July 23rd, 2016

New Tikka TSR-1 Precision Rifle for PRS Competition

Tikka TSR-1 T3 Precison Rifle Series Beretta McCrees Precision Modular Stock PRS Production Class

Here’s good news for Precision Rifle Series (PRS) competitors. Tikka will offer a new, modular T3-based Precision Rifle for the PRS Production Rifle Class. This new, sub-$2000 Precision Rifle is a joint project between Beretta U.S.A. and McRees Precision. Tikka’s new, limited edition TSR-1 Precision Rifle combines the barrel and action of the Tikka T3 Compact Tactical Rifle with a modular aluminum chassis from McRees Precision. Tikka TSR-1 production will be limited to 400 pieces and will have a $1995.00 MSRP. Initially, chamberings will be .260 Remington or .308 Winchester.

According to RecoilWeb.com: “The TSR-1 features a McRee’s Precision G10 folding rifle stock with an M-LOK compatible fore end, adjustable LOP and cheek riser, McRee’s M-LEV integrated cant indicator, upper and lower Picatinny rails, QD sling swivel sockets, and a sniper grey Cerakote finish.” The T3 action is fitted with a +20 MOA Mountain Tactical Scope rail, and the barrel comes with a 5/8×24 threaded muzzle. Beretta even includes one of McRee’s Rear Stock Packs.

Phillip Jones, Beretta’s Product Manager for Rifles, says: “Combining the … Tikka T3 Compact Tactical Rifle with McRee’s combat-tested chassis offers the long distance and precision shooting enthusiast an accurate and reliable rifle that is priced aggressively to be eligible for the Production Division of the PRS Series.” Under PRS rules, Production Class rifles may cost no more than $2000.00 (without optic):

PRS Production Class Cost Limits
Production Division combined rifle and scope MSRP as listed on the company’s website shall not exceed $3,000 USD, the rifle shall not exceed $2,000 USD and the optic not exceed $2,000 USD. [Editor: For example, you could have a $2,000 rifle with a $1000.00 scope or vice-versa. The total system cannot exceed $3000. Rifle alone cannot exceed $2000.00 retail sale price.]

Production Division rifles are not permitted to be altered or improved in any way from the original factory configuration”

Tikka TSR-1 T3 Precison Rifle Series Beretta McCrees Precision Modular Stock PRS Production Class

In developing the Tikka TSR-1, Beretta was no doubt inspired by the huge success of the Ruger Precision Rifle, which sold out its initial production run. Scott McRee, owner of McRees Precision, is enthusiastic about how the market will respond to new Tikka TSR-1: “I am confident that the sport shooting, tactical run and gun competitor, as well as the law enforcement community will enjoy this offering. It’s an honor to be working with Beretta U.S.A. and to be helping them provide another superb product to the American market.”

Permalink Competition, New Product, Tactical 6 Comments »
July 23rd, 2016

Add a PVC Bag-Rider to Your Stock for Pennies

PVC Pipe Bag-Rider sandbag

We know you guys like do-it-yourself (DIY) projects. And we also know that our readers like anything that helps a rifle sit more securely in the bags, and track better on recoil. Here’s a little accessory you can make yourself for pennies that will help rifles with conventional (non-benchrest) stocks ride the rear bag better.

This DIY Bag-Rider is simple in design and easy to make. The invention of Forum member Bill L. (aka “Nomad47″), this is simply a short section of PVC pipe attached to the bottom of a wood stock with a couple of screws. The back half of the PVC tube is cut at an angle to match the lower profile of the stock. Nomad47 painted the PVC Bag-Rider black for sex appeal, but that’s not really necessary.

In the top photo you can see Nomad47’s bagrider attached to a Savage varminter. In the photo below, the PVC bag-rider tube is fitted to an F-TR style rig with a green, laminated thumbhole stock. This rifle also features a Savage action with a custom barrel and “wide-track” bipod. (Note: to be legal in F-Class competition, the muzzle brake would have to be removed.)

PVC Pipe Bag-Rider sandbag

Permalink Gunsmithing, Tech Tip No Comments »