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August 22nd, 2020

Sniper’s Hide Precision Rifle Fundamentals Class — Video Report

Sniper's Hide Precision Rifle network

Sniper’s Hide offers a training class for novice shooters getting started in the PRS/NRL precision rifle game. This Precision Rifle Fundamentals course covers equipment selection, using shooting supports, rifle handling, SFP scope basics, and much more. The Precision Rifle Network video below covers a Sniper’s Hide class offered at the Sure Shot Range, near Vinton, Iowa. This video covers the class both in the field and in the classroom, and has interviews with participants.

One participant praised the course: “As a novice shooter, this [Sniper’s Hide Class] was probably the best money I have spent. It helped me learn all my equipment, how to use rear bags, how to figure out dope… and for the dollar, it’s the best money I’ve spent so far.”

Another student concurred: “I’ve been through all kinds of training, including the military and law enforcement, and I have to say the is one of the best, if not THE best class I’ve ever been in.”

Sniper's Hide Precision Rifle network

Joel from the Precision Rifle Network stated: “At the end of four days, from two back-to-back precision rifle courses, we sent approximately 4500 rounds down-range. All in all, I would say this is some of the finest precision rifle training you can find ANYwhere.”

Sniper's Hide Precision Rifle network

Another Video from Frank Galli of Sniper’s Hide
Frank Galli, aka “Lowlight”, is the head honcho of Sniper’s Hide. In the video below, Galli offers a series of shooting tips he calls the “Long Range Shooting W.T.F”. No that’s not what you think it is — no cuss words are involved. “W.T.F.” stands for Wind, Trajectory, and Fundamentals of Marksmanship. To shoot well, Frank says, you first must gauge the wind correctly. Second, you must know the trajectory of your load in your rifle — i.e. know your ballistics. If you want to hit a target at long range, you must start with a rock-solid zero, determine an accurate muzzle velocity, and know the Ballistic Coefficient of the bullet. Plug all that into a good ballistic program (along with elevation, temp, and air pressure) and you should have your point of impact (within a click or two) out to 1000 yards.

Watch Video for Tips about Wind-Reading, Ballistics, and Shooting Fundamentals:

The third element of “W.T.F” is “F” for “Fundamentals of Marksmanship”. This actually involves multiple factors — body position (relative to the rifle), finding your natural point of aim, proper head alignment behind the scope, pre-loading the bipod, breathing modulation, trigger control, follow through, recoil management and more. Frank addresses all these “fundamentals” in the second half of the video, starting at the 3:40 time-mark.

Books for Precision Rifle Training

Along with the Videos above, here are two recommended print publications. These both offer a wealth of useful information for PRS competitors and those interested in tactical/practical style shooting. In addition these books will also benefit hunters. They provide good tips on shooting positions, ranging, supports (bipod, tripod, bags) and more.

Practical Shooter’s Guide

Marcus Blanchard Practical Shooter's Guide

Thinking of getting started in the Practical/Tactical shooting game? Looking for ways to be more stable when shooting from unconventional positions? Then you may want to read Marcus Blanchard’s Practical Shooter’s Guide (A How-To Approach for Unconventional Firing Positions and Training). Unlike almost every “how to shoot” book on the market, Blanchard’s work focuses on the shooting skills and positions you need to succeed in PRS matches and similar tactical competitions. Blanchard provides clear advice on shooting from barricades, from roof-tops, from steep angles. Blanchard says you need to train for these types of challenges: “I believe the largest factor in the improvement of the average shooter isn’t necessarily the gear; it’s the way the shooter approaches obstacles and how they properly train for them.”

Long Range Shooting Handbook

Ryan Cleckner’s Long Range Shooting Handbook is the best-selling modern book on practical rifle skills. A former U.S. Army sniper instructor, Cleckner is knowledgeable, and his text is well-organized and chock full of good information. You can view Sample Chapters on Amazon.com.

Ryan Cleckner’s highly-regarded Long Range Shooting Handbook is designed as an intro to important fundamental concepts such as MOA vs. Mils, External Ballistics, and Environmental Effects. Included are personal tips and advice based on Cleckner’s years of experience as a sniper instructor and special operations sniper.

The Long Range Shooting Handbook is divided into three main categories: What It Is/How It Works, Fundamentals, and How to Use It. “What It Is/How It Works” covers equipment, terminology, and basic principles. “Fundamentals” covers the theory of long range shooting. “How to Use It” gives practical advice on implementing what you’ve learned, so you can progress as a skilled, long range shooter. This book will benefit any long-range shooter, not just PRS/NRL competitors.

Permalink - Videos, Shooting Skills, Tactical 3 Comments »
November 20th, 2015

Sniper’s Hide Boss Hot Rods His Ruger Precision Rifle

Ruger Precision Rifle Frank Galli Snipers Hide RPR K&P Magpul PRS Seekins

If you own a Ruger Precision Rifle (RPR), or are considering purchasing one, you should watch this short video from Sniper’s Hide. The Hide’s head honcho, Frank Galli (aka “LowLight”), added some upgrades to his RPR, to enhance looks and ergonomics. Frankly we think the RPR is pretty good right out of the box. Our friend Gavin Gear of UltimateReloader.com is seeing near-half-MOA accuracy with his “box-stock” RPR in .243 Winchester. Nonetheless we know some RPR owners will want to swap barrels or otherwise “hot rod” their rifle. Here’s how it’s done…

Video Shows New Barrel, Stock, Grip and Handguards Installed on Ruger Precision Rifle:

Galli unbolted quite a few factory parts, replacing them with proven aftermarket components. That’s one of the advantages of the RPR — it’s modular nature allows the owner to make changes with simple tools. Off came the handguards, stock, and grip. While we’ve been fairly impressed with the accuracy of some RPR factory barrels, Galli decided to fit a custom barrel, courtesy Chad Dixon of LongRifles Inc. (LRI). All totaled, the new components cost more than the original rifle. Galli figures he now has about $2400 in the gun. A new RPR (if you can find one) will run you about $1100-$1200.00.

The new barrel was a good investment, but the other items could be considered indulgences. But we like the fact that Galli demonstrated how easily the RPR can be modified by anyone with basic mechanical skills. (The Ruger’s barrel-mounting system allows you to run a “Pre-fit” barrel with headspace set by clamping nuts.) CLICK HERE for details of the build.

Ruger Precision Rifle Frank Galli Snipers Hide RPR K&P Magpul PRS Seekins

New Components for LowLight’s Ruger Precision Rifle

Magpul MOE Grip
Magpul PRS Stock
Seekins Precision “Triangle” Handguards
LongRifles Inc. (LRI) Aluminum Bolt Shroud
Custom K&P “Pre-Fit” Barrel from LRI (chambered in 6.5 Creedmoor)

Permalink Gunsmithing, Tactical No Comments »
October 10th, 2014

Sniper’s Hide Boss Builds a Tactical Tack-Driver in Gunsmith Class

Frank Galli, aka “Lowlight”, runs the popular SnipersHide.com website. A while back, Frank completed a gunsmithing course with Robert Gradous. Frank recounts the learning process in an informative, nicely-illustrated article on the ‘Hide. Frank explains how he put together a new 6.5 Creedmoor tactical rifle using a Bartlein barrel, Bighorn Action (Rem clone with floating bolt-head), and a “lightly used” Accuracy International 1.5 chassis. The HD video below shows the process start-to-finish. READ Full Article.

During Frank’s “hands-on” training sessions with Gradous, Frank learned to thread and chamber a barrel, fit a recoil lug, and install the barreled action in the AI chassis. Chambering was done with great care: “We spent the better part of the day working the barrel. I feel this is a critical component and seeing the attention to detail in Robert’s approach confirmed it for me. When it came time to chamber Robert had a custom tight chamber reamer there for a 6.5CM but I’m shooting a tactical rifle, tight chambers aren’t for me, and this was clear, as out came the standard SAAMI reamer.”


Frank also learned how to modify an aluminum chassis: “the AI chassis had the recoil lug opened up, but it was opened in the wrong direction. This was going to require milling increasing the gap to at least a 1/2″ in size. Robert was really leery of this, but my attitude was, ‘it’s just a chassis and nothing a little Marine Tex can’t handle’.” Thankfully the chassis mod came out OK.

Once the barreled action was complete and the AI chassis was successfully milled, Frank applied a tan Cerakote finish to the barreled action. This would give a proper tactical look to the rifle, while providing superior corrosion resistance for the metal parts. To learn more about Cerakote finishing, check out the Cerakote Application Video, published last week in the Daily Bulletin.

When the rifle was complete, Frank took it out for testing with a variety of ammo, both factory fodder and handloads. There were some initial worries about accuracy as it took a while for the barrel to break in. A few sessions of bore cleaning were required before the barrel stopped fouling and then — like magic — the rifle started printing really small groups.

By the end of his load testing session, Frank was getting good groups with Hornady 120gr GMX factory 6.5 Creedmoor ammo, and really superb groups with handloads. The 120gr GMX ammo “was going 3100 fps with no ill effects”. The best handloads were approaching 1/4 MOA for three shots, and Frank’s load with Berger 130 VLDs shot even smaller than that: “In my opinion the load development we did was worth its weight in gold. Where else can you build in a rifle in two days, then go out and develop a baseline load using everything from 120gr ammo to 140gr ammo with a few in between? My favorite load and clearly the rifle’s too, was the [Berger] 130gr VLD. This gave us great velocity, awesome groups [with some one-holers] and really nice results at distance.”


Lowlight’s Gunsmithing Story is a ‘Must-Read’
We recommend you read Frank’s story. It shows that, with the right tools, and the supervision of a master smith, even a novice can produce an ultra-accurate rifle. For those of you who have considered taking a gunsmithing class, Frank’s successful experience with gunsmith Robert Gradous should give you plenty of motivation.

CLICK HERE to Read Lowlight’s Gunsmithing Course Article
CLICK HERE for Info on Gradous Rifles Gunsmithing Class

Photos courtesy SnipersHide.com and Frank Galli, used by permission.

Permalink - Articles, - Videos, Gunsmithing 1 Comment »
August 10th, 2011

Lowlight Goes to Gunsmithing Class — And Builds a Tack-Driver

Frank Galli, aka “Lowlight”, runs the popular SnipersHide.com website. Frank recently completed a gunsmithing course with Robert Gradous. Frank recounts the learning process in an informative, nicely-illustrated article on the ‘Hide. Frank explains how he put together a new 6.5 Creedmoor tactical rifle using a Bartlein barrel, Bighorn Action (Rem clone with floating bolt-head), and a “lightly used” Accuracy International 1.5 chassis. The HD video below shows the process start-to-finish. READ Full Article.

During Frank’s “hands-on” training sessions with Gradous, Frank learned to thread and chamber a barrel, fit a recoil lug, and install the barreled action in the AI chassis. Chambering was done with great care: “We spent the better part of the day working the barrel. I feel this is a critical component and seeing the attention to detail in Robert’s approach confirmed it for me. When it came time to chamber Robert had a custom tight chamber reamer there for a 6.5CM but I’m shooting a tactical rifle, tight chambers aren’t for me, and this was clear, as out came the standard SAAMI reamer.”


Frank also learned how to modify an aluminum chassis: “the AI chassis had the recoil lug opened up, but it was opened in the wrong direction. This was going to require milling increasing the gap to at least a 1/2″ in size. Robert was really leery of this, but my attitude was, ‘it’s just a chassis and nothing a little Marine Tex can’t handle’.” Thankfully the chassis mod came out OK.

Once the barreled action was complete and the AI chassis was successfully milled, Frank applied a tan Cerakote finish to the barreled action. This would give a proper tactical look to the rifle, while providing superior corrosion resistance for the metal parts. To learn more about Cerakote finishing, check out the Cerakote Application Video, published last week in the Daily Bulletin.

When the rifle was complete, Frank took it out for testing with a variety of ammo, both factory fodder and handloads. There were some initial worries about accuracy as it took a while for the barrel to break in. A few sessions of bore cleaning were required before the barrel stopped fouling and then — like magic — the rifle started printing really small groups.

By the end of his load testing session, Frank was getting good groups with Hornady 120gr GMX factory 6.5 Creedmoor ammo, and really superb groups with handloads. The 120gr GMX ammo “was going 3100 fps with no ill effects”. The best handloads were approaching 1/4 MOA for three shots, and Frank’s load with Berger 130 VLDs shot even smaller than that: “In my opinion the load development we did was worth its weight in gold. Where else can you build in a rifle in two days, then go out and develop a baseline load using everything from 120gr ammo to 140gr ammo with a few in between? My favorite load and clearly the rifle’s too, was the [Berger] 130gr VLD. This gave us great velocity, awesome groups [with some one-holers] and really nice results at distance.”


Lowlight’s Gunsmithing Story is a ‘Must-Read’
We recommend you read Frank’s story. It shows that, with the right tools, and the supervision of a master smith, even a novice can produce an ultra-accurate rifle. For those of you who have considered taking a gunsmithing class, Frank’s successful experience with gunsmith Robert Gradous should give you plenty of motivation.

CLICK HERE to Read Lowlight’s Gunsmithing Course Article
CLICK HERE for Info on Gradous Rifles Gunsmithing Class

Photos courtesy SnipersHide.com and Frank Galli, used by permission.

Permalink - Articles, - Videos, Gunsmithing 3 Comments »