November 18th, 2018

Coast Guard Pistolero Dominates CMP New England Games

Coast Guard Petty Officer Charlie Petrotto Vermont pistol travel games CMP winner handgun bullseye

This fall in Vermont, Coast Guard Petty Officer First Class (PO1) Charlie Petrotto proved he is one of the nation’s top pistol shooters. At the Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) New England Travel Games, held at the Camp Ethan Allen in Vermont in September, 34-year-old PO1 Petrotto won every single pistol competition during the event. As the “Top Gun” in every pistol match, Petrotto took home SEVEN plaques for his pistol marksmanship — a remarkable trophy haul.

Report based on story by Ashley Brugnone, CMP Writer
At the 2018 New England Games, Charlie Petrotto swept all the pistol events. Competitors during the pistol events saw the skies open up to periodic rain showers, but, according to Petrotto, the biggest challenge wasn’t the precipitation so much as the darkness brought on from the clouds overhead.

Coast Guard Petty Officer Charlie Petrotto Vermont pistol travel games CMP winner handgun bullseye

That created a challenge he explained, “Obviously you need to be hard on your front sights and smooth on the trigger, and it was hard to do the first part, so it was hard to get on your sights and stay on your sights – the target was so bright, and your sights were so dark. It was easy to just jump to the target. I shot a couple of 7’s that way, not paying attention to my sights.” Though adequately tested, he captured each win during the weekend.

Coast Guard Petty Officer Charlie Petrotto Vermont pistol travel games CMP winner handgun bullseye

Petrotto is passionate about marksmanship. He’s a Coast Guard Petty Officer First Class (Gunners Mate) currently stationed at the Coast Guard Academy. There he studies marksmanship and works with cadets and Officer Candidate School (OCS) candidates.

Being stationed at the Coast Guard Academy has definitely helped Petrotto’s skill set: “It’s really a fortunate opportunity,” he said. “I get to come in early to work, we have a range where I shoot air pistol, I shoot free pistol, .45, .22 – all the things – before we have a cup of coffee and get to work. With that, we really get to do a lot of shooting,” he said with a grin.

Petrotto has achieved both Pistol and Rifle Distinguished badges. And he has reached the President’s Hundred in pistol at the Camp Perry National Matches four years running. Petrotto’s love for marksmanship competition began when he was in A-school in the Coast Guard. Looking through a manual he saw a picture of the Distinguished Badges. He photocopied the pages, put them in his locker and told himself, “I have to get that.” And he did — he is now double-distinguished in both pistol and rifle.

READ Full Story on CMP Website HERE »

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November 5th, 2018

Basics of the Prone Position — Building the Position

USAMU Prone First Shot CMP
USAMU Prone First Shot CMP

The First Shot, the CMP’s online magazine, features a well-written article on Prone Shooting Technique by SPC Matthew Sigrist of the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit (USAMU). The article covers all the major points of gun hold and body position: hand position, elbow position, stock weld, buttstock placement, and sling position/tension.

Keep it Steady — The Elements of a Good Prone Position

Part 1 — Building the Position
By SPC Matthew Sigrist

Imagine the following scenario: You are at the last stage of fire in the National Trophy Individual Match, firing at the 600 yard line in the prone position and every point matters. What should you reflect on as you prepare to shoot this final string? As your eyes cloud from sweat, you realize that all you have to rely on is your experience and knowledge of the fundamentals.

During the National Trophy Individual Match, you will fire 60 percent of your shots from the prone position. This article will address the fundamentals of a good prone position and help you learn the techniques required to be successful in both the slow and rapid-fire stages of National Match competition.

This article will be divided into two parts. In part one, we will discuss the elements of a good prone position. In part two, we will cover the techniques you will in the rapid-fire and slow-fire stages.

The Fundamentals

The fundamentals are the building blocks of a position. Much like the framework of a house, a correct application of the fundamentals ensures a solid and stable structure. Since each person’s position will depend on their particular body build and shape, there is no “perfect position” that applies to everyone. Experience, practice and knowledge of the correct fundamentals will dictate the best position for you.

There are six key elements of any position. The purpose for these six points is to achieve a solid platform that allows for consistent sight alignment using the least amount of muscle tension.

    1. Placement of the Firing Hand (the hand that pulls the trigger)
    The firing hand needs to be placed high on the pistol grip. This high hand position will give you better control of the rifle. Combined with a firm grip there will be a reduced amount of hand movement when pulling the trigger. Wrap your thumb over the three fingers on the pistol grip (excluding the trigger finger). This will help isolate the movement of the trigger finger.

    2. Placement of the Non-firing Hand (the hand supporting the rifle).
    The non-firing hand should grip the handguard or stock in the flat portion of the hand between the thumb and forefinger. The fingers should curl naturally around the stock, but they should not grip it tightly. The position of the hand on the stock will depend on the physical size of the shooter. Generally speaking, taller shooters with longer arms will grip the rifle further out, near the sling swivel, while shorter shooters will need to pull their hand rearward. This is sometimes referred to as “short-stocking” the rifle.

    3. Stock Weld
    Stock weld is the contact that the face makes with the stock. It is important because it directly effects your sight alignment. Consistent head placement will help you achieve consistent sight alignment. The human head weighs an average of 8 to 10 pounds. The full weight of the head must rest on the stock. In doing this you achieve two things, a relaxed neck and reduced recoil because of the pressure of the head.

    4. Placement of the Rifle (the contact that is made in the firing shoulder)
    The rifle butt placement needs to be consistent. If this changes between shots, it effects your sight alignment and the effect of recoil. In the prone position the rifle will sit lower in the shoulder compared to other shooting positions. This allows for a more forward head and a lower position as a whole.

    5. Position of the Sling
    The sling should be high on the arm, above the bicep. This way the sling will have less leverage on the arm so it doesn’t cut off the circulation.


Demonstration of the placement of the firing elbow (left) and non-firing elbows (right).

    6. Placement of both the firing, and non-firing elbows
    A guideline for non-firing elbow placement is that there should be 1 ½’’ to 2’’ gap between your non-firing arm and the rifle’s magazine. (NOTE: this references the AR-15 service rifle) Your arm should be almost straight up and down; this will transfer the weight directly down the arm and not to the side (see picture above). Think of the firing arm as only a kind of kickstand, it doesn’t support weight it only holds the firing hand in position.

Variations of the Prone Position

There are two main variations of the prone position; open/spread legged, and bent-legged. The two types will be discussed below.

Open/Spread Leg Position

Demonstration of the Open/Spread Leg Position.

The first position is the open/spread legged position. This is when the shooter spreads their legs shoulder width or more apart. This allows for a more forward pressure on the sling and elbows. This position requires a tighter sling and solid elbow placement. The rifle should sit tight in the shoulder. With this position, your body will be farther behind the rifle compared to the bent leg position, allowing for minimum disturbance from recoil.

Bent Leg Position

Demonstration of the Bent Leg Position.

The bent leg position is when the shooter bends the firing side leg up towards the firing hand making the knee at a rough 90 degree angle to the body. The non-firing leg will remain straight and inline with the body. This will take pressure off the lungs and heart minimizing the pulse from the chest as well as easing the pressure on the lungs which will allow for easy breathing and control.

Summary

You now know the fundamentals of a good prone position, as well as the two types most commonly used. Extensive dry-firing will reveal which is the best position for you. If possible, have a friend take pictures of you in position. This will enable you to better diagnose and correct your errors. Remember, a position must be both fundamentally sound and comfortable. Practice frequently to learn your new position and to develop the conditioning required to endure long days on the range.

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September 19th, 2018

CMP Western Games and GAP Grind PRS on Shooting USA

GAP Grind G.A. Precision Precision PRS CMP Western Games

Shooting USA will broadcast a great episode today, September 19, 2018. There are three segments worth watching. First the TV show spotlights the popular GAP Grind, a Pro-Am PRS event at the K&M Precision complex in Tennessee. Then this episode covers the CMP Western Games at Ben Avery Shooting Facility in Phoenix. Finally John Scoutten reviews two new 6.5 Creedmoor Savage rifles.

AIR TIMES — NOTE possible changes this week during the Outdoor Channel’s Deer Week promotion. Check Outdoor Channel TV listings in your cable menu. Shooting USA Episode normally airs Wednesdays at 9:00 PM Eastern and Pacific, and 8:00 PM Central.

Part One: GAP Grind Pro-Am PRS Match

Lots of Action, with 20+ Stages
The GAP Grind, the biggest PRS match in the country, is a notoriously challenging, “high tempo” match with minimal down-time between stages. Over the course of 20+ stages, competitors will fire 200+ shots at a variety of steel, paper, moving, and reactive targets out to 1,200 yards. Targets vary in size/difficulty based on the shooter’s position, distance, and time allotted. Most stages include “stressors” — i.e. time limits or required movement(s).

GAP G.A. Precision Grind K&M tennessee

Part Two: CMP Western Games

CMP Western Games ben avery phoenix garand vintage sniperThe Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) was established by act of Congress in 1903, with the purpose of teaching shooting skills to American citizens. The Western Games at the Ben Avery Facility North of Phoenix draws enthusiasts from many Western states for competition with Service Rifles, vintage military rifles, M1 Carbines, and Rimfire Sporter rifles. Along with numerous matches (including the Vintage Sniper Team match), the Western Games features Small Arms Firing School (SAFS) shooting clinics.

“Our mission is to teach marksmanship and give the citizens of the United States the opportunity to learn marksmanship, with an emphasis on youth”, states Mark Johnson, CMP Chief Operating Officer.

Part Three: Savage 6.5 Creedmoor Rifles Review

Shooting USA Savage MSR 10 BA Stealth model 10 6.5 CreedmoorIn this review segment of today’s Shooting USA episode, John Scoutten reviews two new 6.5 Creedmoor rifles from Savage Arms. The Model 10 BA Stealth is a short action bolt gun priced at $1,207 MSRP. The MSR 10 Long Range is am AR-platform semi-auto priced at $2,284 MSRP. Both rifles showed good accuracy with factory ammunition. For this test both Savage rifles were topped with Bushnell Elite LRTS optics.

Shooting USA Savage MSR 10 BA Stealth model 10 6.5 Creedmoor

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September 14th, 2018

Rimfire Sporter — Competitive Shooting Fun on the Cheap

BRRC Rimfire Sporter CMP match

Readers often ask us: “Is there an inexpensive way I can get started in position shooting?” The answer is “yes” — across the country CMP-affiliated clubs host Rimfire Sporter matches. You can use a wide variety of .22 LR rimfire rifles — manual actions (such as a Winchester model 52) or semi-automatics (such as a Ruger 10/22). There are prone, sitting/kneeling, and standing stages. CMP rules provide separate classifications for scoped rifles, open-sighted rifles, and aperature-sighted rifles. The matches are fun, the ammo is inexpensive, and everyone has a good time while improving their marksmanship.

The rapid-fire sitting or kneeling stage of a CMP-sanctioned .22 Sporter Match consists of two, 5-shot strings. A manually-operated or semi-automatic rifle may be used for this match.

The video shows the sitting/kneeling rapid-fire stage of a Rimfire Sporter match.

Our friend Dennis Santiago helps run CMP Rimfire Sporter Matches in Southern California. Dennis observes: “You want something challenging? Well that X-Ring 50 yards away is the diameter of a 50 cent piece, and there are people out there that can womp that thing with iron sights.”

BRRC Rimfire Sporter CMP match

Dennis notes: “There are six (6) stages of fire on a tough little target. Notice the rifles that can be used run the gamut from pump and bolt actions to variations on the semi-auto theme. All still require a good eye and a steady hold to earn one’s bragging rights for the day. A match takes about an hour and a half per relay. The slowest part of the match is initial sighting in. It’ll take longer than the allocated 5 minutes for the typical first timer coming to a club match.”

At Dennis’s Burbank Rifle & Revolver Club (BRRC), procedures are modified a little bit: “What we typically do at BRRC is run two relays. Experienced competitors shoot per the full rulebook. New shooters are afforded a bit more relaxed environment to make the experience more fun and inviting. We do the same thing in our M-1 Garand Clinic/Match series.”

BRRC Rimfire Sporter CMP match

Rimfire Sporter Match Basics
The CMP Rimfire Sporter Rifle Match is an inexpensive, fun-oriented competition using .22 caliber sporter rifles (plinking and small game rifles) commonly owned by most gun enthusiasts. To compete, all you need is a basic rifle, safety gear, and ammunition. No fancy, high-dollar rifles are required.

Rimfire Sporter Guide ShootingThe event is shot with standard sporter-type, rimfire rifles weighing no more than 7 ½ lbs, with sights and sling. Rifles may be manually-operated or semi-automatic. Shooters with manually-operated actions are given extra time in the rapid-fire stage to compensate for the difference. (See Video).

There are three classes of competition — the standard “O Class” for open-sighted rifles, “T-Class” for telescope-sighted and rear aperture-sighted rifles and “Tactical Rimfire” class, which is a .22 caliber A4 or AR15 style rifle. Firing for all classes is done at 50 and 25 yards on a target with a 1.78″ ten-ring and an 18″ outer one-ring. Even new shooters can get hits on this target, but it’s still tough enough that no one yet has fired a perfect 600×600 score.

The Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) has a CMP Guide to Rimfire Sporter Shooting. This FREE, 50-page digital publication covers equipment, positions, course of fire, rules, scoring and much more. You’ll find helpful “how-to” sections on aiming, sight picture, hold control, and trigger control. Reading these instructional sections can benefit any prone or three-position competitive shooter.

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August 12th, 2018

Getting a Garand from the CMP — How to Order Your M1

CMP M1 Garand auction store
M1 Garand Springfield Armory July 1941 production. Facebook photo by Shinnosuke Tanaka.

Want an authentic surplus M1 Garand? You can get these classic battle rifles from the Civilian Marksmaship Program (CMP) through direct sales as well as auctions. If you are looking to obtain an authentic, safe-to-shoot M1 Garand, the CMP is your best bet. Each M1 Garand rifle sold by the CMP is an genuine U.S. Government rifle that has been inspected, head-spaced, repaired if necessary, and test fired for function. Each rifle is shipped with safety manual, one 8-round clip, and chamber safety flag. CMP operations, warehousing, inspection & repair, test firing, sales order processing and distribution activities are headquartered in Anniston, Alabama.

CLICK HERE for Garand Ordering Information | CLICK HERE for Garand Grading Information

CMP M1 Garand auction store

M1 Garand Manufacturer Codes: SA (Springfield Armory), HRA (Harrington & Richardson Arms), IHC (International Harvester Co.), WRA (Winchester Repeating Arms)

CMP M1 Garand auction store

The federal law that established the new CMP authorizes the Corporation to sell surplus .30 and .22 caliber military rifles, parts and ammunition to qualified U.S. citizens “for marksmanship”. Accordingly, the CMP sells government-surplus M1 Garands, .22 caliber target rifles, and small quantities of other rifles to qualified purchasers.

M1 Garands at CMP Retail Store in Anniston, Alabama.
Garand CMP Sales

How to Order an M1 Garand from the CMP
To purchase an M1 Garand through the CMP, you must be an adult U.S. Citizen, who is a member of an affiliated organization, and who has participated in a “Marksmanship Activity”*. This basically meas you need to join a a gun club and participate in a clinic or match. Proof of club membership and citizenship is mandatory for all ages. However, the marksmanship requirement is waived for those over 60 years. Garands must be ordered by mail or through official CMP Auctions. Orders are filled on a first-come, first-serve basis. Rifles of all grades are packed for shipment purely by “luck of the draw”. Most orders ship within 2-4 weeks. If price has changed after an order has been received, customers will be notified before new prices are charged. Free Shipping except Puerto Rico and P.O. Boxes. CLICK HERE for ordering information.

CMP Garand Sale

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August 9th, 2018

Become a CMP Master Rifle Instructor

CMP Master instructor clinic workshop training Camp Perry Talladega Marksmanship
Photo Courtesy Garand Collectors Association, TheGCA.org.

We all enjoy shooting rifles, but it’s also fulfilling to share your knowledge as a mentor. Serving as a rifle instructor can be very rewarding. Now the CMP offers a program to certify Master Instructors for the CMP’s most popular rifle programs — Vintage Military and Rimfire Sporter.

CMP Master Instructor Training Workshops

As a CMP Instructor you can help novices learn to safely shoot the M1 Garand, M1903 Springfield, and other vintage military rifles. You can also help with the very popular Rimfire Sporter program. Later this year, the CMP is offering an excellent program to help train new Master Instructors.

Experienced rifle marksmanship instructors and shooters who wish to receive advanced training and be certified as “Master Instructors” to teach CMP-sanctioned Clinics are invited to apply to attend a CMP Master Instructor Training Workshop. These workshops will train instructors to conduct Garand, Springfield, and Vintage Military Rifle Clinics and/or Rimfire Sporter Clinics. There will be two (2) instructor training workshops this year, one at Camp Perry in October and the second in Talladega in December. Dates and locations are:

Camp Perry, Ohio: Oct. 6-7, 2018 | Talladega Park, Alabama: Dec. 4, 2018

For more information or to register, visit http://thecmp.org/training-tech/gsm-rifle-master-clinics/ or contact Kim Filipiak at kfilipiak@thecmp.org, 419-635-2141 ext 706.

M1903 Springfield shooter at Camp Perry. From GarandThumbBlog’s 2015 CMP Games Video.
CMP Master instructor clinic workshop training Camp Perry Talladega Marksmanship

CMP Master Instructor Class — In the Beginning
Our friend Dennis Santiago has been a CMP instructor for many years. He reports this has been a great experience and the CMP is a great organization. Dennis earned his “teaching credentials” at the first-ever GSM (Garand/Springfield/Vintage Military) Master Instructor Class.

CMP GSM Dennis Santiogo Master Instructor
CMP Director Gary Anderson is top row far left, with Dennis in front row center.

My Decade as a CMP Master Instructor by Dennis Santiago
I was in the first GSM Master Instructor class. It was taught at Camp Pendleton (CA) in November 2006 as part of the CMP Western Games. It was a three-day class by then-head of the Civilian Marksmanship Program, Gary Anderson.

Master InstructorWe were the guinea pigs for an experiment. Our mission would be to take what we learned back to our clubs and create programs to teach the sport of High Power riflery to Americans, most of whom, were unfamiliar with shooting, let alone the details of serious competition. It was one of the most rewarding shared experiences of my life and it began a 10-year journey that helped build my love for the sport.

Gary spent lots of time not only teaching his prepared material but working with us on feedback about how to improve the curriculum. I took what I learned back to the Burbank Rifle and Revolver Club (BRRC) and, working with Wayne Fenner (left in photo), my friend and fellow sponsor of the California Grizzlies Junior Rifle Team, adapted BRRC’s training match program to the CMP’s approach.

Over the course of almost a decade, I taught a battalion of Americans from every walk of life and every political and ethnic background how to operate and compete with the U.S. Rifle M-1 Garand. It defined one weekend of every month of my life. We experimented with every CMP match format that came out, often discussing concepts with Gary and the CMP team.

Many of the students I taught went on to become accomplished competitors in their own right. I’ve watched them win medals, major tournaments, become distinguished riflemen. Some set national records. One made it to the Olympic Trials. The true reward was to hear from all of them again and again over the years. I’m from the old school that says you pass on what you have learned because you pay forward in gratitude to those who taught you. And so it was the decade I was BRRC’s GSM Master Instructor of record.

If you want to make a difference to the growth of our sport, consider taking the time to become a GSM Master Instructor. Teach another battalion of Americans what it means to be the caretakers of our heritage from behind every blade of grass.

DCM Emeritus Gary Anderson Teaches Clinic at Camp Perry, Ohio:
CMP Master instructor clinic workshop training Camp Perry Talladega Marksmanship

CMP 1903 springfield
Here a Springfield M1903 shooter (in period-authentic uniform) competes in CMP Legacy Match.

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July 15th, 2018

The Real Deal — Sources for Official Shooting Targets

Official Target Printer Vendor Source

NRA Target IBS Hunter Rifle Target

Sources for Official Shooting Competition Targets:

ALCO Target Company

American Target Company

Kruger Premium Targets

National Target Company

Pistoleer.com

U.S. Target Company

AccurateShooter.com offers dozens of FREE, printable targets for target practice, load development, and fun shooting. We also offer a few of the most popular NRA Bullseye targets. One or more of these printable targets should work for most training purposes. However, some readers have asked: “Where can we get the real targets… exactly like the ones used in NRA, IBS, and NBRSA shooting matches?”

All these vendors carry nearly all the NRA High Power and Smallbore targets, including the new, smaller F-Class targets. Germany’s Kruger Targets sells all the important NRA targets, and international (ISSF) air rifle and smallbore targets too.

Available Official Competition Targets
Vendor NRA High Power F-Class NRA Smallbore Air Rifle/Pistol IBS NBRSA Other
ALCO Target
Company
Yes, All No Yes Yes No No Archery, IDPA, IPSC, Police, Realistic, Shoot-N-C, Silhouette, Fun Targets, Pasters.
American Target
Company
Yes, All Yes Yes, All Yes No No USBR, Sight-in, Muzzle-Loading, Police Silhouette
Kruger Premium
Targets
Yes, All Yes Yes, All Yes No No IDPA, IPSC, Animal Shapes, ISSF, Sight-in, Fun Targets
National Target
Company
Yes, Nearly All Yes Yes, All Yes Yes* No IDPA, IPSC, FBI, Police Silhouette, Sight-in, Target Backers, Pasters
Pistoleer.com Yes Yes Yes, most and color training Yes Yes No Bianchi, FBI, IBS, IDPA, IPSC, Silhouette, Archery, Pasters
U.S. Target, Inc. Yes Yes Yes, All Yes No No Bianchi, FBI, Police Silhouette, IPSC, Realistic Silhouette, Varmint

Orrville Printing currently sells IBS targets for rimfire (50 yard) benchrest, short-range centerfire Benchrest (100, 200, 300 yards), Hunter BR Rifle (100, 200, 300 yards), plus the official 600-yard and 1000-yard IBS targets. National Target Company also has most of the IBS targets. NBRSA short-range, 600-yard, and 1000-yard benchrest targets are available directly from the NBRSA Business Office. Call (307) 655-7415 to order for the season.

CMP Western games target source
At Western CMP Games, veteran rifle competitors Leon Rutherford, left, and Don Rutherford, demonstrate how to score targets at the GSM new shooter clinic. Note the use of a separate Target Center, which is available from many of the vendors listed above.

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July 3rd, 2018

National Rimfire Sporter Match at Camp Perry July 22, 2018

CMP rimfire sporter match Camp Perry 2017 smallbore rifle
The CMP National Rimfire Sporter Match is a fun competition with affordable smallbore rifles with either scopes or iron sights. All you need are a .22 LR rifle, sling, and ammo.

Each year, the Rimfire Sporter Match attracts hundreds of shooters to the shores of Lake Erie. If there is a single CMP event at Camp Perry that offers the highest level of shooter satisfaction, the most diverse group of competitors, and the lowest cost of entry, that would be the annual Rimfire Sporter Match. This year’s match will be held on Sunday, July 22, 2018 on the Viale Range. The Rimfire Sporter Match is for smallbore rifles that weigh 7 1/2 pounds or less with sights. Firing is done at 25 and 50 yards in prone, sitting and standing positions, in slow and rapid fire modes.

Register Online for 2018 Rimfire Sporter Match | Download Printable PDF Registration Form

On Saturday July 21st, Rimfire Sporter Competitors will check-in, have their rifles weighed, triggers checked, and receive their squad assignment. Also on Saturday there will be a free Rimfire Sporter Seminar held at the Gary Anderson CMP Competition Center.

Rifles may be manually operated or semi-automatic, in three classes: the standard “O Class” for open-sighted rifles, “T-Class” for telescope-sighted rifles, and the “Tactical Rimfire” Class. Firing is done at 50 and 25 yards on a target with a 1.78″ ten-ring. The target is simple enough for a beginner to hit, yet challenging enough that only one competitor in the history of the match has ever fired a perfect 600 score. Here’s the young man who did that, Samuel Payne:

CMP rimfire sporter match Camp Perry 2017 smallbore rifle

Download CMP Rimfire Sporter Guidebook | View AccurateShooter’s Rimfire Sporter Page

National Rimfire Sporter Match Camp Perry 2016

FREE Ammo from Lapua (One 50rd Box per Entrant):
Lapua has graciously donated 50 rounds of Lapua .22 smallbore ammunition for each competitor in the National Rimfire Sporter Match, but this ammunition will not be enough to shoot the entire match. Competitors will need a total of 60 rounds to fire the Rimfire Sporter Match plus any sighters or range alibis.

Rimfire Sporter Equipment

Getting Ready for the 2018 Rimfire Sporter Match

Preparing for the Match: You need to bring your own .22 cal. Rimfire rifle(s) and ammunition. Special target shooting equipment, shooting jackets, or shooting gloves are not permitted, but feel free to bring a spotting telescope and ground cloth or shooting mat. You will be shooting on a grass firing point. Competitors are strongly urged to you wear hearing and eye protection.

A free Shooters’ Clinic will be held Saturday the 21st from 4:00-6:00PM (no equipment is needed for the clinic). The Clinic covers Rimfire Sporter rules, safety instructions, course of fire, and competition procedures. The Clinic will also demonstrate the firing positions, use of the sling, as well as slow and rapid-fire techniques. Shooters who have not previously attended a CMP Rimfire Sporter Match are strongly encouraged to attend.

Rimfire Sporter Course of Fire

Competitors will complete slow fire prone, rapid fire prone, slow fire sitting or kneeling, rapid fire sitting or kneeling, slow fire standing, and rapid fire standing shot sequences. To learn more about the National Rimfire Sporter Match, CLICK HERE.

National Rimfire Sporter Match Camp Perry 2016

National Rimfire Sporter Match Camp Perry 2016

Three different classifications of rifles can be used in Rimfire Sporter competition: “O Class” for open-sighted rifles, “T Class” for telescope-sighted rifles and the recently-added “Tactical Rimfire” class. Awards are offered to High Juniors, High Seniors, High Women as well as Overall winners are named for each class.

National Rimfire Sporter Match Camp Perry 2016

National Rimfire Sporter Match Camp Perry 2016

Do you want to see more match photos? CLICK HERE to view the CMP Zenfolio Archive with 500+ photos from 2016 National Rimfire Sporter Match.

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June 10th, 2018

Match Etiquette: Be Prepared, Know the Rules and Course of Fire

Match Etiquette USAMU Course of Fire Rules SFC Norman Anderson CMP Rulebook NRA

Match Etiquette USAMU Course of Fire Rules SFC Norman Anderson CMP Rulebook NRA

Don’t Be “That Guy” (The Bad Apple on the Firing Line)

By SFC Norman Anderson, USAMU Service Rifle Team Member
You know the guy, he’s still talking at the coffee jug when his preparation period begins, then his magazines aren’t loaded when the command “STAND” is given, and finally, he doesn’t know the rules when he argues with the block officer as his target comes up marked “9 and No”. Although this guy might be the highlight of the “after match” activities, he is the proverbial bad apple on the firing line. With this example fresh in your mind, let’s go over how not to be “that guy”.

While the sport of High Power shooting is a hobby for most, all are passionate about performance throughout the day. In order to achieve your maximum performance each and every day, it is essential that you conduct yourself as a professional competitor. As a competitor, you have a personal responsibility to know the course of fire as well as the rules and procedures that apply to it and to be prepared to follow them. Knowing this will not only make you a better competitor, but it will enable you to resolve situations with other targets besides your own. So what does all this mean? I’ll explain…

Know the Course of Fire
Know the course of fire. It sounds easy enough, as we all shoot plenty of matches, but it’s more than that. If you think about it, how many people in the pits, for example, do not really know what is happening on the firing line? This leads to targets being pulled early during a rapid fire string or missing a shot during a slow fire string. In cases like this, the result is the same, delays in the match and upset competitors. To avoid being “that guy,” it is imperative that you stay tuned to the events as the day progresses. When you are at the range shooting a match, be at the range shooting the match.

At any firearms competition — be sure you know (and understand) the course of fire.
CMP Match Etiquette

Match Etiquette USAMU Course of Fire Rules SFC Norman Anderson CMP Rulebook NRAKnow the Rules
Now, let’s discuss rules. As you have probably heard more than once, the rulebook is your best friend. Here is why. I can virtually guarantee that most competitors know some of the rules based only on the old “this is how we do it at home” adage. The funny part of that is, the same green NRA rulebook and orange CMP rulebooks are used to govern High Power matches all over the country.*

It is vital that all shooters be familiar with the rules as they are written, not with “how they are applied at home”. This creates consistency and continuity in how matches are conducted, from local club matches to state tournaments to National Championships. Knowledge is power when it comes to scoring targets under contention, what to do in the case of a malfunction, or even how to file a protest correctly. These rules are in place for a reason and it benefits everyone to both know and operate by these rules.

Maintain Composure and Humility — Exhibit Good Sportsmanship
One aspect of competing that cannot be forgotten is bearing. As I mentioned earlier, you must be prepared for both good and bad to happen. All too often we all see “that guy” (or that “that guy’s” gear) flying off of the firing line in disgust. Remember that we all must maintain our composure and humility in all conditions, not matter what happens. After all, it’s just a game. To put it into perspective, if it were easy, attendance would be a lot higher. Sportsmanship must be displayed in an effort to keep from ruining the day for all those around you. It doesn’t cost anything to smile, and smiling never killed anyone. So turn that frown upside down and keep on marching, better days will come.

Like a Boy Scout — Always Be Prepared
Lastly, I would like to cover preparedness. Being prepared goes beyond simply having your magazines loaded and a zero on your rifle. It means approaching the firing line, knowing what you are about to do, being ready for what is going to happen (good or bad), and being ready for the results. If you approach the firing line to merely shoot 10 shots standing in your next LEG match, you are not going to be pleased with the result. You must be prepared mentally and physically, not only for the next stage, but also the next shot. By being prepared physically (equipment ready), you give yourself peace of mind which is an essential part of being prepared mentally, and by being prepared mentally, you are less likely to become distracted and are more likely to maintain focus for each and every shot.

Conclusion — Informed Competitors Make for Better Matches
The culmination of these efforts results in a shooter that knows how to be ready for success on the range, but also and perhaps more importantly, a shooter who knows what it means to be a competitor. When you have a range full of competitors who know and follow the rules and proper match procedures, the match runs smoothly, everyone shoots well, and a good time is had by all. In the end, isn’t that what it’s all about?


* After this article was originally written, the CMP separated its rules into two different Rulebooks:

The 2016 4th Edition of the CMP Competition Rules for CMP Games Rifle and Pistol Matches governs all CMP-sanctioned matches for As-Issued Military Rifle and Pistol events including Special EIC Matches that are fired with As-Issued Military Rifles or Pistols.

The 2016 20th Edition of the CMP Competition Rules for Service Rifle and Service Pistol governs sponsored and sanctioned matches for Service Rifle, Service Pistol and .22 Rimfire Pistol events, including National Trophy Rifle and Pistol Matches, Excellence-In-Competition (EIC) matches and other CMP-sanctioned competitions.

This article by SFC Norman Anderson originally appeared in the CMP First Shot Online Magazine.

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June 4th, 2018

Get Physical — Strength and Cardio Training for Shooters

In the archives of The First Shot (the CMP’s Online Magazine), SGT Walter E. Craig of the USAMU discusses physical conditioning for competitive shooters, particularly High Power competitors. Fitness training is an important subject that, curiously, is rarely featured in the shooting sports media. We seem to focus on hardware, or esoteric details of cartridge reloading. Yet physical fitness also matters, particularly for High Power shooters. In his article, Craig advocates: 1) weight training to strengthen the Skeletal Muscle System; 2) exercises to build endurance and stamina; and 3) cardiovascular conditioning programs to allow the shooter to remain relaxed with a controlled heart beat.

SGT Craig explains: “An individual would not enter a long distance race without first spending many hours conditioning his/her body. One should apply the same conditioning philosophy to [shooting]. Physical conditioning to improve shooting skills will result in better shooting performance…. The objective of an individual physical training program is to condition the muscles, heart, and lungs thereby increasing the shooter’s capability of controlling the body and rifle for sustained periods.”

CLICK HERE to READ FULL FITNESS ARTICLE

In addition to weight training and cardio workouts (which can be done in a gym), SGT Craig advocates “some kind of holding drill… to develop the muscles necessary for holding a rifle for extended periods.” For those with range access, Craig recommends a blind standing exercise: “This exercise consists of dry-firing one round, then live-firing one round, at a 200-yard standard SR target. For those who have access only to a 100-yard range, reduced targets will work as well. Begin the exercise with a timer set for 50 minutes. Dry-fire one round, then fire one live round and without looking at the actual impact, plot a call in a data book. Continue the dry fire/live fire sequence for 20 rounds, plotting after each round. After firing is complete, compare the data book to the target. If your zero and position are solid, the plots should resemble the target. As the training days add up and your zero is refined, the groups will shrink and move to the center.”

Brandon GreenFitness training and holding drills help position shooters reach their full potential.

Training for Older Shooters
Tom Alves has written an excellent article A Suggested Training Approach for Older Shooters. This article discusses appropriate low-impact training methods for older shooters. Tom explains: “Many of the articles you will read in books about position shooting and the one mentioned above are directed more toward the younger generation of shooters in their 20s. If you look down the line at a typical high power match these days you are likely to see quite a few folks who are in their middle 30s and up. Many people in that age range have had broken bones and wear and tear on their joints so a training program needs to take that into account. For instance, while jogging for an extended period for heart and lung conditioning may be the recommended approach for younger folks, it may be totally inappropriate for older people.”

READ FULL ARTICLE by Tom Alves

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May 31st, 2018

University Students Attend Small Arms Firing School at Butner

Small Arms Firing School SAFS USAMU Liberty University Camp Butner North Caroline Virginia AR15

For the shooting sports to survive, and thrive, we need to bring new shooters into the game. It’s vital that young people get involved in compeitive shooting at an early age. It’s equally important that novice shooters get instruction and encouragement from skilled mentors.

Thankfully the Civilian Marksmanship Program is providing that kind of knowledgeable skills training through programs conducted throughout the country. Recently, at Camp Butner (North Carolina), the CMP offered a Small Arms Firing School (SAFS) taught by U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit (USAMU) experts. The USAMU trainers had a chance to teach members of the Liberty University Shooting Team. Here is the CMP’s report on the successful SAFS:

Liberty University Rifle Team Attends CMP’s Small Arms Firing School
Story based on report by Ashley Brugnone, CMP Writer
On a beautiful, sunny morning in North Carolina, over 40 bright-eyed students of all ages set foot on the grounds of Camp Butner Training Facility to take part in a century-old tradition that has trained thousands of new marksmen around the country — the Small Arms Firing School (SAFS). The class was held during the CMP’s Eastern Travel Games at the end of April.

Small Arms Firing School SAFS USAMU Liberty University Camp Butner North Caroline Virginia AR15

Attending the SAFS were student-athletes of Liberty University, a private institution in Virginia. This year the school launched a new program with four shooting teams: rifle, pistol, shotgun, and three-gun. Among the Liberty University Flames and Lady Flames rifle team member are some accomplished shooters, but others are relatively inexperienced.

Small Arms Firing School SAFS USAMU Liberty University Camp Butner North Caroline Virginia AR15
Susie Krupp of the Liberty Lady Flames team was the High Non-Distinguished competitor of the event, earning her introductory EIC points.

The SAFS course is a combination of classroom education and hands-on competition and safety instruction on the firing line. At the conclusion, students fire a true M16 rifle match, with the chance to receive Excellence-in-Competition (EIC) points towards earning a Distinguished Rifleman Badge – a prestigious achievement. All equipment is provided by the CMP — even the rifles.

Small Arms Firing School SAFS USAMU Liberty University Camp Butner North Caroline Virginia AR15

This year members of the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit (USAMU) trained students. Here SSG Amanda Elsenboss offers pointers to a Liberty University Service Rifle shooter. The USAMU video below features SSG Elsenboss, who has served in the U.S. Army for 8.5 years.

Executive director and head coach of the Liberty University shooting sports program, Dave Hartman, was impressed by the SAFS event and grateful for the education his team received. The university is already looking forward to next year’s Eastern Games: “What’s beautiful about this event is that our competitors can come to this event without any prior knowledge, they don’t need to have a rifle. They go through the classroom portion, and they learn a vast amount of information. And having the USAMU here was fantastic.”

Small Arms Firing School SAFS USAMU Liberty University Camp Butner North Caroline Virginia AR15

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May 25th, 2018

Big D-Day Match at Talladega Marksmanship Park

CMP Talledega D-Day Garand Match

TALLADEGA, Alabama — The Annual D-Day Anniversary Matches will be held June 8-10, 2018, at the CMP’s Talladega Marksmanship Park in Alabama. The event commemorates the Anniversary of the Allied landing at Normandy in June, 1944. In 2015, the $20-million-dollar Talledega Park celebrated its Grand Opening with its first D-Day Match. That was a great success, and the 2018 D-Day Match promises to be even better. This has become a hugely popular event — last year there were over 250 competitors. For many, this match was their first opportunity to shoot on electronic targets. That speeds up the relays and nobody complained about not having to do pit duty.

CMP Talledega D-Day Garand Match

It’s not too late to join the fun — there are still slots available for the event. You can register online. For more information, email shall [at] thecmp.org or phone 256-474-4408 ext. 414.

CLICK HERE to REGISTER | CLICK HERE for Match Program with Rules | MAP to Facility

Watch Highlights from 2017 Talladega D-Day Match:

EDITOR: Worth Watching! Guys, this nicely-produced video shows multiple disciplines (including Service Rifle, Carbine, Pistol, and Vintage Sniper) and lets you see how the electronic targets work. We highly recommend you watch this video.

Electronic Targets + No Pit Duty = More Fun
Competitors will be firing all matches on electronic targets. The John C. Garand Range has a huge firing line with monitors at all shooting stations. These connect to three banks of electronic targets positioned at 200, 300, and 600 yards. Spectators can view the results in real time on large monitors.

Talladega CMP Marksmanship Park D-Day match

INVITATION: The CMP’s John C. Garand D-Day Anniversary Match is a big event with many different competitions for rifle and pistol shooters. Along with the signature M1 Garand event, a Vintage Sniper Match, EIC Service Rifle Match, .22 Rimfire Pistol Match, EIC Service Pistol Match, and .22 Rimfire Pistol matches will be conducted.

CMP Talledega D-Day Garand Match

State of the Art Shooting Facility in Alabama
The 500-acre CMP Talladega Marksmanship Park is one of the most advanced outdoor shooting facilities in the Western Hemisphere. The facility includes a 600-yard rifle range, a 100-yard multi-purpose range, and a 50-yard pistol range, equipped with Kongsberg electronic targets and scoring monitors that allow shooters on the firing line to review shots in a matter of seconds. Since the 54 targets at each line register hits and calculate the scores, no pit duty is required at Talladega.

CMP Talledega D-Day Garand Match

CMP Talledega D-Day Garand Match
State-of-the-art Kongsberg target systems are used at the CMP’s Talladega Marksmanship Park.

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April 24th, 2018

CMP Adds Smallbore Events to National Matches at Camp Perry

Camp

Great News — There will be serious smallbore rifle competition at Camp Perry this year (though the NRA National Smallbore Championships will still be held at Camp Wa-Ke-De in Indiana). The CMP will host a new series of smallbore events in July at Camp Perry, the Mecca of competitive shooting in the USA. This way smallbore competitors can enjoy the experience of shooting on the famed Camp Perry ranges. Smallbore competitions have been slotted into the Camp Perry National Match schedule July 16-22, 2018. These smallbore events include: 3×40 two-day event; 3P Team Match; Two-Day Prone event; Elimination Prone event; Prone Team Match; USAMU Training Clinic.

Camp

The smallbore matches will be fired on Rodriguez Range at Camp Perry under a covered firing line. Shooters Technology will provide a scoring App that allows instant scoring for quick results. Finals will be conducted on the CMP’s Electronic Targets installed on the Camp Perry Petrarca Range.

Camp Perry Petrarca range electronic targets

Learn more about the CMP’s smallbore rifle events at the 2018 National Matches on the CMP website. In addition to an event schedule, the 2018 CMP Smallbore Rifle Competition Rules is also available online. To register for the Camp Perry smallbore events, or to review the 2018 Rulebook, visit http://thecmp.org/competitions/cmp-national-matches/smallbore-matches/.

NATIONAL MATCHES at CAMP PERRY
The National Trophy Pistol and Rifle Matches have been a continued tradition of marksmanship excellence every summer since 1903. Moved to Camp Perry, Ohio, in 1907, the event now draws well over 6,000 annual visitors. For any serious marksman, competing at the National Matches at Camp Perry if a definite “bucket list” item, an experience that creates life-long memories. Participants range from novices to the world’s top smallbore and high power shooters.


Here’s a video from 2011 when the NRA Smallbore Championships were held at Camp Perry. It is great to see smallbore events return to Camp Perry in 2018.

Camp

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April 6th, 2018

Registration Opens for CMP Travel Games

CMP travel games creedmoor Cup

Registration is now open for all of the Civilian Marksmanship Program’s (CMP) 2018 Travel Games, featuring a variety of rifle and pistol events held around the country throughout the year. The CMP has revamped its 2018 Travel Games schedule by adding matches and establishing its own Classification System. Moreover, the CMP will take over the Creedmoor Cup Matches, and all matches will now follow CMP High Power Rifle Competition Rules. CLICK HERE for Travel Games INFO.

The 2018 Travel Games Schedule

10-16 April – Oklahoma Games, Oklahoma City, OK
26 April-5 May – Eastern Games, Camp Butner, NC
8-10 June – Talladega D-Day Matches, Talladega, AL
18-24 September – New England Games, Jericho, VT
16-22 October – Western Games, Phoenix, AZ
4-9 December – Talladega 600, Talladega, AL

Click links to Register, or to get more information.

The 2018 Travel Games schedule now includes the Cup Matches (formally the Creedmoor Cup Matches), now administered by the CMP. These will be part of the Eastern Games and the Western Games.

CMP travel games creedmoor Cup

Events fired at the Travel Games include a mix of modern and vintage military rifle competitions like the John C. Garand, Springfield, Rimfire Sporter, Carbine and Vintage Sniper Matches. The Travel Games also feature pistol matches, as well as a Small Arms Firing School and other training clinics taught by qualified CMP staff members.

For more details, visit the CMP Travel Games Page. Pre-squadding will be completed for certain events. Double-check the match program prior to registration. Download Travel Games RULES.

Registration Procedures
Upon registration, competitors will choose match date, relay, relay time and rifle for the Garand/Springfield/Vintage/Modern Military Rifle Matches only. There will be different relays and relay time choices available for competitors to fire Garand (GAR), Springfield (SF), Vintage Military (VM) or Modern Military (MM) rifles. Competitors may only choose a maximum of FOUR relays per day to allow the opportunity to fire the GSM 3-Gun and 4-Gun Aggregates.

CMP travel games creedmoor CupNew Classification System
Additionally, the CMP has created a new Classification System. Competitor scores in the 80 Shot, 100 Shot or EIC Rifle matches will count towards CMP Classification. Competitor classifications are based on a competitor’s average scores fired in his or her most recent competitions. The CMP maintains a national database of competitors and scores that are used to establish competitor classifications. Competitors can view his/her current CMP Classification by logging into CMP Competition Tacker and clicking in his/her personal “Competitions” and “EIC Results” files.

Electronic Targets at Travel Games
As last year, rifle competitions will be fired on CMP Targets, a user-friendly electronic target system shows shot placement and records scores. This system and eliminates the need for pit duty — allowing matches to run more quickly with less physical strain.

CMP Travel Games 2018

New Pay-Back Program for Clubs
A Club Pay Back Program is also being introduced during the 2018 Games season, where $5.00 per competitor will be awarded to any CMP Affiliated Club that has five or more of their members attending and participating in the marksmanship competitions held at the event.

CMP Travel Games

About the CMP Travel Games
The Travel Games are regional competitions held throughout the year, featuring exclusive CMP rifle and pistol outdoor events. A common part of the CMP schedule for the last decade, the Games are centered around recreation-oriented competition and educational activities that are designed to accommodate experienced marksmen as well as those hoping to learn more.

CMP Western Travel Games Ben Avery

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February 21st, 2018

CMP Offers $1000 College Scholarships to Young Shooters

CMP Scholarship

CMP ScholarshipThe Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) invites young men and women shooters to apply for CMP scholarships for the 2018-2019 school year. The CMP offers $1,000 one-year scholarships to current high school seniors. Since 2005, CMP has awarded over $1 million in scholarship grants. Last year, the CMP received a record-setting number of applications and awarded over $150,000 in scholarship money. Winning scholarship recipients came from JROTC programs, 4-H groups and other shooting clubs.

Don’t Delay — Scholarship Application Deadline is March 20, 2018

CMP Scholarships are based on merit. Selected individuals arehigh school seniors who are currently enrolled in a team or club that is participating in rifle or pistol marksmanship competitions. Applicants must provide rifle or pistol competition history, list of awards, and future goals in the shooting sports. Applicants must also provide academic GPA and an official high school transcript (3.0 Minimum GPA Required).

CMP Scholarship

Applications are Being Accepted Now for 2018-2019
The CMP is now taking scholarship applications for the 2018-2019 freshman college year. Scholarships are one-year awards that may be used to fund any accredited, post-secondary education or vocational program. (Note: Students planning to enroll in a military academy are not eligible).

CMP Scholarship Regulations | 2018-2019 Scholarship Application Form.

The deadline for CMP Scholarship Application is March 20, 2018. Learn more about the program at the CMP Website Scholarship Page. If you have any questions, please contact Kathy Williams at 419-635-2141, ext. 709, or email kwilliams [@] thecmp.org.

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February 6th, 2018

Teaching New Shooters — CMP Training Resources

The CMP (Civilian Marksmanship Program) offers a wide variety of resources for novice shooters and juniors. These materials help novices learn basic marksmanship skills and get started in competition. Some resources can be downloaded from the CMP website, while others are available for purchase from the CMP E-Store. In addition, The CMP maintains a Coaching Resources webpage with dozens of informative articles. Here are some of the CMP articles you can find online:

teaching shooting positions youth junior

Videos

These short marksmanship trainging videos cover the basics of the Kneeling, Standing, and Prone postions. (NOTE: these are live links — videos will launch when you click.)

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January 30th, 2018

UPDATE: CMP Has Received 8000 Surplus M1911 Pistols

1911 surplus U.S. Army handgun pistol CMP sales report

Ever since Congress passed the 2018 Defense Authorization Act authorizing the U.S. Army to transfer surplus 1911 pistols to the Civilian Marksmanship program, folks have wondered “When are we going to be able to buy these 1911s?” Well that day is growing closer. The CMP HAS received 8,000 pistols and is doing an inventory this week. But before the CMP can start selling the 1911s, it must first inspect/grade/repair and then test-fire the handguns. We’re figuring that sales are now still 4-6 months away. For more updates, visit the CMP 1911 Sale INFO page.

The CMP declared this week: “The CMP has been authorized to receive 8,000 1911 type pistols from the United States Army. The 1911s have been received by the CMP. A complete inventory will be conducted over the course of this week. The pistols will then be securely stored until the Army-approved 1911 building and armory infrastructure is completed. That completion is anticipated to be approximately 60 days from now. Once the 1911 armory is completed, inspection, grading, repair, and ultimately test firing of the pistols will begin.”

1911 surplus U.S. Army handgun pistol CMP sales report

Sales Process Explained
The CMP explained: “The CMP 1911 order packet will be posted 90 days prior to the order acceptance date and opening sales date. No orders will be accepted prior to that date. CMP customer service has been inundated with calls and emails concerning the 1911s and no further information is available at this time. The CMP will keep everyone posted as we move through this process.”

About The Civilian Marksmanship Program: The Civilian Marksmanship Program is a federally chartered 501 (c) (3) non-profit corporation. It is dedicated to firearm safety and marksmanship training and to the promotion of marksmanship competition for citizens of the United States.

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January 15th, 2018

Guntry Clubs — Posh, Upscale Facilities for Gun Aficionados

Guntry Club Greshame GunVenture Televison Iain Harrison Sig Sauer

Shooting ranges have gone upscale with the development of the “Guntry Club”. This new kind of recreational/social facility combines a shooting range with Country Club style amenities. Imagine a high-tech indoor range with “Pro Shop”, restaurant, and maybe outdoor shooting facilities as well. In the past five years, more and more of these deluxe “Guntry Clubs” have opened nationwide.

This week GunVenture TV takes a look at some of the country’s finest gun clubs. First, join Tom Gresham and RECOIL Magazine’s Iain Harrison at one of the original “Guntry Clubs” — the Scottsdale Gun Club. You’ll tour the exclusive Titanium lounge before heading to the range for some full-auto fun with Sig Sauer’s John Hollister. Then, Tom visits a very high-end facility in Centennial, Colorado. The upscale Centennial Gun Club features a retail store, range, training center, and lounge.

Guntry Club Greshame GunVenture Televison Iain Harrison Sig Sauer

Finally, GunVenture visits the Talladega Super-Speedway, where Ryan Gresham takes a lap on the famous track before visiting at the CMP’s impressive new Talladega Marksmanship Park, which boasts state-of-the-art electronic targets.

Here’s a CBS News report on upscale “Guntry Clubs”, luxurious facilities that target younger, more affluent patrons. Chip Reid reports on a high-end gun club in Manassas, Virginia: “This is not your Grandfather’s shooting range. Elite Shooting Sports is 65000 Square feet of bright lights, polished wood, flat-screen TVs, and state of the art equipment”.

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December 19th, 2017

New Law Mandates Civilian Sales of Historic M1911 Pistols

CMP NRA-ILA 1911 surplus military pistols
Photo courtesy NRA-ILA.org

Report by NRA-ILA
Last week, President Trump signed into law H.R. 2810, the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (NDAA). Included in the law is a provision long sought by collectors of vintage firearms and militaria that would require military surplus M1911/M1911A1 pistols (1911s) to be made available for sale to the American public. The military currently has some 100,000 excess 1911s sitting in storage at taxpayer expense.

A previous version of the NDAA signed into law by then-President Obama in 2015 authorized, but did not require, the Secretary of Defense to transfer up to 10,000 surplus 1911s per year to the Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) for sale to the public. Unsurprisingly, no such transfers were ever made while Obama remained in the White House.

The language in the 2018 NDAA effectively establishes a mandatory pilot program under which at least 8,000 (and as many as 10,000) 1911s would be transferred to the CMP for public sale in 2018. The Secretary of Defense must then report to Congress on the outcome of the program. Thereafter, the Secretary would be authorized to continue transferring up to 10,000 [more] surplus 1911s a year to the CMP for further public sales. READ More about CMP Sales of Vintage 1911 Pistols on NRA-ILA.org.

CMP NRA-ILA 1911 surplus military pistols

The Process to Acquire a Military 1911 Pistol
Sales of the surplus 1911 handguns will be handled a bit differently than most other CMP firearms transfers for M1 Garands, M1 Carbines and other vintage rifles. All transfers must go through a local FFL in a face-to-face transaction. In addition, there will be two background checks of the purchaser before the gun can be transfered. The first check is done by the CMP prior to shipping the pistol, while a second check is done by the FFL before releasing the pistol to the customer at the FFL’s place of business. Customers will be limited to one 1911 pistol per calendar year.

Additional CMP Requirements
The CMP has a number of “threshhold” requirements for purchase of a surplus 1911. To acquire one of the CMP 1911s, you must be a U.S. citizens, eligible to receive firearms under federal law, and the laws of your city/state. In addition you must belong to a CMP-affiliated club, and able to provide proof of participation in a marksmanship activity.

CMP NRA-ILA 1911 surplus military pistols

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November 13th, 2017

CMP Travel Games — Big Changes for 2018

CMP Travel Games electronic targets Creedmoor Cup

Report based on story By Ashley Brugnone, CMP Writer
The CMP Travel Games will see some big changes in 2018. The Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) has revamped its 2018 Travel Games schedule by adding matches and establishing its own Classification System. Starting in 2018, ALL additional Travel Games matches will be held on Electronic Targets, the CMP will take over the Creedmoor Cup Matches, and all matches will now follow CMP High Power Rifle Competition Rules. Moreover, all the Individual Service Rifle Matches will now count towards the new CMP Classification System.

CMP Travel Games schedules have been updated to accommodate the latest additions. CLICK HERE for New Schedules and more INFO.

Electronic Targets to Be Used for Additional Travel Games Matches
In 2018, the CMP will take over the Creedmoor Cup Matches and add new events to the CMP Oklahoma and New England Games. All additional matches will use the CMP’s Electronic Target System. This shows shot location instantly on monitors next to each shooter. The Electronic Targets also eliminate the need for pit duty, so matches run more quickly and there is less work for competitors.

CMP Travel Games

CMP Travel Games electronic targets Creedmoor Cup

New Events Added to the CMP Travel Games
Additional matches added to the Travel Games include Excellence In Competition (EIC) events that will count towards the Distinguished Rifleman Badge. All regular CMP events, such as the Small Arms Firing School, various vintage rifle competitions, Vintage Sniper Match, Rimfire Match, Carbine Match, and pistol matches (except Western), will still be included on the Travel Games schedule.

Oklahoma CMP Travel Games
File photo from 2015 Oklahoma CMP Games. Check schedule for 2018 dates.

Match Changes for CMP 2018 Travel Games:

  • Oklahoma CMP Cup & CMP Games Matches — two 80-Shot (800 Aggregate) Matches and a 4-Man Team Match.
  • Eastern CMP Cup & CMP Games Matches — The three Creedmoor 80 Shot Matches will now be changed to three 80-Shot CMP Cup Matches (800 Aggregate). A 4-Man Team Match and EIC Rifle Match will still be fired.
  • New England CMP Cup & CMP Games Matches — two 80-Shot (800 Aggregate) Matches and a 4-Man Team Match.
  • Western CMP Cup & CMP Games Matches — The three Creedmoor 80-Shot Matches will now be changed to two 100-Shot (1000 Aggregate) Matches. A 4-Man Team Match and EIC Rifle Match will still be fired.

CMP Travel Games

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