September 10th, 2016

New Leica Rangemaster CRF 2000-B Laser Rangefinder

Leica CRF 2000-B Rangefinder LRF 2000 Yards

Leica has introduced a new Laser Rangefinder (LRF), the CRF 2000-B, with a claimed effective range of 2000 yards. Leica says upgrades to optics, internal software, and electronics have extended the range of Leica’s top-of-the-line LRF from 1600 yards to 2000 yards. We expect the new unit may indeed have reduced beam divergence or better error correction. In any event we don’t doubt the Leica CRF 2000-B will range farther than previous models, at least when clamped in immovable test fixtures.

However, in the real world LRFs are hand-held, and there’s the problem. We’ve never found ANYone who could hold the ultra-compact Leica LRFs steady enough to range deer-sized objects even at 800 yards. Consequently very few if any folks could really effectively use the claimed 1600-yard range of the previous model. The Leica CRF units are designed to be held vertically. That’s not great ergonomically and this unit was not designed to be fixed to a tripod for extra steadiness. Therefore, we doubt most humans will be able to range 2000 yards with the CRF 2000-B, except maybe with very large targets such as barns or huge storage tanks. It’s just too difficult to hold the little Leica CRFs rock steady.

But even if the new Leica Rangemaster 2000-B’s theoretical extended range doesn’t have much practical utility, there are some interesting new features that may make the 2000-B worth its $799.00 MSRP. First, the 2000-B has air pressure and temperature sensors, along with an on-board inclinometer. That last feature will appeal to Hunters, who often take angled shots. The new CRF 2000-B also offers a variety of ballistics readouts — users can select Equivalent Horizontal Range (EHR) up to 1200 yards or Inches of Holdover, and MIL & MOA corrections to .1 decimal point. The built-in microprocessor is fast — data is delivered to the shooter in only 0.3 seconds via the heads-up four digit LED display in the viewfinder.

As with previous Leica compact LRFs, the new CRF 2000-B is very light and easy to carry. It weighs just 6.5 ounces and really does fit in a shirt pocket. The 7-power (7X) optical lens is bright and sharp, and we appreciate the fact that Leica made this unit waterproof — it will withstand rainstorms though we certainly wouldn’t recommend dropping ANY rangefinder in a river.

View Leica Rangemaster CRF 2000-B features and specifications at: https://us.leica-camera.com/Sport-Optics.

Permalink New Product, Optics No Comments »
January 1st, 2016

Technology: Bluetooth-Enabled Ballistic Targeting System

Ashbury Precision bluetooth wireless rangefinder Vectronix kestrel GPS

You knew it was just a matter of time until modern Bluetooth wireless technology was harnessed for precision shooting. Now weather data from a Kestrel and range info from a Vectronix rangefinder can be shared to a remote PDA with GPS capability. The system works via the common Bluetooth networking protocol used for smartphone accessories and computer peripherals. Ballistic solutions are calculated using Field Firing Solutions software. Composed of weathermeter, rangefinder, and hand-held processor (PDA), this three-part TALON Wireless Ballistic Targeting System was developed for Ashbury Precision Ordnance (APO). The Talon System will be introduced by APO at SHOT Show 2015 where pricing and availability will be announced.

Ashbury Precision bluetooth wireless rangefinder Vectronix kestrel GPS

Here’s how it works — dual Bluetooth feeds (from Kestrel and rangefinder) communicate with a Trimble T41 Juno or NOMAD PDA. The dongle is set up for any Vectronix Laser Rangefinder equipped with a RS232 data port. The enabling technology, a nicely packaged Bluetooth dongle, was developed by a team of U.S. SpecOps personnel. Their goal was enhance operational capabilities by getting rid of wires and cables. They succeeded.

Permalink New Product, Optics 2 Comments »
November 30th, 2014

PrecisionRifleBlog.com Tests Range-Finding Binoculars

Last year, PrecisionRifleBlog.com published results from the most comprehensive field test of rangefinder binoculars ever conducted. The comparison test included virtually every product then available in the USA. If you are thinking about getting a set of binoculars with range-finding capability, you should definitely read this test. Here we summarize key findings of the test, but you’ll want to read the FULL STORY.

Six range-finding binocular optics (and two monocular rangefinders) were field-tested in a variety scenarios to see which had the best performance in terms of both optical clarity and ranging capabilities. The results are based on over 10,000 data points collected from the field over 3 months of testing. Cal Zant, author of PrecisionRifleBlog.com, published a series of posts with exhaustive details about his optical and ranging tests and results, but we’ll hit the highlights here.

Ranging Binocular Field Test and Reviews

VOICE FILE: Click Button to Hear Cal Zant TALK about Rangefinder Binocular Test

Six of the models tested were binoculars, and the other two were monoculars. The Leupold monocular was included for reference, because many shooters have a 1,000-yard rangefinder similar to the RX-1000. The Vectronix Terrapin model was included as the control for ranging performance, because it is known to be an extremely accurate rangefinder (spoiler alert: it is). Cal provides a very detailed side-by-side spec comparison for these models in one of his posts.

Ranging Test Results

Rangefinder Binocular ReviewEach model was used to range 500+ times in a variety of scenarios from 25 to over 30,000 yards. The tests showed these models had similar performance at close and mid-range targets, but at 600 yards their performance started to diverge … so that is where most of the testing was focused.

The chart below summarizes the ranging performance found on the test targets in ideal conditions, which was from a sturdy tripod, at sunset, with 10+ mile visibility. The exact target shape and surroundings varied, but the targets were all approximately 2 MOA wide, highly reflective, and perpendicular to the rangefinder. Specifics on target dimensions, view from the ranging position, and target surroundings are given in the detailed ranging performance results post.

Rangefinder Binoculars Review Ranging Performance Under Ideal Light Conditions

Vectronix is the leader of the rangefinder world, and that was proved once again in these tests. The new Leica Geovid HD-B wasn’t far behind them, with accurate ranging beyond 1 mile. The Zeiss Victory RF also had surgical precision off a tripod, although it had a reduced range compared to the Vectronix and Leica. The Bushnell Fusion 1 Mile also proved to be able to range targets out to their claimed max range of 1,760 yards.

PrecisionRifleBlog.com also tested the ranging performance of each model in bright lighting conditions, and offhand as well. The data from those tests also contained a few surprises. To determine how accurate each model really was, Cal Zant carefully analyzed the results from each model when aimed at precisely positioned, “known distance” targets. To see how those tests turned out, or learn more details about specific models, GO TO full results.

Optical Test Results

Rangefinder Binoculars Review Optical QualityFor the optics tests, Cal’s goal was to find an objective, data-driven approach to testing optical performance. What he came up with was placing eye exam charts from 600 to 1,400 yards with different size letters, and then recording what two different people could accurately read with each model. The data for each unit was summed into a single score so they could be ranked relative to how much detail the testers could make out. More specifics are provided regarding how the test was conducted and how scores were calculated in the optical performance results post. Here are the results from Cal’s data-driven approach:

Rangefinder Binoculars Review Optical Quality

The Leica Geovid HD-B edged out the other models for the top spot, with its completely new, Perger-Porro prism design. The original Leica Geovid HD, and Zeiss Victory RF also showed great optical clarity.

The Rest of the Story

Cal’s full series of posts is very informative. He’s done tons of analysis on the data, and summarizes it in several charts that provide a lot of insight. Cal is also in the process of publishing detailed reviews on each model, including notes he and the other testers compiled for each unit. They used them all — a lot, so they have a unique perspective on what’s good or bad about each. Find out more at the link below:

CLICK HERE to Read Full Article with More Info

Permalink Hunting/Varminting, Optics 4 Comments »
December 24th, 2013

Ultimate Range-Finding Binocular Test by PrecisionRifleBlog.com

PrecisionRifleBlog.com recently published results from the most comprehensive field test of rangefinder binoculars ever conducted. It included virtually every product available in a variety of real-world scenarios, to see which had the best performance in the field in terms of both optical clarity and ranging capabilities. The results are based on over 10,000 data points collected from the field over 3 months of testing. Cal Zant, author of PrecisionRifleBlog.com, published a series of posts with exhaustive details about his optical and ranging tests and results, but we’ll hit the highlights here.

Ranging Binocular Field Test and Reviews

VOICE FILE: Click Button to Hear Cal Zant TALK about Rangefinder Binocular Test

Six of the models tested were binoculars, and the other two were monoculars. The Leupold monocular was included for reference, because many shooters have a 1,000-yard rangefinder similar to the RX-1000. The Vectronix Terrapin model was included as the control for ranging performance, because it is known to be an extremely accurate rangefinder (spoiler alert: it is). Cal provides a very detailed side-by-side spec comparison for these models in one of his posts.

Ranging Test Results

Rangefinder Binocular ReviewEach model was used to range 500+ times in a variety of scenarios from 25 to over 30,000 yards. The tests showed these models had similar performance at close and mid-range targets, but at 600 yards their performance started to diverge … so that is where most of the testing was focused.

The chart below summarizes the ranging performance found on the test targets in ideal conditions, which was from a sturdy tripod, at sunset, with 10+ mile visibility. The exact target shape and surroundings varied, but the targets were all approximately 2 MOA wide, highly reflective, and perpendicular to the rangefinder. Specifics on target dimensions, view from the ranging position, and target surroundings are given in the detailed ranging performance results post.

Rangefinder Binoculars Review Ranging Performance Under Ideal Light Conditions

Vectronix is the leader of the rangefinder world, and that was proved once again in these tests. The new Leica Geovid HD-B wasn’t far behind them, with accurate ranging beyond 1 mile. The Zeiss Victory RF also had surgical precision off a tripod, although it had a reduced range compared to the Vectronix and Leica. The Bushnell Fusion 1 Mile also proved to be able to range targets out to their claimed max range of 1,760 yards.

PrecisionRifleBlog.com also tested the ranging performance of each model in bright lighting conditions, and offhand as well. The data from those tests also contained a few surprises. To determine how accurate each model really was, Cal Zant carefully analyzed the results from each model when aimed at precisely positioned, “known distance” targets. To see how those tests turned out, or learn more details about specific models, GO TO full results.

Optical Test Results

Rangefinder Binoculars Review Optical QualityFor the optics tests, Cal’s goal was to find an objective, data-driven approach to testing optical performance. What he came up with was placing eye exam charts from 600 to 1,400 yards with different size letters, and then recording what two different people could accurately read with each model. The data for each unit was summed into a single score so they could be ranked relative to how much detail the testers could make out. More specifics are provided regarding how the test was conducted and how scores were calculated in the optical performance results post. Here are the results from Cal’s data-driven approach:

Rangefinder Binoculars Review Optical Quality

The Leica Geovid HD-B edged out the other models for the top spot, with its completely new, Perger-Porro prism design. The original Leica Geovid HD, and Zeiss Victory RF also showed great optical clarity.

The Rest of the Story

Cal’s full series of posts is very informative. He’s done tons of analysis on the data, and summarizes it in several charts that provide a lot of insight. Cal is also in the process of publishing detailed reviews on each model, including notes he and the other testers compiled for each unit. They used them all — a lot, so they have a unique perspective on what’s good or bad about each. Find out more at the link below:

CLICK HERE to Read Full Article with More Info

Permalink Gear Review, Optics 3 Comments »
January 17th, 2013

SHOT Show Sampler — Interesting Products for 2013

SHOT Show 2013 has been underway since Monday. This show seems bigger than ever, and the sheer number of noteworthy products on display is mind-boggling. We’ve seen some remarkable new scopes from Nightforce, Kahles, and IOR-Valdada. Dave Kiff at PT&G has some “game-changing” new products. Winchester’s new 17 Win Super Mag rimfire cartridge has generated lots of interest, and Savage showed off its new B.MAG bolt action chambered for the new cartridge.

Here’s a quick sample of some cool or interesting products we saw in action on Media Day or on display inside the Sands Convention Center. We’ll do more complete write-ups/reviews once we “back to the office” and have a change to digest spec sheets and edit video. But please enjoy this photo “sampler” from SHOT Show 2013.

New Kahles 10-50X Competition Scope, with Central (big wheel) Parallax Adjustment

New Savage B.MAG Rifle Chambered in 17 Win Super Mag Rimfire

Prototype “Tinkertoy” Benchrest Rifle from McMillan Built on “Alias” Action

New Datum Dial Ammunition Measurement System from Forster Products

New .338 Lapua Magnum Action and Complete .338 LM Rifles from Kelbly’s

Kelbly's Lapua .338 Panda Action Magnum

New Savage Bolt from PT&G with User-Adjustable Spring Tension

Kelbly's Lapua .338 Panda Action Magnum

Futuristic $22K Tracking-Point Rifle System with Automatic Ranging, Ballistic Calculation, and Aiming Solution

Trackingpoint Target Rifle

New .375 Caliber, 350 grain, ultra-high-BC Match-King Bullet from Sierra

Sierra .375 Bullet

Vectronix Laser Rangefinder Units ($1995.00 – $8510.00)

Vectronix LRF

Air Arms S400 Multi-Purpose Rifles (Regular and Biathlon Models)

Air Arms Air Rifles

Accuracy Int’l PSR Multi-Caliber Rifle System — ‘Takedown Edition’ in .338 LM

Accuracy International  PSR

Permalink New Product, News 1 Comment »
April 10th, 2012

New High-End Extreme-Range Laser RangeFinder from Vectronix

terrapin LRF laser Vectronic rangefinderEurooptics.com now carries the impressive Vectronix Terrapin Laser Rangefinder. The $1995.00 Terrapin is a high-grade, milspec device rated to 2400m, well beyond the stated ranges for LRFs in the $600-$1000 class. Field reports indicated that the Terrapin is very good. One field tester, using a Terrapin set on a tripod, said the Terrapin hit 16″ plates at 800 yards more reliably than a Swarovski Laserguide. Ranging a small object like that at 800 yards is a tough test for any LRF. The Terrapin performs well on smaller objects because it has extremely tight beam divergence (this means the beam doesn’t spread out like a wide cone at long range).

The reports we’ve received indicate that the Vectronix lives up to expectations created by its 2400m distance rating. Jason Baney reports: “This Vectronics is impressive. In the right conditions, these units can range well beyond 2000 yards. On a Snipers’ Hide Thread, Vectronix Terrapin owners have reported ranging successfully past 3000 yards on large objects.” Available in tan or green, the Terrapin has a rugged aluminum inner housing and is rated to be waterproof with 60 minutes of immersion. It is easy to hold, and weighs just 1.1 pounds. Efficient electronics allow the Terrapin to make over 7,000 ranging “shots” before the two CR123 batteries need to be replaced.

terrapin LRF laser Vectronic rangefinder

Permalink New Product, Optics No Comments »