November 10th, 2019

Sunday GunDay: From Russia with Love — Amazing Mosin Nagant


One of the most popular features of our Shooters’ Forum is the Official ‘Pride & Joy’ Rifle thread. There you’ll find dozens of interesting rifles, with photos and descriptions supplied by proud owners. Today we’re spotlighting one of the more interesting ‘Pride & Joy’ rifles unveiled this year, a Mosin Nagant “senior citizen”. This 72-year-old Russian bolt gun is not like any Mosin Nagant you’ve ever seen before. It has been brought into the 21st Century with a handsome target stock and some first-class upgrades, including Lothar Walther barrel and Timney trigger. Here’s a look at a very nice Russian rifle, belonging to Forum member Ben C. (aka “Grimstod”):

Video Shows Rifle Shooting Sub-Half-MOA from Bipod (in the Snow):

Name of rifle: Smyert Mk3 (Modified Mosin Nagant)
Make: Izhmekh/Izhevsk (“Izzy”) High Wall
Model: 91/30 | Year: 1942

Components and Specifications:

Barrel: Lothar Walther 26″
Contour: 1.18″ straight
Chambering: 7.62x54R, .310 bore
Stock: Bluegrass Tactical (Gen 1 & 2)
Trigger: Timney with Bluegrass trigger shoe
Magazine: Finnish No-Jam magazine
Scope mount: Rock Solid (looks like an action sleeve)
Scope: SWFA 20x42mm MRAD
Gunsmith: Sheppard
Bolt handle: Rock Solid with Surgeon tactical handle
Bipod: Versa Pod
Total Weight: 18.6 lbs

Grimstod’s Mosin Nagant Custom Shoots Under 0.5 MOA From Bipod
Even in harsh winter conditions, the rifle shot well. (I guess we should expect that for a Russian gun). The photo below shows a group shot from bipod. (The video shows Grimstod’s snow-bound range session). Grimstod calculated the group at 0.394 MOA measuring from outside edge to edge. Using our On-Target software, which measures center to center of most distant shots, we came up with 0.428 MOA. Still that’s impressive for an ancient action being shot in the dead of winter with snow falling. To learn more about this rifle (and view photos of the build process), visit the SurplusRifleForum.com.

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November 10th, 2019

Be Amazed at the Tests Zeiss Does for Its Riflescopes

Zeiss optics riflescope scope impact shock salt freezing G-Force immersions test testing

You know that Zeiss riflescopes boast superb glass, excellent controls, and a rock-solid warranty. What you may not realize is how rugged Zeiss scopes are. Zeiss optics are designed for the toughest conditions that hunters may experience. Zeiss understands that hunting optics can be exposed to extreme temperatures, moisture, shock, and vibration.

To ensure Zeiss scopes perform in the toughest conditions, Zeiss tests production-line optics with rigorous testing procedures unrivaled in the optics industry. Zeiss runs Impact Shock Tests with 800 impact cycles at high G-forces. In addition, Zeiss does a continuous vibration test for 1.5 hours. Scopes are also tested in a salt spray environment to confirm corrosion resistance. But there is more — test optics are immersed in water for two HOURS at depth and the scopes are also lab-tested at -40° F in a climate chamber and also subjected to “temperature shocks” from -13° to +122° F. Now that’s some serious testing.

Zeiss does all this elaborate scope testing to ensure its optics perform in all situations, in all environments. View all these tests in this Zeiss video. We think you’ll be VERY impressed:

Impact Shock Test — 800 Cycles
Zeiss optics riflescope impact shock salt freezing G-Force immersions test testing

Continuous Vibration Test — 1.5 hours
Zeiss optics riflescope scope impact shock salt freezing G-Force immersions test testing

Zeiss optics riflescope impact shock salt freezing G-Force immersions test testing

Water Immersion Test — Validated Waterproof for 2 hours at 13 feet
Zeiss optics riflescope impact shock salt freezing G-Force immersions test testing

Temperature Testing — Extreme Temp Shock Test and Sub-Zero Freeze Chamber
Zeiss optics riflescope impact shock salt freezing G-Force immersions test testing

Zeiss optics riflescope impact shock salt freezing G-Force immersions test testing

Corrosion Resistance Test — 24 Hours in Salt Spray Environment
Zeiss optics riflescope impact shock salt freezing G-Force immersions test testing

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November 10th, 2019

Go with the “O” — O-Rings May Reduce Run-Out When Sizing

reloading die O-ring
reloading die O-ring

Here’s an inexpensive procedure that can help you load straighter ammo, with slightly better measured concentricity (i.e. less run-out) on the case necks and bullets. Simply use a Rubber O-Ring on the underside of the die locking ring. This allows the die to self-align itself (slightly) to the case that is being sized. Without the O-Ring, if the flat surface on the top of your press is not perfectly square with the thread axis, your die can end up slightly off-angle. This happens when the bottom of the locking ring butts up tight against the top of the press. The O-Ring allows the die to float slightly, and that may, in turn, reduce the amount of run-out induced during case sizing.

Top prone shooter GSArizona has tried this trick and he says it works: “Go to your local hardware store and get a #17 O-Ring (that’s the designation at Ace Hardware, don’t know if its universal). Slip the O-Ring on the die and re-adjust the lock ring so that the O-Ring is slightly compressed when the die is at the correct height. Size and measure a few more cases. You will probably see a slight improvement in neck concentricity as the die can now float a bit as the case enters and leaves it. This isn’t going to be a dramatic improvement, but it’s a positive one.”

We want to stress that adding O-Rings to sizing dies may help some reloaders, but we don’t offer this as a panacea. Try it — if using the O-Ring reduces measured runout that’s great. If it doesn’t, you’ve only spent a few pennies to experiment.

reloading die O-ring

Lee Precision makes die lock rings with built-in O-Rings. Lee’s distinctive lock ring design allows the same kind of self-alignment, which is good. However, Lee lock rings don’t clamp in place on the die threads, so they can move when you insert or remove the dies — and that can throw off your die setting slightly. By using an O-Ring under a conventional die lock ring (that can be locked in place), you get the advantages of the Lee design, without the risk of the lock ring moving.

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