April 29th, 2021

New 2021 JoyPod-X — Rapid Height Adjustability + Color Options

2021 JoyPod-X bipod seb lambang coaxial bipod F-Class F-TR joystick

F-TR and varmint shooters know about the outstanding JoyPod coaxial bipod created by Sebastian Lambang of SebRests.com. This popular design provides a stable, low-COG platform that allows instant aiming changes with a handy joystick. Over the years the JoyPod design has been refined, and now the enhanced Gen 2, 2021 JoyPod-X will soon be available. The 2021 JoyPod-X offers improved feet plus a new, rapid leg adjustment system that is a real break-through. For this new JoyPod-X, specific enhancements have been made to internal plates, the locking lever, and the more radiused top and feet. Plus now you have a choice of six anodized colors: blue, red, green, purple, black, and bronze.

2021 JoyPod-X bipod seb lambang coaxial bipod F-Class F-TR joystick

Leg Height Adjustment System
on New 2021 JoyPod-X

Seb tells us: “Now height adjustment of the JoyPod-X can be much easier quicker and more precise. With a simple, adjustable brake and improved ratchet system. Thanks to Bob Bock for the design suggestions”.

Watch the video to see how this works. You can adjust each leg individually in seconds. You can do individual clicks up and down, with ratcheted steps. Or slide the entire leg unit rapidly up and down for gross elevation changes. So you have the choice of small, precise increments or big movements — whichever you want. This is very slick.

JoyPod-X Coming Soon in 6 Colors
The new 2021 JoyPod-X Should be ready sometime in mid- to late-May 2021, according to Sebastian Lambang. The JoyPod-X will be available in blue, red, green, purple, black, and bronze colors.

The head of the 2021 JoyPod-X has been radiused and refined. The design allows the JoyPod-X to fit a variety of fore-arm rails. To secure the JoyPod-X on your rifle, slide on the rail and then tension the clamping lever.

2021 JoyPod-X bipod seb lambang coaxial bipod F-Class F-TR joystick

2021 JoyPod-X bipod seb lambang coaxial bipod F-Class F-TR joystick

Permalink - Videos, Gear Review, New Product, Tactical 3 Comments »
April 29th, 2021

8.4 Million New American Gun Owners Drive Demand for Ammo

Ammunition shortage gun sales 2020

With reloading components and factory-loaded ammunition still in very short supply, gun owners are justifiably concerned. Every day, in our AccurateShooter Forum, members ask “Where are the primers?”, “Why can’t I get loaded ammo?”, “Why have component prices doubled or tripled?”. The answer is complex. Yes there have been production shortfalls (with the Remington Bankruptcy and some raw material shortages), yes there has been a reaction to the Biden election (causing panic buying), and yes there have been hoarding and profiteering (just look as the prices of primers on Gunbroker — over $300 per 1000!).

But probably the number one factor in the supply shortages has been the increase in gun owners in the past year, fueled in part by concerns over the BLM/Antifa led riots and social unrest, and Democratic Party attacks on gun rights. And, according to the NSSF, roughly 8,400,000 Americans purchased their first firearm in 2020. If each of these new gun owners purchased just two, 50-round boxes of ammo, that equates to 840,000,000 rounds of ammo. Think about that…the gun industry would have to produce an additional 2.3 million rounds of ammo EVERY DAY just to fill the demands from new gun owners. There are consequences for this increased production. Primers are in short supply because much of the available inventory is being used in loaded ammo.

Ammunition shortage gun sales 2020

This NSSF Infographic helps explain the situation. Among gunshops/dealers nationwide, there was a 95% increase in gun sales for the first half of 2020 (compared to 2019). And ammunition sales rose by 139%.

Ammunition shortage gun sales 2020

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April 29th, 2021

Cartridge Headspace 101 — Understanding the Basics

Brownells Headspace Gauge cutaway chamber drawing SAAMI ANSI

Do you know what the inside of a rifle chamber (and throat zone) really looks like? Do you understand the concept of headspace and why it’s important? If not, you should read the Brownells GunTech article Gauging Success – Minimum Headspace and Maximum COL. This article explains the basics of headspace and shows how to measure headspace (and length to lands) in your barrels with precision. The article also explains how to adjust your full-length sizing dies to “bump the shoulder” as needed.

Why is headspace important? The article explains: “Controlling headspace and setting proper C.O.L. also represent improved safety and reduced cost of handloading. Excessive headspace can cause case head separation and gases in excess of 60,000 PSI escaping from a rifle’s chamber. Too little headspace can result in a chamber forced bullet crimp and a bullet that becomes an obstruction more than a properly secured projectile. Excessive C.O.L. can result in a rifling-bound bullet, a condition that could result in spikes of excessive pressure.” [Editor’s NOTE: It is common for competitive benchrest shooters to seat bullets into the rifling. This can be done safely if you reduce your loads accordingly. With some bullets we often see best accuracy .010″ (or more) into the lands. However, this can generate more pressure than the same bullet seated .010″ away from initial lands contact. As with all reloading, start low and work up gradually.]

Brownells Headspace Gauge cutaway chamber drawing SAAMI ANSI

How is headspace specified? Most cartridges used within the United States are defined within ANSI/SAAMI Z299.3-4. Brownells explains: “In the case of the .243 Winchester, as an example, there are pressure specifications, cartridge drawings and, as pictured above, chamber drawings. Armed with a chamber drawing, each manufacturer producing a firearm for the .243 Winchester knows the proper standard dimension to cut chambers and set headspace. Notice there are two headspace reference dimensions for the chamber. The upper is a place in the chamber where the shoulder is .400″ in diameter; the “datum” or “basic” line. The lower is the 1.630″~1.640″ minimum – maximum dimension from the breech face (bolt face) to that point in the chamber that measures .400″.”

The actual headspace of any firearm is the distance from the breech face to the point in the chamber that is intended to prevent forward motion of a cartridge.

Finding Cartridge Length to Lands with OAL Gauge
Using a comparator on a set of calipers, you can quickly determine catridge base-to-ogive length. This is the measurement from the base of the case to the forward-most full diameter section of the bullet, typically called the ogive. Shown here, that ogive is 0.243″ diameter.

The next step is using a modified (threaded) case with a Hornady OAL tool to determine Length-to-Lands (LTL) in your rifle’s chamber. During this measurement process, the modified case, with a bullet in its neck, is inserted in the chamber. Go slow, take your time. Here are 5 tips that will help you get repeatable and reliable LTL measurements:

1. Start with a clean chamber and clean barrel throat.
2. Make sure the modified case is fully screwed down and seated on the OAL Gauge. It can sometimes unscrew a bit during repeated measurements.
3. Insert the modified case slowly and gently, but ensure the shoulder of the modified case is fully seated on the end of the chamber.
4. Push the gray plastic rod GENTLY. It is common for the bullet to be tilted a bit. You want to allow the bullet to self-center in the throat BEFORE you apply much pressure. Then tap a couple times and push until you feel resistance. Do NOT push too hard — that will jam the bullet in the lands.
5. Repeat the measurement at least 3 more times. If you follow our instructions, you should, typically, get a repeatable measurement, within 0.0015″ or so, 3 out of 4 times.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading, Tech Tip 2 Comments »