April 22nd, 2014

Huge Discounts on Weaver Scopes at Natchez Shooters Supplies

Looking for a good, solid scope for your hunting or varmint rifle, but don’t want to spend more than $400.00? Here’s your opportunity. Natchez Shooting Supplies just slashed prices on the Weaver Classic Extreme Series of rifle scopes. This is a major price cut. Scopes that previously retailed for $500 or more are now being sold for $300-$350.00. Here’s an example, the Weaver Classic Extreme 8-32x50mm is going for $499.99 on eBay but Natchez has it for $349.95. And the Weaver 4-16x50mm Classic Extreme scope is now just $299.95, also marked way down from the original $500+ price. These scopes offer 30mm maintubes, 95% light transmission, multi-coated optics, and fast-focus eyepieces.

Quantities are limited and prices are subject to change. CLICK HERE for Natchez Sale Inventory.

Natchez Weaver Optics Sale

Sale Tip by EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.

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April 18th, 2014

Cool Integrated Optics Mount for under Ninety Bucks

AR skeletonized Warne AR MountHere’s a cool new optics mount at a very attractive price — just $87.95. Midsouth Shooter’s Supply is now featuring the Warne Skeletonized integrated scope mount for Picatinny Rails. This should work great on flat-top ARs. And for you fashionistas out there, the Warne mount is offered in four different colors: Matte Black, Dark Earth (tan), Ruby Red, and Bold Blue. Tactical shooters will probably pick black or tan sets, while image-conscious 3-Gun competitors might favor the Red or Blue versions.

These Warne integrated ring/mount sets are offered for 1″, 30mm, and 34mm rings. The 1″ and 30mm versions come in all four (4) colors and cost $87.95. The 34mm is offered in Matte Black only for $115.00. You may want to order soon. These are popular. The most popular colors (black and dark earth) could sell out quickly at this price.

AR skeletonized Warne AR Mount

AR skeletonized Warne AR Mount

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April 16th, 2014

Horus Video Explains Sources of Zero Shift in Rifle Scopes

YouTube Preview Image

In the above video, a spokesman for Horus Vision explains how and why scopes can experience zero shift. First, just cleaning the gun can cause a small shift in point of impact. Second, when you re-tighten rings and ring bases, this can cause a change in zero. Horus recommends that you use a torque wrench to confirm that you maintain the same torque settings each time. The same goes for action screw tension — tensioning your action screws can shift the point of impact.

Other factors that can cause a change in zero:

Temperature
Dramatic ranges of temperature will change your zero, because the air density affects the velocity of the bullet. With increased temperature, there may be a higher velocity (depending on your powder).

Gun Handling and Body Position
You rifle’s point of impact will be affected by the way you hold the gun. A “hard hold” with firm grip and heavy cheek weld can give you a different POI than if you lightly address the gun. Even when shooting a benchrest gun, the amount of shoulder you put into the rifle can affect where it prints on paper.

Type of Rifle Support — Bench vs. Field
Whenever you change the type of rifle support you use, the point of impact can shift slightly. Moving from a bipod to a pedestal rest can cause a change. Similar, if you switch from a mechanical rest to sandbags, the gun can perform differently. That’s why, before a hunt, you should zero the gun with a set-up similar to what you would actually use in the field — such as a rucksack or shooting sticks.

shooterXbag.com sandbag

Transportation of Firearms
Even if you don’t mishandle your weapon, it is possible that a shift of zero could occur during transport. We’ve seen zero settings change when a tight plastic gun case put a side load on the turrets. And in the field, if the turret knobs are not covered, they can rub against clothing, gear, storage bags, scabbard, etc. If the knobs turn, it will definitely move your reticle slightly and cause your point of impact to be off.

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April 15th, 2014

Field Test of Nightforce SHV by LongRangeHunting.com

If you’ve been considering the new Nightforce SHV scope for a hunting application, head over to LongRangeHunting.com. There you’ll find an in-depth field test of the 4-14x56mm SHV by Nicholas Gebhart. This is a very thorough review — Gebhardt checks every feature of the scope and comparison tests the SHV against the more costly Nightforce NXS 3.5-15x50mm. Gebhardt even put the SHV scope in his freezer for a weekend to ensure there was no fogging.

CLICK HERE for Product Specs and/or to Pre-Order Nightforce NXS.

NXS SHV scope review long range huntingOverall, Gebhardt was very pleased with the SHV: “Optical clarity, image brightness, contrast and resolution were all extremely good.” The tester also liked the MOAR reticle in his scope. He didn’t think it was too “busy” though he thought the hold-over lines would benefit from numbers: “Nightforce’s MOAR was easy to use and provided a clear sight picture for engaging small targets. The line thickness is perfect for both precise shot placement and visibility. My personal preference however would be for the even hash marks to be numbered for the entire lower portion of the reticle.” Gebhart noted that the SHV’s side parallax knob had yardage marking numbers that proved accurate (and handy to use) — most other scopes just have lines.

Nightforce SHV vs. Nighforce NXS
How did the new SHV stack up against the NXS in a side-by-side comparison? Gebhardt was impressed with the $995.00 SHV, saying it held its own with the pricier NXS model: “I took about 30 minutes to evaluate the optics of the SHV and see how it compared to an older Nightforce NXS 3.5-15X50. Both of these scopes are made in Japan but given the price differential, I expected to see some difference in the optical quality. To my surprise, I couldn’t find any optical difference between the two except for a very slight possibility of a brighter image with the SHV.”

Nicholas Gebhardt longrangehunting.com Nightforce SHV review

CLICK HERE to Read Full Nightforce SHV Scope Review.


Nicholas Gebhardt has been an active hunter primarily pursuing mule deer, antelope, coyotes and prairie dogs since he was old enough to legally hunt. Nicholas is also a precision rifle competitor and a Captain in the Montana National Guard.

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March 23rd, 2014

Big Sale on Nightforce Scopes at Lilja Precision Rifles

Need a first-rate scope for you new rifle? How would you like to get a Nightforce for a great price? Well, you’re in luck. Lilja Precision Rifles (“Lilja”) has placed its entire inventory of late-model Nightforce scopes on sale. The reason is that Lilja has decided to stop selling scopes and focus on its primary barrel-making business. Dan Lilja says that: “We have been a Nightforce dealer since Nightforce’s first year in business. But we’ve made the decison to leave the scope-selling business… and concentrate on our barrels. That part of our business is excellent and taking all of our time.”

Nightforce sale optics discount lilja barrels

Show below are the scopes on sale with regular price and sale price. Quantities are limited and these scopes are being sold “First Come, First Serve”. Prices are limited to stock on hand and do not include shipping. Scopes are not returnable – all sales final.


Nightforce sale optics discount lilja barrels

Lilja explains that some of these prices are well below MAPP (Minimum Advertised Price Policy) because they are for discontinued products. From time to time, Nightforce changes reticle combinations (or other features) and an product number (sku) becomes obsolete. Lilja also has some optics accessories for sale, such as rings and bases, PC programs, torque wrenches and other small items. Call (406) 826-3084 for availability or visit Lilja Precision Rifles.

Sale tip from EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.
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January 30th, 2014

Big Sale on Nightforce Scopes at Bullets.com

nightforce scope discount saleNightforce makes great scopes — just ask the man who owns one. Here’s your chance to get a Nightforce NXS, Benchrest, or Competition scope at a big discount. Bullets.com has acquired a large selection of 2013-model Nightforce scopes, and these are now being offered at sale prices. You can save hundreds of dollars on a scope (compared to original retail prices). For example the 5-22x56mm NXS is on sale for $1495.00. This same 2013 optic retails elsewhere for $1830.00 or more. The 2013 15-55x52mm Competition scope is $1840.00. Compare that to $2352.00 for a 2014-edition 15-55 Comp scope.

These special offers are limited to scopes in inventory. When they’re gone, they’re gone. When shopping online, go to the Bullets.com Nightforce Promo Page, and click on a particular model. In the detail page that opens you will see full specifications, including objective size, turret click value, and reticle type. Here are the specific Nightforce scopes on sale at Bullets.com:

nightforce scope discount sale

Before placing your order with Bullets.com, be sure you are 100% certain about the model you are ordering. Some scopes with the same magnification range come with a choice of either 50mm objective or 56mm objective. Likewise, there are various reticles offered for each basic model, and Nightforce offers 1/4 MOA clicks on some scopes, with 1/8 MOA clicks on others.

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December 27th, 2013

New $995.00 Nightforce SHV 4-14x56mm Scope

Nightforce Optics has introduced a new medium-magnification, second-focal plane scope for hunters and tactical shooters. Described as “the most affordable Nightforce riflescope [offered] to date”, the all-new 4-14x56mm SHV will sell for $995.00 (non-illuminated model) or $1195.00 with an illuminated reticle. The “SHV” stands for ShooterHunterVarminter™, reflecting this scope’s versatility — it can be used for a wide variety of applications. The SHV has plenty of travel for long-range use: 100 MOA of elevation adjustment and 70 MOA of horizontal (windage) travel. Two reticle options will initially be offered, the basic IHR (Int’l Hunting Reticle) with floating center cross-hair, and the popular MOAR reticle with 1-MOA vertical and horizontal hash marks.

Nightforce SHV 4-14x56 scope

The 4-14 SHV scope represents a new direction for Nightforce. The optics-maker kept the price under $1000.00 by “limiting some options, offering simpler controls, and using a less complex manufacturing process.” Nightforce said the goal with the SHV was to offer a scope priced “within the reach of a wider range of hunters and shooters who don’t need the ‘overbuilt’ characteristics of our NXS™ series, most of which were originally created to withstand actual combat conditions.”

Nightforce SHV scope 4-14x56

Nightforce SHV 4-14x56 scope
Nightforce SHV 4-14x56 scope

The 4-14x56mm SHV weighs 26.8 oz. for the basic version, and 28.5 oz. for the illuminated model. Full specifications are listed below. CLICK HERE for 2014 Nightforce Catalog.

Nightforce SHV 4-14x56 scope

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November 2nd, 2013

AccuScore SmartPhone Apps Help with Rifle Sight-In Process

Accuscope rifle zero appMany folks struggle when they sight-in a scoped rifle for the first time. A very common mistake is clicking the turrets in the wrong direction. That’s frustrating and it wastes ammo. Another common problem occurs when people sight-in at a distance other than 100 yards. People sometimes struggle to figure out how many clicks they need to correct point of impact if they’re zeroing at 200, 250, or 300 yards.

To make the sight-in process more fool-proof, AccuScope has released two handy Apps for smart phone users. Whether used for initial sight-in or in-the-field adjustments, these smartphone Apps can get you zeroed quickly and reliably.

Accuscope rifle zero app

Using the Apps is easy. First, boresight the gun to get on paper. After the gun is fouled-in (so it is shooting normally) shoot a carefully aimed 3-shot group. Then go to the target and measure the vertical and horizontal distance from the 3-shot group center to your aiming point. Input those numbers into the App, along with your sight-in distance (from muzzle to target). The App then calculates exactly how many elevation and/or windage clicks you must crank into your scope to move point-of-impact to point of aim. Put in the specified clicks and then take a fourth shot to confirm your zero. The fourth shot should impact right on your point of aim (within the limits of the gun’s inherent accuracy.)

Given Murphy’s Law, a shooter can still mess things up if he inputs left clicks when the App calls for right clicks, or inputs down clicks when he needs up clicks. But as long as you look at the “R/L” and “Up/Down” labels on your turrets before spinning the knobs, you shouldn’t have any problems.

AccuScope is available in two versions, Standard and Premium. The $4.99 Standard version works for 1/4 MOA-click-value scopes. The $9.99 Premium version works with all scopes and any click values. The Premium version works with 1/8 MOA clicks, 1/4 MOA clicks, Metric clicks, or Milrad segment click values. So, if you have a scope with 1/8 MOA clicks, you’ll need the Premium version.

AccuScope iPhone Apps are available through Apple’s App Store: Standard | Premium
AccuScope Android Apps are available through the AppBrain Store: Standard and Premium

Editor’s Comment: Does this App really provide a solution you can’t figure out yourself with simple arithmetic? No, but some math-challenged guys may find that the App prevents errors. Additionally, following the step-by-step process used by the App will probably help some shooters avoid confusion, and avoid wasting ammo clicking in the wrong directions.

Note however, that there is an even simpler way to zero, if you have a very solid front and rear rest that will hold the gun absolutely steady while you click. After bore-sighting, fire a couple rounds (with the same point of aim). Then place the rifle so the center of the cross-hairs is exactly on your original point of aim. Next, without disturbing the gun in any way, dial your turrets so that the center of the cross-hair moves over the center of your group. That’s it. You’re now zeroed (though you may want to repeat the process for confirmation). Again, this only works if the gun doesn’t shift one bit when you’re clicking. Having a helper steady the gun as you click the turrets will make this “no-math” method work more effectively.

Click-to-Initial POI Zeroing Method Demonstrated

Product Tip by EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.

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October 28th, 2013

Want to Be the Boss? Leupold & Stevens Seeks New CEO

Want to guide one of America’s leading optics companies? Well here’s your chance. Leupold & Stevens, Inc. is seeking a Chief Executive Officer. Leupold is seeking a new CEO to “lead the company as it continues to expand into new markets and experience record growth.” Here’s the job description:

Leupold & Stevens logo company optics“The CEO at Leupold & Stevens, Inc. partners with the Board of Directors and Corporate Executive Team to ensure short- and long-term organizational goals are achieved. This position is responsible for the strategic leadership and direction of the business, with the objective of providing optimum financial results while maintaining the vision and values of the company.

The Chief Executive Officer also has a key responsibility to ensure that the interests of customers, owner-shareholders, and employees are served in a manner that supports business objectives and in a manner consistent with Leupold & Stevens, Inc. core values. A strong outdoors background is preferred for this highly visible role within the organization and industry.”

Candidates should submit resumes via the Leupold Career Page at Careers.Leupold.com by November 15, 2013. For questions, contact Kimberly King, VP of Human Resources/ Organizational Development. King can be reached at (503) 526-1433 or by email at kking [at] leupold.com.

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October 18th, 2013

Inside Look — Cutaway Weaver Scope Reveals Complex Internals

Based on its external appearance, a modern riflescope may seem simple. It’s just a tube with two or three knobs on the outside right? Well, looks can be deceiving. Modern variable focal-length optics are complex systems with lots of internal parts. Modern scopes, even ‘budget’ optics, use multiple lens elements to allow variable magnification levels and parallax adjustment. We had a chance to look inside a riflescope thanks to a product display from ATK, parent of Alliant Powder, CCI, Federal, RCBS, Speer, Weaver Optics. ATK sliced open a Weaver Super Slam scope so you can see the internal lens elements plus the elevation and windage controls. We thought readers would like to see the “inner workings” of a typical modern rifle scope, so we snapped some pictures. The sectioned Super Slam scope was mounted inside a Plexiglas case, making it a bit hard to get super-sharp images, but you can still see the multiple lenses and the complex windage and elevation controls.

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October 9th, 2013

Gear Review: Steiner 8x30mm Military/Marine Binoculars

A while back your Editor was in New Mexico, on a prairie dog expedition. While in the field, my companions and I used two pairs of Steiner 8x30mm Military/Marine binoculars to spot the critters. Finding the Prairie Dogs (PDs) could be challenging in the high grass. Often, a PD would reveal only its head — a small target at distances approaching 400 yards. We really needed sharp optics with high contrast to spot the dogs hiding behind tufts of grass or dry brush.

The Steiner Military/Marine binoculars performed superbly. I came away very impressed with these armored 8x30mm binoculars. The glass is bright and super-sharp. And the rubber-armored body is truly rugged. These binoculars offer both right and left diopters — important for me as my right eye requires more correction than the left eye. One great feature of the Steiners is the focusing system which keeps everything you can see in focus. This really is a big deal. You don’t have to constantly fiddle with focus — everything past about 20 yards is in sharp focus all the time. As one Steiner owner reports: “Focusing set-up is worth the price of admission. Set it and forget. Amazing. This single feature makes these worth owning.” And the sharpness is impressive. I compared the Steiners’ image with a 6.5-20×40 Leupold EFR riflescope set at 8X. Both 8×30 Steiners were brighter than the Leupold scope, and the Steiners resolved individual blades of grass and fine details better than the Leupold. Of course, comparing a binocular optic with a riflescope is like comparing apples and oranges. The advantages of binoculars (compared to a monocular scope) are well known — the brain combines the two images (left eye and right eye) to create a more vivid, 3D effect, with greater perceived contrast.

Good Binoculars are a “Must-Have” Item for Hunters
After three days in the prairie dog fields I came away convinced that a good set of binoculars is absolutely essential for any varmint hunter. As the PD population was fairly thin where we were shooting, we probably spent five minutes glassing for every minute actually behind the trigger. Over 90% of the dogs were first spotted with binos rather than riflescopes. We had a fixed (non-rotating) bench so it was difficult to swing the rifle more than about 30° from one side to another (60° total arc). With the binoculars, and their wide field of view, we could quickly scan a much wider arc.

Steiner 8×30 Military/Marine Binocs are Just $227.98
At the end of our hunt, I told my host that I planned to purchase a Steiner 8×30 Military/Marine Binocular just like the one we used during our hunt. When I arrived home I was amazed to see that the Steiner 8×30 Military/Marine is available for just $227.98 on Amazon.com, with free shipping for Prime members. That’s a great value, considering the ruggedness and optical quality of the unit.

The 10×50 Steiner Military/Marine is also offered on Amazon.com. It has more magnification and better low-light performance. However, it currently runs about $489.98, more than twice the price of the 8×30 Military/Marine! Unless you really need the 10×50′s extra low-light capability, the 8×30 M/M is the smart choice.

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October 2nd, 2013

Get a $300.00 Kelbly’s Credit When You Buy a March Scope

kelbly.com kelbly's march scope scale $300 credit promoThe good folks at Kelbly’s have announced a great October sales promotion. If you buy a March scope — any March scope in stock — you’ll earn a $300.00 credit that can be used to purchase any other products Kelbly’s sells. That includes rings, reloading gear, bullets, and many more items you’ll find at www.Kelbly.com.

Jim Kelbly explains how this works:

“For the month of October only, buy a March Scope in stock and get $300.00 of credit towards Kelbly’s products and the Kelbly’s store. Kelbly’s now carries a number of reloading products and bullets. The credit can be used same day as scope purchase to get scope rings or anything else we sell. This sale is for any March Scope in stock. With over 150 scopes in stock there is a great selection of scopes. If you would like to see a inventory of scopes just email us and we will send [that] to you. If you have any questions just email or call. NOTE: Scopes will only be sold to U.S. citizens and shipped to U.S. addresses.”

For more information, email jim[at]kelbly.com or call (330) 683-4674 and ask about the October Promo.

kelbly.com kelbly's march scope scale $300 credit promo

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