Yeah but you could have at least shot an X like I did on yours.” (At Raton — Rocky F.)

“I had a bughole going and my second shot dropped straight down!” (JDMock)

“The nut came loose on the end of my stock.” (TXDan)

“That’s a pretty eight.” (REastman quoting James Crofts)

“I almost shot a record.” (Jay Christopherson)

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April 25th, 2022

What Level of Accuracy is “Good Enough” for Your Discipline?

Jim See Elite Accuracy
This impressive 15-round group was shot by Jim See of Elite Accuracy.

Different Shooting Disciplines Demand Different Levels of Precision/Accuracy
In the rapid-fire 3-Gun game, you could probably “clean” most stages with a 2-MOA rifle. By contrast, in the short-range group benchrest game, to compete with the best, you’ll need a rifle that shoots in the “ones” (i.e. 0.1-0.19 MOA) in perfect conditions. In 1000-yard F-Class competition, the top shooters want a rifle that will hold one-third-MOA of vertical at that distance.

What is your standard of accuracy? How good is “good enough”. Jim See, a skilled gunsmith and successful PRS competitor, recently answered that question for his tactical discipline. For the kind of matches Jim shoots, he likes to have a rifle that will hold half-MOA for five (5) shots, 3/4-MOA for 15 shots, and 1 MOA for twenty shots. Remarkably, Jim’s rifle can do that with factory ammo. Above is an impressive 15-shot group shot with .260 Remington Federal Premium Ammo.

Jim See Elite Accuracy

“I say it all the time, my loads need to print 5 under 1/2″, 10 under 3/4″, and 20 under 1″. It’s simple, if a hot barrel will keep 20 rounds fired in succession under my standard it will be a good barrel and load for Precision Match Shooting. Federal Premium Gold Metal Match .260 with Sierra bullets made the cut for me today. 15 consecutive shots under 3/4 MOA.” –Jim See

It’s said that you “can never have too much accuracy”, but there are acceptable standards for each discipline, and they’re not the same. A 100/200 yard Benchrest shooter will be sorely disappointed with a rifle/ammo set-up that can only deliver half-MOA. On the other hand, a PRS competitor like Jim See can achieve great success with a lesser degree of precision. This means you can save time and money. You can run your barrels longer between cleanings, and you don’t have to go “full OCD” when loading your ammo. The PRS shooter does not need to weigh-sort primers, or load powder to single-kernel standards. Proof is the performance. Jim See recently took third place at the Spearpoint Shootout, and he has been a podium finisher at other events. Learn more about Jim’s gunsmithing and training operations at EliteAccuracy.com.

Download This Load Development Target

Jim’s target seemed a bit familiar. AccurateShooter.com created this Diamond and Dot Target a few years back. On each aiming point, there are high-contrast black horizontal and vertical lines for aligning your cross-hairs. The gray circle lets you see the bullet impacts above, without obliterating the red diamond, which is quite useful for precise aiming (we put fine cross-hairs on the points of the diamond). This target sheet includes data entry tables below each of the three aim points. There are many other free targets out there, but this format is very popular. We’re pleased to see Jim using it. You can download this and dozens of other FREE Targets from the AccurateShooter.com Target Page.

AccurateShooter precision load development free target

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April 25th, 2022

For Sling Shooters — How to Set Up and Use Slings Optimally

Dennis DeMille Creedmoor Sports Rifle Sling video training set-up
Dennis DeMille shows a young competitor at the CMP Western Games how to adjust his leather sling.

If you want to learn more about setting up your sling properly for position shooting, here are some tips from Dennis DeMille, a past Service Rifle Champion. Dennis explains how to choose a sling, and how to adjust it to fit properly.

Dennis DeMille High PowerThe Benefits of Dry-Fire Training
Once you know how to set up your sling properly, you’ll want to practice. Dennis DeMille stresses the importance of dry-fire practice with sling and shooting coat. Dry-Fire training is essential to the sling disciplines. Dennis DeMille, a national Service Rifle Champion, told us that, for every minute he spent in actual competition, he would spend hours practicing without ammunition. While in the USMC, Dennis would practice in the barracks, working on his hold and dry-firing:

“The most important thing is to spend time off the range practicing. Most of what I learned as a High Power shooter I learned without ammunition — just spending time dry firing and doing holding exercises. Holding exercises will really identify the weak parts of your position. The primary purpose of dry firing is to get you used to shooting an empty rifle. If you can shoot a loaded rifle the same way you shoot an empty rifle then eventually you will become a High Master.”

Brandon Green Sling shooting
SFC Brandon Green, 2018 Nat’l High Power Champion. Brandon, one of the nation’s best “hard-holders”, demonstrates proper use of sling in prone position.

Setting-Up a Leather Service Rifle Sling for Competition

So you made the mistake of disassembling your leather service rifle sling, or are intimidated about how to use one? In this Creedmoor Sports InfoZone video, former Creedmoor G.M. Dennis DeMille explains how to set up and use a sling. The covers the basics — Dennis starts with a totally disassembled leather service rifle sling and shows you how to set it up properly.

Tip: “Many shooters shy away from using a leather sling because they have never been taught how to use one. That’s unfortunate. In my opinion a leather sling offers more support than a web sling, which is important when competiting with the heavier than normal rifles.”

Configuring the Sling for the Standing (Offhand) Position
In this second in a series of Creedmoor InfoZone videos on the setup and use of the leather service rifle sling, Dennis DeMille details how to configure and best utilize the leather service rifle sling while shooting from the standing position.

Tip: “Putting the Frogs in different hole will change the amount of added elevation a sling provides.”

Looking at Sling Types — Comparing the Features
In this video Dennis showcases a large variety of shooting slings. He explains the strong points of each type so you can choose the sling best suited to your discipline and shooting style.

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April 21st, 2022

CMP Updates Smallbore Rifle Competition Rules for 2022

cmp updated 2022 smallbore competition rule
CLICK HERE for latest, updated version of the 2022 CMP Smallbore Rifle Competition Rules.

The updated 2022 CMP Smallbore Rifle Competition Rules are now posted at: https://thecmp.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/2022SmallboreRifleRulebook.pdf. The major change in this update is the recognition of the 3×20 course of fire as the standard 3-position event.

In January 2022, the CMP noted that the ISSF was changing its 3×40 three-position event to a 3×20 course of fire and that three-position and air gun finals were also being changed. There has been uncertainty as to what the final version of these rules will be. Since CMP competitors need to know what the CMP rules are going to be this year, the CMP has decided to finalize its 2022 CMP Smallbore Rifle Competition Rules based on what is now known, namely that the 60-shot 3×20 course of fire is likely to stay, while ISSF rules for finals have just seen yet another change.

cmp updated 2022 smallbore competition rule

The updated CMP Smallbore Rifle Rules adopt the 60-shot 3×20 course of fire as the standard three-position event but leave previous finals rules in place until there is more clarity regarding whether the new 2024 Olympic finals rules can or should be adopted for CMP smallbore competitions.

The major change in this Smallbore Rules update is the recognition of the 3×20 course of fire as the standard 3-position event. All smallbore position EIC matches where competitors can earn credit points for the new Distinguished Smallbore Position Badge must be 3×20, not 3×40, events.

Smallbore position tie-breaking has also changed. Three-position ties will be broken according to the highest standing score, then the highest kneeling score. Inner tens will not be used unless two competitors are tied in all three positions. Smallbore prone competitors are NOTE affected by these latest rule changes except that new rules for conducting 40-shot prone events on electronic targets have been added.

Given the uncertainty regarding ISSF finals rules, this edition of the CMP Smallbore Rifle Rules will still include the 45-shot progressive elimination final that the ISSF previously used (Rule SB10.4) and a 24-shot prone final that was previously used by the ISSF.

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April 20th, 2022

Airgun Depot 10×10 Contest with $4000+ Prize Package

Airgun depot 10x10 contest prizes shooting contest

Airgun Depot has a new skill contest for airgun shooters. Airgun Depot’s 10X10 Challenge encourages customers to head out to the range, test their marksmanship skills, and earn a chance at over $4000 worth of prizes.

No purchase is necessary to enter. You can download FREE 10X10 Challenge targets or order a free set of pre-printed, 10×10 Challenge targets at AirgunDepot.com. CLICK HERE for target page then use Promo Code 10X10 to get the target set for free (shipping is extra).

Airgun depot 10x10 contest prizes shooting contest

How the 10×10 Challenge Works

Participants take 10 shots at the 10-inch target from a set distance. Try multiple distances for more challenge. The farther the distance, the bigger the prize level. To enter the contest, you must upload a photo of your completed 10X10 Challenge target. Upload the target using the online instructions at airgundepot.com/challenge.html.

10 yards: 10 winners of a Smith & Wesson M29 BB Revolver
30 yards: 3 winners of a Springfield Armory M1A Pellet Rifle
50 yards: 2 winners of a Air Venturi Avenger Bullpup
100 yards: 1 grand prize winner of a AirForce Texan LSS

Airgun depot 10x10 contest prizes shooting contest

The 10X10 Challenge will run from April 15th through May 20th. Winners will be selected randomly at the end of the campaign. NOTE: To enter the contest, you must upload a photo of the target(s) you shot. UPLOAD PHOTOS HERE.

With a wide selection of air rifles, air pistols, ammo, and accessories, Airgun Depot is the one-stop shop for all the airgun enthusiasts on your shopping list. To learn more and browse the full Airgun Depot inventory, visit AirgunDepot.com.

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April 17th, 2022

Sunday Gunday: Amazing Mad Minute Norway Speed Shooting

Mad Minute Norway Haga 6.5x55 speed shooting marksmanship British Army

Think you can shoot fast with a bolt gun? Bet you can’t beat these Norwegian speed-demons. In 2019, Inge Hvitås set a Mad Minute World Record, putting 39 rounds inside a 16″ circle at 200 meters, all in a single minute. At the same match, another Norwegian ace fired 48 rounds in a minute, with 38 in the bullseye. Now that’s spectacular speed and accuracy. We first ran this story in 2019 when the record was set. Wikipedia reports this is still the current record. So we believe no one has ever put more rounds on a 16″ target at 200m (with a bolt-action rifle) than Inge Hvitås. We include videos showing Inge’s amazing sequence.

Watch Inge Hvitås Set New Mad Minute World Record:


NOTE: This video, hosted by Facebook, may be slow to load. But be patient — it’s amazing to watch! CLICK HERE to run this story all by itself, speeding up the video load.

Mad Minute Norway Haga 6.5x55 speed shooting marksmanship British Army

Mad Minute World Record — 39 Hits in One Minute (60 seconds)
At the Haga shooting range in Norway, spectators witnessed spectacular speed shooting in 2019. Norwegian shooter Inge Hvitås set a Mad Minute Challenge World Record with 39 hits in ONE MINUTE at 200m. The target was a 40cm (15.75″) bullseye placed at 200m (218 yards). Fellow Norwegian Jesper Nilsstua also shot brilliantly, sending 48 rounds down-range in one minute. Jesper had 38 hits, missing the record by just one. Both shooters were using iron-sighted Sauer 200 STR target rifles, which are normally chambered for the 6.5×55 cartridge. For this event, magazines are limited to 5 rounds and shooters may use slings but no bipods or other support.

Amazing Bolt-Gun Cycling Speed — 48 Rounds in One Minute

Another Norwegian ace, Jesper Nilsstua, missed the Mad Minute Challenge record (by one hit), but boy was he fast. Dennis Santiago (who has done his own Mad Minute drill), was dazzled: “This dude didn’t get the new world’s record of 39 hits in 60 seconds. He ‘only’ got 38 hits after getting off an amazing 48 shots in 60 seconds. Watch the smoothness of his shooting. It’s amazing.”


NOTE to Readers: This video is hosted by Facebook. It may be slow to load. But it is worth watching.

Mad Minute Norway Haga 6.5x55 speed shooting marksmanship British Army

Mad Minute Norway Haga 6.5x55 speed shooting marksmanship British Army electronic targets
For the Mad Minute Challenge in Norway, a standard 200m DFS target was used, with 1 point per hit within the black area which is 40cm (15.75″, or 6.9 MOA) in diameter.

Norwegian Mad Minute Challenge — Event Rules
The organizers of the event posted: “The Mad Minute Challenge [is] a modern edition of a old military drill. This is a place for sport shooters to … share experiences on the subject of speed shooting with bolt-action rifles. The Mad Minute Challenge is all about the sport! To make a attempt for the record everyone must follow these five simple rules:”

Mad Minute Norway Haga 6.5x55 speed shooting marksmanship British Army rules

Mad Minute Norway Haga 6.5x55 speed shooting marksmanship British Army

Rapid-Fire Shooting Comparison Video
To illustrate the remarkable speed of Norwegian champion Inge Hvitås, this video shows Inge (top of frame) compared with other skilled competitors shooting the same 1-minute course of fire in Lesja, Norway.

About the Original MAD MINUTE
“Mad Minute” was a pre-World War I term used by British Army riflemen during training at the Hythe School of Musketry to describe scoring a minimum of 15 hits on a target at 300 yards within one minute using a bolt-action rifle (usually a Lee-Enfield or Lee-Metford rifle). It was not uncommon during the First World War for riflemen to greatly exceed this score. The record, set in 1914 by Sergeant Instructor Alfred Snoxall, was 38 hits.

Mad Minute Lee Enfield

Listed as “Practice number 22, Rapid Fire” of The Musketry Regulations, Part I, 1909, this drill required at least 15 shots on the Second Class target at 300 yards. The exercise was just one of several annual tests to classify a soldier as a sharpshooter, first or second class shooter depending on the points achieved.

Made Minute Second Class targetResearch indicates the Second Class target was a 48″ x 48″ square with 24″ inner circle and 36″ outer circle. The sight mark was a central 12″ x 12″ shape representing a soldier. ALL hits scored points (3 for center circle, 2 for outer circle, 1 for outer square). NOTE: Though some sources say the Mad Minute drill used a 12″-diameter round target, this appears to be a mistake from Ian Hogg’s book “The Encyclopedia of Weaponry”. No other source mentions a 12″ circle, which would be a mere 3.82 MOA. In reality the true drill target was a 48″ x 48″ square, roughly 15 times larger. (From No.WikiPedia.)

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April 17th, 2022

Loading at the Range — How it Works for Benchrest Matches

Benchrest IBS Shooting Reloading Chargemaster tuning load
Shown are funnel with ultra-long drop tube (which helps get more kernels in the cases), RCBS Chargemaster (in wood box), and Hood Press (similar to Harrell’s Combo press).

Loading at the range remains important in the Benchrest for Group discipline. In a Special Report below, past IBS President Jeff Stover explains how loading methods (and hardware) have evolved over the years. The advent of accurate, affordable electronic powder dispensers, such as the RCBS ChargeMaster and Frankford’s new Intellidropper, have changed the game and made it easier to load efficiently at the range. And quality manual powder measures are fast and can be very consistent, with a little practice. Loading at the range permits competitors to tune their load to the conditions, change seating depths, or even choose different bullets to suit the barrel’s preferences on any given day.

IBS Benchrest

Although pre-loading is not uncommon, most 100/200-yard group shooters usually load at the match, often between relays. The goal is to shoot smaller groups by staying “in tune”. In a game where 5-shot groups “in the 1s and Zeros” is the goal, tuning loads for the conditions helps deliver match-winning accuracy. Nearly all competitors in this short-range discipline shoot the 6mm PPC cartridge, or a PPC variant.

IBS Benchrest loading at range Jeff Stover

Loading at the Range — Then and Now

IBS Benchrest Shooters International Memorial Match Weikert PA Jeff Stover

In benchrest shooting for group, loading at the range has been de rigueur for decades. In the Score discipline, preloading is usually the custom. The main reason is that, in Score competition, only one Aggregate (warm-up match and five record targets) per day is usually shot. That would be less than 50 shots, assuming a few sighter shots. Also, the 30BR, the dominant Benchrest-for-Score cartridge, is very amenable to pre-loading.

By contrast, the Group discipline includes 21 targets (two warm-ups and twenty record targets) over a weekend, usually shot with 6PPC-chambered rifles. Many times, the 6PPC shooters may tweak their loads through the day given changing atmospheric conditions or simply trying to find the correct tune to “dot up”. This term, “Dot up”, means the shots are essentially going through the same hole, or closely so.

IBS Benchrest Shooters International Memorial Match Weikert PA Jeff Stover

Loading at the range was a bit different when benchrest competition was in its infancy. The 1951 book, Modern Accuracy by Bob Wallack, is the best of the early benchrest books. Copies can be found, from time to time, on eBay or Alibris. It is a fascinating survey of benchrest as it existed more than six decades ago. There’s even coverage of a controversial target that was argued over at the time. In it, there is a photo of Wallack using the rear bumper of a car at the bench to clamp his reloading tools. Things have come a long way compared to the range loading set-ups of modern shooters. Here you can see Bob Wallack way back in 1950:

IBS Benchrest Shooters International Memorial Match Weikert PA Jeff Stover

Modern loading bench set-ups shown in this Special Report belong to top shooters Howie Levy, Bob Hamister, and Kent Harshman.
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April 17th, 2022

Shocking Stuff — Pistol Competitor Nearly Kills Range Worker

RSO Range Safety violation

Here is a video every shooter should watch. It reminds us that our sport demands 100% attention. Lose track of individuals down-range and the results could be tragic. This video will give you chills (starting at about the 0:25 mark). We need to remember to follow all the firearms safety rules, and apply them all the time. At the range, all it takes is one brief moment of inattention to create a life-threatening situation. Never assume the downrange area is safe. Use your own eyes and ears.

This video shows a competitor shooting a stage at an action pistol match. He starts when instructed by the Range Safety Officer (RSO). But unbeknownst to both RS0 and competitor, a volunteer is downrange working on targets. Watch carefully. At 0:27 the shooter sweeps left to right, engaging a paper silhouette target to his right. Then, at 0:30, as he begins a mag change, his head turns downrange. A few yards away is a white-shirted range worker! The shooter yells “Hey what’s going on?!”

What’s going on indeed… The RSO should have ensured that nobody was downrange before the shooter even stepped up to the firing line. If other competitors standing to the side had been alert, they might have seen the worker changing targets and called for a halt. And the target-worker himself — even if he was wearing earmuffs, he should have noticed that live fire had commenced just yards away…

We also have to wonder about the stage design. This set-up made it very difficult to see downrange. The white panels (see 0:10-0:20) definitely hid the target worker from view. In hindsight, given the way the stage was laid out, this was truly an “accident waiting to happen”. It’s fortunate that no one got injured in this incident. But this chilling video provides a lesson to all shooters — “Safety First”.

How could this “near-fatality” have been averted? Post your comments below.

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April 16th, 2022

Saturday at the Movies: Firearms Science Series — 7 Smart Videos

NRA firearms science videos ballistics chronography mil-dot eye dominance

NRA Media offers a series of informative videos about the Science of Shooting, covering a wide range of topics, from eye dominance to long-range ballistics. These videos feature high production values, with super-slow motion segments, as well as helpful computer graphics to illustrate the principles covered.

The videos are narrated by Jessie Harrison, a top action pistol shooter (and the first women ever to achieve USPSA Grand Master status). Jessie is assisted by talented shooters such as Top Shot Season 4 Champion Chris Cheng. There are 40 videos in the Firearm Science Video Series. Here are seven good NRA science videos, with links to others below.

CLICK HERE to Access All 40 NRA Firearm Science Videos »

BULLET TRAJECTORY — Factors at Play and Zeroing Strategies

Host Jessie Harrison (formerly Jessie Duff) and Veteran Air Force Sniper and Long Range Expert George Reinas help us understand the factors behind bullet trajectory. NOTE: There are some exaggerations in the graphics in the videos, and inconsistent terminology use, but it’s still a helpful basic primer on the subject of trajectories. This popular video has over 1 million YouTube views.

SHOOTING POSITIONS — Prone, Standing, Sitting, Kneeling

Olympic Gold Medalist Jamie Gray demonstrates the four positions used by competition shooters: Prone, Standing, Sitting, and Kneeling. Helpful overlay graphics show how the human skeleton aligns in each of these positions. This video should help hunters as well as competitive position shooters. If you shoot silhouette, definitely watch this video!

INTERNAL Ballistics — Cartridge Ignition and Bullet in Barrel


NRA firearms science videos ballistics chronography mil-dot eye dominance

What happens inside the barrel of your gun when you pull the trigger? In this edition of Firearm Science, Jessie Harrison goes over internal ballistics, which studies the combustion of propellant, the pressure developed, and the motion of the bullet along the bore of the barrel. There are some good 3D animations showing how the powder charge ignites and the bullet moves through the barrel.

CHOKE TUBES and Shot Patterns — Shotgun Science

With over 2 million YouTube views, this shotgun-centric video is the most popular of all the NRA Firearms Science series videos. Here Olympic trap shooter Corey Cogdell explains how choke tubes affect a shotgun’s shot pattern in this edition of Firearm Science. We recommend that all Shotgun hunters watch this video — it explains the effect of choke tubes very well.

ZEROING RIFLES for Long Range — Tech Tips

The process of zeroing rifles for long range is covered in this Firearm Science video featuring George Reinas, a veteran Air Force sniper. George demonstrates how to adjust his scope to compensate for bullet drop at long range. Our friend Dennis Santiago was involved in the making of this video, which was filmed at the Burbank Rifle & Revolver Club in Southern California.

CHRONOGRAPHS — Calculating the Speed of a Bullet

pistol shooting science Jessie Duff NRA Ballistic PendulumThis video shows a conventional chronograph with front and rear light sensors. The bullet first trips the front sensor and then the rear sensor as it flies over the unit. The difference in sensor time is used to calculate bullet speed. This is not the only kind of chrono in common use today. The popular MagnetoSpeed chrono works by tracking the bullet as it passes over two magnetic sensors mounted on a bayonet-style fixture on the barrel.

The high-tech LabRadar chronograph employs Doppler Radar to measure the speed of a bullet without the need to send the round directly over sensors. No need to set up tripods down-range. Just set the unit near your rifle’s muzzle, on the side. There is also an inertial trigger accessory for LabRadars. Interestingly, this video also explains how, in the days before electric lamps, digital processors, and radar, scientists used a mechanical “Ballistic Pendulum” to calculate bullet velocity using Newtonian physics. The Ballistic Pendulum (shown at right) was first used in the mid 1700s.

EYE DOMINANCE — How to Determine Which Eye is Dominant

Host Jessie Duff and longtime shooter Krystie Messenger demonstrate how eye dominance affects aim and teach you how to determine your dominant eye in this edition of Firearm Science. There are very simple tests you can do to determine your eye dominance. This Editor is right-handed but left-eye dominant. All competitive shooters should check for eye dominance. If you are cross-dominant, you can alter your head position or put a paper patch on one frame of your shooting glasses.

Other NRA Firearm Science Videos

Firearm Science: Using Mil-Dots to Estimate Range

Firearm Science: Terminal Ballistics

Firearm Science: Rimfire vs. Centerfire

Firearm Science: Eye Protection

Firearm Science: Shooting Moving Targets

Firearm Science: Trigger Control (Pistol)

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April 13th, 2022

PRS 22 Rimfire Finale Featured on Shooting USA Today

PRS precision rimfire tactical NRL22 shooting usa tv smallbore .22 LR

Precision Rifle Series (PRS) 22 Finale on Shooting USA
This week Shooting USA showcases the first-ever PRS Rimfire Finale. This new rimfire discipline is akin to Precision Rifle Series (PRS) centerfire tactical competition, but shot with .22 LR rifles. The inaugural PRS Rimfire Finale drew nearly 150 competitors to Texas, where shooters could compete without the cost of expensive centerfire ammo and without the need for a 1000-yard range. SEE: PRS Rimfire Series Info.

Shooting USA SHOW TIMES: This Shooting USA Episode airs Wednesday, April 13, 2022 at 9:00 PM Eastern and Pacific; 8:00 PM Central. If you miss the regular broadcast, you can stream the show online at any time on Vimeo for $0.99 per episode.

PRS Rimfire Finale — Nearly 150 Shooters in Texas

PRS and NRL tactical matches are among the fastest-growing competitive shooting disciplines. And rimfire tactical disciplines are actually growing even faster (than centerfire PRS/NRL) because .22 LR ammo is much cheaper than centerfire ammo, and there are many more ranges where rimfire matches can be held. PRS Rimfire offers the same kind of fun without the high cost of centerfire ammo and/or countless hours spent hand-loading. Rimfire PRS also offers generally less expensive rifles, and a whole lot less recoil. That’s why PRS Rimfire (as well as NRL22) has become so popular. And in the first year of the PRS Rimfire series, the Finale drew close to 150 competitors. The Finale Match was held at the Triple C Shooting Facility in College Station, Texas.

PRS precision rimfire tactical NRL22 shooting usa tv smallbore .22 LR

The Triple C Shooting Facility hosted the First Annual PRS Rimfire Finale. At this excellent Texas venue, match directors set out 20 unique courses of fire. There were the standard props you’d expect to see at any Precision Rifle match — tractor tires, wire spools, concrete culverts, and even cross tie bunkers. And the target placements were certainly challenging. Many of the stages had cross-course target lay-outs. This makes wind-reading much more challenging, especially with the relatively slow, low-BC .22 LR cartridges used in PRS rimfire competition.

Tune in to Shooting USA TV tonight. You’ll enjoy the coverage of this popular PRS rimfire sport, which we expect to grow significantly in 2022 and beyond. Notably, the National Rifle League (NRL) now conducts many more NRL22 matches than NRL centerfire matches. And competitors of course are drawn by the fun/challenge of a tactical match with much lower ammo costs — $0.15-$0.25/rd vs. $1.00/rd or more (counting brass, primer, bullets, powder, and barrel wear). And there are many more viable venues, because you only need a 300-yard (max) range to conduct a rimfire tactical match.

PRS precision rimfire tactical NRL22 shooting usa tv smallbore .22 LR


Some images for this PRS Rimfire article are from the Central Region (TX) Finale Facebook Page

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