August 8th, 2020

Watch Ammo Being Made in Revealing Video

Sellier Bellot Ammunition Videos

Sellier & Bellot is one of Europe’s older ammunition manufacturers, producing a wide variety of rifle and pistol ammo. The video below shows ammunition being made from start to finish, starting with raw materials. This is a fascinating video that is well worth watching. It shows some amazing machines in operation.

EDITOR: Guys, this really is an exceptional video that shows every aspect of production. I have watched dozens of videos about ammo making. This is definitely one of the BEST. Take the time to watch.

Based in Vlasim, Czech Republic, Sellier & Bellot was founded in August 5, 1825 by Louis Sellier, a German businessman of French lineage. His family were royalists who fled France during the French Revolution. Louis Sellier began manufacturing percussion caps for infantry firearms in a factory in Prague, Bohemia on the request of Francis I, the Emperor of Austria. Sellier was later joined by his countryman Jean Bellot.

Sellier & Bellot has also produced an interesting CGI video that shows what happens inside a rifle chamber and barrel when a cartridge fires can’t be seen by the naked eye (unless you are a Super-Hero with X-Ray vision). But now, with the help of 3D-style computer animation, you can see every stage in the process of a rifle round being fired.

3D animation bullet ammunition in rifle

In this X-Ray-style 3D animation illustrates the primer igniting, the propellant burning, and the bullet moving through the barrel. The video then shows how the bullet spins as it flies along its trajectory. Finally, this animation shows the bullet impacting ballistic gelatin. Watch the bullet mushroom and deform as it creates a “wound channel” in the gelatin.

Watch Video – Cartridge Ignition Sequence Starts at 1:45 Time-Mark

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August 7th, 2020

Save Money This Summer with Brownells Discount Codes

Brownells discount code savings bargain

If you’ve been thinking about a big purchase at Brownells, here are some money-saving codes. Now through the end of August, Brownells is offering $50 Off a $500+ purchase or $25 Off a $250+ purchase. That’s a great deal, effectively a 10% savings. Use Code VTH to save $50 on $500+, or use Code VTG to save $25 on the purchase of $250 or more.

Brownells discount code savings bargain

Coupon Code: VTH — $50 Off $500 or more
Expiration date: August 31, 2020 at 11:59 PM CDT

Coupon Code: MFX — $25 Off $250 or more
Expiration date: August 31, 2020 at 11:59 PM CDT

More Brownells Discount Codes

If you miss these deals listed above, Brownells is still running some discounts for $99-$200 purchases. With a purchase of $200 and up, save $20 with Code M8Y. Or, with a purchase of $99 or more, you can save $10 with Code MDX. You can also get free Shipping/Handling for all purchases over $49 with Code VB5. That free shipping/handling could save you another $10-$20 easy. NOTE: These codes have no listed expiration date, but Brownells could terminate them at any time, so you should still act soon.

Coupon Code: M8Y — $20 off $200 + Free S/H
Expiration date: Unknown expiration

Coupon Code: NCS — $15 off $150 + Free S/H
Expiration date: Unknown expiration

If that doesn’t work, try this one (no free shipping):
Coupon Code: TAG — $15 Off $150
Expiration date: Unknown

Coupon Code: NBM — $10 OFF $99 + Free S/H
Expiration date: Unknown expiration

If that doesn’t work, try this one (no free shipping):
Coupon Code: PTT — $10 Off $100
Expiration date: Unknown

Coupon Code: VB5 — Free S/H Over $49
Expiration date: Unknown expiration

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August 6th, 2020

Guns and Ammo in Aftermath of Floods — What to Do

NSSF SAAMI flood flooding submersion water Ammunition Ammo damage
NOAA photo of flooding after Hurricane Floyd in 1999. The Colt Python Revolver once belonged to Elvis Presley (Rock Island Auction).

This past week, Tropical Storm Isaias has hammered the East Coast of the USA. The BBC reported: “From North Carolina up to New York, Isaias left more than 3.4 million residents without power. It spawned tornadoes, uprooted trees, damaged homes and caused floods and fires.” This article explains what to do if you have experienced flooding.

Firearms owners who have seen their guns and stored ammunition submerged by flood waters in storm-wracked areas are probably wondering if their firearms and ammunition can be salvaged and safely used. To answer these questions, the NSSF and the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers’ Institute (SAAMI®) created two documents outlining the proper response to submersion of guns and ammo. If you’ve got wet guns and/or ammo, download these two PDF files and read them carefully.

SAAMI Guidance 1: What to Do About Firearms That Have Been Submerged in Water

SAAMI Guidance 2: What to Do About Ammunition That Has Been Submerged in Water

Dealing with Firearms That Were Submerged

The SAAMI document “Guidance on Firearms That Have Been Submerged or Exposed to Extensive Amounts of Water” points out two major concerns about firearms that have been exposed to water: parts susceptible to moisture and rust damage such as metal parts, wood stocks and grips, and optics; and, secondly, infiltration of the action, barrel and safety systems by grit, silt and other foreign debris.

#1 Always unload firearms before beginning any treatment process.

It’s important to limit moisture and corrosion damage to the component parts of the firearm. This can be accomplished by disassembling the component parts and using up to two coats of a moisture-displacing lubricant such as Hoppes #9 MDL or WD-40 to clean and stabilize the parts while, importantly, following the product’s directions so as not to damage, for instance, plastic or synthetic parts. Another tip is to allow wood stocks and grips to air-dry and not be force dried by exposure to heat.

The document emphasizes that once the firearm has been thoroughly dried, consideration must be given to having the firearm inspected and serviced by the manufacturer, an authorized service center, or a qualified gunsmith before putting the firearm back in service.

Dealing with Ammunition That Was Submerged

NSSF SAAMI flood flooding submersion water Ammunition Ammo damage

Bottom Line, if your ammo has been submerged — DON’T USE IT. SAAMI explains why…

To help firearms owners determine what to do with ammunition that has been affected by water and moisture, SAAMI offers another helpful document, “Guidance on Ammunition That Has Been Submerged in Water.” This document covers differences in moisture resistance between centerfire, rimfire and shotshell ammunition, and potential hazards associated with “drying out” cartridges, including possible deterioration and damage to cartridges due to drying methods.

Another serious hazard that could result from using compromised ammunition is the potential for a bore obstruction due to partial ignition of either the priming compound or the propellant powder charge, or both. Firing a subsequent round through an obstructed barrel can result in bodily injury, death and property damage.

SAAMI provides the following cautionary conclusion: “It would be impossible to ascertain for certain the extent of the deteriorating affect, if any, the water may have had on each individual cartridge. Therefore, the safe answer is that no attempt be made to salvage or use submerged ammunition. The ammunition should be disposed of in a safe and responsible manner. Contact your local law enforcement agency for disposal instructions in your area.”

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August 6th, 2020

Hornady Video Shows How Ammunition is Made

Hornady Manufacturing

Hornady ManufacturingIf you wonder how ammo is made, starting with raw metal, check out this video from Hornady. It shows how bullet jackets are formed from copper, followed by insertion of a lead core. The jacket is then closed up over the core with the bullet taking its final shape in a die (a cannelure is applied on some bullet types). Next the video shows how cartridge brass is formed, starting with small cups of brass. The last part of the video shows how cases are primed and filled with powder, and how bullets are seated into the cases, using an automated process on a giant assembly-line. CLICK Link below to watch video:

Hornady’s New 150,000-sq-ft Ammo Production Center
In 2018, Hornady opened a new, state-of-the-art factory. The 150,000-sq-ft Hornady West Facility, featured in the video below, handles ammunition production and product distribution — Hornady produces millions of rounds annually. Hornady cartridge brass and bullets will continue to be produced at Hornady’s 100,000+ square foot factory in Grand Island, Nebraska. The Grand Island factory is open for tours Monday through Thursday. Hornady Manufacturing was founded by Joyce Hornady in 1949, so 2019 marked the company’s 70th anniversary.

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August 5th, 2020

Primers 101 — What You Need to Know About Primers

Glen Zediker reloaders corner midsouth book AR-15 reloading  brass safety primer resizing

Here is an article Glen Zediker wrote for the Midsouth Blog. In this article Glen gives important advice on selecting, handling, seating, and testing primers. The right primer choice can and will affect your load’s performance and accuracy. And proper primer handling is essential for safety.

Glen is the author of many excellent books on reloading. This article is adapted from Glen’s books, Handloading For Competition and Top-Grade Ammo, available at Midsouth HERE. For more information about other books by Glen, visit ZedikerPublishing.com.

Handloading for Competition
by Glen Zediker

The Competitive AR-15
by Glen Zediker

Top-Grade Ammo
by Glen Zediker

RELOADERS CORNER: PRIMER TECH

by Glen Zediker
The primer is one component in the collection that might not get all the attention it warrants. That’s because it is the one thing, above all other components, that you don’t want to just swap and switch around. We’ve all heard cautions about testing new lots of every component, especially propellant, but primers not only change lot to lot, they vary greatly in their influence on any one load, brand to brand.

The difference in one brand to the next can equal a good deal more or less pressure, for instance. While there are “general” tendencies respecting the “power” of various-brand primers, always (always) reduce the load (propellant quantity) when switching primers.

This has become more of an issue over the past few years as we’ve faced component shortages. I can tell you without a doubt that going from a WW to a CCI, or from a Remington to a Federal, can have a major influence on a load. I establish that from chronograph readings. No doubt, it’s best to have a good supply of one primer brand and lot that produces good results, and when that’s not possible, it’s a hard sell to convince someone to stop loading ammo and get back to testing. But. It is important. I can tell you that from (bad) experience. How I, and we all, learn most things…

When I switch primers, whether as a test or a necessity, I reduce my load ONE FULL GRAIN. There can be that much effect.

The Elements of a Primer
A primer is made up of a brass cup filled with explosive compound (lead styphate). Lead styphate detonates on impact. Primers don’t burn – they explode! In the manufacturing process, this compound starts as a liquid. After it’s laid into the cup, and while it’s still wet, a triangular piece or metal (the “anvil”) is set in. When the cup surface is struck by the firing pin, the center collapses, squeezing the explosive compound between the interior of the cup and the anvil. That ignites the compound and sends a flame through the case flash hole, which in turn lights up the propellant.

Primers Can be Dangerous — Particularly When Stacked
Don’t underestimate that. I’ve had one experience that fortunately only created a huge start, but I know others who have had bigger more startling mishaps. These (almost always) come from primer reservoirs, such fill-tubes. Pay close attention when charging up a tube and make sure all the primers are facing the right way, and that you’re not trying to put in “one more” when it’s full! That’s when “it” usually happens. What will happen, by the way, is akin to a small grenade. Static electricity has also been blamed, so keep that in mind.

Sizes and Types of Primers
Primers come in two sizes and four types. “Large” and “small”: for example, .223 Rem. takes small, .308 Win. takes large. Then there are pistol and rifle in each size.

Rifle primers and pistol primers are not the same, even though they share common diameters! Rifle primers [normally] have a tougher cup, and, usually, a hotter flash. Never swap rifle for pistol. Now, some practical-style competitive pistol shooters using their very high-pressure loads (like .38 Super Comp) sometimes substitute rifle primers because they’ll “handle” more pressure, but they’ve also tricked up striker power. That’s a specialized need.

Further, some primer brands are available with a “magnum” option. Some aren’t. My experience has been that depends on the “level” of their standard primer. A magnum primer, as you might guess, has a more intense, stouter flash that travels more “deeply” to ignite the larger and more dense powder column. It reaches further, faster.

Glen Zediker reloaders corner midsouth book AR-15 reloading  brass safety primer resizing

Flash Consistency Counts
Glen Zediker reloaders corner midsouth book AR-15 reloading  brass safety primer resizingFlash Consistency is very important, shot to shot. The consistency of every component is important: bullet weights, diameters, case wall thicknesses, and all the way down the list. We’re hoping to get more consistent behavior from a “match” or “benchrest” primer, and we’re paying more for it. I can tell you that some brands that aren’t touted as “match” are already consistent. That all comes from experience: try different primers, just respect the need to initially reduce the load for each test.

Primer Dimensional Differences and Primer Tools
One last thing — there are small variations in primer dimensions (heights, diameters) among various brands. These variations are not influential to performance. However — small diameter variations can influence feeding through priming tools. This can be a hitch especially in some progressive loading machines. Manufacturers usually offer insight (aka: “warnings”) as to which are or aren’t compatible, so find out.

Glen Zediker reloaders corner midsouth book AR-15 reloading brass safety primer resizingGet Midsouth products HERE

Get Primer trays HERE

This article is adapted from Glen’s books, Handloading For Competition and Top-Grade Ammo, available at Midsouth HERE. Learn more about Glen’s books at ZedikerPublishing.com.

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August 4th, 2020

Accuracy vs. Precision — Litz Explains the Difference

Applied Ballistics Rounds on Target DVD accurateshooter.com

The NSSF has posted a video featuring Bryan Litz of Applied Ballistics. Bryan also serves as Chief Ballistician for Berger Bullets and ABM Ammo. In this short video, Bryan explains the importance of ballistics for precision shooting at long range. Bryan covers key elements — drop, wind drift, angle correction and more. And Bryan also explains the key difference between Accuracy and Precision.

The principles Bryan discusses are covered (in greater detail) in the Putting Rounds on Target instructional DVD set. This 3-Disc collection boasts a total run-time of 3 hours and 37 minutes. The three DVDs, with many graphics and video segments, deliver as much information as a weekend shooting seminar… at a fraction of the cost. The 3-DVD set sells for $44.95.

Applied Ballistics Rounds on Target DVD accurateshooter.com

Disc 1

• Accuracy & Precision
• Tall Target Test
• Chronographs & Statistics
• Ballistic Coefficient
• Trajectory Terms
• Run Time: 1 hour, 4 min

Disc 2

• Primary Elevation (Wind)
• Secondary Effects
• Using Ballistics Solvers
• Short & LR Equipment
• Run Time: 1 hour, 11 min

Disc 3

• On The Range: .308 Win
• On The Range: .284 Win
• On The Range: .338 LM
• Extended Range Shooting
• One Mile Shooting
• Run Time: 1 hour, 22 min

DVD Applied Ballistics Bryan Litz Shooting F-Class .284 Win .338 LM

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August 4th, 2020

Brownells Videos on PRS, Handloading, Ammo Storage and More

Brownells video archive youtube channel AR15 reloading .22 LR cleaning

Brownells is a well-known retailer of guns, gun parts, tools, accessories, ammo, and pretty much everything gun related. What you may not know is that Brownells has a very active video production department that releases new “how-to” and product information videos every week. These videos offer helpful advice on gun cleaning/maintenance, reloading, as well as selecting/assembling components for various kinds of rifles. And every week Brownells serves up a new products video. There now over 1000 videos on the Brownells YouTube Channel, this really is a remarkable resource.

Here are six of our favorite recent videos from Brownells. AR owners will find some good advice on spare parts, new reloaders can learn how to use the OAL tool, and all gun owners should watch the video on ammunition storage.

Introduction to PRS Competition

In this video, Tom Beckstrand, former Special Forces Sniper Team Leader and Guns & Ammo magazine staffer, looks at the Precision Rifle Series (PRS). Tom covers the types of stages in a typical PRS match using unconventional, real-world shooting rests. He also discusses the equipment you’ll need including bag supports, bipods, tripods, and optics. As most ranges aren’t set up for PRS, Tom offers tips on how to train at your local range.

How to Use Hornady OAL Tool and Hornady Bullet Comparator

Gun Tech Steve Ostrem explains how to properly use Hornady’s Overall Length Gauge to determine length-to-land precisely. The OAL Gauge uses a “Modified Case” that theads onto the tool and holds a bullet. Push on the back of the gauge until you feel the bullet just touch the rifling. (We do this gently at first, tapping the rod a couple time to ensure the bullet is aligned correctly). Once you’ve got the length, then use the tool with a comparator on your calipers to get the lenght-to-lands. NOTE: We recommend taking the measurement 3-4 times in a row to get a reliable number. With a little practice your should be able to get repeatable measurements within .0015″.

New Bog Pod Tripod and Caldwell Electronic Muffs

Brownells staffer Paul Levy showcases the impressive new DeathGrip Tripod from Bog Gear. The DeathGrip’s adjustable jaws clamp firmly to the rifle’s forearm. This is a useful device for both PRS shooters and hunters. The head assembly has 25-deg front/rear tilt and 360-deg swivel. And the jaws’ non-slip, rubberized padding won’t scratch that stock. The legs snap open to three pre-set hard stops, and there’s plenty of length extension. Easily switch between rubber feet and steel spikes without removing a single part from the trippod. This video also features Caldwell’s E-Max™ Pro noise-cancelling electronic muffs. These affordable 23 dB NRR units boast dual microphones and digital volume controls, and two sizes are offered — Youth and Adult.

How to Store Ammunition Safely and Securely

Notably, this is the single most popular Brownells video this year, with 494,000 views since March 2020. Here’s the deal — ammunition WILL keep for a long time if you store it properaly. DO store ammunition in a cool, dry place that doesn’t have wide temperature swings. Temperature cycling will also degrade primers and powder. Put it in airtight ammo cans to keep out the moisture. Tupperware containers will work too. Brownells also recommends putting moisture-absorbing silica packs in your ammo containers. DON’T just keep ammo in factory cardboard factory boxes stacked in the basement, attic, or garage — especially not on the floor! The ammunition boxes will absorb moisture which will degrade primers and powder and corrode the brass cases. Yes, sealed military ammo will usually handle this kind of storage for quite a while, but it’s still not wise.

Must-Have Spare Parts for AR-Platform Rifles

This is one of Brownells most popular recent videos, with 154,000 views in just four months. Two gun technicians answer the question: “What spare parts should I keep on hand for my AR-15?” On the list are: Gas Rings, Buffer Spring, Extractor Spring and Pin. NOTE: You may want to try the one-piece spiral gas ring rather than the standard rings which require alignment. The cotter pin and cam pin can also easily get lost when the Bolt Carrier Group is disassembled for cleaning. On the lower receiver you’ll want spare springs and detents for the pivot/takedown pins. If you’re using lighter-power springs, keep standard-power spares on hand. If your rifle stops working, swap in the factory-spec springs to find out if the problem is the gun or your ammo. Also, if you have upgraded your trigger, always keep the original trigger as a backup.

Cleaning Advice for .22 LR Rimfire Rifles

Gun Techs Steve Ostrem and Caleb Savant debunk some myths about cleaning .22 LR barrels. One myth is that cleaning will harm the accuracy of a .22 LR barrel. Caleb thinks this myth is the result of people cleaning a barrel from the muzzle and damaging the muzzle crown, which CAN diminish accuracy. If it’s done right, cleaning won’t damage the bore. However, you certainly do NOT have to clean your 22 LR’s bore every time you go to the range. But DO clean the action every time you shoot the rifle, especially on a semi-auto. What about shooting a lot of lead bullets? Won’t that lead up the bore? The guys give us the straight skinny on lead fouling, too. When you see your .22 LR rifle’s groups opening up, you may want to consider cleaning.

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August 4th, 2020

Bullet Tip Touches Comparator Body Before Ogive Reaches Insert

Bullet ogive comparator gauge tool drill fix hybrid ogive bullet

Bullet ogive comparator gauge tool drill fix hybrid ogive bulletDo you shoot long, pointy Hybrid Ogive bullets? If so, you may need to modify the Hornady L-N-L Bullet Comparator tool commonly used to measure the distance from bullet base to bullet ogive.

With modern, high-BC match bullets, so much of the bullet may extend forward of the ogive that the bullet tip actually contacts the inside of the red comparator body BEFORE the bullet’s ogive contacts the gray caliber-specific insert ring attached to the red body. When this happens you will NOT get an accurate Base-to-Ogive (BTO) measure. And likewise you will not get a proper Cartridge-Base-to-Ogive (CBTO) measurement with loaded rounds.

Watch this video — it shows exactly how this measurement “fail” can happen with a .338-caliber Berger Elite hunter bullet. The tester was getting a false bullet Base-to-Ogive reading of 1.175 (0:25 timemark) before modifying his tool. The true BTO measurement, with the bullet actually contacting the gray comparator ring, is 1.121 (1:25 timemark):

How to Fix the Problem
What’s the fix? With a drill, you must relieve the back “wall” inside the red comparator holder bore. This will provide more clearance for the bullet tip. With more clearance the bullet ogive will seat properly on the gray, caliber-specific insert. The tip will no longer bottom out on the red clamping half of the tool.

The maker of this helpful video, EuLRH explains: “As we all know the CBTO (Cartridge Base to Ogive) measurement is [more useful than] COAL (Cartridge Overall Length). There are lots of products that can do this. One of them is Hornady L-N-L bullet comparator. Attention! With modern long range bullets it is possible that the bullet tip is touching the comparator body instead of the bullet ogive touching the gauge.” In this example, EuLRH worked with the 300gr Berger elite hunter bullet in .338 Caliber.

Why You Need to Check with Your Own Loads
If your bullets have this “tip touching” issue, when you measure your loaded rounds you will be seeing COAL instead of the Cartridge Base to Ogive (CBTO) length. Take a moment, test with your own bullets and your comparator to determine if you have this measurement problem. If you do, try the drilling solution shown in the video.

Credit Boyd Allen for finding EuLRH Video.

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August 3rd, 2020

Bargain Finder 254: AccurateShooter’s Deals of the Week

AccurateShooter Deals of the Week Weekly Bargain Finder Sale Discount Savings

At the request of our readers, we provide select “Deals of the Week”. Every Sunday afternoon or Monday morning we offer our Best Bargain selections. Here are some of the best deals on firearms, hardware, reloading components, optics, and shooting accessories. Be aware that sale prices are subject to change, and once clearance inventory is sold, it’s gone for good. You snooze you lose.

1. Bruno Shooters Supply — Massive BAT Action Sale

bat action sale

Superb BAT custom actions, over 80 on sale at $100 Off

BAT actions have an amazing reputation and are available in more configurations that just about any other action on the market. Head over to Bruno Shooters Supply and choose from over 80 BAT Actions on sale. Many models are avaiable, all discounted $100 off Bruno’s normal pricing. This BAT promo gets you $100 closer to that elite custom rifle you’ve always wanted.

2. Sportsman’s Warehouse — Ruger American Scoped Rifle 6.5 Creedmoor, $539.99

ruger american sale

Great deal on hunting rifles with Vortex Scope, 6.5CM, .308 Win, .243 Win

Sportsman’s Warehouse is running a special on Ruger rifles with Vortex scopes. For $539.99 you can get this Ruger American in 6.5 Creedmoor topped with a Vortex Crossfire II 3-9x40mm scope with Dead-Hold BDC reticle. For the same $539.99 price you can also get this rifle in .308 Win, or .243 Win, also scope-equipped. This is a very good option if you are looking for an affordable hunting rig, ready to go.

3. EuroOptic — Vortex Optics Scope Clearance Sale

vortex scope sale

Super-low prices on scopes for PRS, Hunting, and Tactical

Maybe you’re in the market for a new scope for your AR or perhaps you’d like more magnification for your long-range rig. No matter what you’re in the market for, EuroOptic is running a huge Vortex Clearance Sale on scopes ranging from 1-4x24mm up to 6-24x50mm all at crazy low prices. If you’re planning a future build, you may want to grab one of these scopes now — the prices are exceptional.

4. Graf’s — Hornady A-Tip Bullets, All Calibers, Good Prices

hornady a tip sale

High BC A-Tips, wide selection of calibers

Hornady A-Tip bullets has started to earn a place on the line as more and more people are learning how to load and shoot them. As a result stock levels have been spotty at best in popular calibers. At Graf & Sons, we found a full selection of Hornady A-Tip bullets, including hard-to-find bullet weights. If you’ve been interested in trying A-Tips, grab these before they sell out.

5. Bullet Central — Bix’n Andy Benchrest Trigger, $385.00

tipton gun vise sale

Truly superb Benchrest match trigger or get Dakota Trigger for $195.00

Having a light and reliable trigger is critical to success in many disciplines. The Bix’n Andy Rem700 Benchrest Trigger is one of the best out there. With its easy-to-change pull weight and a ultra-crisp break it’s the choice of many competition shooters. If you’re looking for something with a slightly heavier pull at a much lower price, check out the $195.00 Dakota Trigger.

6. Amazon — Tipton Best Gun Vise, $87.54

tipton gun vise sale

Versatile, stable, works with all rifles, including ARs

You need a stable platform at home for your gun when clealing, and most gun vises are too light or unstable to do the job properly. If you’re looking upgrade to a better solution than what you have, grab the Tipton Best Gun Vise. The vise was designed to accommodate the widest possible array of firearms for cleaning, maintenance, or gunsmithing, and is easily configurable to handle bolt-action rifles, break-open shotguns, AR-15s, and handguns. You can also purchase this excellent Gun Vise for $89.99 at Midsouth Shooters, also a good deal.

7. MidwayUSA — MTM Shooting Range Box, $41.16

mtm range box sale

Great unit holds gear and has cradles for cleaning

Whether heading to the range or a weeklong competition, having all your cleaning gear in one easy-to-use place is critical. Enter the MTM Shooting Range Box. This will hold solvents, jags, brushes, patches, guide rods, and tools. PLUS this unit has cradles to support your rifle. This Editor has been using the MTM Range Box for years and wouldn’t dream of attending a match without it. Order now from MidwayUSA for $47.99, or back-order from Midsouth Shooters for $41.16.

8. Amazon — Motion-Sensor LED Interior Light, $15.99

gun safe light vault cabinet motion sensor light motion sensing LED magnet lamp

Activates when door opens, Rechargeable, 3 LED Light Levels

Here’s a great accessory for your Gun Safe or closet. This rechargeable LED lamp turns itself on when you open the door, and off when you close the door. Select three brightness levels: 10LED, 20LED, 30LED. With the supplied 3M adhesive magnetic strip you can easily attach the light to the inner walls of your gun safe. And then quickly remove the unit for charging with a standard USB cord (no batteries to replace!). It works, it’s handy, and it’s inexpensive — just $15.99 on Amazon. These motion-sensor LED lamps can also be used in garages or stairwells. NOTE: this is Amazon’s choice for rechargeable LED Motion-Sensor lights.

9. Amazon — Tipton Universal Bore Guide, $13.59

tipton bore guide sale

Very inexpensive but versatile for full range of chamber sizes

Bore cleaning is critical for rifle longevity and accuracy. But you need a good bore guide to avoid potential damage to your chamber and bore. This handy Tipton Universal Bore Guide ships with multiple chamber adapters. Three tapered tips are included (small fits calibers .17-.24, medium fits most calibers .25-.30, and large fits most calibers over .30). This Universal Bore Guide includes an action collar for AR rifles.

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August 2nd, 2020

Expanding Cartridge Brass in Stages with Progressive Press

Darrell Jones DJ's Brass Service expanding brass 6mmBR 6BR BRX 30BR Hornady press
Photos from DJ’s Brass Service.

Have you ever expanded a .22 or 6mm cartridge all the way up to .30-caliber? If so, you know this can be a difficult procedure that stresses the case necks and neck-shoulder junction. A significant neck-size expansion done in one big jump can increase run-out, cause doughnuts, or worse yet, even split the brass. Therefore you want to proceed in increments, increasing the neck diameter in stages. One smart way to do that is to use a Progressive Press. This article explains how…

The most successful short-range brenchrest-for-score cartridge is the 30 BR. That cartridge, as well as 30 BR variants such as the 30 BRX, all start with the 6mmBR Norma parent cartridge, typically with Lapua 6mmBR brass. To get a nice 30 BR case you want to expand in stages, increasing the inside neck diameter incrementally from .243 to .308.

Darrell Jones of DJ’s Brass Service creates thousands of 30 BR cases each year. He has found a clever way to speed up the process — Darrell uses a Progressive Press. He runs his 6BR brass through four (4) separate Hornady neck-sizing dies with expander mandrels. First there is a .257 die, followed by .264 (6.5mm), .284 (7mm), and then .308. Then a fifth and final K&M die provides one last, slight expansion so the newly-fashioned 30 BR cases perfectly fit the arbor of Darrell’s neck-turning tool.

So to repeat, the case starts as .243 (6mm), then moves in up stages .257, .264, .284, and .308, with a final “finishing” step prior to neck-turning. You can see the expansion in this video, which starts with 6mmBR brass that was first hydro-formed to 6 BRX:

Watch 6mm Cases Expanded to 30-Caliber (6BRX to 30 BRX)

For this demo video, Darrell expands just one case at a time. However, he can also put multiple cases in the progressive — one per station. This takes a little more effort, Darrell says, but the results are still excellent. Darrell tells us: “I do put multiple cases in the progressive to save time. The results are the same — I just wanted to show a single-step process and how it reduces run-out by not stressing the shoulder with one big expansion from 6mm straight to 30 caliber. Doing the operation in multiple stages avoids binds and helps keep the shoulders concentric.”

This same multi-stage procedure can be use to expand other cartridge types. For example you could take .221 Fireball brass in stages up to .308 to create 300 Blackout brass.

Darrell Jones DJ's Brass Service expanding brass 6mmBR 6BR BRX 30BR Hornady press

Darrell uses caliber-specific, Hornady neck-sizing-only dies with elliptical expanders. Darrell tells us: “The Hornady elliptical expander has a reduced bearing surface that puts less strain on the brass when expanding the necks to the next size.” The fitting at the bottom of the die is the Lock-N-Load die bushing that allows fast die changes.

These particular cases used in the video were first hydro-formed to 6BRX then expanded to 30 BRX before neck turning. DJ’s Brass offers hydro-forming for many popular wildcat cartridges such as 6 PPC, 6mm Dasher, and .284 Shehane.

Darrell Jones DJ's Brass Service expanding brass 6mmBR 6BR BRX 30BR Hornady press

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August 1st, 2020

The Hazards of Old Ammo — Watch Out for Internal Corrosion!

300 Winchester Magnum winmag reloading hand-loading powder corrosion
Above is a 26-year-old hand-loaded .300 Winchester Magnum case that failed to fire. After the misfire, the shooter used an inertial (impact) bullet puller to pull the bullet. In the process the case-neck sheared off.

Here’s a cautionary tale from the Tactical Rifle Shooters Facebook group. This real-world example explains why you should be cautious of old ammunition. Here serious internal corrosion was discovered.

Old Ammunition — Why You Should Be Careful

Commentary by Tactical Rifle Shooters
The subject often comes up as to whether it is safe to shoot old ammunition. Historically my answer has always been yes, since over the years I have shot military surplus ammo dating back to World War II (1939-1945) and never had a problem. With over 40 years in competitive shooting, I’ve also had boxes of factory ammo that were 30+ years old and all worked flawlessly.

But I had an interesting experience this week shooting some .300 Winchester Magnum (WinMag) that I had loaded for competition with Reloder 22 back in 1993. I was breaking in a new barrel so just shooting any old ammo that I had. Of the 20 rounds, 15 shot perfectly, three had a fraction of a second hang-fire, and two didn’t shoot at all.

SMART TIP: If you have old ammunition, pull one bullet to see what’s going on inside.

So I pulled the bullets using a hammer-type impact (inertial) bullet puller. What I found was verdigris-like corrosion inside the necks, with one neck completely separating. One reason for this could be that dissimilar metals (copper and brass) can set up a reaction resulting in corrosion. Like I said, this is the first time I’ve seen this, but will definitely be more aware when shooting old hand-loads in the future.

300 Winchester Magnum winmag reloading hand-loading powder corrosion

Above is one of the 26-year-old reloaded .300 WinMag cartridges which had failed to fire. To check the internal condition, the bullet was removed using an impact (inertial) bullet puller. Note the verdigris-like corrosion and crack in neck.

300 Winchester Magnum winmag reloading hand-loading powder corrosion

Here’s a close-up of the same .300 Winchester Magnum hand-load from 1993 showing serious corrosion inside the neck. (This was a fail-to-fire.) The powder was Alliant Reloder 22. If you have old ammo, it wouldn’t hurt to pull one bullet to see what’s going on inside.

CREDIT Tactical Rifle Shooters Facebook Group for this Ammo Tech Tip and photos.

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July 31st, 2020

Grip on Bullet — Many Factors Involved, Not Just Bushing Size

case neck bushing reloading die tension bullet release

Many novice hand-loaders believe that neck bushing Inside Diameter (ID) size is the only important factor in neck tension. In fact, many different things will influence the grip on your bullet and its ability to release from the case neck. To learn more about neck tension and “case grip”, take the time to read this article carefully. We bet you’ll gain knowledge that will let you load more accurate ammo, with better ES/SD.

Editor: Guys, this is a VERY important article. You really should read it over carefully, twice. Variations in the force required to release a bullet can significantly affect accuracy and ES/SD. You really need to know how the grip on bullet can be altered by many different factors.

Neck Tension (i.e. Grip on Bullets) Is a Complex Phenomenon
While we certainly have considerable control over neck tension by using tighter or looser bushings (with smaller or bigger Inside Diameters), bushing size is only one factor at work. It’s important to understand the multiple factors that can increase or decrease the resistance to bullet release. Think in terms of overall brass-on-bullet “grip” instead of just bushing size (or the internal neck diameter in non-bushing full-length sizing dies).

Bullet grip is affected by many things, such as:

1. Neck-wall thickness.
2. Amount of bullet bearing surface (shank) in the neck.
3. Surface condition inside of neck (residual carbon can act as a lubricant; ultrasonic cleaning makes necks “grabby”).
4. Length of neck (e.g. 6mmBR neck vs. 6mm Dasher).
5. Whether or not the bullets have an anti-friction coating.
6.The springiness of the brass (which is related to degree of work-hardening; number of firings etc.)
7. The bullet jacket material.
8. The outside diameter of the bullet and whether it has a pressure ridge.
9. Time duration between bullet seating and firing (necks can stiffen with time).
10. How often the brass is annealed.
11. Amount (length) of neck sized (e.g. you can size only half the neck).
12. Interior diameter of bushing, or neck section of non-bushing die.


– and there are others…

One needs to understand that bushing size isn’t the beginning and end of neck tension questions, because, even if bushing size is held constant, the amount of bullet “grip” can change dramatically as the condition of your brass changes. Bullet “grip” can also change if you alter your seating depth, and it can even change if you ultrasonically clean your cases.

Redding neck bushingsIn our Shooters’ Forum a reader recently asked: “How much neck tension should I use?” This prompted a Forum discussion in which other Forum members recommended a specific number based on their experience, such as .001″, .002″, or .003″. These numbers, as commonly used, correspond to the difference between case-neck OD after sizing and the neck OD of a loaded round, with bullet in place. In other words, the numbers refer to the nominal amount of interference fit (after sizing).

While these commonly-used “tension numbers” (of .001″, .002″ etc.) can be useful as starting points, neck tension is actually a fairly complex subject. The actual amount of “grip” on the bullet is a function of many factors, of which neck-OD reduction during sizing is just one. Understanding these many factors will help you maintain consistent neck tension as your brass “evolves” over the course of multiple reloadings.

Seating Depth Changes Can Increase or Decrease Grip on Bullet
You can do this simple experiment. Seat a boat-tail bullet in your sized neck with .150″ of bearing surface (shank) in the neck. Now remove the bullet with an impact hammer. Next, take another identical bullet and seat it with .300″ of bearing surface in another sized case (same bushing size/same nominal tension). You’ll find the deeper-seated bullet is gripped much harder.

PPC lapua brassNeck-Wall Thickness is Important Too
I have also found that thinner necks, particularly the very thin necks used by many PPC shooters, require more sizing to give equivalent “grip”. Again, do your own experiment. Seat a bullet in a case turned to .008″ neckwall thickness and sized down .003″. Now compare that to a case with .014″ neckwall thickness and sized down .0015″. You may find that the bullet in the thin necks actually pulls out easier, though it supposedly has more “neck tension”, if one were to consider bushing size alone.

In practical terms, because thick necks are less elastic than very thin necks, when you turn necks you may need to run tighter bushings to maintain the same amount of actual grip on the bullets (as compared to no-turn brass). Consequently, I suspect the guys using .0015″ “tension” on no-turn brass may be a lot closer to the guys using .003″ “tension” on turned necks than either group may realize.

Toward a Better Definition of Neck Tension
As a convenient short-cut, we tend to describe neck tension by bushing size alone. When a guy says, “I run .002 neck tension”, that normally means he is using a die/bushing that sizes the necks .002″ smaller than a loaded round. Well we know something about his post-sizing neck OD, but do we really have a reliable idea about how much force is required to release his bullets? Maybe not… This use of the term “neck tension” when we are really only describing the amount of neck diameter reduction with a die/bushing is really kind of incomplete.

My point here is that it is overly simplistic to ask, “should I load with .001 tension or .003?” In reality, an .001″ reduction (after springback) on a thick neck might provide MORE “grip” on a deep-seated bullet than an .003″ reduction on a very thin-walled neck holding a bullet with minimal bearing surface in the neck. Bushing ID is something we can easily measure and verify. We use bushing size as a descriptor of neck tension because it is convenient and because the other important factors are hard to quantify. But those factors shouldn’t be ignored if you want to maintain consistent neck tension for optimal accuracy.

Consistency and accuracy — that’s really what this all about isn’t it? We want to find the best neck tension for accuracy, and then maintain that amount of grip-on-bullet over time. To do that you need to look not only at your bushing size, but also at how your brass has changed (work-hardened) with time, and whether other variables (such as the amount of carbon in the neck) have changed. Ultimately, optimal neck tension must be ascertained experimentally. You have to go out and test empirically to see what works, in YOUR rifle, with YOUR bullets and YOUR brass. And you may have to change the nominal tension setting (i.e. bushing size) as your brass work-hardens or IF YOU CHANGE SEATING DEPTHS.

Remember that bushing size alone does not tell us all we need to know about the neck’s true “holding power” on a bullet, or the energy required for bullet release. True bullet grip is a more complicated phenomenon, one that is affected by numerous factors, some of which are very hard to quantify.

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July 30th, 2020

The 300 Raptor — Monster .30-Caliber Magnum for Long Range

300 Raptor Allen Precision
The 300 Raptor just might be the most powerful .30-Cal magnum for a conventional-sized receiver.

With the success of the King of 2 Miles (KO2M) event and the growing popularity of extreme long range shooting, we’ve seen an increased interest in really big cartridges for really long range. One such wildcat cartridge is the 300 Raptor pioneered by Kirby Allen. This monster magnum can launch a 230gr bullet at 3350 fps. That delivers some serious ballistics at extreme long range.

300 Raptor Allen PrecisionKirby Allen of Allen Precision Shooting, www.apsrifles.com, has developed a .30-caliber, jumbo-sized magnum wildcat cartridge. The powerful 300 Raptor (center in photo) is based on Allen’s 338 Excalibur parent case (far right in photo), necked down to 30 Cal with shoulder moved forward to increase case capacity. Allen states: “This is the largest capacity and performance .30 caliber magnum on the market that can be used in a conventional-sized receiver.”

Shoot 200s at 3600 fps
Performance of Allen’s new 300 Raptor is impressive. Allen claims that “200gr Accubonds can be driven to nearly 3600 fps, 230gr Berger Hybrids to 3350 fps, and the 240gr SMK to right at 3300 fps. These loads offered case life in excess of 6-7 firings per case and many of my test cases have over 8 firings on each case so they are not an overly hot load showing the potential of this big .30 caliber.”

To showcase the new cartridge, Allen built up a prototype rifle with a McMillan A5 stock, Raptor LRSS Action with extended tenon, and a Jewell trigger. The first 300 Raptor Rifle is currently on its second barrel, a new 30″, 3-groove 1:9″-twist Lilja in a custom APS “Raptor Contour”. This distinctive dual-fluted contour runs full-diameter almost to the end of the stock, and then steps down and tapers to the muzzle, where a beefy Medium 3-port ‘Painkiller’ Allen Precision brake is fitted.

300 Raptor Allen Precision

Story tip by EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.
Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Hunting/Varminting 1 Comment »
July 29th, 2020

Reloading Rescue — How to Remove a Case Stuck in a Die

stuck72

Western powders, ramshot, norma, accurate

To err is human… Sooner or later you’ll probably get a case stuck in a die. This “fix-it” article, which originally appeared in the Western Powders Blog, explains how to remove a firmly stuck cartridge case using an RCBS kit. This isn’t rocket science, but you do want to follow the directions carefully, step-by-step. Visit the Western Powders Blog for other helpful Tech Tips.

Curing the Stuck Case Blues

decapstem72Sticking a case in the sizer die is a rite of passage for the beginning handloader. If you haven’t done it yet, that’s great, but it probably will eventually happen. When it does, fixing the problem requires a bit of ingenuity or a nice little kit like the one we got from RCBS.

The first step is to clear the de-capping pin from the flash hole. Just unscrew the de-capping assembly to move it as far as possible from the primer pocket and flash hole (photo at right). Don’t try to pull it all the way out. It won’t come. Just unscrew it and open as much space as possible inside the case.

Place the die upside down in the padded jaws of a vise and clamp it firmly into place. Using the supplied #7 bit, drill through the primer pocket. Be careful not to go too deeply inside the cartridge once the hole has opened up. It is important to be aware that the de-capping pin and expander ball are still in there and can be damaged by the bit.

Drill and Tap the Stuck Case
taping72drilling72

Once the cartridge head has been drilled, a ¼ – 20 is tap is used to cut threads into the pocket. Brass is relatively soft compared to a hardened tap, so no lube is needed for the tapping process. RCBS says that a drill can be used for this step, but it seems like a bit of overkill in a project of this nature. A wrench (photo above right) makes short work of the project.

RCBS supplies a part they call the “Stuck Case Remover Body” for the next step. If you are a do-it-yourselfer and have the bit and tap, this piece is easily replicated by a length of electrical conduit of the proper diameter and some washers. In either case, this tool provides a standoff for the screw that will do the actual pulling.

pulling72fingers72

With an Allen Wrench, Finish the Job
Run the screw through the standoff and into the tapped case head. With a wrench, tighten the screw which hopefully pulls the case free. Once the case is free, clamp the case in a vice and pull it free of the de-capping pin. There is tension here because the sizing ball is oversized to the neck dimension as part of the sizing process. It doesn’t take much force, but be aware there is still this last little hurdle to clear before you get back to loading. Don’t feel bad, everyone does this. Just use more lube next time!

wholekit72unstuck72

Article find by EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.
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July 28th, 2020

How Muzzle Velocity Changes with Different Barrel Twist Rates

applied Ballistics Barrel Twist rate velocity testing test bryan Litz
Many barrel-makers mark the twist rate and bore dimensions on their barrel blanks.

Does muzzle velocity change with faster or slower barrel twist rates? Absolutely, but much less than you might think. Faster twist rates do slow down bullets somewhat, but the speed loss is NOT that significant. With Bartlein .308 Win barrels of identical length and contour, a 1:12″-twist barrel was only 8 fps faster than a 1:8″-twist barrel. That was the result of testing by Applied Ballistics.

The Applied Ballistics team tested six (6) same-length/same-contour Bartlein barrels to observe how twist rate might affect muzzle velocity. This unique, multi-barrel test is featured in the book Modern Advancements in Long Range Shooting, Vol. 1. That book includes other fascinating field tests, including a comprehensive chronograph comparison.

applied Ballistics Barrel Twist rate velocity testing test bryan Litz

applied Ballistics Barrel Twist rate velocity testing test bryan Litz
Barrel Twist Rate vs. Velocity — What Tests Reveal
by Bryan Litz
When considering barrel twist rates, it’s a common belief that faster twist rates will reduce muzzle velocity. The thinking is that the faster twist rate will resist forward motion of the bullet and slow it down. There are anecdotal accounts of this, such as when someone replaces a barrel of one brand/twist with a different brand and twist and observes a different muzzle velocity. But how do you know the twist rate is what affected muzzle velocity and not the barrel finish, or bore/groove dimensions? Did you use the same chronograph to measure velocity from both barrels? Do you really trust your chronograph?

Summary of Test Results
After all the smoke cleared, we found that muzzle velocity correlates to twist rate at the average rate of approximately 1.33 FPS per inch of twist. In other words, your velocity is reduced by about 5 FPS if you go from a 1:12″ twist to a 1:8″ twist. — Bryan Litz

Savage Test Rifle with Six Bartlein Barrels
Barrel Twist Rate Velocity Modern Advancements Book Bryan Litz Applied Ballistics

Most shooters don’t have access to the equipment required to fully explore questions like this. These are exactly the kinds of things we examine in the book Modern Advancements in Long Range Shooting, Vol. 1. In that book, we present experiments conducted in the Applied Ballistics lab. Some of those experiments took on a “Myth Buster” tone as we sought to confirm (or deny) popular pre-conceptions. For example, here’s how we approached the question of barrel twist and muzzle velocity.

Six .308 Win Barrels from Bartlein — All Shot from the Same Rifle
We acquired six (6) barrels from the same manufacturer (Bartlein), all the same length and contour, and all chambered with the same reamer (SAAMI spec .308 Winchester). All these barrels were fitted to the same Savage Precision Target action, and fired from the same stock, and bench set-up. Common ammo was fired from all six barrels having different twist rates and rifling configurations. In this way, we’re truly able to compare what effect the actual twist rate has on muzzle velocity with a reasonable degree of confidence.

Prior to live fire testing, we explored the theoretical basis of the project, doing the physics. In this case, an energy balance is presented which predicts how much velocity you should expect to lose for a bullet that’s got a little more rotational energy from the faster twist. In the case of the .30 caliber 175 grain bullets, the math predicts a loss of 1.25 fps per inch-unit of barrel twist (e.g. a 1:8″ twist is predicted to be 1.25 fps slower than a 1:9″ twist).

Barrel Twist Rate Velocity Modern Advancements Book Bryan Litz Applied Ballistics

Above, data shows relationship between Twist Rate and Muzzle Velocity (MV) for various barrel twist rates and rifling types. From fast to slow, the three 1:10″ twist barrels are: 5R (canted land), 5 Groove, 5 Groove left-hand twist.

We proceeded with testing all 6 barrels, with twist rates from 1:8″ to 1:12″. After all the smoke cleared, we found that muzzle velocity correlates to twist rate at the average rate of approximately 1.33 fps per inch of twist. In other words, your velocity is reduced by about 5 fps if you go from a 1:12″ twist to a 1:8″ twist. [Editor: That’s an average for all the lengths tested. The actual variance between 1:12″ and 1:8″ here was 8 FPS.] In this case the math prediction was pretty close, and we have to remember that there’s always uncertainty in the live fire results. Uncertainty is always considered in terms of what conclusions the results can actually support with confidence.

Barrel Twist Rate Velocity Modern Advancements Book Bryan Litz Applied BallisticsThis is just a brief synopsis of a single test case. The coverage of twist rates in Modern Advancements in Long-Range Shooting Vol. 1 is more detailed, with multiple live fire tests. Results are extrapolated for other calibers and bullet weights. Needless to say, the question of “how twist rate affects muzzle velocity” is fully answered.

Other chapters in the book’s twist rate section include:
· Stability and Drag — Supersonic
· Stability and Drag — Transonic
· Spin Rate Decay
· Effect of Twist rate on Precision

Other sections of the book include: Modern Rifles, Scopes, and Bullets as well as Advancements in Predictive Modeling. This book is sold through the Applied Ballistics online store. Modern Advancements in Long Range Shooting is also available as an eBook in Amazon Kindle format.

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July 27th, 2020

Bargain Finder 253: AccurateShooter’s Deals of the Week

AccurateShooter Deals of the Week Weekly Bargain Finder Sale Discount Savings

At the request of our readers, we provide select “Deals of the Week”. Every Sunday afternoon or Monday morning we offer our Best Bargain selections. Here are some of the best deals on firearms, hardware, reloading components, optics, and shooting accessories. Be aware that sale prices are subject to change, and once clearance inventory is sold, it’s gone for good. You snooze you lose.

1. Midsouth — RCBS ChargeMaster, $244.49 with Rebate

rcbs chargemaster powder scale dispenser rebate midsouth

Great Deal with $75 Cash Rebate from RCBS

Here’s a great way to save on the popular RCBS ChargeMaster Dispenser, currently $314.99 at Midsouth Shooters (vs. $380 elsewhere). RCBS is running a Buy Green, Get Green Rebate currently. Buy ANY RCBS products worth $100.00 or more and you qualify. The more you spend, the more you get back — up to $100.00 total. Buy at least $400 worth of RCBS Products and get a big $100.00 rebate. Spend $250-$399 to get a $75.00 rebate. So if you buy the ChargeMaster from Midsouth you get $75 Cash Back. That lowers your net cost to $244.49!

2. CDNN Sports — Kel-Tec CP33 .22 LR Pistol with 33rd Mags

kel-tec keltec cp33 cp 33 pistol semi-auto .22 LR 22LR

33-rd Magazine, Top Rail, Xlnt Trigger, Great for Gun Games

We shot this Kel-Tec .22 LR pistol at SHOT Show Media Day and really liked it. It balanced well, the trigger is very good, and it functioned flawlessly. This is a great choice for gun games or reactive targets, such as dueling trees. The CP33 comes with built-in Fiber Optic blade sights and has a full-length Picatinny rail to mount a scope or red dot on top. The muzzle is threaded for easy suppressor attachment. This CP33 costs $449.88 with two 33-round magazines. You can pay nearly $500 elsewhere for this unique rimfire pistol.

3. Remington — Summer Rifle Rebates — Offer Ends 7/31/2020

remington rem 700 rebate $75 savings rifle cash back

Save $75 on Remington Model 700 Rifles, but Act Soon!

Folks — you can save big with these Remington Summer Rebates. But you must act SOON! Purchases must be made no later than July 31, 2020. Repeat: Deadline is 7/31/2020. Get $75 rebate on popular Remington Model 700 Rifles — Long Range, PCR, Magpul, 5R. There are also rebates on some Remington shotguns and Remington 1911 R1 handguns. CLICK HERE for Details and Mail-In Rebate Form.

4. Amazon — Frankford Arsenal Intellidropper, $199.95

frankford arsenal intellidropper

Smart Powder Dispenser, Works with App, Fast and Accurate

There are many good digital powder scale/dispensers on the market. But one of the best new-generation machines is the Frankford Arsenal Intellidroper. This offers excellent controls, good drop speed and +/- 0.10 grain accuracy, plus an easy-to-use Mobile App. Right now on Amazon you can get the advanced Intellidropper for under $200! If you’re looking for a new “smart” digital powder dispenser with advanced features, this is an excellent deal. Intellidropper Review HERE.

5. Palmetto Armory — Savage A22 .22 LR Pro Varmint, $419.98

savage a22 pro varmint rifle semi-auto .22 LR 22LR

Versatile Self-Loader for NRL22, Fun Shooting, and Varminting

Looking for an affordable, versatile .22 LR rifle for NRL22 and PRS rimfire matches, varminting, and fun shooting? The A22 Pro Varmint is an excellent choice at $419.98 on sale. The rifle’s Boyds Pro Varmint stock has good ergonomics. The gun has a nice medium contour barrel and a one-piece Picatinny rail. Savage’s 10-round rotary magazine offers fast cycling. The delayed blowback action is safe and reliable. For gun games where speed counts, we like semi-autos — follow-up shots are way faster than a bolt-action.

6. Amazon — Vortex 20-60x60mm Angled Spotting Scope, $399

vortex spotting scope

Great Spotting Scope Deal — Hard to beat at twice the price

Whether hunting or target shooting, spotting scopes get you on target faster and easier than bare eyes or riflescope. If you need a good all-purpose spotter, check out the Vortex Diamondback 20-60x60mm angled spotting scope for $399.99. It offers great clarity and rock-solid lifetime guarantee. There’s also a straight version for just $398.95, with same 20-60X power and 60mm objective. If you need more low-light ability, the Vortex 20-60x80mm spotter is $499.00, angled or straight.

7. MidwayUSA — Pelican 1750 & Vault V800 53″ Cases, 30% Off

vortex spotting scope

LARGE 53″ Cases hold two long rifles, 30% Off Savings

Do you own long-barreled F-Class, Benchrest, Palma, or PRS rifles? Here are two great Pelican hard cases that will each hold a pair of rifles up to about 51″ OAL. This week you can get 30% Off these quality cases. The Pelican 1750 is now $188.26, marked down from $269.95 — a 30% savings. The sturdy Pelican Vault V800 is even cheaper — $139.96, 30% Off the regular $199.95 price. Choose Black or tan colors for either model. NOTE: You must add these cases to MidwayUSA’s shopping cart to see the discounted prices.

8. Midsouth — Lee APP Press with Pocket Swage Kit, $109.99

Lee automatic processing press swage kit dies APP shuttle press

Great for Decapping and bulk sizing, Swage Kit Remove Military Crimps

The Lee Deluxe Automatic Processing Press (APP) features an innovative case/bullet feeder with Jaws that automatically open and grasp the bullet or case and move them into operating position. This unique press efficiently handles repetitive functions such as decapping, case sizing, and primer pocket swagging. This $109.99 Combo Pack includes Primer Pocket Swage Kit which removes the military crimp from the primer pocket while swaging the primer pocket of your brass. Kit includes: BOTH .22 and .30 Cal decap/flare dies, swage push die, swage holder, push rod, swage punch, and shell holder adapter.

9. Amazon — The Wind Book for Rifle Shooters, $22.99

wind reading book

Best Wind-Reading Book — NEW Edition, Released May 2020

Readers often ask: “Is there a good, easy-to-comprehend book that can help my wind-reading?” Many of our Forum members have recommended The Wind Book for Rifle Shooters by Linda Miller and Keith Cunningham. Other books cover wind reading in a broader discussion of ballistics or long-range shooting. But the Miller & Cunningham book is ALL about wind reading from cover to cover, and that is its strength. The book focuses on real world skills that can help you accurately gauge wind angle, wind velocity, and wind cycles. Here’s a video review explaining what makes this book so good.

10. CDNN — 51-Piece Driver Set (Flat, Phillips, Hex, Torx) — $9.99

Accurateshooter Bargain Finder Deals of Week Outers Screwdriver 51-piece set torx phillips allen driver

Everyone Can Use This — Four Driver types (51 pieces) at Great Price

This Outers-brand, 51-piece set contains all the drivers you could ever need: Flat-head, Phillips, Hex (Allen), and Torx. Priced under ten bucks, this driver set offers great value for the money. Even if you already own high-quality Allen and Torx wrenches, you can buy this as a spare set for your gun room. And this also makes a great holiday “stocking stuffer” for gun guys. These drivers work great for installing scope rings or bases, or everyday use around the home.

• Molded Driver with Magnetic Tip
• 15 Flat Head Bits
• 10 Hex Bits (inch)
• 9 Hex Bits (metric)
• 4 Phillips Bits
• 9 Torx Bits
• 2 Extra Long Phillips Bits
• 1 Hex to Square Adapter

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July 24th, 2020

Six Tips for Success at Local Fun Matches

Varmint silhouette fun match

Every summer weekend, there are probably 400 or more club “fun matches” conducted around the country. One of the good things about these club shoots is that you don’t have to spend a fortune on equipment to have fun. But we’ve seen that many club shooters handicap themselves with a few common equipment oversights or lack of attention to detail while reloading. Here are SIX TIPS that can help you avoid these common mistakes, and build more accurate ammo for your club matches.

Benchrest rear bag1. Align Front Rest and Rear Bag
We see many shooters whose rear bag is angled left or right relative to the bore axis. This can happen when you rush your set-up. But even if you set the gun up carefully, the rear bag can twist due to recoil or the way your arm contacts the bag. After every shot, make sure your rear bag is aligned properly (this is especially important for bag squeezers who may actually pull the bag out of alignment as they squeeze).

Forum member ArtB adds: “To align my front rest and rear bag with the target, I use an old golf club shaft. I run it from my front rest stop through a line that crosses over my speed screw and into the slot between the two ears. I stand behind that set-up and make sure I see a straight line pointing at the target. I also have a piece of tape that I’ve placed on the golf shaft that indicates how far the back end of the rear bag should be placed from the front rest stop.”

2. Avoid Contact Interference
We see three common kinds of contact or mechanical interference that can really hurt accuracy. First, if your stock has front and/or rear sling swivels make sure these do NOT contact the front or rear bags at any point of the gun’s travel. When a sling swivel digs into the front bag that can cause a shot to pop high or low. To avoid this, reposition the rifle so the swivels don’t contact the bags or simply remove the swivels before your match. Second, watch out for the rear of the stock grip area. Make sure this is not resting on the bag as you fire and that it can’t come back to contact the bag during recoil. That lip or edge at the bottom of the grip can cause problems when it contacts the rear bag. Third, watch out for the stud or arm on the front rest that limits forward stock travel. With some rests this is high enough that it can actually contact the barrel. We encountered one shooter recently who was complaining about “vertical flyers” during his match. It turns out his barrel was actually hitting the front stop! With most front rests you can either lower the stop or twist the arm to the left or right so it won’t contact the barrel.

varmint fun match groundhog

3. Weigh Your Charges — Every One
This may sound obvious, but many folks still rely on a powder measure. Yes we know that most short-range BR shooters throw their charges without weighing, but if you’re going to pre-load for a club match there is no reason NOT to weigh your charges. You may be surprised at how inconsistent your powder measure actually is. One of our testers was recently throwing H4198 charges from a mechanical measure for his 30BR. Each charge was then weighed twice with a Denver Instrument lab scale. Our tester found that thrown charges varied by up to 0.7 grains! And that’s with a premium measure.

4. Measure Your Loaded Ammo — After Bullet Seating
Even if you’ve checked your brass and bullets prior to assembling your ammo, we recommend that you weigh your loaded rounds and measure them from base of case to bullet ogive using a comparator. If you find a round that is “way off” in weight or more than .005″ off your intended base to ogive length, set it aside and use that round for a fouler. (Note: if the weight is off by more than 6 or 7 grains you may want to disassemble the round and check your powder charge.) With premium, pre-sorted bullets, we’ve found that we can keep 95% of loaded rounds within a range of .002″, measuring from base (of case) to ogive. Now, with some lots of bullets, you just can’t keep things within .002″, but you should still measure each loaded match round to ensure you don’t have some cases that are way too short or way too long.

Scope Ring5. Check Your Fasteners
Before a match you need to double-check your scope rings or iron sight mounts to ensure everything is tight. Likewise, you should check the tension on the screws/bolts that hold the action in place. Even with a low-recoiling rimfire rifle, action screws or scope rings can come loose during normal shooting.

6. Make a Checklist and Pack the Night Before
Ever drive 50 miles to a match then discover you have the wrong ammo or that you forgot your bolt? Well, mistakes like that happen to the best of us. You can avoid these oversights (and reduce stress at matches) by making a checklist of all the stuff you need. Organize your firearms, range kit, ammo box, and shooting accessories the night before the match. And, like a good Boy Scout, “be prepared”. Bring a jacket and hat if it might be cold. If you have windflags, bring them (even if you’re not sure the rules allow them). Bring spare batteries, and it’s wise to bring a spare rifle and ammo for it. If you have just one gun, a simple mechanical breakdown (such as a broken firing pin) can ruin your whole weekend.

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July 23rd, 2020

6mm ARC Cartridge — SAAMI Specs, Build Requirements, Videos

6mm ARC brownells bolts cartridge loaded ammunition hornady

In June 2020, Hornady introduced the 6mm ARC, a new SAAMI cartridge optimized for AR-platform rifles*. The new 6mm ARC is basically a 6.5 Grendel necked down to 6mm, with the shoulder moved back around .030″. That pushed-back shoulder does reduce case capacity (and velocity), but we assume Hornady did that to create a shorter, proprietary chamber so people could not simply neck-down Lapua 6.5 Grendel brass, as has been done for years with Robert Whitley’s outstanding 6mm AR wildcat.

CLICK Image for official SAAMI Specifications:
6mm ARC brownells bolts cartridge loaded ammunition hornady

If you are intrigued by the 6mm ARC, you’ll find the products you need at Brownells — uppers, barrels, bolts, and magazines. Brownells also sells Hornady-made 6mm ARC factory-loaded ammo, but most varieties are out-of-stock right now, as is the 6mm ARC brass. More brass and ammo should arrive soon. Midsouth is also taking brass/ammo backorders. For general information, see 6mm ARC Info Page.

What Is the 6mm ARC Cartridge?
6mm ARC brownells bolts cartridge loaded ammunition hornadyThe 6mm ARC cartridge is a new SAAMI-spec cartridge based on the 6.5 Grendel case necked down for 6mm bullets, with the shoulder moved back 0.030. Yes it is designed to run in AR15-platform rifles. You’ll need a new barrel, bolt, and mags. If you already have an AR chambered in 6.5 Grendel, the ONLY thing you need to change is the barrel. Everything else — bolt, magazines, gas system – is compatible with 6mm ARC.

▶ Official SAAMI Cartridge (not wildcat)
▶ Fits standard AR15-platform rifles
▶ Fits Short/Mini action bolt rifles
▶ Efficient short, fat case design
▶ 30-degree case shoulder

For more INFO, see 6mm ARC Info Page.

What Do I Need To Shoot the 6mm ARC?
Faxon and Ballistic Advantage are already producing barrels, with more manufacturers sure to follow. All the other required components are already on the market for 6.5 Grendel rifles. Aero Precision already offers complete 6mm ARC uppers.

If you’re converting a standard 5.56×45 mm (.223 Rem) AR15 upper to shoot 6mm ARC, you’ll need a 6mm barrel, a Type II 6.5 Grendel bolt carrier group, and new magazines. Some folks have suggested standard AR mags will work, but trust us, you want the magazines that have been designed for 6.5 Grendel. All the hardware you need is currently available at Brownells. And Brownells also sells complete Aero Precision 6mm ARC Uppers, starting at $749.99.

6mm ARC brownells bolts cartridge loaded ammunition hornady

6mm ARC Videos from Hornady (18 Total)

6mm ARC: Overview
6mm ARC: Handloading
6mm ARC Initial Offerings
6mm ARC: AR-15 vs AR-10
6mm ARC vs. 6.5 Grendel
6mm ARC vs the Creedmoors
6mm ARC: 6.5 Creedmoor of the Gas Gun World
6mm ARC vs 308 WIN
6mm ARC: How it started

6mm ARC: What is it
6mm ARC: Military Application
6mm ARC vs. 6.8 SPC
6mm ARC: Bolt Gun Application
6mm ARC: Cartridge Design
6mm ARC: Best AR-15 Cartridge
6mm ARC: Hunting
6mm ARC: Match
6mm ARC: Barrel Length


* While 6-6.5 Grendel shooters are known to run stout pressures, the new 6mm ARC cartridge has a relatively moderate Maximum Average Pressure (MAP) rating of 52,000 psi according to the official SAAMI specifications. For a variety of reasons, is wise to keep pressures in a semi-auto rifle moderate. Don’t chase the velocities you might get in a bolt-action gun.

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July 20th, 2020

Bargain Finder 252: AccurateShooter’s Deals of the Week

AccurateShooter Deals of the Week Weekly Bargain Finder Sale Discount Savings

At the request of our readers, we provide select “Deals of the Week”. Every Sunday afternoon or Monday morning we offer our Best Bargain selections. Here are some of the best deals on firearms, hardware, reloading components, optics, and shooting accessories. Be aware that sale prices are subject to change, and once clearance inventory is sold, it’s gone for good. You snooze you lose.

1. Sportsman’s Warehouse — $75-$200 Gift Cards with Spotters

vortex spotting scope sale

Deal of Year on Vortex Spotters — get $75, $100, or $200 gift cards

Vortex makes fine spotting scopes with rock-solid, unconditional warranties. Vortex spotters offer great performance for the price, so it is rare to see multiple Vortex spotter models on sale. But right now Sportsman’s Warehouse is running a Vortex Spotter Promo. Prices are slashed, PLUS when you buy a Vortex spotting scope you get a $75, $100, or $200 gift card. This is the best deal we’ve seen on Vortex Spotters in a long, long time. If you’re in the market for a new spotter, definitely check this promo offering discount prices PLUS valuable gift cards.

2. Grafs.com – Lapua Brass and Scenar Bullets Rebate

lapua brass sale rebate

SAVE 10% with Rebate Program for Lapua Brass and Bullets

Here is a great deal on great cartridge brass. Check out Graf’s full selection of Lapua brass. With the Lapua Summer Savings Rebate you can then save 10% on your purchases up to $200 max. This is a great deal on top of Graf’s already attractive prices. NOTE: You can also get a 10% summer Savings Rebate on the excellent Lapua Scenar bullets. We have found the Scenars to be extremely consistent in weight and base-to-ogive measurements. The Lapua Rebate Program covers purchases through August 31, 2020.

3. Midsouth — Hornady Precision Measurement System, $229.99

hornady precision measurement system

Versatile, performs many tasks, integrated concentricity checker

Precision reloading involves taking precise measurements, typically using many different tools. Hornady’s new Precision Measurement System allow multiple measurements to be taken with a single work-station. With this unit you can sort bullets, check cartridge base to ogive location, measure cartridge headspace location and OAL. You can also measure bullet run-out and case concentricity using an adjustable, bearing-equipped concentricity checker. This versatile system comes complete with five headspace bushings (.330, .350, .375, .400, .420), and seven bullet comparators (.224, .243, .257, .264, .277, .284, .308).

4. Amazon — RifleKuhl and BarrelCool Portable Cooling Units

barrel coolers

Get Barrel Coolers for hot summer months, extend Barrel Life

In summer it can be tough to keep your barrel at moderate temperatures. But a handy, compact cooling fan device can really help. Two of the best barrel coolers on the market are the RifleKuhl from Magnetospeed and the original Barrel Cool from BarrelCool. Both of these units can double as empty chamber indicators, feature high power fans and can cool your barrel down to a decent, usable temperature in about 10 minutes.

5. Bruno Shooters Supply — Nosler Brass Sale, Huge Savings

nosler brass sale

Wide selection of hard-to-find brass types at very good prices

Did you know that Nosler makes brass for more lesser-known cartridge types than just about any other domestic brass-maker? From .204 Ruger to 375 H&H, Nosler brass is a great choice for any handloader who reloads for specialized, “boutique” chamberings. Head over to Bruno’s for the Nosler Brass Sale and you can pick up hard-to-find brass varieties at remarkably low prices.

6. Brownells — SIG KILO Laser Rangefinders 1800/2200 BDX

Sig rangefinder sale

SAVE $150-$160 on quality Sig Sauer Laser Rangefinders

If you’ve been looking for a compact, feature laden and powerful rangefinder head over to Brownells where they are having a smoking Sig Sauer Rangefinder Sale. You can pick up the Kilo 1800BDX for only $249.99. This model is accurate to 1,000 yards off deer or 2,000 yards on reflective surfaces. If you’re looking for even more capability, grab the Kilo 2200 BDX for $339.99 on sale. The 2200 BDX ranges deer to 1300 yards off deer or reflective surfaces to 3400 yards.

7. Cabela’s — Ruger American Rifle Compact Rifle, $279.97

ruger american compact rifle

Great bargain hunting rifle, decent accuracy and Ruger reliability

Right now you can buy a Ruger American Rifle Compact Bolt-Action Rifle in .243 Winchester or 7mm-08 for just $279.97, an amazing price! These reliable compact Ruger rifles are great for smaller stature shooters or those with thicker clothing on because of their shorter length of trigger pull. However they still have all the features of the standard Ruger American Rifle. This would be a great first hunting rifle for a young person.

8. Amazon — Caldwell The Rock Deluxe Front Rest Combo, $67.99

caldwell rock rest
caldwell rock rest

Super deal for basic rest and rear bag

For plinking, varmint shooting, or sighting in a hunting rig, Caldwell’s The Rock Deluxe Front Rest Combo provides a functional basic setup for $67.99 — a true bargain. Consider that a quality rear bag such at the Protektor Rabbit Ear Hard Bottom model costs $71.65 by itself. But a better bag will improve stability and tracking. Still this Caldwell Combo is way better than what many folks use for sighting-in rifles.

9. Midsouth Shooters — Buy Green Get Green RCBS Rebates

Bergara B-14 HMR

Rebate Program for ALL RCBS products — presses, tools and more

RCBS Buy Green Get Green promo is simple — buy ANY RCBS products worth $100.00 or more and you qualify. There’s no restricted list of “qualifying” products. Buy from Midsouth or other retailer. The more you spend, the more you get back — up to $100.00 total. Buy at least $400 worth of RCBS Products and get a big $100.00 rebate. Spend $250-$399 to get a $75.00 rebate. Purchase $100-$249 and get $50 back. If you are considering purchasing a single-stage press, electronic powder dispenser, progressive press, or a reloading kit, save big with this promo. It’s good for purchases now through August 31, 2020. Submit RCBS Rebate Forms HERE.

10. Amazon — Hornady One Shot Spray Lube, $13.99

hornady one shot

Dry-Film Lube — not sticky, easy to apply, used by top shooters

If you’re looking for a mess-free way to lube cases before sizing give Hornady One Shot a try. It’s easy to apply and leaves a grease-free, friction-reducing film that works great for full-length case sizing. Here’s a good video that shows application methods with tips to ensure great results with your brass.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Handguns, Hot Deals, Optics 2 Comments »
July 20th, 2020

New Berger Loaded Ammo with LR Hybrid Target Bullets

berger factory ammo ammunition 6mm 6.5mm creedmoor prs nrl loaded long range hybrid target bullets

Here’s good news for PRS/NRL shooters, and factory-class competitors at local bench and varmint matches. Berger is now offering factory-loaded ammunition with Lapua brass and Berger’s outstanding, match-proven Long Range Hybrid Target™ (LRHT) bullets. This new loaded ammo is offered for the 6mm Creedmoor and 6.5 Creedmoor cartridges. Get the 109gr LRHT bullet in 6mm Creedmoor, or choose a 144gr or 153.5gr LRHT bullet in 6.5 Creedmoor.

Berger Long Range Hybrid Target ammunition features Berger’s high-BC, LRHT bullet, which is Doppler Radar-verified to less than 1% BC variation. LRHT ammo is assembled with Lapua cartridge cases and clean-burning, temperature insensitive propellants. These Berger cartridges are meticulously constructed to exacting tolerances — you will be pleased with the accuracy and low ES numbers.

Berger Long Range Hybrid Target™ Ammunition is available now in these offerings:

6mm Creedmoor 109 gr LRHT | 6.5 Creedmoor 144 gr LRHT | 6.5 Creedmoor 153.5 gr LRHT

This ammo will be available from leading retailers including Brownells, Graf & Sons, Midsouth Shooters, and Precision Reloading. Visit NoBSBC.com to learn more about Ballistic Coefficients (BC), and their effects on accuracy and precision. Visit Bergerbullets.com for general information on Berger loaded ammo.

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