May 25th, 2021

DIY DownUnder — Aussie Builds Rail Gun Including Action

Australia Benchrest Bulletin

We know some guys who make their own stocks, and others who do their own chambering. But consider this, Robert Carnell of Australia built his own state-of-the-art, water-cooled, tension-barrel Rail Gun, even including the action. That’s right, Robert designed and crafted his own precision action. This has got to be the ultimate home gunsmithing, do-it-yourself (DIY) project.

Carnell is an accomplished benchrest shooter and past Australian Sporter Class Champion. In 1993 he won a Silver Medal at the World Championships. But Carnell is far more than an ace trigger-puller. Robert is a skilled and creative “home gunsmith” who has crafted his own custom action and built his own railguns from scratch. Robert also runs the Austrialian Benchrest Bulletin website.

Home-Built Rail Gun — Aussie Innovation
Below are photos of one of Rob Carnell’s most amazing builds. This liquid-cooled, tension-barrel rail gun is a great example of self-reliant Aussie engineering. The barrel runs inside a coolent-filled, large-diameter sleeve, much like an old water-cooled machine gun. This is the fourth rail gun that Rob built, and the second fitted with a tensioned barrel.

Australia Benchrest Bulletin

Robert explains: “My railgun design has a 1.75″ barrel under tension inside an aluminium tube filled with radiator coolant. There is nearly a gallon of coolant, and the barrel stays cool no matter how many shots I seem to fire, or how quickly they are shot. The brass nut on the front rides on a nylon bearing and can be tightened to get the best accuracy. I am a believer in the ‘tuner’ idea and this seems to work for me. The main tube is thick-walled aluminium 600mm (24″) long. There is a flange at both ends. The flange at the back fits onto the barrel before the action is screwed on. The front flange is a press-fit into the tube, then there is a brass nut that fits over the barrel and screws against a nylon washer on the front flange. The Railgun’s base is aluminium and has the standard adjustments — windage, elevation and a sighter cam. In addition, there is a 1/10 thou dial indicator for windage. This allows me to zero the indicator and shoot my group. If I need to add a bit of windage for a condition, I can quickly get back to the original position if my condition comes back.”

Home-Built Action Uses Rem Bolt
Rob’s rail gun uses his own home-made stainless action, which features Panda-spec threads and a modified Remington 700 aftermarket bolt. Not bad for a do-it-yourself project we’d say! CLICK HERE to read how Rob designed and built the action.

Australia Benchrest Bulletin

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December 6th, 2020

Sunday GunDay: .300 WSM F-Open Rig from Australia

Australia F-Class F-Open .300 WSM Win Short Mag sunday Gunday

Today’s featured rifle comes from the land Down-Under — Australia. This impressive .300 WSM F-Open rig has top-tier components/accessories from multiple countries. From the USA comes the Borden BRMXD action, Krieger barrel, McMillan Kestros ZR stock, and R.A.D. 2 recoil system. The 10-60x56mm March scope comes from Japan. The Lenzi rear bag is from Italy, and the SEB front rest is from Indonesia, with a Rodzilla top from America. This rifle is brand new, and just had its first competitive test this weekend, emerging with the top 600m Aggregate. By all indication, this .300 WSM F-Open beast is a winner.

Australia F-Class F-Open .300 WSM Win Short Mag sunday Gunday

Impressive .300 WSM F-Open Rifle from Australia

This rifle belongs to Kris Wilson, aka “Willow” on our AccurateShooter Forum. Just last week Kris posted in the Pride and Joy Rifle thread: “Got my latest build up and running — a .300 WSM F-Open rifle. Never shot a .300 WSM (Winchester Short Magnum) before today and I have to say that, while the recoil is on the sharp side, it’s entirely manageable thanks to the stock design and front rest.” Kris resides in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia and shoots at the Hornsby RSL Rifle Club. He is his club’s current F-Open Champion, even with some very tough competition — his club boasts two Australian F-Open championship-winning club members. Kris loves the F-Class game: “I started rifle shooting in 2015 when I was introduced to the world of F-class through shopping for a riflescope. Once I saw what F-class was all about, I was hooked.”

Kris produced this video on December 5, 2020. He reports: “Here is my first real outing with my new .300 WSM. I had previously sighted in at 50 meters at an indoor range to establish a wind zero. Had a rough idea of velocity so I threw together two loads to run at 600 meters. Our Aussie targets have a max numerical ring value of 6 (equivalent to “10” on USA targets). On Stage One I shot a 60.8X (60.10X max possible), grouping about 3.7 inches. On Stage Two, shown in this video, I shot a a 66.9X (66.11X max possible) with a 3-inch grouping. I took first place in both stages and won the overall Aggregate for the day. That earned me a Christmas ham and turkey for my trouble!”

Australia F-Class F-Open .300 WSM Win Short Mag sunday Gunday

.300 WSM Rifle Hardware, Cartridge Choice, and Reloading

Report by Kris Wilson, NSW, Australia

Stock: McMillan Kestros ZR with R.A.D. 2 system. 70% black, 15% grey, 15% red.
Action: Borden Rimrock BRMXD, left bolt, right port, left eject. The action is fully DLC coated and fitted with a +20 MOA rail
Trigger: TriggerTech Diamond
Barrel: Krieger 1:10″-twist, 4 groove finished at 31″ and fitted with an Ezell tuner.
Scope: March High Master 10-60x56mm with MTR-1 reticle, illuminated
Rings: ARC M10 High Rings
Front Rest: SEB Mini Rest, with Rodzilla Rest Top system
Rest Feet: Bryan Blake (F-Class Products) adjustable stainless feet
Rear Support: Lenzi (Italy) LR Rear bag, with custom metal base plate

Cartridge Selection — Why the .300 WSM Was Chosen over a 7mm Cartridge
I set out with the goal of building my ultimate F-Open rifle. Now “ultimate” is of course subjective, but I did not want to leave any stone unturned when it came to building a .300 WSM. When researching the equipment for my new build I had a couple of ideas in mind. I was already shooting a 7mm, in the form of a 280AI which had served me well, but I already had plans to switch to a .284 Shehane with the introduction of Peterson .284 Win brass, coupled with the fact Norma stopped making 280AI brass (Note: Peterson now makes 280AI brass). While I was reasonably well-covered with my .284 Shehane, I wanted something with a bit more horsepower to hold up at long range in choppy conditions. A lot of the top guys here shoot 7mm SAUMs but I wasn’t keen on going down that path. Why? For every accurate SAUM I’ve seen, I’ve seen others struggle and given that the 7mm SAUM seems to be particularly hard on barrels, I wanted something that could match the 7mm SAUM ballistically, but have better barrel life.

Australia F-Class F-Open .300 WSM Win Short Mag sunday Gunday

After plenty of research on AccurateShooter.com, and speaking with some shooters, both locally and in the USA, I decided to give the .300 WSM a go. This cartridge is not particularly popular in Australia for F-Open, primarily because most states enforce muzzle energy restrictions, so pushing the .300 WSM to its potential simply isn’t viable for many shooters here. It IS viable in my home state however, along with the ACT, so I can at least use it in major competitions in two Australian states without having to run at lower nodes where it would otherwise be trumped by the 7 SAUM shooters. I was also attracted to the cartridge through its general design, having a 35-degree shoulder angle similar to the inherently accurate .284 Winchester. I also think the .300 WSM resembles a super-sized Dasher, another devastatingly accurate cartridge. Most .300 WSM shooters report ease of tuning, another key factor I considered.

Australia F-Class F-Open .300 WSM Win Short Mag sunday Gunday

Choice of Stock, Action, and Barrel
My gunsmith, Matt Paroz (aka MattP on the AccurateShooter Forum) is one of Australia’s top gunsmiths as well as one of Australia’s top F-Open shooters. He knows what it takes to build match-winning rifles. Matt is also an agent for McMillan stocks and I was sold on the Kestros ZR after seeing how it well it tracked — the lower center of gravity it offers cannot be underestimated once you start stepping up in caliber size. I had previously seen a couple of rifles that Matt built for an Australian F-Open team member and I was blown away not only by the quality of the builds, but how well the components worked with one another. I already own a Barnard action, a match-winning action in its own right, but I was desperate to get my hands on a Borden. I liked the fact that Jim Borden times his actions as they leave his factory, so I ordered a BRMXD, left bolt, right port, left eject. I ordered my BRMXD fully DLC-coated, for both longevity and aesthetics.

Australia F-Class F-Open .300 WSM Win Short Mag sunday Gunday

I opted for a TriggerTech Diamond trigger which has been timed to the action and offers a level of crispness the factory Barnard trigger cannot replicate. The synergy between action and trigger is just superb. I managed to get my hands on a 10-twist, 4-groove Krieger barrel that looks like a winner so far. Finished at 31″, this barrel has been super-easy to tune so far, with Berger 215gr hybrids showing very good promise. NOTE — Overall the rifle comes in 500 grams (1.1 lbs.) below F-Open max weight, so the next barrel will probably finish at 32″.

The barrel sports an Ezell tuner. I don’t touch the tuner until I’ve sorted my load and bullet seating depth. The tuner just affords me that extra flexibility in tightening up an already good grouping. At the end of the day, like any competitive shooter, I’m chasing tight vertical and horizontal, something which will run inside 1 MOA at 1000 yards. If I drop a shot, I want it to be my fault, not the rifle’s.

Australia F-Class F-Open .300 WSM Win Short Mag sunday Gunday

About my optics choice — when the chance to own a March High Master came up, I didn’t think twice. I have used March previously and got a sneak peek through an original High Master prototype which was doing the rounds in Australia. With superb image quality, it left a lasting impression. March has built up an excellent following and reputation in Australia, and so far I have to say it was money well spent. The March is held in place with a set of beefy ARC M10 rings.

Australia F-Class F-Open .300 WSM Win Short Mag sunday Gunday

The rest of my F-Open setup includes a modified SEB Mini up front, with a Rodzilla Rest top and Bryan Blake adjustable feet. I chose the SEB Mini because it has a wide, stable footprint but relatively light weight. That makes the Mini easier to transport. At the rear I use an extremely well-crafted Lenzi LR bag which sits on a custom rear plate. This heavy combination keeps things nice and planted. That aids in straight tracking.

Reloading for the .300 WSM — Process and Die Choice
When it comes to reloading, I keep it simple and don’t over-think things. I use Norma .300 WSM brass. I ensure case mouths are always deburred on the inside and out but I do not neck turn. I am set up to turn necks with a 21st Century unit, but after neck turning previously for a 6mm SLR, I just didn’t see a noticeable benefit in doing so. I always full length re-size after firing and prefer bushings, generally opting for .002″ of neck tension on anything I shoot. So far it seems to be working. With my .300 WSM I run a Redding Type-S full-length bushing die with a .335 bushing. A loaded round comes in at 0.337″ across the neck and I opted for a no-neck turn reamer which comes in at 0.343″, so there’s plenty of clearance. I use a Forster micrometer seating die. I prefer the feel of the Forster and I use Redding dry lube media to assist in smooth bullet seating.

Australia F-Class F-Open .300 WSM Win Short Mag sunday Gunday
Reloading room with MEC single-stage press on left and AutoTrickler with Force Restoration Scale on right. Note there are plenty of bullets — Kris got his supplies before the shortage.

I use an AMP Annealer and anneal after every firing. Powder charges are measured and dropped with a V3 AutoTrickler and A&D FZ500i scale. The 215gr Berger Hybrid seemed like a pretty good place to start as far as bullet selection. I point them with a Whidden bullet pointing die. Powder options can sometimes be a contentious choice and if you’re lucky you’ll get a couple of powders which will work well in any given barrel. For my .300 WSM I use Alliant Reloder 23. It is very temp-stable. My primer of choice is S&B Standard Large Rifle Primers. How does it all come together? The first nine shots through the barrel while zeroing the scope resulted in an ES of 17 and SD of 6 — promising signs for a light initial load of 63 grains.

Australia F-Class F-Open .300 WSM Win Short Mag sunday Gunday

First Test in Competition — Kris Earns Victory at 600m with his .300 WSM
The first real test came after only 19 rounds had gone down the barrel. My local range and district had its annual Christmas shoot with Christmas hams and turkeys awarded to discipline winners. I was up against a decent field with two members from the Australian F-Open team running against me — one sporting a .284 Win and the other a 7mm SAUM. I ran two different loads using Reloder 23. I was hoping to be in the vicinity of 2920 fps with my pointed Berger 215gr hybrids. What made this a bit harder was not being able to run my LabRadar prior to the shoot. Based on user comments on the 215gr hybrids, I jumped them 20 thousandths, hoping they would hold together and not end up with a shotgun grouping on target.

My first sighting shot at 600 meters was a 4 which landed high, but windage was good. I wound down 1 MOA and the second sighter was a 5. My first scoring shot was an X. I proceeded to shoot clean, scoring a 60.8X (100.8X on a USA target), with the group measuring 3.7 inches. Quite a good start for shots 20-31 through the barrel! For Stage 2, we were only allowed one sighter with 11 shots to count (66.11 max possible). I knew my second load was a touch higher so I came down several clicks, and my first sighter was an X. This second stage load grouped tighter, shooting clean again with a 66.9X, with 11 shots in 3 inches. That was good enough to take first place in both stages and win the overall Aggregate for the day. See HEXTA target screen capture below. American readers take note — a SIX in Australia is the same as a TEN in your USA system.

Australia F-Class F-Open .300 WSM Win Short Mag sunday Gunday

Suffice to say I was very pleased with how things turned out! Despite the bigger bang this rifle makes, the Kestros ZR and R.A.D. 2 system made it remarkably compliant. The recoil is sharp but the R.A.D. system just takes all the sting out of it — it reminded me of shooting my old 280AI in terms of felt recoil. I was able to get back on target with a minimum of fuss and didn’t find the rifle fatiguing at all, so it gets a massive thumbs up from me. This just illustrates how important component selection and rifle set-up is to the overall experience. Going home with a Christmas ham and Turkey was an added bonus!

CONCLUSION — The .300 WSM is Very Effective for F-Open
With recent trends in F-Open equipment, such as rifle stock technology making a lower center of gravity possible, bigger F-Open options such as the .300 WSM are now quite manageable. That’s not to say this caliber is a pussy cat — it definitely kicks more than the .284s out there. But with my choice of components, the recoil is manageable and the R.A.D. 2 system takes the sting out, so I’m not left nursing a sore shoulder at the end of a stage. The rifle is off to a very positive start so far but I know it’s capable of more. The lead up to Christmas will keep me busy fine-tuning a load in time for the NSW State Title match to be held in late January 2021. With COVID-19 halting most competitive shooting in Australia in 2020, this 2021 NSW competition is sure to prove popular. I intend to have my .300 WSM rifle humming in time for it.

Kris Wilson (NSW, Australia) Talks About Competitive Shooting
When I was introduced to F-Class shooting, I was fascinated with the level of accuracy shooters were obtaining with their rifles and it was something that just drew me in. Since then it has been a gradual learning curve, not to mention the fact everyone I have met has been super friendly and willing to share their knowledge. The shooting fraternity is a great community to be part of…. Mixing it with Australia’s best is what drives me right now.

For the past two years I have taken competition more seriously as I hope to represent Australia in the future. In my first Nationals match in 2019, I finished 15th out of 30 F-Open shooters. I then finished 7th in the 2019 NSW State Championships, with every shooter above me having been a state or national championship winner, including current F-Open world champion Rod Davies. 2020 has been different due to COVID-19 — unfortunately many of Australia’s state championships and prize shoots were cancelled. But I’ve been working hard to maintain my skills and the new rifle is motivation. As reloading equipment and rifle components continue to improve, it’s a great sport which encourages learning and provides many opportunities to keep improving your shooting.

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March 15th, 2020

Sunday GunDay: Twin 30 BR Score Rigs — Thunder Down-Under

30BR Hunter Class Rifle
This story, from our Gun of the Week Archives, offers a good intro to the 30 BR cartridge, which is still the leading chambering for short-range Score Benchrest.

What’s better than one custom-built 30 BR with gorgeous wood and top-shelf components? A matching pair of course. Just ask Australian shooter Greg Roche (“Caduceus” in our Forum). A decade ago, Greg spent two years living and working in the USA. While in America, he commissioned two matched custom rifles to bring back to Australia for Hunter Class BR matches. Though the look-alike rigs are both chambered in 30 BR, one is designed for the Australian “Traditional” centerfire Hunter Class (10-lb limit), while the other is purpose-built for the “Custom” centerfire Hunter Class (14-lb limit). The 10-lb Traditional rifle features a fully-functioning two-round magazine and a 6-power scope. In contrast the Custom Class rifle is a single-shot action, with a 45X Leupold scope. The Custom weighs 13.5 pounds so it can also be used in traditional Heavy Varmint Benchrest matches if desired.

30BR Hunter Class Rifle

Tale of Two Rifles
Story and Photos by Greg Roche (“Caduceus”)

The USA boasts some of the finest precision rifle-builders and Benchrest parts suppliers in the world. Before returning to Australia after two years in the States, I decided to have two special BR rifles built using American components and skilled labor. I wanted a matched pair — twin guns that would be as handsome as they were accurate. The heavier gun of the pair, the 13.5-lb Custom Class rifle, features top-of-the-line (but well-proven) technologies and components. With the 10.5-lb Traditional Class rifle, we had to develop new solutions to allow the 30 BR cartridge to feed from a functional two-round magazine. Here is my saga of how my twin 30 BRs were conceived and built, and how they have performed in competition.

30BR Hunter Class Rifle

BACKGROUND — The 30 BR for Score Competition

The 30 BR is a wildcat cartridge based on a necked-up version of the 6mmBR Norma case. It originated in U.S. Benchrest circles where it found its niche in Varmint For Score (VFS) matches. Unlike traditional Benchrest, where group size determines the winner, VFS matches are shot on a target with multiple, concentric-ringed bullseyes. Point total is based on “best edge” shot location (one shot per bull). In score competition, the 30 BR’s “supersized” .308-diameter hole offers an advantage over the 6mm hole created by a 6 PPC, the dominant group BR chambering.

30 BR cartridge

The starting point for loading the 30 BR wildcat is Lapua 6mmBR brass. These are necked up as a single-step operation using a .30 caliber tapered expander ball (or dedicated expander mandrel). This will leave a bulge in the neck, so the expanded case neck is normally turned to bring the thickness down to the correct dimension for the chamber. I turned these necks down to .010″ wall thickness using a Stiller neck-turning tool. It features an eccentric mandrel similar to the Nielson “Pumpkin”. Loaded rounds measure .328″ neck diameter. This gives minimum clearance in my .330″ neck chamber, so very little neck resizing is needed after firing. Cases are trimmed to 1.500″ prior to turning to ensure consistency since the Stiller tool indexes the length of cut off the case mouth. Other than that, cases are just chamfered, loaded and made ready to shoot. No special fire-forming is required.

17-Twist Barrels for Both Rifles
Texan gunsmith Mike Bryant chambered both barrels. Mike also polished both barrels to a high-gloss to match the receivers. In this game, barrels are consumables, much like powder and primers, so most owners wouldn’t bother to polish their barrels. However a 30 BR barrel can provide up to 5000 rounds of accurate life (unlike a 6PPC barrel which might be tossed after 800-1000 rounds.) So, these barrels are likely to be on the rifles for many seasons. Given the high-gloss finish of the Grizzly actions and the beauty of the Red Cedar stocks, it would have been an injustice to leave a dull finish on the barrels.

The chambers were both cut with the same reamer supplied by Dave Kiff of Pacific Tool and Gauge. Randy Robinett, one of the originators of the 30 BR wildcat, specified the reamer dimensions. Randy’s 118gr, 10-ogive custom BIB bullets and the 30 BR cartridge enjoy a winning track record in the USA. The 30 BR Robinette reamer has zero free-bore and a .330″ neck, and is optimized for the BIB 118s. The bullets perform best when seated far enough out to jam firmly into the rifling as the bolt is closed. The long ogive means the bullet’s bearing surface is very short.

Slow Twists for Maximum Accuracy
You may note the unusually slow twist rate of both barrels. In most .30-caliber chamberings, the barrel twist rate is 1:11 or 1:12 to stabilize 150gr to 200gr bullets. The 30 BR is optimized for 115gr to 118gr flat-base bullets and 1:17 provides sufficient stability at muzzle velocities around 2900-3000 fps. In competitive Benchrest, where every thousandth of an inch counts, over-stabilization of projectiles can hurt accuracy, so “just stable enough” is the goal; hence the 1:17 twist.

Case Forming, Case Prep, and Reloading Methods

Sinclair Neck Micrometer, 30 BR Neck Turning
A Sinclair case neck micrometer indicates neck thickness of 0.010″ after neck turning.

Sinclair Neck Micrometer, 30 BR Neck Turning30 BR dies are readily available from a number of manufacturers. I personally use Wilson neck and seating dies with a Sinclair Arbor press, but Redding and Forster both supply high-quality threaded dies for use in a conventional press. For under $100.00 US, custom full-length dies can be obtained from Hornady and CH Tool & Die by sending them reamer prints or a couple of fired cases. Harrell’s Precision offers “semi-custom” dies. Just send them some fired cases and they select a pre-made CNC-cut die that ideally fits your chamber. You can ask the Harrell brothers for a die that’s tighter at the shoulder or base, or otherwise customized to your preferences.

Load Development and Accuracy Testing
With cases formed and bullets selected, load development is simply a matter of choosing the right primer, powder and charge weight, and loading the most consistent ammunition possible. The Lapua BR cases use a small rifle primer. The choice here was Federal 205 Match primers vs. CCI BR4 Benchrest primers. Some shooters have also had success using CCI 450 Magnum primers but it is very unlikely the small case needs this much spark to light off regular extruded powders. In my case, I selected Federal primers because availability tends to be better in Australia.

The relatively large bore-to-capacity ratio of the 30 BR case means that fast burning powders are the order of the day. Once again, US experience suggests H4198 (the Hodgdon equivalent of ADI AR2207) is the choice of match winners. The fact that H4198/AR2207 is an Australian-made product is an added bonus. So, I loaded up test rounds with AR2207 from 32.5 grains to 35.0 grains in approximately 0.3 grain increments. All bullets were seated to jam +0.010″ into the lands. This places the bullet base about two-thirds of the way down the neck and well short of the neck-shoulder junction.

READ FULL Story on AccurateShooter.com Main Site »

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October 13th, 2019

Sunday GunDay: Seb Succeeds at WARA Match in Australia

SEB Neo Rest Sebastian Lambang Australia WARA Queen match

It’s not often when a gun accessory designer/builder shoots a high-level international competition and finishes on the podium. Well Sebastian (“Seb”) Lambang did just that recently, earning the Silver Medal for finishing second overall (F-TR) at the West Australian Rifle Association (WARA) Queens Prize Meeting at the Pinjar Range in Western Australia. Seb shot in F-TR division, piloting a handsome new .308 Win rifle supplied by Seb’s Aussie friend Jason Mayers, the F-TR Match winner. Here is Seb’s account of his visit to Perth, Australia to shoot the WARA Queens Match. SEE Match Results HERE.

SEB Neo Rest Sebastian Lambang Australia WARA Queen match

WARA Queens Prize Meeting in Western Australia
Report by Sebastian (“Seb”) Lambang
My wife Lily and I arrived in Perth, Australia, on September 23, two days before the competition began. At first, I wanted to attend the Australian Nationals in Brisbane which I have participated in before. I thought that would be bigger and more exciting than the WARA Queens. However, I received a recommendation from Jason Mayers to participate in the Queens instead. I was told that more shooters would come to this match because there would be a State team match and pre-qualification for the World Championship.

SEB Neo Rest Sebastian Lambang Australia WARA Queen match

About the Pinjar Shooting Range in Perth, Australia
The Pinjar shooting range near Perth (on Australia’s West Coast) is excellent both in its facilities and management. Ranging from ample parking space, clean toilets, spacious hall and canteen, wailing walls, water reservoir, very nice electronic targets etc, they have it all. It even offers a special preparation area for fouling shots on the far right side of the range.

SEB Neo Rest Sebastian Lambang Australia WARA Queen match
SEB Neo Rest Sebastian Lambang Australia WARA Queen match

The Target boards downrange are at 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900 meters from right to left. One interesting thing about Pinjar is that all the firing stations are along the same horizontal track. Shooters only need to move sideways to change the shooting distance — e.g. from 300 to 500 or from 600 to 800.

SEB Neo Rest Sebastian Lambang Australia WARA Queen match

Twin Rifles for Seb and F-TR Match Winner Jason Mayers
My rifle is one of the two identical builds put together by Jason Mayers with the help of some local gunsmiths and shooters. This rifle, loaded with moly-coated Berger 200gr Hybrids, shot like a laser.

SEB Neo Rest Sebastian Lambang Australia WARA Queen match
Both Seb and F-TR match winner Jason Mayers used the new, prototype ski-feet on their Joy-pods.

The stock was designed over a period of time with local stock maker Robert Eager based in Goulbourn, NSW, Australia. Jason worked with Bob over several years trialing various shapes until they settled on the design seen in the photos. The stocks are made from Spalted Blackbean wood.

SEB Neo Rest Sebastian Lambang Australia WARA Queen match

For the twin rifles, Barnard actions were chosen and Bartlein 1:10″-twist .308 barrels were fitted to both by Matt Parroz of LRP Solutions. The barrels are chambered for Berger 200gr Hybrids. Both rifles are running moly-coated projectiles. Huntsman Tuners, made in Brisbane, are fitted to both rifles.

Impressive F-TR Second Place for Seb at 2019 WARA Queens Match

SEB Neo Rest Sebastian Lambang Australia WARA Queen match
Here F-TR Silver Medal Winner Seb Lambang (466.22V) stands with F-TR Match Winner Jason Mayers (469.38V). They shot identical .308 Win rifles!

“Thank you my brother Jason Mayers who took care of everything for me, and shared your knowledge[.] Without your help I wouldn’t have been able to place 2nd in the WARA Queens F-TR! Congratulations on your 1st place Jason, it was absolutely outstanding! I am sure this is the toughest and biggest F-TR match in Australia ever held so far … with the best Australian shooters qualifying for the Worlds. Congratulations to all winners in the WARA Queens! See you again next time!” — Seb Lambang

About SEB Products — Coaxial Rests, Joystick Bipods, Accessories

Seb told AccurateShooter: “I always try to make my products better over time, not just keeping them ‘as is’. Quality has and always been my top priority. I am grateful that many friends around the world always willing to help through their input, suggestions, and field testing. I am also grateful for what we have achieved today. Yes there have been some who copied my rests and bipod but people know which one has the best value for them. My thanks to all our loyal customers around the world!”

SEB Neo Rest Sebastian Lambang Australia WARA Queen match

SEB Neo Rest Sebastian Lambang Australia WARA Queen match

SEB Neo Rest Sebastian Lambang Australia WARA Queen match
SEB Max rest set for 1200 yards in Coonabarrabran, Australia (Jenni Hausler photo).

Sebastian Lambang SEB Mini coax coaxial pedestal rest F-Open Vince Bottomley

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January 3rd, 2018

The Whims of the Wind — Slow-Motion Windflag Video


Photo of Aussie Wind Flags courtesy BRT Shooters Supply.

A while back our Aussie friend Stuart Elliot of BRT Shooters Supply recently filmed some interesting videos at the QTS range in Brisbane, Australia. Stuart told us: “I was shooting in an Air Gun Benchrest match here in Brisbane, Australia. I finished my target early and was awaiting the cease fire and took a short, slow-motion video of windflag behavior.” You may be surprised by the velocity changes and angle swings that occur, even over a relatively short distance (just 25 meters from bench to target).

Here are windflags in slow motion:

The flags show in the videos are “Aussie Wind Flags”, developed by Stuart Elliot. These are sold in the USA by Butch Lambert, through Shadetree Engineering.

Here is a video in real time:

Stuart says this video may surprise some shooters who don’t use windflags: “Many people say the wind doesn’t matter. Well it sure does — whether for an airgun at 25 meters or a long range centerfire at 1,000.” This video illustrates how much the wind can change direction and velocity even in a small area.

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August 18th, 2017

F-Class Team Worlds: USA Wins F-TR, Australia Wins F-Open

F-TR F T/R Canada Connaught Ranges F-Class Team World Championship
Photo Credits Laura Perry(top) and Kelly McMillan (bottom)

The 2017 F-Class World Championships wrapped up August 17 with the final day of Team competition. Over the past two days, 8-shooter squads competed in the major international challenge match while 4-shooter teams vied for honor in the Rutland match. Team USA F-TR stole the show with a stirring come-from-behind victory over a very strong Australia F-TR squad. Not to be denied, Aussie F-Open shooters countered America’s F-TR success with a solid win for Australia in the 8-shooter F-Open match. It was Deja Vu… this result was a replay of the 2013 Worlds, where Team USA won the F-TR Team Title, while Team Australia won F-Open.

CLICK HERE for full 2017 F-Class World Championships Team and Individual Results

F-TR World Champions: Team USA, Richardson Trophy — Score: 3400-264V
PERRY, LAURA, AL — 419v31
DROELLE, JOHN, MI — 418v27
BARNHART, ALAN, MI — 433v36
HOGG, TRACY, NC — 424v31
KLEMM, IAN, WI — 426v39
RODGERS, DEREK, NM — 435v39
RORER, JEFFREY, NC — 429v35
POHLABEL, DANIEL, OH — 416v26
GROSS, RAYMOND, MI
HARDIN, CARLTON, GA
PHILLIPS, PAUL, MI
LENTZ, DANIEL, WI
LITZ, BRYAN, MI
FULMER, SCOTT, NY
REEVE, KENT, NC
BOYER, DOUGLAS, MI

F-Open World Champions: Team Australia, Farquharson Trophy — Score: 3511-342V
DAVIES, ROD — 441v45
CARTER, PETER — 437v37
LARSEN, PETER — 442v38
LOBERT, MARTY — 437v43
POHL, ADAM — 440v48
BRAUND, STUART — 431v39
BUNYAN, BRETT — 440v40
NUGENT, TIM — 443v52
MCGOWAN, CRAIG
BRAUND, RICHARD
WAITES, MICHAEL
LAZARUS, STEVE
REID, JOSH
FERRARA, BEN
TILLACK, LOWELL
DOBSON, DAVID

Team USA — Three-time World Champions deliver a come-from-behind win at the 900 meter line.
F-TR F T/R Canada Connaught Ranges F-Class Team World Championship

Along with winning F-Open, the Aussies did well in the 8-man F-TR competition, finishing second overall with a score of 3394-237V, six points behind Team USA F-TR (3400-264V). Third in F-TR was Team South Africa, with 3376-250V.

Rutland F-Class World Championship

Team Canada (3506-346V) finished second in F-Open, while Team USA (F-Open) finished third with the interesting score of 3500-350V (that’s not a misprint). We believe Calvin Waldner of Canada had the top individual F-Open score for the match — 444-51V.

The F-TR Team Battle — It Paid to Wait
The top two F-TR squads, Team USA and Team Australia, followed very different strategies. The Australians got off to a quick start, while the Americans waited… and waited … and waited. Being patient and waiting for more readable and stable wind conditions proved a winning strategy for the Yanks who overcame a 9-point deficit to finish with a six-point margin as time closed down in the firing period.

Team USA Captain Ray Gross reports: “The match came down to the last yard line. The Australians were up 11 points to start the day and the Canadians were 6 points behind. We made up 2 points at 700m and shot even with the Australians at 800m, leaving us 9 points down going into the final 900m stage.

The Aussies chose to start shooting right away in what looked liked easy conditions and we waited, hoping for better. While we waited the team stayed focused and ready. Luck was on our side, it calmed down and the shooters and coaches performed flawlessly, making up the nine points and finally pulling ahead in the last few minutes of the match.

We were the last team on the line shooting and everyone was behind us watching. After two days of very close competition, the match was not decided until our last two shooters. Our last shooter started with only 12 minutes left in the match and he finished his string of 15 shots in about five minutes. He only dropped two points giving us a six point victory.

We were so focused on delivering our best performance that we weren’t sure how the other teams had finished. After the last shot the Australian captain came over and congratulated me. They had been watching our score after they had finished and knew that we had won the match. Our gritty determination had paid off and it had been one of the most exciting matches that I’ve ever been a part of. Everyone on the team should be proud that they did not let our slim chances discourage them going into that last yard line. They stayed focused and each delivered a top performance.”

American F-Open Squads Dominate 4-Shooter Rutland Match

In the F-Open Rutland competition for 4-shooter teams, American squads dominated, taking the top 4 places. Team USA Blue (1758-177V) won the Rutland title, edging Spindle Shooters by a slim one-point margin. In third place was Team USA Red followed by the Texas State Rifle Association team.

Rutland F-Class World Championship

Rutland F-Class World Championship

In F-TR Rutland competition, Team “Da Bulls” secured a very convincing win. Da Bulls’ 1709-131V score was a full 14 points ahead of Team KP Ballistics. This was sort of an American victory… though Da Bulls did have one Canadian “ringer” on the squad, Stephen Ireland of Toronto. Runner-up KP Ballistics was just the opposite — KP had all Canadian members except one Yank, Wade Fillingame of New Hampshire.

Rutland F-Class World Championship
Above Team Da Bulls member James Crofts waives “good-bye” from the Connaught Ranges in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The next F-Class World Championships will be held in South Africa in 2021. ICFRA Web Page for 2021 FCWC.

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April 22nd, 2017

‘Pride and Joy’ Rifles Showcased in Shooters’ Forum


This stunning flame-painted PPC belongs to Chris from Australia. This rifle features a Stiller Viper action, Speedy (Robertson) BRX stock, and Maddco (Australian) 14-twist barrel chambered in 6PPC.

In our Shooters’ Forum you’ll find a thread in which readers can post photos of their “pride and joy” — their favorite rifle. You’ll find a wide range of guns, from “big boomers” to .17-caliber varminters. Here are some of our favorite entries in the “Pride and Joy” Gallery.

The Bear’s Barbed-Wire Barnard

BarryO, aka ‘the Blue-eyed Bear’, posted his beautiful 6mm Dasher, with its unique barbed wire 3D finish. (There’s a story behind that design.) This rifle was smithed by John King in Montana, with stock bedding work by Leo Anderson. The gun features a Barnard ‘P’ action (with trigger), and 28″ Broughton 5C fluted barrel with VAIS muzzle brake. The Barnard sits in a Tom Manners carbon fiber BR stock decorated with amazing graphics by Mad Shadow Custom Paint.

Sebastian’s Radical Swallowtail 6PPC

Sebastian Lambang is the designer and builder of SEB Coaxial Rests. He’s a smart, creative guy, so you knew when he designed a short-range benchrest stock it would be something special. It needed to be lightweight, yet very rigid. Using “out of the box” thinking, Seb employs a truss-style structure to provide great strength with minimal weight. The rear section is equally radical. There are two splayed “keels” in the rear, forming what this Editor calls a “swallowtail” rear design. Others have called it a “catamaran buttstock.” Below is a side-view of the prototype SEB stock before painting.

Brad’s 6CM Long-Range Match Rifle
Chad Dixon Surgeon 6CM Paint

Chambered in the 6mm Competition match cartridge, this handsome rig features a Surgeon RSR Action, Bartlein Barrel, and LRB stock. Barrel work was done by Chad Dixon at LongRifles, Inc. and paint by AT Custom Painting.

Varmint Special with Figured Walnut Stock
pride joy low boy gray yellow Dasher

Here’s a handsome varminter with a beautifully-figured walnut stock. This is one of three rifles Forum Member Dan Hall posted in the Pride and Joy thread.

A Trio of Pealescent Bench Guns
pride joy blue UK 7mm WSM

DixiePPC served up not one but THREE pretty bench rigs, all with pearlescent paint jobs. We’d be proud to own three eye-catching rifles like that. Click the image to see a full-screen version.

Zebra-Skinned Match Rifle
And here is Mark Walker’s amazing Zebra-skin BR rifle. With that wild-looking paint job, this rifle turns heads whenever Mark brings it to the range…

Anschutz BR rifle

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December 9th, 2016

Ultimate DIY — Aussie Builds his own Action and Rail Gun

Australia Benchrest Bulletin

We know some guys who make their own stocks, and others who do their own chambering. But consider this, Robert Carnell of Australia built his own state-of-the-art, water-cooled, tension-barrel Rail Gun, even including the action. That’s right, Robert even made his own action. Wow, this has to be the ultimate home gunsmithing, do-it-yourself project.

Carnell is an accomplished benchrest shooter and past Australian Sporter Class Champion. In 1993 he won a Silver Medal at the World Championships. But Carnell is far more than an ace trigger-puller. Robert is a skilled and creative “home gunsmith” who has crafted his own custom action and built his own railguns from scratch. Robert also runs the Austrialian Benchrest Bulletin website.

Home-Built Rail Gun — Aussie Innovation
Below are photos of one of Rob Carnell’s most amazing builds. This liquid-cooled, tension-barrel rail gun is a great example of self-reliant Aussie engineering. The barrel runs inside a coolent-filled, large-diameter sleeve, much like an old water-cooled machine gun. This is the fourth rail gun that Rob built, and the second fitted with a tensioned barrel.

Australia Benchrest Bulletin

Robert explains: “My railgun design has a 1.75″ barrel under tension inside an aluminium tube filled with radiator coolant. There is nearly a gallon of coolant, and the barrel stays cool no matter how many shots I seem to fire, or how quickly they are shot. The brass nut on the front rides on a nylon bearing and can be tightened to get the best accuracy. I am a believer in the ‘tuner’ idea and this seems to work for me. The main tube is thick-walled aluminium 600mm (24″) long. There is a flange at both ends. The flange at the back fits onto the barrel before the action is screwed on. The front flange is a press-fit into the tube, then there is a brass nut that fits over the barrel and screws against a nylon washer on the front flange. The Railgun’s base is aluminium and has the standard adjustments — windage, elevation and a sighter cam. In addition, there is a 1/10 thou dial indicator for windage. This allows me to zero the indicator and shoot my group. If I need to add a bit of windage for a condition, I can quickly get back to the original position if my condition comes back.”

Home-Built Action Uses Rem Bolt
Rob’s rail gun uses his own home-made stainless action, which features Panda-spec threads and a modified Remington 700 aftermarket bolt. Not bad for a do-it-yourself project we’d say! CLICK HERE to read how Rob designed and built the action.

Australia Benchrest Bulletin

Permalink Competition, Gunsmithing 4 Comments »
November 18th, 2015

Rebecca Rules — Aussie Lady Dominates Down Under

Rimfire Air rifle benchrest Rebecca Richards Australia

We congratulate Rebecca Richards of Australia for her incredible shooting in the recent RBA Benchrest Grand Prix at the Sydney International Shooting Centre. Consider this, out of the five (5) benchrest classes competing (two air rifle, and three rimfire) Rebecca won four classes outright while placing third in the fifth class. Wow — that represents complete and total domination. Remarkably, Rebecca dropped only 10 points in four days of shooting.

Rebecca’s amazing 4-day performance was near perfection. Overall, she scored 2740 out of a total of 2750 possible points. She shot four of 11 targets with perfect 250/250 scores, and six more with 249/250. Over the course of the event she hit 152 “dots” (center bulls) out of a total possible 275. That’s pretty amazing if you understand how small those center bulls really are. Take a look at the target photo below — the center dot is tiny.

Rimfire Air rifle benchrest Rebecca Richards Australia

All in all, this was a performance for the ages — one of the best combined airgun/rimfire benchrest performances in Southern Hemisphere history. Kudos to Rebecca for her brilliant performance.

Here’s the modern Sydney International Shooting Centre…
Rimfire Air rifle benchrest Rebecca Richards Australia

Now THAT’s a Shooting Range… CLICK HERE for Slide Show.
Rimfire Air rifle benchrest Rebecca Richards Australia

CREDIT: Thanks to March Scopes for providing this story. Rebecca uses many March scopes including a 10-60X, 5-32X, and 40X Benchrest model.

Permalink Competition, News 4 Comments »
September 26th, 2015

USA Wins World Benchrest Championship Amidst Controversy

World Benchrest Championship St. Louis Team USA Russia Accuracy Benchrest Rifle
Benchrest legend Tony Boyer finished fifth overall in the individual standings.

Congratulations to USA Team 2, which won the “battle of the nations” at the World Benchrest Championship. Team 2 members are: Lester Bruno, Wayne Campbell, Larry Costa, and Billy Stevens. Wayne Campbell also won the individual Championship, earning him the title of 2015 World Benchrest Champion. Wayne is now officially the best point-blank benchrester on the planet! We wish to acknowledge all the many competitors, from 24 nations, who attended this prestigious event.

Penalties and DQs
Other USA Teams might have finished in the top five, but there were some major mishaps at this event. USA Team 1 suffered a big penalty because of a 5-shot cross-fire at 200 yards. USA Team 3 was disqualified from the event due to a late shot after the “Cease Fire” command (DQ details below).

Report by Vince Bottomley, Target Shooter Magazine

Here’s how the Teams Match ended up. USA Team 2 finished first, followed by three Australian squads, with Canada Team 1 finishing fifth:

World Benchrest Championship St. Louis Team USA Russia Accuracy Benchrest Rifle1. USA Team 2 – 0.2230 MOA
2. Australia Team 1 – 0.2441
3. Australia Team 3 – 0.2463
4. Australia Team 2 – 0.2635
5. Canada Team 1 – 0.2678

Wayne Campbell Wins WBC with 0.1866 Agg
But who is the individual World Benchrest Champion? That would be American Team member Wayne Campbell — a very popular result. Wayne shot a remarkable 0.1866 MOA Agg over the four-day event, combining 100- and 200-yard LV and HV matches. That shows you how accurate today’s Benchrest rifles can be (and the skill of the top shooters). Here are the top five individuals, all of whom Agg’d under 0.2100:

1. Wayne Campbell (USA) – 0.1866 MOA
2. Gene Bukys (USA) – 0.1973
3. Murray Hicks (Australia) – 0.2062
4. Larry Costa (USA) – 0.2087
5. Tony Boyer (USA) – 0.2095

The USA took four out of the Top Five individual spots. Living legend Tony Boyer proved he’s still got his stuff. Tony finished just .0033 off the podium, which saw Boyer protege Wayne Campbell in 1st place, Gene Bukys in second, and Australian Murray Hicks in third. The best of the two Great Britain Teams finished in 13th spot (out of 24 teams) with a 0.2998 MOA Agg. Top individual Brit was Bruce Lenton in 31st place with a very creditable 0.2666 MOA Agg.

Shooters from 24 nations competed at the 2015 World Benchrest Championship. Here Alexander Skuratov from Russia prepares ammo for a match.
World Benchrest Championship St. Louis Team USA Russia Accuracy Benchrest Rifle


DAY Four (Friday) Match Report
The fabulous St Louis weather was with us again for the last day and this is the first World Championship I can remember that didn’t have rain! Facilities at this fabulous Benchrest range are second to none and the event has run like the proverbial clockwork. That is a credit to the Club and its helpers and officials who have worked tirelessly for two weeks, as of course the NBRSA Nationals preceded the 2015 WBC.

Today, on the final day, Heavy Varmint rifles shot at 200 yards. Winds were again light, except for the odd relay but the top shooters again banged in those itty-bitty groups that the rest of us can only dream about. Just one non-American managed to sneak into the top five:

Friday Results, 200-Yard Heavy Varmint

1. Wayne Campbell (USA) – 0.1866 MOA
2. Gene Bukys (USA) – 0.1973
3. Murray Hicks (Australia) 0.2062
4. Larry Costa (USA) – 0.2087
5. Tony Boyer (USA) – 0.2095

Thursday DQ Drama — Disqualification and Penalty for American Teams
On Thursday, we had drama when one of the three USA Teams suffered a ten-inch penalty but such is the strength of American Benchrest that USA Team 1 members fought themselves back into contention. The ten-inch penalty was given when a USA Team 1 shooter fired all five shots on the wrong target at 200 yards. But, just as things were looking possible for an American 1, 2, 3 sweep, yet more drama occurred with the disqualification of USA Team 3! That’s right, the entire team was DQ’d as the result of a safety breach. Apparently, a USA Team 3 shooter fired AFTER the “Cease fire” command. That serious rule violation caused the disqualification.

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June 3rd, 2015

Wind Flags in Slow Motion — You’ll Be Surprised


Photo of Aussie Wind Flags courtesy BRT Shooters Supply.

Our Aussie friend Stuart Elliot of BRT Shooters Supply recently filmed some interesting videos at the QTS range in Brisbane, Australia. Stuart told us: “I was shooting in an Air Gun Benchrest match here in Brisbane, Australia. I finished my target early and was awaiting the cease fire and took a short, slow-motion video of windflag behavior.” You may be surprised by the velocity changes and angle swings that occur, even over a relatively short distance (just 25 meters from bench to target).

Here are windflags in slow motion:

The flags show in the videos are “Aussie Wind Flags”, developed by Stuart Elliot. These are sold in the USA by Butch Lambert, through Shadetree Engineering.

(more…)

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May 31st, 2015

.300 WM Aussie Style — Most Popular 1000-Yard Benchrest Video

Here’s a true “Blast from the Past”, a video featuring our friend Stuart Elliott of Brisbane, Australia. This 2011 video has now racked up nearly 680,000 views, making it probably the most-watched long-range benchrest video ever uploaded to YouTube. The video shows Stuart shooting a 10-shot Heavy Gun string at the Brisbane range, Queensland, Australia, in July 2011. In this example, Stuart elected to “run a condition” with his big, .300 WM Heavy Gun, shooting fast with slight hold-off adjustments as the wind increased during the string. The cartridge is a .300 Winchester Magnum, loaded with moly-coated 190gr Berger VLDs. Stuart has an unusual bolt configuration. After each shot, Stuart removes the bolt completely with his right hand, and then uses the bolt to “shuck” the fired cartridge while loading the new cartridge with his left hand. That sounds awkward, but Stuart makes it all look easy. Stuart runs BRT Shooters Supply, a leading vendor of precision shooting equipment (including March scopes), in Australia and nearby regions.

Stuart Elliot BRT Shooters 1000 yards 1k benchrest march scope

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August 10th, 2014

Aussie Ben Emms Wins Fullbore Championship at Camp Perry

fullbore nationals

fullbore nationalsBen Emms of Australia won the U.S. Fullbore Championship with an 891-114V score. One point back, Nancy Tompkins finished second, earning the Silver Medal with 890-105V. Michigander Charles Hayes won the F-TR division with 807-34V.

For the “slings and irons” Target Rifle competitors, the individual championship came down to a ten-person Shoot-Off. Americans fared well. Along with Tompkins’ second-place finish, Kelly Bachand placed fifth, Trudie Fay was eighth, Steven Powell finished ninth, and SSG Shane Barnhardt was tenth. Overall, that was a great showing by Americans. This bodes well for the 2015 Fullbore World Championship at Camp Perry.

Today the Fullbore Championships conclude with Palma Team matches. The top shooters are on the firing line, doing their best for their teams and respective countries.

Annette Wachter, aka “30 Cal Gal” offers this report from yesterday: “Here is my Award for most awesome team shirt. Saturday was a crazy morning. I got into position to shoot and there was zero wind. But by the time I took a shot it went to 11 minutes! I Got blown off the target twice. Had to laugh. Nothing I could do. I held great elevation though.”

fullbore nationals

CLICK HERE for Individual National Fullbore Championship Results, with Shoot-Off.

The Fullbore Championship — Down to the Wire

Competitor’s Report from Kelly Bachand, Kelly’s Gun Sales
Well it all turned out pretty darn well. I was in 7th place in the grand aggregate at the beginning of the day. After the first match of the day I dropped to 10th, and after shooting one of the best strings I’ve ever shot in my life I moved up to 3rd! I then shot in the Top 10 Shoot-Off to determine the final standing and I ended up 5th overall. I’m really quite pleased with this result and I feel very blessed.

Click No Bang — You Have to Load the Rifle!
Going into the final string at 1000 yards I felt myself starting to get a little worked up. I stopped and prayed and really worked at calming myself down. I got in position and got ready to shoot, loaded my first round, made my wind call and took the shot. “Click”. It didn’t go off and worse still I jerked the heck out of the trigger. It’s odd that it didn’t go off, but it happens once in a while, I usually just cock the rifle again and the round goes off on the second try. I line up the sights again, “Click”. Yikes! I jerked the trigger again and there must be something wrong with my rifle! I pull the bolt back and check the end cap, it’s not loose, so I go to eject the round to inspect it and I discover that I never loaded the rifle to begin with! That really calmed me down, quite a lot. I was almost laughing at myself on the line.

Reading the Wind
After the embarassing “click no bang” sequence, I picked an indicator — there was a flag almost pointing at me, and I used it to judge the angle changes. I watched other flags and the mirage for velocity changes and I tried my best to break good shots, and it worked. It was as if God helped me break the right shots at the right time. On a number of occasions I took a shot I called on one side or the other and the wind had either picked up or let off in such a way that if I hadn’t shot it exactly where I did then I would have lost points (calling a shot is just guessing where the shot will be based on how it felt and what it looked like when the gun went off). It was awesome. I ended up with a 75-8V, one of only five 75s that were shot on that string. This means that in 10-15 mph crosswinds, from 1000 yards away, with iron sights, and supported by a sling, I kept 15 consecutive shots inside an area less than two feet across with more than half of them in an area less than one foot across.

fullbore nationals Kelly Bachand

The Top 10 Shoot-Off
Since this match is a dress rehearsal for the World Long Range Championships next year there is then a shoot off among the top 10 scoring competitors. Fifteen more shots at 1000 yards and the score from that additional string is added to each shooter’s running total. The overall winner is the one with the most points.

During the Shoot-Off, the wind had picked up a little more, but not much. The biggest challenge I had was that the wind had such a speed that even from prone and with a sling the rifle was no longer steady. Instead the rifle sights were bouncing around as if I was shooting standing. So it was no longer good enough to simply have a good handle on the wind, we now also needed to squeeze the shot off at precisely the right moment. Needless to say some shooters excelled and some did not. Nancy Tompkins impressed everyone present by shooting a 75-7V in these conditions. I had a 70-4V which moved me from 3rd place to 5th place overall.

So I just got 5th place in the U.S. Fullbore Nationals and I’m honestly quite blown away by that result. There were some of the best shooters in the world present. Some of the other countries brought the same shooters who will compete next year in the World Long Range Championships — they were here. This also served as a try-out session for the U.S. Palma Team so many of the best shooters from the USA were present and competing. And then there is me. I’ve shot just two matches this year: a local 1000 yard match back home, and these Nationals. I practiced about half a dozen times and usually at less than 200 yards before coming to Nationals. Yet, despite the many reasons I shouldn’t have done well here, God saw fit to bless me and helped me to shoot very well.

Read Full Report by Kelly Bachand (more details).

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June 4th, 2014

Butterfly Bag from the ‘Place of Loud Thunder’ Down Under

Australian long-range shooter Meichelle K. has customized her gear in a distinctive way. Meichelle hails from a small town called Jimboomba which means “place of loud thunder” in the aboriginal language. Yes indeed, that sounds appropriate for a rifle shooter. We smiled at the “feminine touches” Meichelle applied to her new SEB Bigfoot rear bag. This displays real creativity — and now no one will ever mistake Meichelle’s bag for one belonging to another shooter.

Jimboomba Queensland Australia SEB Rear Bag

Jimboomba Queensland Australia SEB Rear Bag

Meichelle regularly shoots F-Class in Australia. She has traveled extensively to compete in major matches. Here is a photo from one of her favorite ranges in Australia. Looks like a beautiful place to shoot. And we love the printed fabric on the range cart! Kisses from Down Under.

Jimboomba Queensland Australia SEB Rear Bag

Jimboomba — Place of Loud Thunder and Little Rain
Meichelle resides in Jimboomba, a small township located south of Brisbane in Queensland. Jimboomba is named after a sheep and livestock station based where the township is today. The word Jimboomba (originally Gimboomba) is a Gugingin word meaning “place of loud thunder and little rain”. The Gugingin were the first native Australian peoples of this Yugambeh region, now part of Queensland.


View Larger Map

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May 4th, 2014

Aussie Sets Southern Hemisphere 1K Record with Borrowed Rifle

We recently wrote about a spectacular 2.6872″ ten-shot group shot at 1000 yards in Montana. Well Australian Peter Varley recently turned in another amazing group at 1000 yards — this time 2.010″ for FIVE shots. And he did it with a borrowed gun! That’s not the smallest 1K group ever shot on the planet*, but it’s still an Australian and (we believe) a Southern Hemisphere record. Varley shot the 2.010″ group with a borrowed 17-lb Light Gun at a Canberra Rifle Club match in March of this year. Congrats to Peter for his outstanding shooting. And “hats off” to fellow Queenslander John McQuire, who loaned Peter the rifle.

Shown below is Peter Varley with his target, plus a close-up. You’ll note that two of the five (5) shots go through a paster. You’ll find pasters all over these targets because the Canberra Club “recycles” these large 1K targets many times.

Peter Varley 1000 Yards Light Gun Record

Peter Varley 1000 Yards Light Gun Record

Peter reports: This was shot at a 1000-yard match on the Canberra Rifle Range on Sunday, March 9, 2014. I traveled 1300 kilometers (807 miles) from Nambour (Sunshine Coast) Queensland to Canberra in the Australian Capital Territory.

I had left my rifle case keys at the motel and resigned myself to target butts duty or a lazy day. A friend, John McQuire from Mackay (Central Queensland Coast) said: “Get my 6.5 x 47 out, clean up, and you’re in the first detail (relay)”. So it was a borrowed gun for the shoot. The match commenced around 9:00 am. Conditions were very good — winds were very light with no mirage to speak of. Everything fell into place.”

Gun Specifications: Lawton 7500 action with Jewell trigger, PacNor barrel chambered for 6.5×47 Lapua, home-made custom stock, March 10-60x scope

6.5x47L Load: Lapua 123gr Scenars, with CCI 450 primers and Varget (ADI 2208) powder.

Peter Varley 1000 Yards Light Gun Record

*The current NBRSA Light Gun 1000 Yard 5-shot group record is 1.473″ by Bill Schrader in 2002. Tom Sarver is credited with an even smaller 5-shot IBS Light Gun record.

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October 31st, 2013

Report from World Benchrest Championships in Australia

WBC World Benchrest Championships Australia

There was “Thunder Down-Under” last week at the 2013 World Benchrest Championships (WBC 2013) in Australia. The event was held at the Silverdale Range, a 1.5 hour-drive west of Sydney, NSW. This event drew roughly 80 of the world’s best 100/200 yard Benchrest group shooters who competed both individually and on national teams. Squads from Australia, Canada, Finland, Italy, New Zealand, Russia, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the USA vied for WBC team honors. Both Australia and the United States fielded three teams, while New Zealand and South Africa each fielded two squads.

WBC World Benchrest Championships Australia

Conditions were vicious at times, with extremely high winds in a few relays. To show you how tough things were, legendary shooter Tony Boyer had a 1.560″ group during the LV 200-yard match, while Tom Libby shot a shocking 2.280″ group in the same relay. We can’t remember when we’ve ever seen groups like that posted by shooters of this skill level.

In team competition, the strong USA ‘A-Team’ finished first followed by South Africa A (second place) and Australia A (third place). Ed Adams, Tony Boyer, Gene Bukys, and Bob Scarbrough Jr. were the members of the winning USA A-Team.

WBC World Benchrest Championships Australia

In individual competition, Americans finished 1-2-3 in the Two-Gun. Texan Charles Huckeba topped the field, winning the Two-Gun Overall with a 0.2804 Grand Agg. Gene Bukys (0.2863) was second, and Bob Scarbrough Jr. (0.2881) finished third. In fourth place overall was South African Roland Thomsen (0.2919), while New Zealander Peter Haxell (0.2940) finished fifth. The top five for each of the LV and HV yardages are listed below.

WBC World Benchrest Championships Australia

Complete WBC 2013 Results have been posted on the Australian Benchrest Bulletin website. Scroll down and look for the blue “Latest Stuff” tab on the lower left. There you’ll find links for WBC 2013 events under the “Latest Results” header.

Light Varmint Grand Agg
1. Gene Bukys (USA-A) .2796
2. Todd Tyler (USA-C) .2817
3. Roland Thomsen (SA-A) .2952
4. Peter Haxell (NZ-A) .2971
5. Jan Hemmes (SA-A) .3024
Light Varmint 100 Yards
1. Freddie Botha (SA-B) .1936
2. Todd Tyler (USA-C) .2258
3. Wayne Campbell (USA-B) .2464
4. Peter Haxell (NZ-A) .2484
5. Gene Bukys (USA-A) .2486
Light Varmint 200 Yards
1. Jan Hemmes (SA-A) .2939
2. Gert Le Roes (SA-B) .2962
3. Roland Thomsen (SA-A) .2978
4. Gene Bukys (USA-A) .3106
5. Todd Tyler (USA-C) .3375
Heavy Varmint Grand Agg
1. Ivan Piani (ITA-A) .2389
2. Bob Scarbrough (USA-A) .2399
3. Ch. Huckeba (USA-C) .2424
4. Tony Boyer (USA-A) .2520
5. Ed Adams (USA-A) .2781
Heavy Varmint 100 Yards
1. Tony Boyer (USA-A) .1574
2. Ch. Huckeba (USA-C) .1722
3. C. Whittleton (AUS-B) .1872
4. Wyn. Campbell (USA-B) .1874
5. Bob Scarbrough (USA-A) .1900
Heavy Varmint 200 Yards
1. Ivan Piani (ITA-A) .2786
2. Ed Adams (USA-A) .2869
3. Bob Scarbrough (USA-A) .2897
4. Ch. Huckeba (USA-C) .3126
5. Jari Laulumaa (FIN-A) .3168

WBC World Benchrest Championships Australia

Photos by Todd Tyler, Tom Libby, and Scott Pieper, provided courtesy Aaron French.
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August 28th, 2013

FCWC — Images from Day 2 of Team World Championship

The F-Class World Championships wrapped up yesterday at Raton. This was the biggest F-Class Worlds ever, and the level of competition was higher than ever before. But the World Championships were not just about wind calls and V-Counts. The event was also about camaraderie. All those who participated made new friends from around the globe. In the end, this event was about fellowship, and the bond of shared challenges with fellow shooters. No matter what the tally on the team score-card, everyone who participated in the World Championships came home a winner — a winner in the game of life.

Two Aussies Share the Joy of Victory…
World F-Class Championships

Team F-TR USA Members Ham it Up After Winning F-TR World Championship.
World F-Class Championships

The U.S. F-Open National Team on its Way to the Silver Medal.
World F-Class Championships

Tough Guys Jim Crofts, Paul Phillips, and Brad Sauve Helped Carry Team USA to Victory.
World F-Class Championships

Team Canada at the 1000-yard Line. Canada Hosts the next F-Class Worlds in Ottawa, 2017.
World F-Class Championships

2013 World Individual F-Class Champion Kenny Adams Shooting in Team Mode.
World F-Class Championships

Past NRA President John Sigler with his Wife. John is an Avid F-Class Shooter Himself.
World F-Class Championships

South African F-Open Shooter Hard at Work.
World F-Class Championships

Our British Friends Russell Simmonds and Laurie Holland — both Forum Members.
World F-Class Championships

Spanish Team Genius at work — Farley Rest Bolted to a Truck Brake Rotor. Rock Solid.
World F-Class Championships

Team F-TR USA Captain Darrell Buell with the Superb New Nightforce Spotting Scope.
World F-Class Championships

Two Young Ladies on the Junior F-TR Team Enjoyed the Event.
World F-Class Championships

Team Ireland Proudly Shows the Colors. Erin Go Bragh!
World F-Class Championships

Forum Boss and Raton Range Boss Watch the Action on Day 2.

World F-Class Championships World F-Class Championships

Editor’s Note: If I learned one unforgettable lesson from this match, it is that we shooters have a common bond that spans oceans and crosses national borders. We truly are a brotherhood of riflemen who share a passion for a challenging and rewarding sport.

I want to thank all the many people who came up to me and said “Thanks for the website — keep doing what you’re doing — it’s important”. I heard that message from Brits, Aussies, Spaniards, South Africans, Germans, Kiwis, Italians, Brazilians, Ukrainians, Irelanders, and of course my fellow Americans. Thank you all for your kind words. Rest assured, we’ll do our best to “keep the faith” in the years ahead.

Permalink Competition, News 3 Comments »
August 26th, 2013

Squads Battle Wild Winds at F-Class Team World Championships

F-class world championshipsTop marksmen from around the world battled for national honors today during Day 1 of the F-Class Team World Championships. F-Open and F-TR teams from many countries were decked out in their national colors. We saw squads from Australia, Brazil, Canada, Great Britain, Ireland, Italy, New Zealand, South Africa, Ukraine, and the USA. Other nations were represented as well.

Along with the basic two divisions, F-Open and F-TR, there are separate classifications for 4-man squads and the big 8-member National Teams. One Junior team from the USA is also competing. Right now the 8-man USA F-TR squad has a commanding lead. The talent-laden USA 8-man F-Open squad sits in second place, just three points behind the surprisingly strong Australian squad. But there are hundreds of record rounds left to fire tomorrow, and USA F-Open team members hope to move into the top slot on Day 2. Scroll down the page for a video interview with USA F-Open Team Captain Shiraz Balolia.

F-Class World Championship

More than once in today’s matches dust devils appeared on the range. During the 1000-yard match a large swirling dust cloud formed dead center on the range. We heard coach Mid Tompkins call to his shooters: “Whoa – Whoa, stop firing, stop everything”. Mid told us: “When you have dust devils like that, you have to stop — you can’t out-guess it and you may not even be able to see the target.”

F-Class World Championships

Interview with USA F-Open Team Captain Shiraz Balolia

F-class world championships

F-class world championships

Brazil F-Class World Championship

Many of the top teams are using “comm packages” with microphones and headsets. This allows the coaches to communicate with each other, conferring on observations and wind calls. Wireless communicators are not allowed, so cords are strung between the coaching stations.

F-class world championships

F-class world championships

F-class world championships

F-class world championships

F-class world championships

Permalink Competition, News 3 Comments »
January 29th, 2013

Robert Carnell’s Australian Benchrest Bulletin

Thanks to a dedicated ‘Down-Under’ benchrester, Australian shooters have an excellent web resource for their sport. Sydney’s Robert Carnell has created a content-rich website for Australian shooters, www.benchrestbulletin.net. Carnell’s Benchrest Bulletin provides match schedules and results, range info, recent news, record listings, shooting tips, and links to important Australian and Pacific Rim shooting organizations. You’ll also find gear reviews and a Shooter’s Forum.

Australia Benchrest Bulletin

Carnell, a past Australian Sporter Class champion, is an accomplished benchrest shooter with decades of experience. In 1993 he won a Silver Medal at the World Championships, and he has placed highly in events he’s attended in the United States. But Carnell is far more than an ace trigger puller. Robert is a skilled and creative “home gunsmith” who has crafted his own custom action and built his own railguns from scratch. You can learn about these and other Carnellian creations in the “Personal Projects” section of Robert’s website.

Home-Built Rail Gun — Aussie Innovation
Below are photos of one of Rob Carnell’s most amazing builds. This liquid-cooled, tension-barrel rail gun is a great example of self-reliant Aussie engineering. The barrel runs inside a coolent-filled, large-diameter sleeve, much like an old water-cooled machine gun. This is the fourth rail gun that Rob built, and the second fitted with a tensioned barrel.

Australia Benchrest Bulletin

Australia Benchrest Bulletin

Robert explains: “My railgun design has a 1.75″ barrel under tension inside an aluminium tube filled with radiator coolant. There is nearly a gallon of coolant, and the barrel stays cool no matter how many shots I seem to fire, or how quickly they are shot. The brass nut on the front rides on a nylon bearing and can be tightened to get the best accuracy. I am a believer in the ‘tuner’ idea and this seems to work for me. The main tube is thick-walled aluminium 600mm (24″) long. There is a flange at both ends. The flange at the back fits onto the barrel before the action is screwed on. The front flange is a press-fit into the tube, then there is a brass nut that fits over the barrel and screws against a nylon washer on the front flange. The Railgun’s base is aluminium and has the standard adjustments — windage, elevation and a sighter cam. In addition, there is a 1/10 thou dial indicator for windage. This allows me to zero the indicator and shoot my group. If I need to add a bit of windage for a condition, I can quickly get back to the original position if my condition comes back.”

Home-Built Action Uses Remington Bolt
Rob’s rail gun uses his own home-made stainless action, which features Panda-spec threads and a modified Remington 700 aftermarket bolt. Not bad for a do-it-yourself project we’d say! CLICK HERE to read how Rob designed and built the action.

Australia Benchrest Bulletin

Permalink Gunsmithing, News 5 Comments »
November 15th, 2012

Ultra-High Magnification 8-80x56mm March Riflescope

When it comes to long-range optics, some folks can’t have too much magnification (as Tim Allen used to say: “More Power!”). At 500 yards and beyond, when the air’s misty or the mirage is thick, you can’t always use extreme magnification. But, when the conditions are excellent, it’s nice to have 50X magnification (or more) on tap. You can always “crank it back down”. Higher magnification (when conditions are good), can help you see your bullet holes at long range, and that makes it easier to judge your hold-offs and keep your group centered. In addition, there’s no doubt that high magnification lets you aim more precisely, no matter what the distance. Even at 100 and 200 yards, short-range benchresters are using 40X, 50X, and even 60X power scopes. This allows you to position your cross-hairs with extreme precision — something you need when you’re trying to put multiple shots through the same hole.

Raising the Optics Bar
How much power is usable? A few years back, folks said you can’t use more than 45X or so at long range. Well, as modern optics have evolved, now guys are buying scopes with even more magni-fication — way more. There are practical limits of course — with a 56 to 60mm front objective, the exit pupil of a 60X or higher-power scope will be very tiny, making head orientation ultra-critical. Any many scopes get darker as you bump up the magnification.

Despite the exit pupil and brightness issues, shooters are demanding “more power” these days and the scope manufacturers are providing new products with ever-greater magnification levels. Right now, the most powerful conventional riflescope you can buy is the March X-Series 8-80x56mm scope. Featuring a 34mm main tube and 56mm objective lens, this offers a true 10-times zoom ratio and up to 80X magnification. This scope has minimal distortion thanks to high-quality ED lenses designed in-house by Deon Optical, which also machines the main tube from one solid piece of billet aluminum.

To demonstrate the capabilities of high-magnification March scopes, Aussie Stuart Elliot has created a cool through-the-lens video with the March 8-80x56mm scope set at 80-power (See 0:30 timeline). Along with being one of Australia’s top benchrest shooters, Stuart runs BRT Shooters Supply, dealer for March Scopes in Australia. In the video below you can see the March 8-80X focused on a target at 1000 yards (910m). For best resolution, watch this video in fullscreen, 720p mode.

Look through the Lens of 80-power March Scope at Target 1000 Yards Away

Through-the-Lens Views at 40X and 80X at 1100 Yards
To reveal the difference between 40X and 80X magnification, here are two through-the-lens still images taken with March scopes sighting to 1100 yards. The top photo is at 80X magnification, looking through the March 8-80x56mm. The lower photo is at 40X magnification viewed through a 5-50x56mm March X-Series scope. You can see there is a big difference in perceived target size! Click on the “Larger Image” button to see full-screen version at 80X.


larger photo

Here is another view through a March high-magnification scope, this time at 1000 yards. We’re not exactly sure of the power setting, but we think this is at least 40X. Note the good contrast, and the absence of color fringing or chromatic distortion. When you’re shooting at 1000 yards and beyond, having high-quality glass like this can provide a competitive advantage.

Video Find by Boyd Allen. We welcome reader submissions.
Permalink - Videos, Optics 15 Comments »