June 17th, 2021

25 Days and Counting until the National Matches at Camp Perry

CMP Camp Perry National Matches Long Range Pistol Rifle Commercial Row History

Headed to Perry this year? Time to start preparing. The 2021 National Matches at Camp Perry commence on July 12, 2021 — just 25 days away. CLICK HERE for Full Calendar.

Long Range Competition at Camp Perry
For rifle shooters, the ability to shoot out to 1000 yards on the historic ranges of Camp Perry is a definite “bucket list” item. The CMP invites competitors to test their skills in the CMP’s Long Range events at the National Matches. The series features five full days of competition — all from 1000 yards. To learn more, visit the CMP’s Long Range Info Page.

CMP Camp Perry National Matches Long Range Pistol Rifle Commercial Row History

Camp Perry has been a sought-after destination for marksmen since 1907, when the National Rifle and Pistol Matches moved to the Ohio facility. Since then, it has become a coveted journey for hundreds of thousands of guests through the generations. Learn more about the 2021 Camp Perry National Matches through the CMP website: https://thecmp.org/nationals.

CMP Camp Perry National Matches Long Range Pistol Rifle Commercial Row History

Smallbore Training Provided by USAMU Experts
This summer, the CMP will offer a Smallbore Rifle Small Arms Firing School during the 2021 National Matches. The course, taught by members of the Army Marksmanship Unit, will cover .22 LR rimfire competition and fundamentals. This should be a great opportunity for young smallbore competitors.

CMP Camp Perry National Matches Smallbore Small Arms Firing School USAMU

Camp Perry’s famous Commercial Row has long been a big attraction at the National Matches. Take a stroll down Commercial Row and check out a wide variety of products and gear for a variety of disciplines, all in one location. CLICK HERE for a list of all 2021 Commercial Row Vendors.

CMP Camp Perry National Matches Long Range Pistol Rifle Commercial Row History

25 Days and Counting…
The 2021 CMP National Matches will get underway very soon. You can get more info, view the Official Match Programs, and Register Online at the CMP National Matches homepage. If you have questions or need assistance with registration, call the CMP at (419) 635-2141.

Camp Perry rimfire sporter

114 Years of National Match History at Camp Perry
The National Matches have been hosted at Camp Perry since 1907. The National Matches, which have now spanned 114 years and five generations of Americans, have a rich history. Here are two covers of the American Rifleman magazine, from 1931 on the left and 1971 on the right.

CMP Camp Perry National Matches Long Range Pistol Rifle Commercial Row History

History of Camp Perry
Federal legislation originally launched the National Matches. The 1903 legislation also established the National Matches, commissioned the National Trophy and provided funding to support the Matches. The National Matches have been held at Camp Perry since 1907. The range is located along the shores of Lake Erie in northern Ohio near Port Clinton. The site was first acquired in 1906, in response to the need for a larger facility for military training and the NRA’s shooting programs. In 1906 Gen. Ammon B. Crichfield, Adjutant General of Ohio, ordered construction of a new shooting facility on the shores of Lake Erie, 45 miles east of Toledo, Ohio. The original land for Camp Perry was purchased in 1906, and the reservation was named after Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry, the American naval commander who won the Battle of Put-in-Bay during the War of 1812.

NRA National Matches

On August 19, 1907, Cpl. L. B. Jarrett fired the first shot at the new Camp Perry Training Site. And that year, 1907, Camp Perry held its first National Pistol and Rifle Championship events. This location has hosted the annual National Matches ever since (though they were cancelled in 2020 due to COVID). Typically over 4,000 competitors attend the National Matches each year, making it the most popular shooting competition in the western hemisphere.

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June 16th, 2021

CMP Now Offers 3×600 Mid-Range Local Match Sanctioning

CMP 3x600 midrange mid-range match certification

The Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) has added Mid-Range 3×600 events to its list of local club matches that can be CMP-sanctioned. For the new sanctioned Mid-Range 3×600 matches, clubs may choose to have service rifle and/or match rifle categories. The match and service rifle classifications will be the same used in across-the-course competitions. The rifles used can include Service Rifles, High Power Match Rifles, AR Tactical Rifles, and F-Class Rifles (both F-TR and F-Open).

The CMP notes: “With the 3×600 match, various rifles can compete side by side. Service rifles, match rifles and AR tactical rifles shoot at the regular MR1 600-yard targets. F-Class rifles shoot at the MR-1FC, which is an F-Class target. Scoring rings are similar, making it more difficult, with individuals shooting off of rests and/or bipods.”

CMP 3x600 midrange mid-range match certification

Match sanctioning allows CMP Affiliated Clubs to host a number of competitions and clinics, including air rifle, High Power rifle, pistol, rimfire, smallbore rifle and long range disciplines, on their own ranges. CMP’s Long Range program is one of the latest installments to the safety-and-education-based organization and is rapidly growing in popularity.

To sanction a CMP Mid-Range 3×600 event, Affiliated Clubs should visit the CMP Competition Tracker Page. Then click the “Clubs > Sanction Your Club’s Match” option to start a request.

Rifle Specifications for the Mid-Range 3×600 Program:

F-TR (Target Rifle) Classification:
— Rifles chambered for unmodified .223 Rem or .308 Winchester (or NATO equivalents) are permitted.*
— Maximum rifle weight is 18.25 pounds (w/the bipod attached).
— The only front support allowed is a bipod. A sandbag may be used under the rear of the stock.
— Rifles with a 24-inch barrel or longer will suffice. Heavy-barreled factory guns are allowed.

F-Open Classification:
— Open rifles can be chambered for any cartridge up to .35 caliber.
— Rifles must weigh no more than 22 pounds, have a maximum fore-end width of three inches and can be shot using a front tripod rest and separate rear sandbag.
— Rifles may be fired from an adjustable front rest (such as benchrest shooters use), plus a rear sandbag.
— Rifles must be fired from the shoulder, and rail guns are not allowed.

AR Tactical Rifle:
— .223 Rem or .308 Win AR-platform only
— 20-inch max barrel length
— 15-power scope
— Bi-pod or ruck-sack rear rest may be a bag without ears (tactical front rests, such as Harris-type bipods and limited rear rests one might find used in military or police tactical situations).
— There are additional requirements for the AR Stock and grip. **

Other CMP-Sanctioned Match Offerings
The CMP also offers match sanctioning for Long Range 1000-Yard Match, Long Range Palma Match, F-Class Long Range Match, F-Class Palma Match and F-Class 3×600 Match. Learn more about CMP sanctioned matches and clinics at https://thecmp.org/clubs/clinics/.


* The CMP Press release also includes this reference for F-TR: “Rifles may be chambered for any cartridge, not exceeding .308 inches in diameter and not less than .224 inches in diameter.” We don’t know what to make of that statement. Normally F-TR is limited to .223 Rem (5.56x45mm) or .308 Win (7.62x51mm) only. And this would contradict the first part of the CMP class specification.

** The “Tactical” (Military or Police) butt-stock and cheek-piece must be symmetrical (ambidextrous) and in line with the centerline of the bore. The butt-plate must be vertical (perpendicular to the centerline of the bore). The length-of-pull of the stock may be adjustable. Butt-stocks that allow other adjustments, such as the cheek-piece height or butt-plate location, will be allowed. The stock may or may not have a pistol grip. If the stock has a pistol grip, it may not be designed to support the bottom of the trigger hand (hand rest) or extend more than six inches below the centerline of the bore.

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June 15th, 2021

.375 Enabler — Extreme Ammo for Extreme Long Range (ELR)

Berger 379 grain 379gr solid bullet .375 caliber enabler

The .375 EnABELR Cartridge — Big and Fast

The .375 EnABELR cartridge is slightly shorter than a .375 CheyTac so it allows the round to mag-feed. Applied Ballistics is currently using brass made by Peterson. The .375 EnABELR has achieved impressive velocities — 2990 FPS — with prototype Berger 379-grain solid bullets fired from a 1:7″-twist 30″ barrel. Applied Ballistics may also test 1:8″-twist and 1:9″-twist barrels. READ Bullet Testing Report.

The .375 EnABELR cartridge was designed to offer .375 CheyTac performance in a slightly shorter package: “The problem with the .375 CheyTac is that, when loaded with the highest performance .375 caliber bullets (379-407 gr Berger Solids, and the 400-425 grain Cutting Edge Lazers) the round is not magazine feed-able in any action that’s sized for CheyTac cartridges.

Berger 379 grain 379gr solid bullet .375 caliber enabler

“Knowing the .375 CheyTac produced substantial performance, and that it was just too long for magazine feeding, made it easy to converge on a design for the .375 EnABELR. We just had to make the case short enough to achieve magazine length with the desired bullets, while adding a little more diameter to keep the case capacity similar to the .375 CheyTac. The resulting basic shape is quite similar in proportions to the successful .338 Norma Magnum Cartridge which, interestingly, was selected as the cartridge for General Dynamics Lightweight Medium Machine Gun (LWMMG).”

.375 cheytac .408 cheytac EnABLER Applied Ballistics Bryan Litz Cadex defense
Here is Mitchell Fitzpatrick, shooting the 375 EnABELR in an ELR Competition.

.375 cheytac .408 cheytac EnABLER Applied Ballistics Bryan Litz Cadex defense

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June 14th, 2021

V² Finale F-Class Tournament Concludes in Tennessee

V2 finale f-class f-open f-tr match tennessee

The first Annual V² Finale, held this weekend in Tennessee, has concluded. This new-format match pitted F-Class competitors against each other in a bracket-style double elimination match. This was a very elite field, selected via a Points series. All targets were placed at 1000 yards, with a Euro-Style 5V target. In something unusual for an American F-Class match, ALL shooting was done via PAIR FIRING, with shooters going head-to-head with alternating shots, 15 per shooter in the brackets and then 10 per shooter in the final two-man showdowns for F-TR and F-Open divisions.

V2 finale f-class f-open f-tr match tennessee

The competition was fierce but we have final results of this tough F-Class tournament. Congratulations to the V² Finale 2021 winners who earned fame, glory, and large cash pay-outs: Tracy Hogg (F-TR) and William (Bill) Kolodziej (F-Open). Additional top finishers are listed below, with links for FULL RESULTS below the table.


F-TR Winner – Tracy Hogg | F-Open Winner – Bill Kolodziej

V2 finale f-class f-open f-tr match tennessee

V2 finale f-class f-open f-tr match tennessee

F-TR Final Full Results | F-Open Final Full Results

V2 finale f-class f-open f-tr match tennessee

V2 finale f-class f-open f-tr match tennessee

The event, hosted at the modern Dead Zero Shooting Park in Tennessee, was sponsored by Vihtavuori and Vortex Optics. Along with helping to defray the range costs, these sponsors provided prizes to top shooters. In 2021 shooters qualified for the event through a nationwide points series, with 32 slots for F-Open and 32 slots for F-TR. The match organizers encourage F-Class competitors to shoot points series matches in the future, to qualify for next year’s event: “Earn some points so you can be part of V² Finale II in 2022.”

V2 finale f-class f-open f-tr match tennessee

V² Points Series and Finale Info Packet | V² Facebook Page

Big Pay-Outs for Participants
The V² Finale was first and foremost a money match. This event offered the highest payout ever for F-Class competition. Cash awards are distributed to the top 8 shooters for each equipment category, as a percentage of the overall match fee pool. The actual amounts will depend on match fees and attendance. We don’t have final numbers yet but payouts for positions 1-8 in each class were estimated to be:

1st Place: $3840 (40%)
2nd Place: $1920 (20%)
3rd Place: $960 (10%)
4th Place: $450 (4.6%)

5th Place: $300 (3.125%)
6th Place: $300 (3.125%)
7th Place: $300 (3.125%)
8th Place: $300 (3.125%)

V2 finale f-class f-open f-tr match tennessee

V2 finale f-class f-open f-tr match tennessee
Erik Cortina with Bryan Blake. Note the innovative, new spotting scope support Bryan crafted.

V2 finale f-class f-open f-tr match tennessee

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June 14th, 2021

Bryan Litz Wins 2021 Nightforce ELR Steel Challenge

Bryan Litz Applied Ballistics Nightforce ELR Steel Challenge Casper Wyoming

A major ELR match took place this past weekend in Wyoming, the Nightforce ELR Steel Challenge. A familiar name finished first — Applied Ballistics founder Bryan Litz. Bryan had a convincing victory over some 220 other shooters. Bryan earned praise from his colleague and past K02M winner Mitchell Fitzpatrick: “Congrats to Bryan Litz on winning the 2021 Nightforce ELR Steel Challenge! This match is tough, and winning it is no small feat… especially considering there were 221 competitors this year. Bryan and I were both shooting Barrett MRADs in .300 Norma with Nightforce 5-25 ATACR scopes, shooting Berger Bullets 245gr Elite Hunters pushed by VV N565. Absolutely killer combination.”

The match was held June 12-13 2021, at the Tillard 55 Ranch near Casper, Wyoming. This major ELR competition feature some amazing terrain, plus targets out to 2100 yards.

Bryan Litz Applied Ballistics Nightforce ELR Steel Challenge Casper Wyoming

After the match, Bryan told us: “I learned a lot shooting this match last year. Came back with a better plan and more suitable equipment (stock Barrett MRAD in .300 Norma Magnum, Berger 245gr Hybrids, Vihtavuori N565). I also got a lot of great advice from my team-mates who are more experienced in this kind of competition. For ballistics I ran the Garmin Tactix with the Personal Drag Model (PDM) from Radar testing on Friday — it was SPOT ON.

Thanks to Scott Satterlee and his awesome crew of ROs. This match takes a lot of work to set up. Also thank Nick Setting and all the sponsors… especially title sponsor Nightforce. Looking forward to coming back next year!”

Bryan Litz Applied Ballistics Nightforce ELR Steel Challenge Casper Wyoming
Here’s Bryan taping data to his rifle — a tip he got from Chase Stroud.

Personal Drag Models Set with Doppler Radar

Bryan Litz wasn’t just there to compete. Prior to the match Bryan and his Applied Ballistics Team helped competitors develop custom Long Range Ballistics curves for their loads and rifles. This was done with sophisticated Doppler Radar units. As Bryan noted: “Doesn’t get any better than a [ballistics] model built from a Radar track of YOUR bullets from YOUR rifle, the day before the match.”

Bryan Litz Applied Ballistics Nightforce ELR Steel Challenge Casper Wyoming

Bryan Litz Applied Ballistics Nightforce ELR Steel Challenge Casper Wyoming
During Personal Drag Model testing, participants would shot 10 rounds under the Radar. Once the PDM data was gathered, Bryan explained to the testers how to use the custom curve with Applied Ballistics software.

Bryan Litz Applied Ballistics Nightforce ELR Steel Challenge Casper Wyoming

Match Was a Sell-Out with Huge Prize Table

Was this a popular event? Does this ELR stuff generate interest among commercial sponsors?

Absolutely. With 221 shooters, the event was a “sell-out”, with many folks who had to be turned away. The list of sponsors is staggering — over 60 companies — so the prize tables were over-flowing with gear. With great scenery and this treasure trove of prizes, we understand why the match is so popular.

2021 Nightforce ELR Steel Challenge Sponsors
Accuracy International USA
Alamo Precision Rifles
American Precision Arms
American Rifle Company, Inc.
Applied Ballistics LLC
BadRock Rifles
Barrett
Bartlein Barrels, Inc
Bison Tactical
Bix’n Andy USA
Blue Mountain Precision
Brux Barrels
Bullet Central
Burris Optics
Cole-Tac
Cutting Edge Bullets
Defiance Machine
Elite Iron
Foundation Stocks
Garmin
GRAYBOE
Gunwerks
Hawkins Precision
Hawk Hill Custom
Hornady
H-S Precision
Impact Shooting
Kahles North America
Kelbly’s Actions
Kestrel Ballistics
KMW Long Range Solutions
Kreiger Barrels
Leupold Optics
Lilja Precision Rifle Barrels
Lone Peak Arms
Magnetospeed LLC
Modular Driven Technologies – MDT
Mile High Shooting Accessories
Nightforce Optics
Precision Rifle Works
PROOF Research
Really Right Stuff SOAR
Reasor Precision
Sako
Sawtooth Rifles
SilencerCo
SPUHR
SWAROVSKI OPTIK Hunting
Revic
Terminus Actions
Tikka
Timney Triggers
Triggertech
U.S. Optics
Vapor Trails
Warhorse Development
Warner Tool Company
West Texas Ordnance
WieBad.com
XLR Industries
Zermatt Arms
ZRO Delta

Bryan Litz Applied Ballistics Nightforce ELR Steel Challenge Casper Wyoming

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June 12th, 2021

TEN Shots (100-6X) in 4.554″ at 1000 — Watch This on Video!

Scott Nix Dasher Record

6mm DasherHow well can the little 6mm Dasher perform at 1000 yards when the conditions are good, and the shooter is riding a hot streak? Well here’s a shot-by-shot record of Scott Nix’s 4.554″ ten-shot group shot at the Deep Creek Range outside Missoula, Montana at the Northwest 1000-yard Championship a few years back. All 10 shots were centered for a 100-6X score. That’s about as good as it gets. If Scott had stopped after 5 shots, his group would have been under three inches.

Video Demonstrates Amazing 1000-Yard Accuracy
Watch the video. You can see the group form up, shot by shot. It’s pretty amazing. Scott’s first shot (at the 45-second mark of the video) was right in the X-Ring, and four of Scott’s first five shots were Xs. That’s drilling them! This video was recorded from the pits at the 1000-yard line, during record fire.

Deep Creek Range
The Deep Creek Range in Missoula, MT is one of the nicest places to shoot in the Intermountain West region. The range is located in the mountains within a few minutes drive of Missoula, and there is camping on-site. When conditions are good at Deep Creek, records get broken. To learn more about shooting at Deep Creek, contact Jamey Williams at jameydan[at]gmail.com.

Here is an aerial view of the Deep Creek Range (Drone video by David Gosnell):

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June 12th, 2021

Koenig Precision Rifle Match in Colorado This Weekend

Doug Koenig Ruger PRS Precision rifle competition Colorado Cameo grand junction

Many notable shooting matches are being held this month. As Pandemic restrictions recede, competitive shooters are getting back to the range, and that’s definitely a good thing. F-Classers are competing in Tennessee this weekend (see V² Finale Report), and PRS/NRL aces will be competing in Colorado.

The Colorado tactical match is something new — the inaugural Koenig Shooting Sports Precision Rifle Competition. This challenging event takes place this weekend, June 12-13, at the Cameo Shooting and Education Complex outside Grand Junction, Colorado. Doug Koenig will serve as the match director.

Doug Koenig Ruger PRS Precision rifle competition Colorado Cameo grand junction

This two-day event is expected to attract some of the best precision rifle competitors in the nation, all vying for points to earn an exclusive spot at the year-end PRS Pro Series Finale. Utilizing the picturesque landscape and natural terrain props found at the Cameo Shooting Complex, each competitor’s skills will be put to the test while engaging an assortment of steel, reactive, and automated moving targets at distances from 300 to over 1000 yards.

“I want to thank Ruger not only for their support but also for their continued commitment to this sport,” commented Koenig. “The introduction of the Ruger Precision Rifle disrupted the world of PRS by making it a much more affordable discipline to participate in, so it is only fitting that they are the presenting sponsor of this exciting event.”

Doug Koenig Ruger PRS Precision rifle competition Colorado Cameo grand junction

Doug Koenig and the Ruger Precision Rifle
“Koenig” (or König) means “king” in German. That is indeed appropriate for Doug Koenig, 19-Time Bianchi Cup winner, who is now starting to conquer the rifle world as well. Koenig, considered by many to be the best action pistol shooter on the planet, proved he’s an ace with rifles too, as he has had multiple PRS Production Division victories. Koenig, Captain of Team Ruger, shoots a Ruger Precision Rifle (RPR), chambered in 6mm Creedmoor. Notably, Production Division limits rifles to $2000.00 for the gun ($4000.00 overall with scope). You can buy an RPR for around $1350.00 typically ($1320.99 at KyGunCo).

In this video, Gavin Gear Shows How to Accurize a Ruger Precision Rifle:

This Interesting Cut-Away Animation Shows How the Ruger Precision Rifle Functions:

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June 11th, 2021

V² Finale F-Class Tournament Underway in Tennesee

v2 f-tr f-open f-class shooting tournament finale point series tennessee dead zero shooting park

V² Finale Double Elimination Tournament at 1000 Yards
A new kind of F-Class Tournament is being held in Tennessee over the next three days. The V² (“V-Squared”) Finale, sponsored by Vihtavuori and Vortex Optics, is a double-elimination shooting match, conducted much like a basketball tournament. There are 32 competitor places each in F-Open Division and F-TR — for 64 places total. In each round there is “pair firing”. Two shooters compete head-to-head with three, 15-round strings, all at 1000 yards. The winner of each two-person match-up proceeds, while the loser goes into a loser’s bracket… so everyone has a second change to win some of the prizes. This event is about more than trophies and glory — it is also about winning big piles of cash — $28,000 in total.

V² Finale F-Open Bracket LIVE | V² Finale F-TR Bracket LIVE

64 shooters, who earned entry with points garnered in previous matches, have been invited to compete for $28,000 in prize monies. The V² Finale is held at the Dead Zero Shooting Park in Tennessee, an impressive, modern facility. The Dead Zero 1000-yard range is equipped with ShotMarker electronic targets. That means that scoring is quick, there is no waiting for targets to be marked, and, importantly, no pit duties for the competitors.

V² Points Series and Finale Info Packet | V² Facebook Page


This video, created last year explains the V² Finale Rules and Course of Fire.

The V² Finale itself is conducted over three (3) days. It’s a double-elimination tournament — this means that everybody has the opportunity to shoot at least two matchups. A loss in the primary bracket will seed you into the elimination bracket, where you will have the opportunity to continue on and potentially work your way back to shoot for the overall Championship.

The V² Finale is a pair-fire, best two of three format, with 15-shot strings (45 rounds max per person per bracket). If one shooter wins the first TWO strings, the third string is not fired. The idea behind this pair-firing is to have both competitors for each stage shooting at the exact same time, in the exact same conditions, on the exact same target. The only person you are competing against is the person next to you. The competitors who wins two out of three matches in the matchup will advance.

v2 f-tr f-open f-class shooting tournament finale point series tennessee dead zero shooting park

V² Finale Bracket Match Results

READ THIS!! You can scroll UP and Down with your mouse, and thereby see the Loser’s bracket for both F-Open and F-TR.
READ THIS!! You can use the BRACKET Pull-Down Menu (Upper Right) to select Winner’s and Loser’s Brackets, or choose Top 16 and Top 8.
READ THIS!! You can pull box to left to see more on the right side, using mouse (or finger on smartphone).
READ THIS!! The boxes below are live feeds from the Match Website. Click links below to view Bracket Results on FULL SCREEN.
READ THIS!! This is NOT a static image, it will change as results are filled in. You can come back to this page and see more results as the event progresses.

V² Finale F-Open Bracket LIVE | V² Finale F-TR Bracket LIVE

F-Open Event Results in Real Time — Use Mouse to Scroll!

F-TR Event Results in Real Time — Use Mouse to Scroll!

The V² Finale match, sponsored by Vihtavuori Powders and Vortex Optics, takes place June 11-13 at the Dead Zero Shooting Park in Tennessee. This is a limited-field event for the top 32 F-Open and 32 F-TR competitors who have accrued the most points for the 2020-2021 season. The match will be a double-elimination bracket system (e.g. NCAA March Madness) where shooters are matched up against a single opponent for each round. As opposed to a typical match where you shoot against the entire field, this type of competition allows for two shooters to go head to head pair-fire style, competing under the exact same conditions. No wind alibis. No relay roulette. No excuses. Keep advancing and you will find yourself in the finals where you’ll have a chance to win the prestige of being the best F-Open or F-TR shooter in the country plus some serious prize money and awards.

v2 f-tr f-open f-class shooting tournament finale point series tennessee dead zero shooting park
The V² Finale firing line on 6/11 at the Dead Zero Shooting Park.

Thanks to the generous support from Vihtavuori Powders and Vortex Optics, more than 85% of the entry fees are awarded back to the shooters in the form of cash prizes, awarded all the way down to 8th place for each category. The creators of the V² points series noted: “This type of reward for performance is one of the core reasons why we created the V² Finale and why you won’t find any prize tables.”

For more details see the V² Series Information Packet or visit the V² Series Facebook Page.

Vihtavouri Supports Innovative V² Finale Match Format
“Vihtavuori is honored to partner with Vortex Optics for the inaugural V2 F-Class Point Series Finale. We’re excited to be onsite and support the world’s best long range shooters who will compete in a match they designed themselves,” stated Geoff Esterline, Marketing Director for Capstone Precision Group.

v2 f-tr f-open f-class shooting tournament finale point series tennessee dead zero shooting park

Why Was the F-Class Points Series Created? (Official Statement)
Everyone in the F-Class world knows about their local, state and regional matches and many of those shooters attend the Southwest Nationals and F-Class National Championship each year. These matches are often challenging and feature some of the best shooters in the country at any given time. As great and exciting as those matches are, they have some key limitations – they don’t answer the question of consistency over peak performance. They allow for random chance to play a role in results, in the form of target service, conditions, or “relay roulette”, among other factors. Basically, they don’t allow for a true measure of shooter performance over time, and more specifically, in a true test of head-to-head competition. It was partly with this in mind that we created the F-Class Points Series to collect and award points with the ultimate goal of putting on a one-of-a-kind, limited-field, matchup-style event that will give competitors a format to prove that the best indicator of skill is reliable consistency, not peak performance. A points system will allow us to track consistent performance over the course of a yearlong FPS season, culminating in an invitation to join the limited field of the V² Finale for the top 64 qualifying competitors.

Map for Dead Zero Shooting Park

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June 11th, 2021

Luke Johnson Wins Lapua Silhouette Super Shoot in Ridgway PA

Lapua Super Shoot rimfire .22 LR Center-X STandard Hunter class silhouette match

Congratulations to Lapua’s Rimfire Performance Center Manager, Luke Johnson, on winning the Lapua Silhouette Super Shoot. Johnson won the Standard Rifle class with a score of 176 out of a possible 200 and a shot a perfect 40 out of 40 in the Hunter Rifle to win the class with an aggregate score of 185.

With Johnson’s perfect score in Hunter Rifle, he joins the elite 4-member club of registered masters who have shot a perfect score in both Standard and Hunter Rifle silhouette disciplines. Johnson obtained his perfect score in Standard Rifle at the 2017 National Silhouette Championship.

The Lapua Super Shoot took place May 29-30, 2021 at the “Silhouette Capital” of the USA, Ridgway Rifle Club in Ridgway, PA. It consisted of 3 x 120 round relays, all fired from the standing position. For each relay, shooters engage ten chickens at 40 meters, ten pigs at 60 meters, ten turkeys at 77 meters and ten rams at 100 meters.

“This was my 3rd perfect 40/40 of my silhouette career, all have been shot with tested Lapua Center-X,” stated Johnson, “There have only been 10 different competitors to ever fire a perfect score in registered competition. This was a special 40/40 with it being my first in Hunter Rifle class.”

Lapua Super Shoot rimfire .22 LR Center-X STandard Hunter class silhouette match

Choosing the Perfect Ammo for His Rifle
Johnson’s Lapua Center-X .22 LR ammunition is matched to his firearms at Lapua’s Rimfire Performance Center indoor facility. Unique lots of ammunition are tested at 50 and 100 meters simultaneously, identifying the best performing ammunition for purchase. This service is available to all shooters who wish to gain a competitive advantage. Readers take note — you can do this type of ammo testing for your own rimfire rifles. CLICK HERE to schedule ammo testing at either of Lapua’s Rimfire Performance Centers located in Mesa, AZ or Marengo, OH.

About Luke Johnson — Past National Silhouette Champion and All-American
Johnson, a native of Marysville, PA, brings a long background of competitive shooting and hunting to Capstone. Johnson is a graduate of the University of Alaska-Fairbanks. While pursuing his Bachelor of Science degree, Luke was a 4-year letterman for the University’s D1 Rifle Team. In addition to his 3P/Prone shooting pedigree, Luke is a High Master rifle silhouette competitor. Highlights of his competitive background include: NRA Smallbore Rifle Silhouette Champion, NCAA & CRCA All-American, USA Junior National Champion (50 meter rifle).

Lapua Super Shoot rimfire .22 LR Center-X STandard Hunter class silhouette match

About Lapua Bullets, Brass, and Ammunition
Lapua produces the highest-quality, small-caliber cartridges and components for civilian and professional use. Lapua is a part of the Capstone Precision Group, exclusive U.S. distributor for Berger, Lapua, Vihtavuori and SK-Rimfire products. For more information, visit Lapua.com.

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June 10th, 2021

Full Schedule for 2021 CMP National Matches at Camp Perry

Camp Perry National Matches

Good news — there is still time to register for the National Matches at Camp Perry, Ohio. Visit the National Matches Registration Page today. These historic matches include High Power Rifle, Long Range Rifle, Vintage Military, Smallbore Rifle, Rimfire Sporter, and Pistol matches. The National Rifle and Pistol Matches have been part of Camp Perry tradition since 1907. After being cancelled in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the National Matches will be held again, but with some important changes:

— No First Shot Ceremony
— Squadding Reduced to Half Maximum Capacity
— Limiting Firing Points
— Social Distancing and Mask Wearing
— No Public Awards Ceremonies

2021 Camp Perry National Matches

About the National Matches

Held annually at Camp Perry, the National Matches include the CMP National Trophy Pistol and Rifle Matches, the Pistol and Rifle Small Arms Firing Schools, the National Games Rifle Matches, the National Smallbore Matches and the National Long Range Matches. These matches are conducted by a partnership of the CMP and Ohio National Guard.

2021 Camp Perry National Matches

2021 National Matches Program | National Matches Registration

Since their inception, the National Matches have become a huge, national shooting sports festival with well over 4,500 annual participants. Training participants and competitors range from novices to many of the world’s best. This year the CMP National Matches commence July 12, 2021 and conclude August 14, 2021.

National Matches Registration Links and Entry Forums

Pistol Online Registration
Rimfire Online Registration
Smallbore Online Registration
Rifle Online Registration
Long Range Online Registration

Printable Pistol Entry Form
Printable Rimfire Entry Form
Printable Rifle Entry Form
Printable Long Range Entry Form


2021 National Matches Calendar (Click to Zoom)

National Matches Calendar

National Matches Schedules

National Matches Phases

CMP National Trophy Pistol & Games Matches
National Rimfire Sporter Match
CMP Smallbore Matches
CMP Highpower Rifle Championships
CMP National Trophy Rifle Matches
CMP National Games Events
CMP Long Range Matches

Event Schedules

Welcome Center (In Processing) Calendar
National Trophy Pistol Match Schedule
National Rimfire Sporter Schedule
National Smallbore Championships Schedule
HP Rifle LR Relay Rotation
National Trophy Rifle & CMP Games Schedule
National Long Range Match Schedule

Camp Perry 2021 National Matches

Camp Perry Rimfire Sporter

Camp Perry Map and Directions

View Camp Perry Site Map

Camp Perry National Matches 2021Housing and Lodging — In the summer of 2021, Camp Perry on-base housing and RV spaces WILL be available. Visit the Camp Perry Lodging Conference Center website for more details and reservation links. This offers very affordable lodging and/or camping options. A barracks bed starts at $16.10/night. Reserve a 4-person hut for $58.65 per night.

Small Arms Firing Schools — We’re informed that the Small Arms Firing Schools (SAFS) are still on the schedule for 2021, with a reduced number of spots available. The CMP suggests you sign up early if you wish to participate.

Camp Perry 2021 National Matches

Camp Perry 2021 Vintage Sniper National Matches

FIREARM INSPECTIONS
All firearms, to be used in any CMP Games or CMP Service Rifle event, are required to be inspected by a CMP sanctioned armorer prior to any live fire at every event. Competitors will be required to present all applicable scorecards to the CMP Armorer in order to complete the inspection process. Upon completion of the firearm inspection process, each scorecard will receive a stamp of approval from the CMP Armorer, indicating that no safety violations or rules compliance issues were observed at the time of inspection. Each rifle will also receive an inspection tag, verifying participation in the inspection process.

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June 10th, 2021

Zombies in the Heartland 2021 3-Gun Match Is Big Success

zombies heartland hornady 2021

Hornady’s 2021 Zombies in the Heartland 3-Gun Match
Nearly 400 zombie hunters armed with handguns, shotguns, and rifles converged in Grand Island, Nebraska, June 4-6, 2021 to battle the “undead” during the 9th Annual, Zombies in the Heartland 3-Gun Match hosted by Hornady and the Heartland Public Shooting Park.

zombies heartland hornady 2021

Shooters from 20 different states tested their talent in the 10-stage match. Specially developed reactive zombie targets kept shooters engaged and entertained. Participants shot from a suspended motorcycle, through a burned-out auto yard, and while sitting in a parked pickup truck where shooters were required to turn the wheel to see targets.

The top shooters in each class were:

Open: Jon Wiedell, 1st overall
Tactical: Riley Kropff, 2nd overall
Amateur: Jeremiah Ochsner
PCC: Kelly Neal

Lady: Dakota Overland
Junior: Logan Toland
Senior: Tony Holmes
Super Senior: Jerry Miculek, 3rd overall

For complete Zombie Match results visit https://practiscore.com/results/new/137200.

“We look forward to this match every year,” said Jeremy Millard, Hornady Engineer and Match Director. “Competitors from many different states travel to this match because they enjoy the environment, stages and camaraderie,” Millard added.

“The Zombie Match would simply not be possible without the help of our amazing volunteers” said Steve Hornady, President. “In addition, all of the sponsors that donate to this match – thank you. We had a prize table valued at $130,000 this year, that’s incredible,” Hornady added.

Zombies in the Heartland Highlights Video. This well-made 2017 video is worth watching! This video offers Shooter’s POV views of many stages including full auto:

zombies heartland 2021

ZOMBIES HEARTLAND 2021

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June 9th, 2021

Iron Man Silhouette Event at Montana’s Deep Creek Range

Erich Mietenkorte silhouette shooting Missoula Montana Deep Creek

Ace silhouette shooter Erich Mietenkorte (Team SK/Lapua) offers this report from Montana. Erich took top honors in Centerfire Silhouette (both standard and hunter rifle), while earning a first and second in the rimfire classes. Here is Erich’s report:

There’s a reason they call it the “Iron Man” Regional Silhouette Championship — shooting eight rifle matches over two days is no easy task! The four smallbore matches on Saturday were met with very windy conditions but I was able to shoot through it to finish 1st in standard rifle and 2nd in hunter rifle.

Erich Mietenkorte silhouette shooting Missoula Montana Deep Creek

Erich Mietenkorte silhouette shooting Missoula Montana Deep CreekGreat Conditions for Centerfire Matches
The wind died down on Sunday and we had great conditions for the High Power rifle events (bolt-action centerfire). Four matches later I finished first in both standard and hunter rifle classes. After the scores from all eight matches were totaled up, I finished first overall and won the “Iron Man” Aggregate trophy.

These results wouldn’t be possible without the amazing products from SK Ammunition, Lapua, Berger Bullets, and Vihtavuori Powders. Thank you for your support!

Thanks to all of the people who put on a great match at the beautiful Deep Creek Range in Missoula, Montana. All of your hard work is truly appreciated!

Erich Mietenkorte silhouette shooting Missoula Montana Deep Creek

Erich Mietenkorte silhouette shooting Missoula Montana Deep Creek

Erich Mietenkorte silhouette shooting Missoula Montana Deep Creek

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June 9th, 2021

$90,000 Up for Grabs at Armageddon Gear Cup — ShootingUSA TV

Armageddon Gear AG Cup Invitational Shooting USA

Fans of PRS/NRL competition should check out this Armageddon Cup show. Shooting USA offers a special hour-long edition devoted to the second Armageddon Gear AG Cup Invitational. The show airs today, Wednesday 6/9/21 at 9:00 PM Eastern/Pacific (8:00 PM Central) on the Outdoor Channel. You can also stream the show anytime on Vimeo.

The 2020 AG Cup showcased an all-star line-up of tactical talent. 42 of the nation’s top PRS/NRL marksmen were invited to the three-day match at the Arena Training Facility in Georgia. $90,000 was up for grabs at this event — the highest cash payout in the history of rifle competition. There’s $1,000 for the winner of each stage and $50,000 for the overall winner of the Cup.

Watch Video for Highlights of Armaggeddon Gear Cup Tactical Match:

This full, 48-minute AG CUP episode can be streamed on Vimeo for $0.99. Or you can watch an unlimited number of Shooting USA shows for a $3.99 per month subscription. Click the video above to preview the broadcast.

2020 was the second year of the Armageddon Gear Cup match. With $90,000 in total prizes (and $50K for the Cup Winner) there couldn’t be more excitement or more pressure as the field of 42 competitors is cut down to 12 finalists. Those dozen finalists started Day Three with a clean record in their quest for the Cup title and huge pay-out.

hornady armageddon cup a-tip bullets
Armageddon Gear Founder Tom Fuller competes in PRS and supervised the 2020 AG Cup.

Armageddon Gear AG Cup Invitational Shooting USA

In this hour-long Shooting USA special, John Scoutten and Armageddon Gear’s Tom Fuller report the action and interview top competitors. The winner of each of the 20 stages received a $1000 cash prize. During the show, you can watch the competitors adapt to challenging stage set-ups and weather conditions. With $1000 at stake for each stage, a single miss can cost serious money!

Arena Training Facility — 2300 Acres
The 2300-acre Arena Training Facility is a premier shooting facility with multiple shooting ranges from 50m to 2100m. Arena’s 1000-yard covered Known Distance range offers multiple benches, steel and paper targets out to 1000 yards. On Arena’s UKD (unknown distance) range shooters can engage steel out to 2300 yards. This 2100m UKD range boasts a 3-Story Shooting Tower, Air-Conditioned Shoot House, and multiple Positional Challenges.space.

arena training facility Georgia

Armaggedon Gear — Tactical Accessories
Armageddon Gear, founded by former U.S. Army Ranger Tom Fuller, sells support bags, gun cases, slings, suppressor covers, scope covers, and other accessories popular with the PRS/NRL crowd. Armageddon Gear now provides products to the U.S. Military, Law Enforcement, as well as PRS/NRL competitors.

Armageddon Gear Game-Changer Bag
Game Changer PRS bag

Shooting USA new products rifmire challenge
Shooting USA is available On Demand via Vimeo.com. Watch a single episode for $0.99, or get a full-month subscription for $3.99 and watch as many shows as you like with limited commercial interruptions.

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June 8th, 2021

Indiana Teen Wins Air Rifle and Smallbore at Camp Perry Open

Bremen Butler Air Rifle junior Olympics Camp Perry

We like to feature skilled young shooters — they are the future of our sport. Here’s a profile of a very proficient young lady, Bremen Butler, who recently won both Air Rifle and Smallbore competitions at the Camp Perry Open. She also secured two silver medals at USA Shooting’s Junior Olympics — one for air rifle and one for smallbore. Just 16 years old, this talented teen from Fort Wayne, Indiana is well on her way to a becoming a top competitor. Next stop will be a collegiate shooting team, and who knows, maybe she will become an Olympian some day. Bremen has only been competing in marksmanship for about two years but has already enjoyed great success.

Bremen Butler Air Rifle junior Olympics Camp PerryBremen Wins in Field of 250 Shooters
At the Camp Perry Open, Bremen won both the Three-Position Air Rifle portion and the newly added 3×40 Smallbore match. Once the inaugural Camp Perry Open Smallbore event was completed, Bremen went on to claim the overall win in the 3PAR match, fired the same day. She also finished eighth overall in the 60-Shot Open rifle event. “I had a rough first day”, she said of her performance in the 60-Shot. “However, I was able to recover on Day Two by shooting a new personal record of 625.2, which was very exciting for me.”

The 2021 Camp Perry Open attracted more than 250 shooters from around the nation. The annual event is conducted by the Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) at the Gary Anderson CMP Competition Center at Camp Perry in Ohio. Typically fired in January, the 2021 Camp Perry Open was moved to May to allow the 3×40 Smallbore Rifle portion to be added to the schedule for the first time. Over 60 competitors took to the firing line on Camp Perry’s Petrarca Range for the new outdoor 3×40, with Bremen coming out on top.

Bremen said: “I enjoy shooting Smallbore and like the extra challenge the wind brings when shooting outdoors. I feel any opportunity to boost the number of matches for shooters is a fantastic and welcome idea. I was excited to be shooting on Petrarca. My first experience shooting Smallbore was on that same range during the 2019 CMP Summer Camp.”

Home Air Rifle Training in the Kitchen!
young girl shooter Bremen butler air rifle smallbore
Bremen often trains in the kitchen of her family’s home using SCATT movement tracking systems and other modern technologies.

To train, she stands in front of her kitchen stove and shoots through the living room into a trap sitting on the family’s fireplace mantel. She uses a single paper bull with the SCATT attached to her rifle to score a 60-shot match each day. Bremen says she trains four to six days a week, which has helped her scores steadily improve. When she’s not training at home, Bremen travels to as many competitions as she can: “My family has been very supportive as we travel to as many matches as possible.”

Two Silvers at the USA Shooting’s Junior Olympics
Bremen Butler Air Rifle junior Olympics Camp Perry

The week before the Camp Perry Open, Bremen shot at USA Shooting’s Junior Olympics and brought home silver medals for both Smallbore and Air Rifle in the J2 age group. She also qualified for the Smallbore Finals and finished sixth overall in the discipline.

Remote Training with Olympian Rifle Coach During Pandemic
Bremen began competing in Precision Air Rifle and Smallbore almost two years ago. In July 2020, she began training remotely with Olympian and current rifle coach Jayme Shipley via WebEx and utilizing SCATT. She uses her laptop plus a smartphone to allow for multiple-angle views for her coach to observe.

Bremen Butler SCATT MX-2 training

How the SCATT MX-02 Works
The SCATT sensor mounted on the end of the barrel has a digital camera that recognizes the black bullseye in the target, even in broad daylight outdoors. Using the bullseye as a reference, the SCATT software tracks the movement of the muzzle relative to the center of the target. The unit can plot these movements as a continuous trace, which appears on a monitor as a squiggly, colored line. By sensing the exact moment of shot release, the SCATT can also interpolate relative shot placement (for a single shot or series of shots).

Gary Anderson CMP Competition Center at Camp Perry
Gary Anderson Competition Center

When she finds time, Bremen visits Camp Perry to practice air rifle within the Gary Anderson CMP Competition Center. Now when she makes the trip, she can think back to her 2021 Camp Perry Open memories as she works toward even more marksmanship successes. “I love the CMP ranges and enjoy visiting it whenever possible for training,” Bremen said.

CMP Competition Centers — Planning a Visit
The CMP operates two indoor air gun ranges equipped with electronic targets. Plan visits to the Anniston, Alabama, or Port Clinton, Ohio, ranges by calling (419) 635-2141, ext. 704. Both ranges are open to the public and offer rental equipment. Last year, Bremen traveled to CMP’s South Competition Center in Alabama for the annual Dixie Double air gun event and competed in the USA Shooting Winter Airgun event. There she won gold for the J2 age group. It was her first national medal in only the second event of that level in her career.

READ Full Report on CMP.org

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June 7th, 2021

Garand, Springfield, Modern Military Match at Camp Perry

Petrarca Range Camp Perry GSMM electronic target

It’s great to see normalcy return to our shooting facilities, including Camp Perry. COVID is still a concern, but the ranges are opening up at long last. On May 22, 2021, the CMP hosted a Garand/Springfield/Vintage and Modern Military Rifle (GSMM) Match on the electronic targets of Petrarca Range at Camp Perry.

Petrarca Range Camp Perry GSMM electronic target
Petrarca Range Camp Perry GSMM electronic target

The CMP’s recreational-style events, like the GSMM Match, are designed to ease interested individuals into the sport. On the firing line are a mix of seasoned competitors and those getting started in marksmanship. They all come together to share a common interest. The match allows shooters to meet old friends and enjoy the company of fellow shooters. And of course there is the fun and challenge of the course of fire.

Petrarca Range Camp Perry GSMM electronic target

GSMM matches attract new shooters as well as older competitors. You don’t need to make a huge investment in rifles or optics. We have friends who have done well with a “box stock” 1903 A3 Springfield they acquired from the CMP decades ago

During Petrarca GSMM matches, CMP staff members are always on hand to ensure safety on the firing line and answer questions. This match is fun and efficient. The electronic targets, with monitors at each station, show shot location/score instantly. And there is no pit duty. Competitors never have to venture downrange to change or retrieve targets.

Twenty-five competitors participated in Camp Perry’s May GSMM Rifle event. Similar GSSM matches will be held at the Petrarca Range on June 26 and September 25, 2021. Here are the May Match “Top Guns” by class, with their scores:

M1 Garand: Jeffrey Beierke, Blissfield, Michigan – 277-3X
Springfield: Andy Welter, Westerville, Ohio – 262-6X
Modern Military: Scott Whiteman, Fort Wayne, Indiana – 280-5X

Petrarca Range Camp Perry GSMM electronic target
Petrarca Range Camp Perry GSMM electronic target
Petrarca Range Camp Perry GSMM electronic target

CLICK HERE to learn about the Petrarca Range electronic target system at Camp Perry, Ohio.

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June 6th, 2021

Sunday Gunday: AR Service Rifle — Focus on Ammo & Reloading

High Power service rifle AR15 reloading 600 yard Danny Arnold powder kernels
The 600-yard target has an X-Ring 6 inches (1 MOA) across, while the 10-Ring spans 12 inches (2 MOA).

The following article is about reloading for NRA/CMP Highpower Rifle competition and is geared toward competitors shooting the AR15 Service Rifle. In Highpower Rifle competition, shooters fire in four stages: Standing slow-fire at 200 yards, Sitting rapid-fire at 200 yards, Prone rapid-fire at 300 yards, and Prone slow-fire at 600 yards. Competitors use a sling for support in all positions but standing. A typical AR15 Service Rifle sports a 20″ free-floated barrel and a 4.5-pound trigger. Service Rifle scopes are limited to maximum power of 4.5X.

Thoughts on Loading for Service Rifles, Particularly for 600 Yards

by Danny Arnold, Team CMP
Article originally published in CMP Shooting News

Before we get started, I want to stress that all of the information that follows is geared toward the .223/5.56 Service Rifle. That doesn’t mean that there’s nothing here for anyone else, but the .223/5.56 Service Rifle platform is where I’ve spent the majority of my time, so here we go.

There is only one “Perfect” 600–yard load for my rifle, True or False? This example is more anecdotal than scientific, but it provides some food for thought….

Team CMP spent the early part of March competing in the Orange Blossom Regional. As soon as we got on the range, Sara Rozanski (Team CMP member) started having problems with her 600-yard ammunition. Nearly 1/3 of her cases were exiting the chamber minus the primers. I offered to swap my ammunition for hers, suspecting that my Wylde chamber would be more forgiving than her CLE chamber — a solution that seemed to solve the problem. At least neither of us was blowing primers!

High Power service rifle AR15 reloading 600 yard Danny Arnold powder kernels

Sara’s ammunition was a factory load using a well-known 80+ grain bullet with an unknown primer and powder, using brass from a respected manufacturer. My load was a different brand of 80-grain bullet, with my choice of powder and primer, all in brass made by someone else. Given the color of the primers, the only thing that our ammunition could possibly have had in common was the brand of powder… maybe. So, how did we shoot?

Sara and I shot the two-person team together and the entire 2,400 Aggregate, although on different relays. Sara’s combined 600-yard score was 780-28X (97.5%). Mine was a 783-24X (97.87%). Our scores were never more than two points apart on any of the four days. Keep in mind that we were using each other’s ammunition the entire time.

So, we had different barrels, chambers and ammunition, but similar results. That goes back to the idea that a good load will perform similarly if fired in a good barrel.

Are We Too Focused on Ballistic Coefficients (BCs)?
The revailing wisdom has always trended toward loading the highest-BC bullet we could find and pushing it as fast as possible. Back in the early ’90s when I got started with the AR15, the 80-grain Sierra was state of the art. Actually, I picked up all of my Leg points with it, although today it looks a bit dated — kinda like me.

So, the question I’ll pose is this: Would you rather shoot a high-BC bullet that groups 3/4-MOA (minute of angle) or a lower-BC bullet that groups into one-half-MOA traveling 50 feet-per-second faster? The reason that I posed this question is a situation I found myself in a decade ago. Our coach decided that he wanted us to pair-fire some 600-yard for practice. Unfortunately, I hadn’t gotten the memo and all that I had available was my normal short-line ammunition, loaded with a 77-grain bullet. The shooter I was paired with was using a higher-BC bullet than I was, but in the end, we both shot 198s.

Admittedly, using 77-grainers meant that coach had to work a little harder to keep us together on target, but it was a teaching moment for me. I knew that my upper shot 77s better than the available bullets in the 80-grain range, so I cranked out a windage table for the 77-grain bullet at 600 yards and shot those for the rest of the season. After all, the wind blows ALL bullets around. It’s just a matter of knowing what YOUR bullet is doing.

With the shortages that we’re experiencing right now, a lighter bullet may be all that you have available for the 2021 season. That doesn’t mean that you’re disadvantaged though.

High Power service rifle AR15 reloading 600 yard Danny Arnold powder kernels
Danny Arnold teaching Highpower Clinic at 2021 CMP Eastern Games

Loading High-BC Bullets
In the past decade, several bullets have appeared that weigh 80-grains or more. One thing that many of them have in common is a very sharp nose profile, whether metal or polymer. The question is: Are you using the right seating stem?

The jacket material in the bullet’s nose is very thin. If you section a bullet, you’ll find that there is a surprising amount of air space in the nose. If you’re using older seating dies, your seating stem may be contacting the bullet nose too close to the tip, where the jacket is the both thinnest and is unsupported by the lead core. This can manifest itself either as a deformation at the very tip of the bullet or as a circular dent around the bullet nose that you can see and feel with your thumbnail. I think we can all agree that denting a bullet is usually considered a bad thing.

High Power service rifle AR15 reloading 600 yard Danny Arnold powder kernels

One company goes so far as to recommend their proprietary seating stem for use with their high-BC bullets. Other companies leave it up to you to find a seating stem that will allow the bullet nose to go deeper into the seating stem, moving the contact point further down the bullet where the jacket is thicker and supported by the core material.

Seating Depth and Bullet Preferences
Some bullets don’t mind some “jump” into the lands, but some really do. Unfortunately, manufacturers don’t tell you much about that. Your chamber configuration (Wylde, CLE, or some hybrid of the two) and the bullet that you choose will determine your optimal seating depth. Long and short of it, a quality measuring tool to determine seating depth is a necessity these days. Keep in mind that if you’re doing this with a brand new barrel, the throat is likely going to change slightly in the first 200 rounds and may need to be re-measured. Actually, since all of your short range ammunition has to be loaded to magazine length, you’re probably better off developing your short range loads before starting on long range load development. That gives the throat a chance to wear in a bit on a new barrel.

Brass Prep — Why It Is Important
When match-grade AR15s first arrived on the scene, it was amazing how little it took to get them to shoot well. Other than making sure that I had brass from the same lot and running it through a set of match-grade dies, I did nothing. Of course, we were also using a post front sight. Was the occasional bad shot me, the rifle, the load or just an archaic sighting system?

Transitioning to optics has caused me to reconsider how and what I do in my reloading process: That, and having some extra time on my hands to experiment.

A little (or a lot) of time spent with a neck turning tool, a primer-pocket uniformer and a flash-hole reamer will quickly show you how consistent brass is by manufacturer and even by individual lot. That exercise also makes the prices charged for high-quality brass seem ridiculously cheap. That doesn’t mean that I advocate neck-turning or other uniforming practices, nor do I advocate spending scandalous amounts of money on long-range brass. However, our sport is about consistency. The consistency of your brass is a matter of choice, whether you choose to simply segregate cases by weight (cheap option), neck turn (labor intensive) or open your wallet a little wider for premium brass.

High Power service rifle AR15 reloading 600 yard Danny Arnold powder kernels

Weighing Charges vs. Throwing with Powder Measure
To measure or weigh? For a long time, I used a powder measure to throw all of my 600-yard loads. The powder I was using metered well, and the results downrange didn’t justify the extra time spent with a scale. That was in the day of iron sights though. Nowadays, I’m throwing my charges and trickling up to the desired weight as measured on a scale that weighs to a 100th of a grain.

To quantify the difference between individually weighing each charge versus throwing charges with a powder measure, I weighed six kernels of powder that I trickled into the pan and then dumped them into the hopper. Going through that process 10 times, I came up with an average weight of .08 grains for six kernels. Next, I threw 50 charges for weighing using my powder measure. If I felt the measure hanging up as it cut kernels, I put the charge back into the hopper without weighing it.

High Power service rifle AR15 reloading 600 yard Danny Arnold powder kernels
That’s six kernels of powder sitting in the pan — average weight .08 grains.

Those 50 smoothly-thrown charges varied .26 grains from lowest to highest, with the majority varying no more than .16 grains from highest to lowest. If the desired weight was exactly in the middle, at worst you’d be .13 grains (9-10 kernels) low or high, with the majority being off no more than .08 grains (6 kernels) above or below the desired charge weight. Is that enough to send a shot outside the 2-MOA 10-Ring? Probably not.

Has more consistent brass and weighing charges to one-hundredth (0.01) of a grain added up to higher scores? Honestly, this question is hard to answer. Looking at the results on paper at 200 yards, using a powder that meters well combined with a consistent touch on the loading lever doesn’t appear measurably different than meticulously weighing each and every powder charge. Looking back over my 600-yard plots however, I can see a trend toward a group that is closer to X-Ring height.

Since the bullseye is widest at the center, shooting groups that are the height of the X-ring gives you more room for error when the wind is blowing. That can translate into higher 600-yard scores.

How You Load Your Ammunition vs. How You Load Your Rifle
The loading/chambering cycle of the AR-15 is, in a word, violent. You have a relatively heavy bolt and carrier assembly under power of a stout buffer spring slamming forward to chamber each round of ammunition. By design, those rounds were supposed to be held securely by the magazine feed lips until the bolt stripped them off the follower. Obviously, due to their overall length, 600-yard loads can’t be chambered that way. Although the barrel extension is funnel-shaped, it’s also got a lot of “teeth” ringing the inside of it (see below).

High Power service rifle AR15 reloading 600 yard Danny Arnold powder kernels

Whether you’re using a standard magazine or a single-round loading device (SLED), dropping a round in the loading port and releasing the bolt is an act of faith in that you’re trusting the bullet to arrive in the chamber undamaged.

Ask yourself, how many times have you seen someone drop a round on the follower, press the bolt release and watch as the bolt jammed on a cockeyed round? If that happens once every 100 tries, how many times did the bolt close on a scratched, dented, or misaligned bullet? Could that be the cause of the occasional errant shot?

My technique is to drop each round on top of the SLED and then push it slightly forward with my finger, partially chambering it before releasing the bolt. Admittedly, some people may be unable to do this due to body configuration or left-handedness, but why go to all the trouble of loading “perfect” ammunition and then damage it on the way into the chamber?

Now that we’ve covered bullets, brass, and assorted errata we can move on to discussing loads for 600 Yards…

High Power service rifle AR15 reloading 600 yard Danny Arnold powder kernels highpower target
The NRA Highpower 600-yard target has a 6-inch (1 MOA) X-Ring, and a 12-inch (2 MOA) 10-Ring.

Load Development for 600 Yards

Finding a load for 600 yards is a lot like finding a load for short range. Once I decide on a bullet, powder, primer, velocity range and a measured guesstimate of seating depth, I load 10 rounds of each test load, increasing in 0.2 (2/10) grain increments. I test them from the prone position at 200 yards. Ideally, I want to see two loads that are 0.2 (2/10) of a grain apart that shoot almost identical groups. The load that I choose will fall in between the two best shooting loads that I tested. If the first load is XX.2 grains and the second is XX.4 grains, my chosen load will be XX.3 grains.

Why develop loads in 0.2-grain (tenths) increments if I have a scale that measures in 0.01-grain (hundredths) increments? Or, why not test in 0.1-grain increments?

For me, working in 0.2-grain increments gets me to the results quicker. Also, there is a difference between accuracy and consistency in this scenario. Developing loads in 0.2-grain increments gets me to an accurate load. Producing that load using a scale that accurately measures to .01-grain insures a consistent load, assuming that I do my part.

Once I’ve settled on a load, it’s time to play with seating depth, if I choose to. If I’m lucky and the groups are acceptable as-is, I won’t do anything. If I think there’s room for improvement, I’ll experiment a little. Depending on the bullet, changing the seating depth by a couple of thousandths one way or the other may change the group size. During this phase of testing, it’s a good idea to chamber a round and see if the entire round will then extract. If you leave a bullet stuck in the throat, your rounds are too long. Finding that out at a match can ruin an otherwise good day.

High Power service rifle AR15 reloading 600 yard Danny Arnold powder kernels
Danny Arnold shooting his AR15 Service Rifle, standing position at 2021 CMP Eastern Games.

Another thing to keep in mind is that your barrel is not static. Every round fired has an effect on the throat, vaporizing and scouring away metal until the distance the bullet travels before meeting the rifling measurably increases. If you have chosen a bullet that shoots best when close to the lands, you’ll need to periodically re-measure and possibly change your bullet seating depth to maintain that optimal relationship.

The Elephant in the Room — User Skill Level

There’s really not a delicate way to put this, so I won’t try. There’s little point in spending time and effort developing a load that shoots into half-MOA off the bench if you’re only capable of shooting 2 MOA using a sling right now.

That doesn’t mean that there’s no hope. On the contrary, it just means that your time and effort is better spent practicing with some good short-range ammunition on reduced targets at a 100 or 200-yard range. At that distance, wind is not a factor and your technique can be improved more quickly so you’re in a position to benefit from that ½ MOA ammunition.

About Team CMP
CMP has created a Highpower Team with top competitors. Team CMP competes at several events throughout the year and most importantly, helps to teach Highpower Clinics at CMP Competition Events. Learn from Team CMP at Camp Perry during the Advanced Highpower Clinic, scheduled this year for July 30 through August 1, 2021. Visit the Highpower Clinic Web Page for more information.

The Civilian Marksmanship Program is a federally-chartered 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation. It is dedicated to firearm safety and marksmanship training and to the promotion of marksmanship competition for citizens of the United States. For more information about the CMP and its programs, visit www.TheCMP.org.

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June 5th, 2021

My Shooting — New FREE Group Measuring Android App

My Shooting Group Measuring App Android Ballistic-X

Want to instantly measure your shot groups with precision, just by using your smartphone? You can do this with the excellent, proven Ballistic-X program, which has versions for both Android and Apple (iOS) devices. Ballistic-X is handy, relatively precise, and easy to use. But it does cost $7.99.

If you want to try a group measuring App that is completely FREE, there is a good new Android App called My Shooting from Bokili Production software. This new My Shooting App was created by a match shooter in Europe. It actually offers some cool features not available with most other group-measuring Apps. For example you can measure and display MULTIPLE group sizes on the same screen and keep them all in one file so you can quickly compare group size. There is a radius value in addition to group size (center to center of farthest shots). The App also includes an INFO box where you can display rifle type, sights/optics, ammo caliber, target distance, date, and even wind values and temperature. That’s handy.

FREE APP — You can download My Shooting App from the Google Play Store for FREE. Sorry there is NO Apple iOS/iPhone version at this time.

My Shooting Group Measuring App Android Ballistic-X

My Shooting lets you take images and perform all measurements internally within the application. To use the My Shooting App, simply take a photo of the target(s) with your smartphone. Then enter a known dimension on the target (such as the diameter of 10 Ring). Next click a circle on each shot-hole, and then mark the aiming point on the target. The App then does all the calculations, listing the group size in inches or mm (as you prefer). The App also list the Radius of the group, and the group’s Point of Impact (POI) separation from the Point of Aim.*

NOTE: If you enter bullet caliber and target distance, My Shooting App will display the angular measurement in MOA or Milliradians. That can be VERY handy when shooting at long ranges. The “smart” App shows the group’s actual dimension PLUS the equivalent MOA or Mils at your shooting distance. The App lets you choose either imperial (inches/yards) or metric measurements (millimeters/meters).

My Shooting Group Measuring App Android Ballistic-X

Bojan Radović, the creator of My Shooting App, is a shooter himself and an AccurateShooter.com visitor. He told us: “I am a shooter and a programmer from Europe. I recently created an Android App that works very precisely to measure a group of hits. The application is free!” NOTE, however, like most free Apps, the My Shooting App does contain small advertisements.


* POI (indicated with “X”) is precisely calculated as the mean value of all hits in relation to the center of the target — i.e. the mean distance from Point of Aim. The POI location reference (e.g. “down-left”) states a directional angle for which you can make a correction on your optical sight. POI displays with an actual distance (mm or inches) and the equivalent MOA or MRAD.

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June 4th, 2021

The King Reigns — Doug Koenig Wins His 19th Bianchi Cup

Doug Koenig Bianchi Cup 2021 19th championship champion

Doug Koenig Bianchi Cup 2021 19th championship championKoenig Triumphs for 19th Time
Team Ruger Captain Doug Koenig has just won the Bianchi Cup (NRA Action Pistol Championship) for the 19th time in his career. That is a remarkable accomplishment, as the the Bianchi Cup is considered by many to be the most unforgiving and difficult pistol competition on the planet. This legendary competition draws the top pistoleros from around the world. The Bianchi is Tough — for a chance to win overall, you basically have to “shoot clean”, with perfect stages.

Koenig won the Open Division and finished First Overall, capturing the title with a final 1920-182 Aggregate — truly impressive. Koenig took the win shooting a Ruger Custom Shop SR1911 Competition pistol. This championship was held at the Green Valley Rifle & Pistol Club in Hallsville, MO.

Koenig nailed perfect scores of 480 on all four Bianchi Cup events: Practical, Barricade, Moving Target and Falling Plates. That quadruple perfect performance earned Koenig an Aggregate score of 1920. In addition he completed the match with 182 total X-Ring hits, six more than the nearest competitor. By the way, Koenig (aka König) means “King” in the German language. There is no question that Koenig is King of the Bianchi Cup.

“Winning the Bianchi Cup title for the 19th time in my career is very special on its own,” said Koenig. “But to do so after the difficult year we’ve all faced, and to do so wearing a Team Ruger jersey, has made this win that much more meaningful for me.”

What skills does it take to win a Bianchi Cup? You need speed, accuracy, control, and discipline. Koenig explains some of these techniques in these two videos below. You’ll find 30 more Doug Koenig Videos on the NSSF YouTube Channel:

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June 3rd, 2021

Kelly McMillan Has Passed — Sad News for the Shooting World

Kelly McMillan RIP memoriam obituary passing McM Fiberglass stocks

In Memoriam: Kelly McMillan, 1954-2021
Kelly McMillan has left the range. He passed away on June 1, 2021 from rapid, unexpected medical issues. This is a great loss for the shooting community. Kelly was a major figure in the shooting sports world, one of the greatest supporters of competitive shooting and rifle Team USA. Kelly was the son of Gale McMillan, founder of McMillan Fiberglass Stocks. Kelly was the driving force behind McMillan Stocks for decades, but had sold the company earlier this year.

Kelly McMillan RIP memoriam obituary passing McM Fiberglass stocks

Kelly’s successors at McMillan Fiberglass Stocks posted: “It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Kelly McMillan. Kelly spent most of his life putting his unique mark on the firearms industry. His influence and efforts expanded beyond the famed McMillan Stocks…. We are forever grateful to Kelly for what he built. We are grateful that he poured his heart into his many interests. We will celebrate his legacy and see that his lifelong pursuits will continue to grow. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family during this difficult time.”

Kelly McMillan RIP memoriam obituary passing McM Fiberglass stocks

Anyone who ever interacted with Kelly knew him as a strong, forthright, ethical, and generous man. He gave so much back to the shooting community — through sponsorships, by providing stocks to shooters, and by helping shooting teams.

This Editor can also say that AccurateShooter.com owes a debt of gratitude to Kelly. His company was one of the very first sponsors of this site when we started as 6mmBR.com 17 years ago. As he supported us, he also helped many notable shooters such as Derek Rodgers (F-Class World Champion, 2017 K02M Champion), and Paul Phillips, the 2019 K02M Champion. On learning of Kelly’s death, Paul Phillips posted:

“I have no words to express how saddened I am today. We lost an icon in the shooting industry. Kelly McMillan was not only a great friend but the most generous and giving man I knew in the industry. There is not enough space to write about everything he did for competitive shooters, military snipers, hunters, and shooting enthusiasts.

You were one-of-a-kind Kelly and I will forever remember your friendship and how big an advocate you were for shooting sports. RIP my friend. Prayers go out to Kelly’s family for this tragic loss.”

Kelly McMillan RIP memoriam obituary passing McM Fiberglass stocks
Kelly’s Wall of Honor in Phoenix proudly displayed McMillan-stocked rifles used by U.S. Military marksmen.

Kelly McMillan RIP memoriam obituary passing McM Fiberglass stocks
Kelly was also an avid hunter. Here he is with Derek Rodgers (left) and Paul Phillips (center).

Derek Rodgers wrote of his friend and hunting partner: “It is difficult to tell you how deeply saddened I feel about the loss of Kelly. What started as a shooting relationship quickly became a close friendship so many years ago. It was a privilege to know Kelly on a personal level and I will never forget his generous, caring nature and the never-ending kindness he had for others. My heart goes out to his family and he will forever be missed.”

Members of the Shooting Sports Industry Remember Kelly

“We mourn the passing of an icon in the precision rifle community. Rest in Peace Kelly.” — G.A. Precision

“Every man’s heart one day beats its final beat…. The shooting industry lost a legend today. You were a critical piece to the Marine Corps Sniper Program and the shooting community. Kelly McMillan, you will be greatly missed and your legacy will continue.” — Bravo Delta

“Kelly did a lot of things in the sport that were not profit driven. He was a real force in where we are today. He will be missed.” — Wheeler Accuracy

“Dad, Grandpa, Husband, Businessman. Pioneer in the firearms industry for over 30 years. Advancing and pushing the limits of composite rifle stocks. Avid supporter of the NRA, NSSF, and Youth Shooting Sports. The industry has lost a Titan. You will be missed.” — Grayboe

“We lost a great man in the shooting industry. Thank you Kelly McMillan for imparting your leadership, friendship and knowledge to the shooting community.” — Sheila Miles

Kelly McMillan RIP memoriam obituary passing McM Fiberglass stocks
Kelly (left) with 2016 K02M Winner Mitchell Fitzpatrick, and team-mates Paul Phillips and Bryan Litz

Kelly McMillan RIP memoriam obituary passing McM Fiberglass stocks
Kelly (far left) with F-Class Team USA.

Kelly McMillan RIP memoriam obituary passing McM Fiberglass stocks

Remembering Kelly McMillan — How He Helped Shooters
by David Joe, Texas
Kelly McMillan often proudly referred to his father Gale McMillan’s early pioneering work in fiberglass stock production. He assumed that family mantle and moved it forward, for very much of his life, with an energy and dedication few sons match. Kelly was part of a real American family business success story…

He was especially proud of the military’s adoption and deployment of several McMillan stock models. He described to me once how he, himself, was the one who mixed the green camo colors for those early military stocks. I could tell that Kelly really loved stock building for competitions. I think those were his proving grounds for new ideas, but more importantly, his people — the competitors he supported.

Kelly McMillan RIP memoriam obituary passing McM Fiberglass stocks
Kelly with F-TR World and past USA Champion Derek Rodgers and Nightforce’s Sean Murphy.

Kelly enthusiastically and generously helped a large number of F-Class teams, ELR teams, and individuals. I recall dinner in 2018 in Raton with Kelly and some 40 grateful members of teams, including the team my young daughter was on. Kelly was the honoree, but he picked up dinner and then defrayed costs for the teams — what a gentleman. Kelly treated people really well, and that leaves such a lasting impression.

Kelly McMillan RIP memoriam obituary passing McM Fiberglass stocks
Kelly was an original sponsor of the first All-Women F-class Team, X-It Strategy. That was just one example of the many teams he sponsored.

Kelly McMillan RIP memoriam obituary passing McM Fiberglass stocks

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June 3rd, 2021

Match Etiquette: Be Prepared, Know the Rules and Course of Fire

Match Etiquette USAMU Course of Fire Rules SFC Norman Anderson CMP Rulebook NRA

Match Etiquette USAMU Course of Fire Rules SFC Norman Anderson CMP Rulebook NRA

Don’t Be “That Guy” (The Bad Apple on the Firing Line)

By SFC Norman Anderson, USAMU Service Rifle Team Member
You know the guy, he’s still talking at the coffee jug when his preparation period begins, then his magazines aren’t loaded when the command “STAND” is given, and finally, he doesn’t know the rules when he argues with the block officer as his target comes up marked “9 and No”. Although this guy might be the highlight of the “after match” activities, he is the proverbial bad apple on the firing line. With this example fresh in your mind, let’s go over how not to be “that guy”.

While the sport of High Power shooting is a hobby for most, all are passionate about performance throughout the day. In order to achieve your maximum performance each and every day, it is essential that you conduct yourself as a professional competitor. As a competitor, you have a personal responsibility to know the course of fire as well as the rules and procedures that apply to it and to be prepared to follow them. Knowing this will not only make you a better competitor, but it will enable you to resolve situations with other targets besides your own. So what does all this mean? I’ll explain…

Know the Course of Fire
Know the course of fire. It sounds easy enough, as we all shoot plenty of matches, but it’s more than that. If you think about it, how many people in the pits, for example, do not really know what is happening on the firing line? This leads to targets being pulled early during a rapid fire string or missing a shot during a slow fire string. In cases like this, the result is the same, delays in the match and upset competitors. To avoid being “that guy,” it is imperative that you stay tuned to the events as the day progresses. When you are at the range shooting a match, be at the range shooting the match.

At any firearms competition — be sure you know (and understand) the course of fire.
CMP Match Etiquette

Match Etiquette USAMU Course of Fire Rules SFC Norman Anderson CMP Rulebook NRAKnow the Rules
Now, let’s discuss rules. As you have probably heard more than once, the rulebook is your best friend. Here is why. I can virtually guarantee that most competitors know some of the rules based only on the old “this is how we do it at home” adage. The funny part of that is, the same green NRA rulebook and orange CMP rulebooks are used to govern High Power matches all over the country.*

It is vital that all shooters be familiar with the rules as they are written, not with “how they are applied at home”. This creates consistency and continuity in how matches are conducted, from local club matches to state tournaments to National Championships. Knowledge is power when it comes to scoring targets under contention, what to do in the case of a malfunction, or even how to file a protest correctly. These rules are in place for a reason and it benefits everyone to both know and operate by these rules.

Maintain Composure and Humility — Exhibit Good Sportsmanship
One aspect of competing that cannot be forgotten is bearing. As I mentioned earlier, you must be prepared for both good and bad to happen. All too often we all see “that guy” (or that “that guy’s” gear) flying off of the firing line in disgust. Remember that we all must maintain our composure and humility in all conditions, not matter what happens. After all, it’s just a game. To put it into perspective, if it were easy, attendance would be a lot higher. Sportsmanship must be displayed in an effort to keep from ruining the day for all those around you. It doesn’t cost anything to smile, and smiling never killed anyone. So turn that frown upside down and keep on marching, better days will come.

Like a Boy Scout — Always Be Prepared
Lastly, I would like to cover preparedness. Being prepared goes beyond simply having your magazines loaded and a zero on your rifle. It means approaching the firing line, knowing what you are about to do, being ready for what is going to happen (good or bad), and being ready for the results. If you approach the firing line to merely shoot 10 shots standing in your next LEG match, you are not going to be pleased with the result. You must be prepared mentally and physically, not only for the next stage, but also the next shot. By being prepared physically (equipment ready), you give yourself peace of mind which is an essential part of being prepared mentally, and by being prepared mentally, you are less likely to become distracted and are more likely to maintain focus for each and every shot.

Conclusion — Informed Competitors Make for Better Matches
The culmination of these efforts results in a shooter that knows how to be ready for success on the range, but also and perhaps more importantly, a shooter who knows what it means to be a competitor. When you have a range full of competitors who know and follow the rules and proper match procedures, the match runs smoothly, everyone shoots well, and a good time is had by all. In the end, isn’t that what it’s all about?


* After this article was originally written, the CMP separated its rules into multiple Rulebooks:

The 2020-21 8th Edition of the CMP Games Rifle and Pistol Competition Rules for CMP-sanctioned matches for As-Issued Military Rifle and Pistol events including Special M9 and M16 EIC Matches, and Service Pistol, and Rimfire Sporter.

The 2020-21 24th Edition CMP Highpower Competition Rules for CMP-sponsored and sanctioned matches for Highpower Rifle events in National Trophy Matches, Excellence-In-Competition (EIC) Matches, CMP Cup Matches and other CMP-sanctioned competitions.

The 2020-21 24th Edition CMP Pistol Competition Rules for CMP-sponsored and sanctioned Pistol Matches in the National Matches, National Trophy Matches, Excellence-In-Competition (EIC) Matches, and other CMP-sanctioned competitions.

This article by SFC Norman Anderson originally appeared in the CMP First Shot Online Magazine.

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