November 1st, 2020

Sunday GunDay: Glen Zediker 1959 – 2020, In Memoriam

Glen Zediker Obituary memorial book writer author reloading AR15

This Sunday we mark the passing of a prolific writer, High Master marksman, good father, respected colleague, and reloading guru. Glen Zediker, author of many leading treatises on reloading, gun maintenance, and shooting skills, passed away on October 1, 2020, one month ago today. We mourn this loss. Glen helped this website with advice many times and Glen’s classic Handloading for Competition remains one of our favorite reloading resources. Glen was a “leading light” in the shooting sports world for decades. His books and technical articles have helped countless shooters and hand-loaders. His knowledge of the AR15 platform was unrivaled. He will be missed. Rest in Peace Glen.

Glen Zediker Obituary memorial book writer author reloading AR15

In 2015 Glen started a series of articles for the Midsouth Shooters Blog, the Reloaders Corner. Here is a section from his introduction to that series:

Glen Zediker — Author and High Master Marksman
Glen posted this in 2015…

Glen Zediker Obituary memorial book writer author reloading AR15“I’ve been ‘at this’ for over 40 years now, and ‘this’ is shooting, handloading, and writing about it for the past 25. My background is competitive shooting, primarily NRA High Power Rifle. From that followed my exploration of handloading and education therein. As an NRA High Power Rifle competitor, I earned a High Master classification, and I did it competing in Service Rifle division.

The whole reason I started writing about all this came about because I couldn’t find anything to read that put the pieces together — all the pieces that all the better shooters knew. I wanted to learn more, and I spent a lot of time and effort doing so. I continually got answers from winners and those who built rifles for winners. Unfortunately, those answers were not the same as I had been reading, and none of the authors of the other material I had read had won any championships. I thought there must be others who would appreciate some short cuts, and that’s how I started my publications career.

I think I’ve helped a few folks along the way.”

From Glen Zediker’s Reloaders Corner
Here is Glen’s advice about loading from his first “Reloaders Corner” Blog article in 2015:

Glen Zediker Obituary memorial book writer author reloading AR15“So, the advice that accompanies this first installment is to consider or reconsider your standards, and your evaluation of what is a good load. When I’m testing I choose the best group out of whatever it was I was testing. However, when it’s decision time, I choose the best, worst group. Let me explain. I really don’t consider what the very best any combination can show me is, but rather what is the worst the combination has shown me. Exceedingly tight groups are all too often a combination of luck and a little more luck. We got lucky in our judgment to choose the combination and the bullet fairy tipped her tiara. The more rounds anyone shoots, the bigger the groups are going to get. That’s just math. However, if three or four 10-shot groups are showing X-Ring accuracy, I’m going to ignore the group measurement, pay more attention to the chronograph, and pay very close attention to any over-pressure indicators. I don’t want to see anything outside a golf-ball sized circle at 300 yards, and I’m hoping to keep it that way.

Speaking of which — years ago, I was a golf pro… a legendary golf instructor, Percy Boomer (real name) had a line, ‘The difference between the amateur and professional is not in the quality of their best shots, but in their worst.’ That’s it. The difference between a good load and one that’s almost a good load is that also. The good load stays tight, throughout. A ‘flyer’ is grounds for disqualification. That’s a shot that strays from the herd. Don’t ignore it.”

Glen Dwight Zediker Obituary

June 17, 1959 – October 1, 2020

Glen Dwight Zediker, died on October 1, 2020, at home in Oxford, Mississippi, with his sons at his side.

Glen was born on June 17, in Rifle, Colorado, to Lloyd and Marie Zediker (both deceased) of Grand Valley (now Parachute), Colorado. He attended K-12 in Grand Valley, studied at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and graduated from the University of Mississippi with a B.A. in English.

Glen spent most of his professional career combining his expertise in target shooting with his skill at writing. He became an NRA High Master known for pinpoint accuracy. He wrote and published several books on target shooting and reloading which are highly respected in the precision shooting community.

Glen Zediker Obituary memorial book writer author reloading AR15

Glen spent many years in Mississippi and embraced southern culture from the food to Faulkner, but at his core, he remained a Westerner. He loved nothing more than riding over red dirt hills and hiking in the Southwest.

Glen’s two sons, Matthew and Charlie, were the center of his life. In addition to his sons, he is survived by his sister, Diane Zediker-Pastore (Victor) and his former wife, Kris Kunkler Zediker. See more life history and photos on Glen’s Memorial tribute site.

Glen Zediker Obituary memorial book writer author reloading AR15

Read Glen Zediker’s Articles on Reloading and Gun Tech
If you haven’t read any of Glen’s works, you will find a selection of shorter articles on the Midsouth Shooters Blog. This is a good way to sample the scope of Glen’s knowledge of reloading, AR15 technical matters, and service rifle shooting. We’ve enjoyed reading Glen’s articles and we know you will too.

In addition, Glen’s website, Zediker.com, has 20 older articles which you can read in PDF format for free. You can find these at Zediker.com/articles/articles.html. Here are three examples:



By Glen Zediker. Folks who read Handloading For Competition know most of this material, but here it is encapsulated for those who want. It’s the run down on how to load at the range, on the spot, and radically improve your success in working up an ammo recipe.


By Glen Zediker. A lot has changed since the original MKII, but then some things really haven’t. There are new triggers on the market and this article will run down what they are and what I think of them. Drop-ins, pins, and lock-time get their spaces too.
Zediker AR Maintenance

By Glen Zediker. There are three articles on this topic that are separated into barrel cleaning, cleaning and lubrication of the rest of the rifle, and a full component on how to run an AR15 as well as store it unharmed.

Royalties from Glen Zediker’s Books go to his surviving sons/family members. Consider purchasing one now:


NOTE: Most of these books are also available from Midsouth Shooters, some at lower cost.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Competition, News, Reloading, Shooting Skills 3 Comments »
November 1st, 2020

Report from F-Class Nationals in Arizona — LR Team Results

F-Class Nationals Championship ben avery phoenix Arizona

Yesterday was the 1000-yard Team Match Day at the F-Class Nationals in Phoeniz Arizona. It was also Halloween, and there were some very creative costumes on display at the Ben Avery Shooting Facility. First, for the serious stuff, we want to congratulate the two winning teams — Team Lapua/Brux/Borden in F-0pen and Team Texas in F-TR. CLICK HERE for updated F-Class Nationals Results.

F-Class Nationals Championship ben avery phoenix Arizona

F-Class Nationals Championship ben avery phoenix Arizona

Team Lapua/Brux/Borden (LBB) (1590-84X) took the F-Open title by six points (and 4 Xs) over runner-up The Long Shots (1584-80X), with Team Grizzly (1580-58X) third.

In F-TR, Team Texas topped the field with 1572-63X, winning by an impressive 17 points (and 5 Xs) over Team USA Independence (1555-58X). Team USA Freedom was third with 1553-44X. Team Texas’s Randy Littleton turned in a stunning individual performance in the first match, shooting 200-14X, best among F-TR shooters. F-Open competitor Jeff Cochran of Team Spindle Shooters also drilled a 200-14X in that first match, the top F-Open individual 20-shot performance.

F-Class Nationals Championship ben avery phoenix Arizona
“Team Texas (center) had plenty of silver and bronze medals in previous national championships, but today earned their first gold medal. Very talented USA teams finished second and third.” — Skip Barkley

F-Class Nationals Championship ben avery phoenix Arizona

Halloween Long Range Team Day at Ben Avery

F-Class Nationals Championship ben avery phoenix Arizona

F-Class Nationals Championship ben avery phoenix Arizona

F-Class Nationals Championship ben avery phoenix ArizonaF-Class Nationals Championship ben avery phoenix Arizona

F-Class Nationals Championship ben avery phoenix Arizona

F-Class Nationals Championship ben avery phoenix Arizona

Permalink Competition, Gear Review, News No Comments »
November 1st, 2020

Late Season Reminder — Replace Your Safe’s Keypad Battery!

If the battery on your safe’s electronic lock is
more than a year old, or if it is not giving you the
right voltage, replace it today!

safe battery gunsafe sargent greenleaf

Gunsafe safe keypad control battery batteriesWell it’s November folks — winter is around the corner. This time of year, many of our readers are putting their guns away in a safe for the winter. It’s easy to just tuck the guns away and forget about them. But there’s something you should do before you shut the safe door. If you have a safe with an electronic keypad, you should replace the battery every year as a precautionary measure. Trust us, you don’t want to come back in a few months and find that the keypad memory is kaput, and you’re locked out. That can lead to frustration and an expensive locksmith visit.

Here’s a true story. I have one safe with a Sargent & Greenleaf (S&G) keypad. A couple years back, in early December, I went to get into the safe. I punched in the correct combination, but all I got was a rapid “beep, beep, beep, beep” after I finished the last combination entry. I tried again to ensure I entered the combination correctly (I did). But again, the locking system responded with multiple rapid beeps indicating something was wrong. And the safe would not open. Now I was worried….

I popped out the battery holder (which slides in from the bottom of the keypad housing on the door). I removed the battery and tested it with a volt-meter. The 12-month-old Duracell 9-volt battery only registered 6.1 volts.

Low voltage was the problem. I went down to the store and got a couple new 9V batteries. I tested the new batteries and both measured 9.4 volts output. I slipped one of the new 9V batteries into the keypad housing, punched in the combination and everything worked OK again. Eureka.

Most electronic locks for safes WILL “remember” the combination for a period of time even when the battery is low (and the keypad’s “brain” should retain the combination when you remove the battery for replacement). However, a dead battery, or extended periods of low voltage can give you problems. Don’t rely on wishful thinking…

Permalink - Articles, Tech Tip 1 Comment »