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April 1st, 2021

Biden Orders All Military Terminology to Be Gender-Neutral

joe biden military language gender neutral racism systematic racism

By means of an Executive Order signed yesterday, U.S. President Joe Biden has ordered a ban on ALL military words/terms considered sexist or culturally insensitive. The President has ordered the Pentagon to immediately determine replacement nomenclature for offensive words such as “cockpit” and “chief”. Starting today, all military communications must be “gender-neutral” and not male-centric. To address the issue, the Pentagon is now forming a “Rapid Gender Neutralization Force” with top generals and admirals from the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps. Phase One funding of $126.9 million has been allocated from the 2021 U.S. Special Operations budget to handle the Gender Neutralization project.

Among the military nouns, verbs, adjectives and acronyms that will be banned are the terms listed below, with the reason for the ban, and proposed replacements.

Cockpit — Not Gender Neutral (New: Pilot Enclosure)
Airman/Airmen — Not Gender Neutral (New: Aviator/Aviators)
Broadside — Offensive to Female Navy Personnel (New: Full Fire Sequence)
Chief and Chief of Staff — Native American Cultural Appropriation (New: Leader, Leader of Group)
Foxhole — Offensive to Female Infantry Personnel (New: Person Pit)
ASDIC — Offensive to Female Navy Personnel (New: Anti-Submarine Sonar ASS)

Military Phonetic Alphabet Changes (Mandatory Immediately)

In addition to the ordered changes in specific military terminology (as listed above), all U.S. Armed Services will immediately start using new Radio Phonetic Call-outs for particular letters of the alphabet. Here are the new Mandatory Radio/Telephone Comms Alphabet terms (with others pending):

“G Golf” (Issue — Golf, favored by white elites, perpetuates systemic racism) Replaced with “G Grim”.
“P Papa” (Issue — Not LGBTQ tolerant) Replaced with gender-neutral “P Parent”.
“K Kilo” (Issue — Promotes drug trafficking) Replaced with “K Kamala”.
“R Romeo” (Issue — Promotes male patriarchy) Replaced with “R Reset”.
“W Whisky” (Issue — Promotes alcohol abuse) Replaced with “W Woke”.
“Z Zulu” (Issue — Racism, Cultural Appropriation) — Replaced with “Z Zealot”

The phonetic alphabet is a list of words used to identify letters in a message transmitted by radio and/or telephone. The phonetic alphabet can also be signaled with flags, lights, and Morse Code.

joe biden military language gender neutral racism systematic racism

Is it Time for Major Changes in Our Military Language?

For many years, U.S. and NATO military leaders have called for progressive, inclusive terminology changes. Here are three recent articles in highly-respected military journals discussing the issue:

We need gender-neutral words to attract female service personnel:

“Why is adopting gender-neutral language so difficult for the Armed Forces? In 2017, a training establishment was widely ridiculed in the press for having suggested a fairly mild list of gender-neutral terms to replace words such as ‘chaps’ and ‘manpower’. Gendered language does more than just give offence[.] The real effects are … insidious, perpetuating stereotypes, damaging recruitment and retention and undermining the ability of the Armed Forces to harness the talents of its people. At the most severe, it affects mental health, damages unit cohesion and undermines operational effectiveness.”

Source: Wavellroom.com, Importance of Gender Neutral Language for Defense

joe biden military language gender neutral racism systematic racism
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The horrible effects of military-forged toxic masculinity spills over into the business world:

“Military language infused in business systematically elevates traditionally ‘masculine’ qualities and traits as most … valued and important for moving up into the ranks of leadership. Those who don’t fit the mold struggle to rise. The cycle of ‘institutionalized masculinity’ represents a textbook example of how any ‘ism’ becomes institutionalized — racism, sexism, ageism, and anything else that gets ingrained and perpetuated into culture, ultimately reinforcing the status quo and keeping others on the fringe.”

Source: Inc.com, Sexist Military Language Infiltrates Business Culture
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U.S. Male and Female Soldiers Show New Gender-Neutral Combat Uniforms

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Along with gender-neutral words, many military leaders now favor gender-neutral uniforms for all personnel. Shown above are U.S. soldiers field-testing a new gender-neutral combat uniform. It is believed that the U.S. Army is seriously considering issuing this type of combat clothing for the U.S. Army Rangers, which will be renamed the “Rangerettes” in accord with President Biden’s Executive Order.
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UK Military leaders agree we must rid the English language of oppressive gendered language:

“Gendered language permeates the very fabric of the UK’s Armed Forces, from personnel answering the phone with ‘Sir’ to the widespread use of terms such as ‘unmanned’ and ‘airman’. The use of language that is male-centric only serves to create an image that the armed forces are made up only of men, when increasingly they are not.

It’s not about being ‘woke’ — Defense consultant Dr. Alex Walmsley said the debate around the use of gendered language is ‘evolving in a good way’ adding that the push to change the language used in defense was not just about ‘being woke’.

The idea of a woman performing a job whose title implies she is a man, even though women are able to serve in every role in the UK’s Armed Forces, means that change is a ‘no-brainer’. It is not a big deal; we’re not asking for HMS Prince of Wales to be called ‘Princess of Wales’, Walmsley pointed out.”

Gendered language is not only damaging to women, but also non-binary or transgender service members and defense industry professionals. Changing the words you use is such a minor thing[.] Retiring the term ‘manpower’ in favor of ‘personnel’ does not suddenly mean the UK can no longer conduct a freedom of navigation exercise in the South China Sea. — Emma Salisbury Ph.D.

Source: Army-Technology.com, Words Matter — A Case for Gender-Neutral Language in Defense

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November 11th, 2018

Honor All Those Who Served This Veterans Day

Memorial Veterans Day Vet Army Navy Marines WWII

On that day, let us solemnly remember the sacrifices of all those who fought so valiantly, on the seas, in the air, and on foreign shores, to preserve our heritage of freedom, and let us reconsecrate ourselves to the task of promoting and enduring peace so that their efforts shall not have been in vain.

– 1954, President Dwight D. Eisenhower, Veterans Day proclamation.

100 Years Later…
On the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month of 1918, bugle calls signaled the ‘cease fire’ ending the First World War. (The official Armistice was signed earlier that morning.) To those who endured it, WWI was the “Great War”, “the War to End All Wars.” Tragically, an even greater conflict consumed the world just two decades later.

Today, 100 years after the end of WWI, Americans mark the anniversary of the WWI Armistice as “Veterans Day”. In Canada it is known as Remembrance Day. On this solemn occasion we honor all those who have served in the military in times of war and peace.

Memorial Veterans Day Vet Army Navy Marines WWII

While more WWII veterans pass away each year, there are still over 20.4 million veterans in the United States. Take time today to honor those soldiers, sailors, and airmen who have served their nation with pride. Today we remember that… “All gave some, and some gave all.” History of Veterans Day.

Former Secretary of Veterans Affairs Dr. James Peake asked Americans to recognize the nation’s 20.4 million living veterans and the generations before them who fought to protect freedom and democracy: “While our foremost thoughts are with those in distant war zones today, Veterans Day is an opportunity for Americans to pay their respects to all who answered the nation’s call to military service.”

On Veterans Day we especially need to remember the seriously wounded combat veterans. These men and women summon great courage every day to overcome the lasting injuries they suffered in battle. Some of these soldiers have lost limbs, yet volunteered to return to combat duty. That is dedication beyond measure — true patriotism.

Memorial Veterans Day Vet Army Navy Marines WWII

CLICK HERE for List of Regional Veterans Day Ceremonies.

National Veterans Day Ceremony
The Veterans Day National Ceremony is held each year on November 11th at Arlington National Cemetery. The ceremony commences precisely at 11:00 a.m. with a wreath laying at the Tomb of the Unknowns and continues inside the Memorial Amphitheater with a parade of colors by veterans’ organizations. The ceremony is intended to honor and thank all who served in the U.S. Armed Forces. Major regional ceremonies and events are also held throughout the country.

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April 1st, 2015

Gun Tech: Top Barrel-Makers Adopt Degaussing Technology

Advancements in barrel technology in recent decades have been impressive. Today’s premium barrels deliver accuracy that could only have been dreamed-of decades ago. And now a new development promises to help barrel-makers craft the most uniform, consistent, and stable barrels ever.

What’s the new technology? You may be surprised. It’s not a surface treatment, or a cryogenic bath. The latest development in barrel manufacturing is Degaussing — the process of de-magnetizing metal objects. Degaussing is now used in many industries to uniform metallic products and to prevent unwanted interactions with magnetic fields. LEARN MORE.

Degaussing is the process of decreasing or eliminating a remnant magnetic field. It is named after the gauss, a unit of magnetism, which in turn was named after Carl Friedrich Gauss.

At the recent IWA show in Germany, Vallon GmbH, a German manufacturer of degaussing machines, told us that two major Wisconsin barrel-makers have purchased Vallon industrial degaussing units. The units sold to the American barrel-makers are similar to Vallon’s EMS unit show below. This can degauss (i.e. de-magnetize) 50 barrel blanks in one pass.

Barrel degaussing Vallon Kreiger Bartline Wisconsin IWA Show Navy James Crofts

The Vallon degausser works by passing the barrel steel through a coil. Vallon explains: “The density of magnetic field lines is at its maximum in the coil centre, and is strongly decreasing towards the outside. If a ferromagnetic work piece (steel) is introduced into the coil, the field lines are concentrating and flooding the work piece. The conductivity of steel is up to 800 times higher than that of air. Degaussing is done during a continuous movement of the work piece, leading out of the coil. Decreasing field strength is achieved by a slow extraction from the coil.”

Barrel degaussing Vallon Kreiger Bartline Wisconsin IWA Show Navy James Crofts

How Degaussing Improves Barrel Steel and Rifle Performance
So what does magnetism have to do with barrel performance? How can degaussing help make a barrel better? Vallon’s scientists tell us that degaussing has three major benefits. First, it aligns ferrous elements within the barrels, strengthening the steel at the molecular level from the inside out. Second, by reducing static surface charges, degaussing reduces chatter during drilling, which creates a straighter bore with a better surface finish. Lastly, there is evidence that degaussed barrels produce slightly more velocity. When a copper-clad bullet spins through a non-degaussed (magnetically-charged) barrel, this creates waste electrical energy. The energy expended reduces velocity very slightly. You can see this effect yourself if you spin a copper rod in the middle of a donut-shaped magnet. This creates an electrical charge.

Here a barrel is checked after degaussing with a Vallon EMS. The meter records a zero magnetic value, showing complete degaussing success.
Barrel degaussing Vallon Kreiger Bartline Wisconsin IWA Show Navy James Crofts

Degaussing Will Add $50.00 to Barrel Cost
We know what you’re thinking: “All right, degaussing seems beneficial, but how much will this add to the cost of my new barrel?” Based on off-the-record conversations with two barrel-makers, we estimate that degaussing will add less than $50.00 to the cost of a new barrel blank. That’s a small price to pay for greater accuracy and barrel life.

Barrel degaussing Vallon Kreiger Bartline Wisconsin IWA Show Navy James CroftsAsk a Sailor — F-Class Champion and
U.S. Navy Veteran Explains Degaussing

We asked reigning F-TR Champion James Crofts about barrel degaussing. A U.S. Navy veteran, he immediately understood the potential benefits of this process. “I served in nuclear submarines. Since before World War II, the U.S. Navy degaussed its subs and smaller warships. This had many benefits. Principally, it helped reduce the risk of triggering magnetic mines. But that wasn’t the only benefit — the degaussing process gave the steel greater resilience and longevity. And that’s why the Navy degaussed non-combat vessels as well. Will a degaussed barrel shoot better? Honestly I can’t say. But based on my Navy experience, I bet degaussed steel will be more uniform and will last longer. I’m glad somebody is trying this out on rifle barrels. Put me on the waiting list!”

Barrel degaussing Vallon Kreiger Bartline Wisconsin IWA Show Navy James Crofts

The above photo show a U.S. nuclear submarine during a degaussing (also called “deperming”) session. This reduces the vessel’s electromagnetic signature, making it more stealthy. Deperming also adds to the vessel’s longevity. With steel-hulled ships, static electricity builds up as the hull slices through the water. A powerful, constant static charge will cause the steel to deteriorate. Degaussing (deperming) helps prevent this, extending the life of the hull.

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February 3rd, 2013

Former U.S. Navy SEAL Sniper Chris Kyle Killed in Texas

Chris Kyle Sniper SEAL dead

Chris Kyle, highly-decorated U.S. Navy SEAL (retired) and author of the best-selling book American Sniper: an Autobiography was shot dead yesterday at a Texas gun range where he was helping other veterans. The suspected shooter was Eddie Ray Routh, 25, a former marine who was suffering from PTSD. Also killed by Routh was Kyle’s friend Chad Littlefield. Read Related Story from KHOU.com.

Kyle served four tours-of-duty in the Middle East. Kyle served in every major battle in Operation Iraqi Freedom. While deployed in Iraq, Kyle was so feared that insurgents named him Al-Shaitan Ramad (“The Devil of Rahmadi”), and put a $20,000 bounty on his head — later increased to $80,000. In 2008 outside Sadr City, Kyle made a 2,100-yard shot, killing an insurgent who was armed with a rocket launcher. Kyle was using a PGM 338 rifle chambered in .338 Lapua Magnum.

During his military service, Kyle was awarded two silver stars, five bronze stars, and Navy and Marine Corps Commendation and Achievement Medals. Following his combat deployments, Kyle became chief instructor for training Naval Special Warfare Sniper and Counter-Sniper teams, and he authored the Naval Special Warfare Sniper Doctrine, the first Navy SEAL sniper manual. Kyle is survived by his wife and two children.

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July 20th, 2010

U.S. Navy Shoots Down Target Drones with Laser “Death-Ray”

With modern benchrest guns capable of shooting “zero” groups in competition, one wonders what is next in the accuracy game. Perhaps laser rifles? Well, the U.S. Navy believes high-tech lasers may replace projectile weapons in the future — the very near future. In fact, the Navy has already successfully tested a deadly laser cannon.

U.S. Navy Blasts Drones Out of Sky with 32 Kilowatt Laser Cannon
The Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA), with support from Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), successfully tracked, engaged, and destroyed mock-threat Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) flying over the ocean. The Navy’s new “Death Ray”, actually a high-intensity (32 Kw) laser, was aimed using a beam director on a KINETO Tracking Mount, controlled by a MK 15 Close In Weapon System (CIWS).

According to Scientific American: “During the test, the Navy’s Laser Weapon System (LaWS) … engaged and destroyed four UAV targets flying over water near the Navy’s weapons and training facility on San Nicolas Island in California’s Santa Barbara Channel, about 120 kilometers west of Los Angeles. The Phalanx — a rapid-fire, computer-controlled, radar-guided gun system — used electro-optical tracking and radio frequency sensors to provide range data to the LaWS, which is made up of six solid-state lasers with an output of 32 kilowatts that simultaneously focus on a target.”

U.S. Navy Laser Cannon Death Ray

According to Navy sources: “This marks the first detect-thru-engage laser shoot-down of a threat representative target in an over-the-water, combat representative scenario. Multiple UAV targets were engaged and destroyed in a maritime environment during the testing, the second series of successes for the U.S. Navy’s Laser Weapon System (LaWS) Program. This brings to a total of seven UAVs destroyed by the Surface Navy’s first tactical development for fielding a Directed Energy weapon system.”

Watch the video below to see delta-winged UAV “splashed” by the Navy’s new “Death Ray”.

 

According to Program Manager Capt. David Kiel: “Further development and integration of increasingly more powerful lasers into Surface Navy LaWS will increase both the engagement range and target sets that can be successfully engaged and destroyed.” As lasers and other directed-energy systems are perfected, the Navy expects to improve the speed of its responses to aerial threats, while reducing weapons costs: “Laser weapons that provide for speed-of-light engagements at tactically significant ranges [can achieve] cost savings by minimizing the use of defensive missiles and projectiles.”

CLICK HERE for Related Scientific American Story.

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