March 23rd, 2019

Suppressor Facts Revealed — How They Work

Suppressor silencer NSSF infographic decibel noise reduction moderator fact sheet

Curious about suppressors (aka “silencers”, “moderators”, or “cans”)? Below you’ll find an informative NSSF Infographic that covers the history, legal status, design, and operation of modern-day suppressors.

Here’s a cool video showing how suppressors work. This video features see-through rifle suppressors filmed with ultra-high-speed (110,000 frame per second) cameras. When played back in super-slow-motion, you can see the flame propagate through the suppressor and the bullet move through each baffle before it exists the muzzle. Check it out!

See Through Suppressor in Super Slow Motion (110,000 fps) — Click Arrow to Watch:

Suppressor Facts — What You Need to Know

In this infographic, the NSSF provides the history, specifications, benefits and uses of firearm suppressors. Don’t suppress your knowledge!

Suppressors reduce gunfire sound levels by using baffles that contain expanding gasses exiting a firearm’s muzzle when ammo is discharged. Suppressors are similar to car mufflers that were, in fact, developed in parallel by the same inventor in the early 1900s. Well-designed suppressors typically reduce the gun sound levels by 30-35 decibels (dB). Suppressors are becoming more popular even though it still takes many months to get approved. In fact, the number of suppressors registered with the ATF grew by over 1 million from 2011 to 2017. That’s a 355% increase.

Suppressor silencer NSSF infographic decibel noise reduction moderator fact sheet

Permalink - Videos, Hunting/Varminting, Tactical, Tech Tip No Comments »
March 20th, 2019

Less is More — Minimalist Cobra Chassis for 22 BR Varminter

Eberlestock M2 Cobra rifle chassis stock

A while back, Machinist/gunsmith Paul Fakenbridge (aka “Boltfluter” on our Shooters’ Forum) upgraded his favorite 22BR varmint rig with a new skeletal stock. This rifle, Paul’s “Rock Chuck Killing Machine”, was originally fitted with an HS Precision fiberglass stock. Now Paul’s 22 BR sports new hardware — a sleek Eberlestock M2 Cobra Chassis in “Dry Earth” color. The $995.00 M2 Cobra is a one-piece metal stock system that mounts a Rem-700 type action in a V-block. The cheekpad height and LOP are adjustable via spacers. The M2 Cobra uses AICS-type mags and can fit Picatinny rails on the side. Weight of the Cobra chassis alone is 4 pounds. READ SPECS.

Eberlestock M2 Cobra rifle chassis stock

Check out the “Before” and “After” photos below…

Eberlestock M2 Cobra rifle chassis stock

Eberlestock M2 Cobra rifle chassis stock

Boltfluter Likes His Eberlestock M2 Cobra
Paul tells us the stock upgrade was a success: “I got the urge to try something different as far as stocks go. I went from the HS stock to an Eberlestock M2 Cobra. The vertical grip feels quite good and is very easy to shoot. And with this upgrade I finally got the chance to flute and coat my own bolt!”

Paul, who runs Pro Precision Rifles, specializes in bolt fluting and barrel fluting (and he also does bolt knobs, coatings, and other gunsmithing work).

Permalink Gear Review, Hunting/Varminting, Tactical No Comments »
March 17th, 2019

Hunter Training and Mentoring Programs — State by State

Hunter hunt hunting recruitment mentor mentoring junior novice training license licensing programs
Photo from Nebraska Mentored Hunts.

The number of active hunters in the USA has declined in recent years. That’s not good for wildlife management programs, which are supported, in large part, by hunting fees. Perhaps more importantly, the declin in the ranks of hunters weakens the base of support for the Second Amendment. Hunters are key to the future of firearms rights in America. We support efforts to increase the number of hunters, through mentoring and training programs.

The NRA’s American Hunter magazine has compiled a comprehensive list of hunting mentor programs, state by state. This is followed by listing of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) that provide hunter training. If you know individuals looking to get a start in hunting, check out these resources.

Hunter hunt hunting recruitment mentor mentoring junior novice training license licensing programs

State Hunter Mentoring and Training Progams

Alabama | 205-339-5716
• Hunting Programs: outdooralabama.com/hunting

Alaska | 907-267-2534
• Hunter Education: huntereducation.alaska.gov

Arizona | 602-942-3000
• Mentor Camps: azgfd.com/Hunting/MentoredCamps/

Arkansas | 800-364-4263
• Arkansas Outdoors: agfc.com/en/get-involved/first-steps-outdoors/

California | 916-653-1235
• Programs: wildlife.ca.gov/hunter-education
• Apprentice Hunting Licenses: nrm.dfg.ca.gov/ApprenticeHunts/Default.aspx

Colorado | 303-291-7248
• Hunter Outreach: cpw.state.co.us/learn/Pages/HunterOutreach.aspx

Connecticut | 860-424-3000
• Junior Hunter
: ct.gov/deep/JuniorHunter

Delaware | 302-739-9910
• Hunter Ed
: dnrec.delaware.gov/fw/HunterEd/Pages/HunterEd.aspx

Florida | 850-488-4676
• Mentor Program: myfwc.com/hunting/safety-education/mentoring/
• Youth Program: myfwc.com/education/outdoor-skills/youth-hunting-program/

Georgia | 706-557-2335
• Mentor Program: georgiawildlife.com/mentor

Idaho | 208-334-3700
• Hunt Passport: idfg.idaho.gov/hunt/passport

Illinois | 217-300-5352
• Learn to Hunt: publish.illinois.edu/hunttrapillinois/
• Apprentice License: dnr.illinois.gov/hunting/pages/apprenticelicense.aspx

Indiana | 317-233-9382
• Hunting: in.gov/dnr/fishwild/2701.htm

Iowa | 515-725-8200
• Learn to Hunt: iowadnr.gov/Hunting/Hunter-Education/Learn-to-Hunt

Kansas | 620-672-5911
• Hunter Recruitment: ksoutdoors.com/Hunting/Hunting-Programs/Hunter-Recruitment
• Outdoor Mentors: outdoormentors.org/
• Youth Hunts: ksoutdoors.com/Hunting/Special-Hunts-Information

Kentucky | 800-858-1549 Ext. 4475; 502-330-8487
• Hunter’s Legacy Program: fw.ky.gov/Hunt/Pages/Hunter%27s-Legacy.aspx
• Field to Fork Program: fw.ky.gov/Pages/FieldtoFork.aspx

(more…)

Permalink Hunting/Varminting, News, Shooting Skills No Comments »
March 15th, 2019

Record Video Through Your Rifle Scope with Tactacam FTS

rifle scope camera tactacam FTS inline scope cam video capture hunting hunt recording Wifi Streaming

Tactacam, builder of compact, waterproof video cameras, now offers a new system, the Tactacam FTS, that allows you to film directly through your rifle scope. The images you see can be recorded to your mobile device or smart phone as well as viewed live. We think this is an important technology for marksmanship training. In addition, this is great for hunters who may want to record a successful hunt sequence.

rifle scope camera tactacam FTS inline scope cam video capture hunting hunt recording Wifi Streaming

The Tactacam FTS combines the high definition video from your Tactacam camera with the high-power zoom of a rifle scope. This lets you remotely view and record live footage from your rifle on your smart phone. Simply couple your scope and your camera together with the Tactacam FTS components. Then sync the camera to the Tactacam APP on your smart phone for live viewing.

rifle scope camera tactacam FTS inline scope cam video capture hunting hunt recording Wifi Streaming

You continue to watch your target through the normal optical axis of the rifle scope. The camera records via the offset FTS camera mount. The output of the FTS camera system can then be viewed, in real time, via a live feed to a smart phone. After setup, the Tactacam FTS allows the riflescope to operate as normal without additional adjustment or modification.

4K Resolution, Remote Control, Slo-Mo, Wifi Viewing and More
Tactacam’s innovative camera systems allow easy, in-the-field recording of hunts and shooting sessions. The FTS mount can handle all Tactacam Solo, 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0 cameras. The latest Tactacam 5.0 unit provides 4K resolution with outstanding image quality. Other features include Wifi and APP viewing options, remote control activation, slow motion, and live-streaming capabilities. The camera output can be viewed both in the App and on external WiFi-capable devices.

rifle scope camera tactacam FTS inline scope cam video capture hunting hunt recording Wifi Streaming

The Tactacam FTS system can attach to nearly any conventional rifle scope. This system is less expensive and easier-to-mount that most other through-the-scope viewing systems. Importantly, your valuable smart-phone remains separate, i.e. NOT attached to the rifle. Hence it cannot be harmed by recoil or muzzle blast.

Permalink - Videos, Hunting/Varminting, New Product, Optics 2 Comments »
March 13th, 2019

Varmint Silhouette Competition in Texas — Video Feature

Shooting USA TV show varmint silhouette Texas benchrest Travis Frazier John Scoutten

If you like accurate rifles and reactive targets, you’ll enjoy this 48-minute video from Shooting USA TV, which features long-range varmint silhouette competition in Texas, the Lone Star State. We have participated in these kind of matches on the West Coast — they are definitely a ton of fun. The sport combines the pure accuracy of benchrest competition with the fun of knocking down critter targets. These are smaller than standard silhouettes, so it’s quite a challenge to hit them at 300 yards and beyond.

In this episode, host John Scoutten competes with his 6.5 Creedmoor PRS rifle. He found that 1-MOA Coyotes offered plenty of challenge at 385 meters! Most shooters use benchrest-grade rifles with premium front rests.

Full 48-Minute Episode of Shooting USA featuring Texas Varmint Silhouette:

Steel Targets by Distance:
Mini Prairie Dogs — 200 Meters
3″x3″ Armadillos — 300 Meters
3″x5″ Coyotes — 385 Meters
5″x4″ Hogs — 500 Meters
Chickens (on Swingers) — 600 Yards
Pigs (on Swingers) — 750 Yards

Shooting USA TV show varmint silhouette Texas benchrest Travis Frazier John Scoutten

EDITOR: We strongly recommend you take the time to watch this Shooting USA feature — it shows some top-flight benchrest rifles, and also covers the origins of benchrest varmint silhouette in Pennsylvania. There are even some AccurateShooter Forum members on screen. John Scoutten also does nice job explaining the challenges of shooting this discipline with a PRS rig. We think any benchrest or tactical shooter will really enjoy watching this video.

Shooting USA TV show varmint silhouette Texas benchrest Travis Frazier John Scoutten

Travis Frazier of Field & Cave Outfitters says shooters love the reactive targets: “The most exciting thing is seeing your hits — these [targets] really go airborne”. Yep, that’s the best thing about Varmint Silhouette matches — hits deliver instant gratification. Travis designs and produces these steel targets.

This Texas match features multiple target shapes, 10 at each distance: Tiny Prairie Dogs at 200m, 3″x3″ Armadillos at 300m; 3″x5″ Coyotes at 385m; 5″x4″ Hogs at 500m; Chickens (on swingers) at 600 yards; and Pigs (on Swingers) at 750 yards. Competitors are allowed 10 rounds and 10 minutes to hit each set of targets.

Shooting USA TV show varmint silhouette Texas benchrest Travis Frazier John Scoutten

Permalink - Videos, Competition, Hunting/Varminting, Shooting Skills No Comments »
March 11th, 2019

IWA Outdoor Classics 2019 Concludes Today

IWA Outdoor Classics hunting shooting firearms sports exhibition trade SHOT Show nuremberg germany
Some interesting Drive Band bullets were on display at IWA Show.

IWA Outdoor Classics Exhibition Concludes for 2019
As we publish this in the USA, the IWA Outdoor Classics trade show is drawing to a close. Today marked the last day of the 4-Day exhibition in Nuremberg, Germany. IWA is a big event, drawing over 1600 exhibitors, as well as nearly 50,000 show visitors from around the world. Here is our IWA Day 4 report, with more images from the show. Photo Credit for IWA images: NuernbergMesse / Frank Boxler and Thomas Geiger, All Rights Reserved.

IWA Outdoor Classics hunting shooting firearms sports exhibition trade SHOT Show nuremberg germany

Yes they like big boomers in Europe too. Here is an Austrian Steyr-Mannlicher HS .50-M1 in .50 BMG.

IWA Outdoor Classics hunting shooting firearms sports exhibition trade SHOT Show nuremberg germany

These state-of-the-art, computer-controlled commercial loading stations were on display at IWA.

IWA Outdoor Classics hunting shooting firearms sports exhibition trade SHOT Show nuremberg germany

The sound of silence. The new German-engineered Blaser R8 Ultimate Silence features an integral silencer. The over-sized barrel functions as the silencer.

IWA Outdoor Classics hunting shooting firearms sports exhibition trade SHOT Show nuremberg germany

Some of the best specialized competition shooting coats and pants are crafted in Europe.

IWA Outdoor Classics hunting shooting firearms sports exhibition trade SHOT Show nuremberg germany

Zeiss, a German company, produces some of the best rifle scopes in the world.

Spirit of the Hunt — IWA Showcases Hunting Gear and Clothing

At its heart, the IWA Outdoor Classics event remains a showcase for hunting products. The aisles included collections of antlers, hunting gear, and traditional Bavarian hunting clothing.

IWA Outdoor Classics hunting shooting firearms sports exhibition trade SHOT Show nuremberg germany

IWA Outdoor Classics hunting shooting firearms sports exhibition trade SHOT Show nuremberg germany

IWA Outdoor Classics hunting shooting firearms sports exhibition trade SHOT Show nuremberg germany

Parting Shot — Crack Open a Cold One with a Stag-Horn

Here’s just what you need to open a bottle of good German lager — a stag-horn bottle opener. Prost!

IWA Outdoor Classics hunting shooting firearms sports exhibition trade SHOT Show nuremberg germany

Permalink Hunting/Varminting, New Product, News 1 Comment »
March 9th, 2019

Groundhog Match Basics — What to Expect

Groundhog Matches Rules Pennsylvania

If your local shooting club wants to attract new members, and provide a new form of competition, consider starting a series of groundhog (varmint) matches. These can employ paper targets, metal silhouette-style targets, or both. Groundhog matches are fun events with straight-forward rules and simple scoring. You don’t need to bring windflags or load at the range, so a Groundhog match is more “laid back” than a registered Benchrest match. Normally there will be three or four rifle classes, so you can compete with a “box-stock” factory gun, or a fancy custom, as you prefer. Many clubs limit the caliber or cartridge size allowed in varmint matches, but that’s just to protect reactive targets and keep ammo costs down. In this article, Gene F. (aka “TenRing” in our Forum), provides a basic intro to Groundhog matches, East-Coast style.

Groundhog Matches Are Growing in Popularity
Though Groundhog matches are very popular in many parts of the country, particularly on the east coast, I’ve found that many otherwise knowledgeable “gun guys” don’t know much about this form of competition. A while back, I ordered custom bullets from a small Midwest bullet-maker. He asked what type of competition the bullets would be used for, and I told him “groundhog shoots”. He had not heard of these. It occurs to me that perhaps many others are unfamiliar with this discipline.

Groundhog matches have grown rapidly in popularity. There are numerous clubs hosting them in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Delaware, as well as other venues. They are usually open to the public. Most Eastern clubs have five to twenty cement benches, and overhead roofs. At this time, there is no central source for match schedules. If you’re interested in going to a groundhog match, post a query in the AccurateShooter Forum Competition Section, and you should get some info on nearby opportunities.

How Matches Are Run — Course of Fire and Scoring
Unlike NRA High Power Matches, there is no nationwide set of standard rules for Groundhog matches. Each club has their own rules, but the basics are pretty similar from club to club. Paper groundhog targets are set at multiple distances. There are normally three yardages in the match. Some clubs place targets at 100, 200, and 300 yards. Other clubs set them at 200, 300, or 400 yards. At my club in Shippensburg, PA, our targets are placed at 200, 300 and 500 meters.

The goal is to score the highest total. The paper targets have concentric scoring rings. The smallest ring is normally worth ten points while the large ring is worth five points. The course of fire varies among the various clubs. Most clubs allow unlimited sighters and five shots on the record target in a given time period. Only those five shots on the scoring rings are counted, so that with three yardages, a perfect score would be 150 points. Tie breakers may be determined by total number of dead center or “X” strikes; or, by smallest group at the farthest distance.

Types of Rifles Used at Groundhog Matches
The same benchrest rigs found at IBS and NBRSA matches can be utilized (though these will typically be put in a ‘custom’ class). Though equipment classes vary from club to club, it is common to separate the hardware into four or five classes. Typical firearm classes can include: factory rifle; deer hunter; light varmint custom (usually a limit of 17 lbs.with scope); and heavy varmint custom (weight unlimited). Some clubs allow barrel tuners, others do not. Scope selection is usually unlimited; however, some restrict hunter class rifle scopes to 20 power. Factory rifles usually cannot be altered in any way.

Good, Simple Fun Shooting — Why Groundhog Shoots Are Popular
Forum member Danny Reever explains the appeal of groundhog matches: “We don’t have a governing organization, or have to pay $50 a year membership just to compete in matches. Sure the rules vary from club to club, but you adapt. If you don’t like one club’s rules, you just don’t shoot there. It’s no big deal.

There are no National records, or Hall of Fame points — just individual range records. If you want to shoot in BIG matches (with big prizes), there is the Hickory Ground Hog Shoot among others. If competition isn’t your bag, many clubs offer mid-week fun matches that you can shoot just for fun. You shoot the same targets but with a more relaxed atmosphere with no time limits.

The best part is you don’t have to shoot perfect at every yardage. You always have a chance because in this sport it really isn’t over until the last shot is fired. Typically ALL the entry money goes to the host club, with much of the cash returned back to the shooters via prizes. Junior shooters often shoot for free, or at a reduced rate. The low entry cost also encourages young guys to get involved who don’t have $4000 custom rifles or the money to buy them.

There isn’t a sea of wind flags to shoot over or to put up and take down. If the range has a couple of flags so much the better, but after all it is a varmint match. No pits to spot shots and slow things down either. If you can’t see your hits through your rifle scope or spotting scope well you are in the same boat as everybody else. That’s what makes it interesting/ sometimes frustrating!

Permalink Competition, Hunting/Varminting 4 Comments »
March 9th, 2019

“The Brick” — Versatile Support Bag for Tactical & PRS Shooters

Grippy shooting sandbag bag support

We know that quite a few hunters and tactical shooters read the Daily Bulletin. Here’s a product for you guys that need a multi-purpose padded support that can be easily carried and adapted to a variety of positions (such as on platforms, vehicle hoods, as well as flat ground). This versatile bag can be used on the front (supporting the fore-end), or in the rear (supporting the buttstock). Made in the USA, “The Brick” Grippy Bag costs $39.95 from Armageddon Gear. Measuring 6″ x 3″ x 3″, “The Brick” is offered in two colors: Coyote Tan and Black.

Grippy shooting sandbag bag support

Made by Armageddon Gear, and sold through the Armageddon Gear Store, “The Brick” has unique features that make it ultra-handy in the field. First the “grippy” outer material is rubberized and textured so it can provide a firm grip on a support surface as needed. Overlapping Velcro-lined straps allow the bag to be attached to a rifle fore-end, buttstock, tripod head, shooting sticks, or pack. The square cross-section provides secure contact between the rifle stock and support surface. You can easily adjust the firmness of the bag by adding or subtracting filler material. (Some guys will fill their Brick with sand; others may prefer beads or other lighter media to save weight.) The panel under the strap is nylon to allow the shooter’s hand to easily slide underneath the strap when desired.

Permalink Gear Review, Hunting/Varminting, Tactical No Comments »
February 22nd, 2019

Most Popular Hunting & Shooting Products — Survey Results

hunter rifle shooting survey Southwick Associates 2018
Hunting image courtesy NSSF Where to Hunt.

Sportsmen spend millions of dollars on hunting and recreational shooting equipment, but which brands are they buying? In 2018, Southwick Associates surveyed more than 20,000 hunters and recreational shooters to find the top brands in the market. The product preferences of hunters and recreational shooters were determined via HunterSurvey.com and ShooterSurvey.com online polls.

The top handgun maker was Smith & Wesson and the top handgun ammo brand was Federal. Those choices make sense. But some of the other choices were a bit surprising…

IMPORTANT COMMENT: Keep in mind these are just survey results. In many cases, the top choices are simply the cheapest options that sell the most. For example the top choice in reloading dies was Lee Precision. Lee makes some decent products (we like Lee decapping dies), but you won’t find many National Champions using Lee seating or sizing dies.

So assess the survey results with a “grain of salt”, understanding that these aren’t necessarily the best products when gauged by quality or performance. They are just the most popular among those surveyed. A Big Mac isn’t better than a filet mignon, but more Big Macs are purchased. You get the idea…

hunter rifle shooting survey Southwick Associates 2018

SURVEY Results — Most Purchased Hunting & Shooting Brands:


Top rimfire rifle brand: Ruger/Sturm Ruger

Top handgun brand: Smith & Wesson

Top handgun ammunition brand: Federal (including Fusion)

Top holster/ammo belt brand: Uncle Mikes

Top reflex/red dot sight brand: Vortex

Top laser rangefinder brand: Nikon

Top laser sight brand: Crimson Trace

Top scope mount brand: Leupold

Top reloading powder brand: Hodgdon

Top reloading bullets brand: Hornady

Top propellant/powder brand: Triple Seven

Top reloading dies brand: Lee Precision

Top gun cleaning brand: Hoppes

Top hunting knife brand: Gerber

Top game call brand: Primos

Top crossbow brand: Barnett

Top arrow brand: Easton

More than one hundred products are examined in the 2018 Hunting & Shooting Participation and Equipment Purchases Report (CLICK HERE). This in-depth resource covers buying preferences, including the percentage of sales occurring across different retail channels, brand purchased, price paid, and demographics for hunters and shooters buying specific products. Additional information tracked includes total days spent per activity, type of hunting / shooting activity, preferred species and where they hunt. In addition to the topline reports covering hunting and target shooting, annual reports are also offered for special segments including archery consumers, deer hunters, turkey hunters, and waterfowl hunters. To purchase a report or discuss custom research, email Nancy [at] SouthwickAssociates.com.

Permalink Hunting/Varminting, News No Comments »
February 13th, 2019

Universal Background Check Legislation Introduced in Congress

H.R. HR 8 bill private gun sales ban background check Congress democrat legislation anti-gun Pelosi democrat extreme anti-gun Second Amendment
Marlin 1895 Background image from Sportsmans Arms, Petaluma, CA.

Are the days of private gun sales numbered nationwide? Democrats in the U.S. House of Representative have introduced an extreme gun control measure, H.R. 8, that would regulate all private gun sales, circumventing state laws covering gun rights. American Military News reports: “A new bill restricting private gun sales is expected to move to the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives this week for a vote. The bill, H.R. 8, was introduced by [House] Democrats. H.R. 8 plans to stop Americans from conducting private gun sales as they have been since 1791. Instead, they will be required to conduct background checks on prospective buyers before they can sell their own property. The House Judiciary Panel is expected to send the bill to the floor for a vote on Feb. 13.”

READ H.R. 8 Full Text HERE »

Background Checks Would Be Required Nationwide for ALL Private Party Gun Sales
This new legislation would essentially require that ALL gun sales, even between private parties, be subject to Federal NICS background checks.* On the surface, this seems to have some appeal, but there is little convincing evidence that such legislation will produce a meaningful reduction in gun violence. Why? Criminals obtain guns illegally (though theft and the black market), and nearly all the mass shooters in recent years have used weapons that were obtained legally, AFTER the perpetrators had passed normal FBI background checks.

Despite these facts, supporters of H.R. 8, say it is time to outlaw private gun sales. Rep. Henry C. Johnson (Democrat, Georgia) claimed: “Because background checks are not required for sales by unlicensed gun dealers, guns end up in the hands of dangerous people. The failure of Congress to pass universal background check legislation has eroded our sense of safety on the streets, in our schools, and even in our places of worship.”

Conversely, gun rights supporters state that H.R. 8 will NOT have the desired effects. Rep. Doug Collins (Republican, Georgia) stated: “I appreciate the efforts of those who want H.R. 8 and many who have signed on, but similar gun control measures would not have prevented Columbine, San Bernardino, Charleston, or other tragedies. You go to the Bureau of Prisons, when they put out their statistics, most criminals — as you well know — do not get their guns from legal sources.”


* Some states, such as California, already require background checks, made through an FFL, for private-party transfers. But in many other states, a private party can still sell a firearm to another private party, provided there is compliance with applicable state and local laws.

Permalink Handguns, Hunting/Varminting, News 3 Comments »
February 8th, 2019

Friday Feature — .204 Ruger Cooper Model 21 Montana Varminter

While many of our readers are caught in the wicked cold-spell hitting the North Central states, take heart — spring is right around the corner. That means folks will be getting ready for varmint safaris. Here’s a story that may help you choose a cartridge for your next varmint rifle.

For many years, Ken Lunde journeyed to South Dakota to visit with his father, and do a little varmint hunting. This article features Ken’s Cooper Model 21 Montana Varminter chambered in .204 Ruger. During past varminting holidays in South Dakota, Ken had a chance to try the speedy .204 against his “old reliable” .223. He came to favor the .204 for its accuracy, flat trajectory, and superior performance in the wind. Ken told us: “I love my .223, but the .204 has the edge for Dog-Town duty.”

The Cooper Montana Varminter in .204 Ruger

by Ken Lunde

Photos Copyright © Ken Lunde, All Rights Reserved

I’ve been a big fan of Cooper Arms rifles ever since my dad introduced them to me a few years ago. I prefer Cooper Arms rifles over others because they perform as they should out-of-the-box, and have outstanding workmanship and beauty. You get form and function. You don’t need to choose one over the other. For the price one pays, Cooper Arms rifles are a great bargain. I mount a quality scope, usually a higher-end Leupold with a 40mm objective, go through barrel break-in, and they always perform extraordinarily well. I should state that all of my rifle shooting is geared towards hunting. In other words, any shooting I do on paper is treated as preparation for using the same rifle for hunting, whether it’s for varmints such as prairie dogs, or for larger game.

Cooper Montana Varminter 204 Ruger

Cooper Varmint Rifles–Components and Variations
The featured rifle is a Cooper Arms M21 Montana Varminter (aka “MTV”) chambered in .204 Ruger. It has a 24″ varmint-taper stainless steel barrel with a 1 in 12-inch twist. This twist rate seems to be typical of .204 Ruger barrels from other manufacturers. The stock is AA+ grade Claro Walnut, and has the varmint fore-end, “Buick” vents, and steel grip cap that are standard on the Montana Varminter configuration. Among Cooper’s three wood-stocked varmint rifle configurations — Varminter, Montana Varminter, and Varmint Extreme — I prefer the Montana Varminter as it seems to be the best balance of value versus features. Plus, I like the “Buick” vents. They’re very pleasing, at least to my eyes. Maybe that’s why I own seven of them, in M21 and M22 actions, and in a variety of calibers. [Editor: Ken’s father has a near-identical .204 Ruger Cooper, with consecutive serial number.]

For this rifle, I decided to mount a Leupold VX-III 6.5-20×40 LR scope with the Varmint Hunter reticle. The rifle came with Leupold STD bases in Matte finish, and I used Leupold 30mm STD rings in Medium height and Matte finish. I took the time to align the bottom rings on the bases, and properly lapped them. Other than mounting the scope, no custom work was done, because none was necessary. The trigger is superb out-of-the-box, which is typical of Cooper rifles.

Ruger 204 Cooper varminter varmint rifle gun load reloading South Dakota

Load Development and Accuracy
Cooper Montana Varminter 204 RugerI first tried factory ammo, loaded with Hornady 32gr and 40gr V-Max. The 32gr load shot the best—five-shot groups were slightly larger than a half-inch at 100 yards. My dad heard that Alliant Reloder 10X was a good powder for this cartridge, and he worked up a load using the Sierra 32gr BlitzKing bullet. He found that 26.5 grains was the right amount for his rifle. Considering that my rifle was probably made on the same day, having a consecutive serial number, I decided to try my dad’s load, along with a half-grain up and down, meaning 26, 26.5, and 27 grains of powder. I, too, found that my rifle prefers 26.5 grains of RL 10X. With this load, I’ve been able to shoot consistent quarter-inch, five-shot groups at 100 yards. Cartridge OAL is 2.353″, or 1.990″ measured from the ogive.

I am using Winchester brass, Federal 205M primers, Alliant Reloder 10X powder, and Sierra 32gr BlitzKing bullets. I use Forster dies, and load with a Forster Co-Axial single-stage press. Here are two typical targets. As you can see, this .204 can shoot.

Cooper Montana Varminter 204 Ruger

Cartridge Smack-Down — .204 Ruger vs. .223 Remington

Ken made these comments when he first tested his .204 Ruger vs. his trusty (and very accurate) .223 Remington: “I brought along two rifles. The first was my ‘proven’ varmint rifle, the one chambered in .223 Rem. It has stunning wood, and clearly escaped the factory with AAA grade Claro Walnut. That rifle also shoots consistent five-shot, quarter-inch groups at 100 yards. For the .223, my preferred load uses Winchester brass, Federal 205M primers, Hornady 40gr V-Max bullets (non-moly), and 26.2gr of Vihtavuori N133 powder.

I found that I very much enjoyed shooting the .204 Ruger rifle, which explains why I used only the .204 Ruger during the second trip, although I also brought along the .223. Why did I favor the .204? Well, those little 32gr bullets really zing out of the barrel, with a very flat trajectory, like a .22-250. And, to my surprise, they buck the wind very well, perhaps even better than .223. While I am no ballistics expert, I think that this may be due to its high velocity, clearly over 4,000 fps.”

Permalink - Articles, Hunting/Varminting, Reloading 1 Comment »
February 1st, 2019

Varminters’ Debate — Cranking Elevation or Holding Over/Under

Varmint hunter 22 BR elevation scope hold-over

Leuopold Varmint Hunters' ReticleA varmint shooter’s target is not conveniently placed at a fixed, known distance as it is for a benchrester. The varminter must repeatedly make corrections for bullet drop as he moves from closer targets to more distant targets and back again. Click HERE to read an interesting Varmint Forum discussion regarding the best method to adjust for elevation. Some shooters advocate using the scope’s elevation adjustments. Other varminters prefer to hold-over, perhaps with the assistance of vertical markers on their reticles. Still others combine both methods–holding off to a given yardage, then cranking elevation after that.

Majority View–Click Your Scope
“I zero at 100 yards — I mean really zero as in check the ballistics at 200 and 300 and adjust zero accordingly — and then set the scope zero. For each of my groundhog guns I have a click chart taped into the inside of the lid of the ammo box. Then use the knobs. That’s why they’re there. With a good scope they’re a whole lot more accurate than hold-over, with or without hash marks. This all assumes you have a good range finder and use it properly. If not, and you’re holding over you’re really just spraying and praying. Try twisting them knobs and you’ll most likely find that a 500- or 600- or 700-yard groundhog is a whole lot easier than some people think.” — Gunamonth

IOR Scope elevation knob one revolution

“I have my elevation knob calibrated in 100-yard increments out to 550. Range-find the critter, move elevation knob up…dead critter. The problem with hold-over is that it is so imprecise. It’s not repeatable because you are holding over for elevation and for wind also. Every time you change targets 50 yards, it seems as if you are starting over. As soon as I got completely away from the hold over method (I used to zero for 200), my hit ratios went way up.” — K. Candler

“When I first started p-dog shooting, I attempted to use the hold-over method with a 200-yard zero with my 6mm Rem. Any dog much past 325-350 yards was fairly safe. I started using a comeups table for all three of my p-dog rifles (.223 Rems and 6mm Rem). 450-yard hits with the .223s are fairly routine and a 650-yard dog better beware of the 6mm nowadays. An added benefit (one I didn’t think of beforehand) with the comeups table (elevation only), is that when the wind is blowing, it takes half of the variables out of the equation. I can concentrate on wind, and not have to worry about elevation. It makes things much more simple.” — Mike (Linefinder).

“I dial for elevation and hold for wind. Also use a mil-dot reticle to make the windage holds easier. For windage corrections, I watch for the bullet strike measure the distance it was “off” with the mil-dot reticle, then hold that much more the other way. Very fast once you get used to it.” — PepeLP

Varmint Hunting ScopeMinority View–Hold-Over is Better
“I try to not touch my knobs once I’m zeroed at 200 meters. Most of my varmint scopes have duplex reticles and I use the bottom post to put me on at 300 meters versus turning knobs. The reason I try to leave my knobs alone is that I have gone one complete revolution up or down [too far] many times and have missed the varmint. This has happened more than once and that is why I try not to change my knobs if at all possible.” — Chino69

“I have been using the hold over method and it works for me most of the time but the 450 yards and over shots get kinda hard. I moved to a 300 yard zero this year and it’s working well. I do want to get into the click-up method though; it seems to be more fool-proof.” — 500YardHog

Compromise View–Use Both Methods
“I use both [methods] as well — hold over out to 250, and click up past that.” — Jack (Wolf)

“I use the target knobs and crank-in elevation. I also use a rangefinder and know how far away they are before I crank in the clicks. I have a scope with drop dots from Premier Recticle and like it. No cranking [knobs] out to 600.” –Vmthtr

Permalink Hunting/Varminting, Optics, Shooting Skills No Comments »
January 30th, 2019

Great American Outdoor Show in Pennsylvania, February 2-10

SHOT Show is just behind us, and now another big firearms and hunting exposition is about to start. The NRA Great American Outdoor Show runs February 2-10, 2019 in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania (at the PA Farm Show Complex). This is the Largest consumer outdoor recreation show in the world. Over 200,000 attendees are expected to visit the show’s nine exhibit halls, where 1,100+ exhibitors and 400+ outfitters will showcase their products and services.

Great American Outdoor show Harrisburg Pennsylvania PA February hunting fishing

Great American Outdoor Show Pennsylvania1,100+ Exhibitor Booths
New Firearms from Leading Gun-Makers
400+ Outfitters and Charterers
200+ Outdoor Seminars
Country Music Concerts

Attendees can visit over 1,100 exhibitor booths featuring firearms, hunting gear, camping equipment, fishing tackle, archery products, and even boats and RVs. The booths cover 650,000 square feet of exhibit hall space! In addition, the giant Outfitter Hall at the Great American Outdoor Show, one of the largest in the country, hosts over 400 outfitters, boat captains, and charterers.

Over 200 Seminars Hosted by Outdoor Experts and Noted Guides
The 2017 Great American Outdoor Show will feature 216 seminars from leading outdoors experts, covering hunting, stalking, trapping, long range shooting, rifle accurizing, field dressing, venison processing, bow-hunting, fishing techniques, and much more. This year’s notable presentations will include:

  • Abner Druckenmiller — Becoming an Ultimate Predator Hunter
  • Cole McCullough — Advanced Long Range Field Shooting
  • Bobby Hart – Improving Rifle Accuracy
  • Kristy Titus – Positional Shooting and Elk Calling
  • Alan Probst – Coyote Trapping Techniques
  • Rick Fetrow – Venison Processing
  • Barry Wensel – Hunting Whitetails

Hunting gear father son hunter hunting
Father and son deer hunting photo courtesy SportsmansGuide.com.

Great Outdoor Show Highlights
There will be themed exhibitor halls for Archery, Boats, Fishing, Hunting Outfitters, Outdoor Products, RVs, and the Shooting Sports.

More than 1,100 exhibitors will display more than a million outdoor and shooting-related products.

More than 400 hunting outfitters and fishing charter captains from all over the world in attendance.

Special events include the NRA Country Concert, fundraising dinners, speaking events, archery competitions, celebrity appearances, seminars and demonstrations, kids’ activities and more.

Permalink Hunting/Varminting, News, Shooting Skills No Comments »
January 26th, 2019

Suppressors — Why You Still Need Hearing Protection

suppressor silencer moderator facts fiction sound levels noise decibles dB
Silencer-equipped AR photo courtesy The Silencer Shop.

OK, you’ve paid the tax stamp and acquired your new suppressor (aka “silencer” or “moderator”). Do you still need to wear earplugs or muffs? Absolutely. Even with that expensive new “can”, your rifle could be generating over 140 decibels (dB) of noise — about the same as as an unmuffled 9mm pistol shot. That’s loud enough to create permanent hearing loss with repeated exposure.

Firearms Are Loud: 140 dB to 175 dB

Audiology group ASHA explains: “Exposure to noise greater than 140 dB can permanently damage hearing. Almost all firearms create noise that is over the 140-dB level. A small .22-caliber rifle can produce noise around 140 dB, while big-bore rifles and pistols can produce sound over 175 dB. Firing guns in a place where sounds can reverberate, or bounce off walls and other structures, can make noises louder and increase the risk of hearing loss. Also, adding muzzle brakes or other modifications can make the firearm louder. People who do not wear hearing protection while shooting can suffer a severe hearing loss with as little as one shot[.] Audiologists see this often, especially during hunting season when hunters and bystanders may be exposed to rapid fire from big-bore rifles, shotguns, or pistols.” Source: ASHA, Recreational Firearm Noise Exposure.

suppressor silencer moderator facts fiction sound levels noise decibles dB

Suppressors, On Average, Reduce Noise Levels about 30 Decibels
In an article for Ammoland, gunwriter Sam Hoober says that you can expect about 30 decibels (dB) of noise reduction from the average suppressor: “Looking at a few different products, SilencerCo attests their suppressors reduce the sound pressure of a 9mm gunshot to anywhere from 125.7 dB to 131.5 dB, depending on the model. Advanced Armament Co, another popular supplier, attests a 23 dB to 33 dB reduction or down to 127 dB. Liberty Suppressors, another manufacturer, attests a reduction of 24 dB to 38 dB, depending on model and other factors. In short, we can presume something on the order of 30 dB of attenuation as an average.”

Using that 30 dB number you can quickly discern that you’ll still need hearing protection — good hearing protection — when shooting any suppressed firearm (even a .22 LR). “Spikes of 130 dB and more can result in permanent hearing damage instantly”. Source: NRA Blog.

The Myth of the “Quiet” .22 LR
The NRA Blog notes that “many rimfire shooters, particularly those using the beloved .22 Long Rifle cartridge, argue that the small .22 LR caliber doesn’t produce enough sound to damage your hearing”. So, is that really true. or is it a myth?

In fact, a .22 LR can be much louder than you think — a .22 LR pistol can produce sound levels of 134 dB. That’s well above the normal human pain threshhold.

Sound Levels for Common Noises:

9mm Luger pistol: 160 dB

Jet aircraft engine (near): 140 dB

.22 LR pistol: 134 dB

Normal human pain threshold: 120 dB

Noisy Nightclub: 110 db

Riding Motorcycle at 65 mph: 103 db

Power Lawnmower: 95 dB

Hearing damage possible: 85 dB (sustained for 8+ hours)

Ringing Telephone: 80 dB

Normal conversation: 60 dB


The Risk of Hearing Loss
Hearing loss can be progressive and irreversible. If you are a shooter, this is serious business. As the NRA Blog cautions: “You may not even realize you’re harming your hearing. Hearing loss occurs gradually, and can go effectively unnoticed until symptoms become severe. By then, the damage is done.”

Nobody wants to go deaf. But we often see shooters without effective hearing protection when they are walking around a few yards behind the firing line. That’s bad — even if you are away from the firing line, gunshot noises can damage your hearing. You MUST use effective hearing protection every time you go to the range. Good foam earplugs costs mere pennies but they can prevent deafness in your later years. Many folks also wear muffs over plugs.

Permalink Hunting/Varminting, Tech Tip 2 Comments »
January 10th, 2019

Savage Will Launch 40 New Products at 2019 SHOT Show

Savage Arms 2019 new rifles Axis II MSR AR15 PRS hunting rifles

Savage will launch 40 new products at the 2019 SHOT Show in Las Vegas. This will be a big year for Savage as 2019 marks Savage’s 125th Anniversary. The brand is celebrating the historic event by offering limited-edition rifles as well as many new offerings in bolt-action rifles, AR-platform rifles, and shotguns. “Whether you are looking for a training rifle, a competition-grade modern sporting rifle, a reliable shotgun for hunting or personal defense, or a lightweight hunting rifle packaged with a scope, Savage has those needs covered, plus more”, said Savage’s Marketing Director, Beth Shimanski.

New 2019 Product Launch Highlights

The company is expanding and improving its popular XP scoped rifle lines. New models include the 110 Apex XP series, featuring Vortex scopes, and a pint-sized Rascal Target XP. Plus, the existing AXIS XP series has been upgraded with a new modernized stock. The AccuFit system lets shooters quickly adjust comb height and length-of-pull. The feature is an integral part of a new long-range rifle with a superior finish, the 110 High Country, featured below:

Savage Arms 2019 new rifles Axis II MSR AR15 PRS hunting rifles
Savage Arms 2019 new rifles Axis II MSR AR15 PRS hunting rifles

Savage is expanding the popular XP scoped rifle lines. New models include the 110 Apex XP series, featuring Vortex scopes, and a pint-sized Rascal Target XP. Plus, the existing AXIS XP series has been upgraded with a new modernized stock.

Savage Arms 2019 new rifles Axis II MSR AR15 PRS hunting rifles

Savage’s MSR 15 and MSR 10 AR-platform rifle series will include new options for long range, precision and competition shooting. These rifles are not cookie-cutter AR clones. The MSR Savages have some interesting upgrades, such as side-charging handles (on MSR 10), Magpul PRS stocks, adjustable gas blocks, and tunable muzzle brakes. The MSRs also enjoy a good reputation for build quality and reliability.

Savage Arms 2019 new rifles MSR AR15 PRS hunting rifles

Savage Arms 2019 new rifles Axis II MSR AR15 PRS hunting rifles

All of these new rifles, as well as more bolt-action and semi-automatic centerfire and rimfire rifles, will be on display at SHOT Show Booth No. 14551 January 22-25, 2019 at the Sands Expo Center.

Permalink Gear Review, Hunting/Varminting, New Product 1 Comment »
January 5th, 2019

Get a Handle on Your Swivel Bipod — KMW Pod-Loc

KMW pod-lok lock bipod handle swivel

KMW Pod-Loc BipodIf you’ve ever used a Harris Swivel Bipod, you know that, without tools, it is difficult to put enough tension on the swivel locking knob to really lock the unit solid. And, if you do manage to get the knob really tight (perhaps by using pliers), it is difficult to loosen with fingers alone.

That was why Terry Cross and the folks at KMW Long Range Solutions invented the Pod-Loc™. This system replaces the knurled swivel tension knob with a push-button adjustable handle. Using the handle you can easily set the swivel tension at any level from loose to “rock solid”. And you can release tension to adjust the bipod to different terrain just as easily. The genuine KMW Pod-Loc™ retails for $26.99 at Brownells.com.

KMW Podlock Pod-loc bipod swivel locking handle accessory

How to Build Your Own Bipod Swivel Locking System
While we use genuine KMW Pod-Locs on our rifles, readers on a tight budget, or who have a large collection of bipod-equipped rifles, can economize by putting together their own swivel locking systems from off-the-shelf components. You can buy suitable levers from www.T-Nuts.com. This vendor offers a variety of appropriate handles, ranging in price from $7.00 to $10.00. So, by sourcing the parts, you can outfit three bipods with swivel adjusters for the cost of one Pod-Loc.

T-Nuts Bipod Handle lock

We recommend the Nylon/Stainless BPL/NS model ($7.70), but you may prefer the all-metal BPL-ZS ($8.50), or the shorter BPL-Micro model ($8.25). The compact Micro lock does not protrude past the body of the bipod, yet is still easily grasped. T-Nuts supplies one 3/16″ spacer with most of its bipod handles. T-Nuts handles are also available with a metric M6x1.0 thread for use with imported bipods such as Outers and Rockport.

Installation is Easy — With the Right Socket
To install a swivel locking system, first you’ll need a 1/4″ socket to remove the keeper nut from the threaded pivot rod. (During this process, you’ll need to keep pressure on the pivot rod retaining pin on the opposite side of the bipod.) Don’t try to remove the keeper nut with pliers or an open-end wrench. You really need the correct socket. Once that keeper nut is removed, then unscrew the knurled tension knob/ring. This is attached to the same threaded shaft as the keeper nut but you should be able to remove it without tools.

After the knurled tension ring is off, it is easy to put your handle on the bipod. First slip the 3/16″ spacer over the threaded pivot rod. Keeping finger pressure on the pivot rod retaining pin (on reverse side), then spin on the T-Nuts handle. Rotate the handle inwards until it firmly locks the bipod swivel mechanism. By pushing the button in the head of the handle, you can swing the handle left or right to set its position without altering the swivel tension.

Permalink Gear Review, Hunting/Varminting, Tactical 1 Comment »
January 4th, 2019

10 BEST Bolt-Action Rifles of All Time — What Do YOU Think?

Ten 10 best bolt action rifles shooter

A while back, RifleShooter online magazine published a list of the purported Ten Best Bolt-Action Rifles of All Time. Ten classic rifle designs (including the Remington 700 and Winchester Model 70) were featured with a paragraph or two explaining their notable features.

“Best” Lists Stir Controversy…
These Top 10 lists are always controversial. While most readers might approve of half the entries, there are always some items on the Top 10 list that some readers would challenge. Here is RifleShooter’s Top 10 list. What do you think? Are there some other bolt-actions that are more deserving?

1. Springfield M1903
2. Mauser 98
3. Winchester Model 70
4. Remington Model 700
5. Weatherby V

6. Sako L61/AV
7. Savage Model 110
8. Ruger M77
9. Tikka T3
10. Mannlicher-Schonauer

10bolt1402.

Permalink - Articles, Gear Review, Hunting/Varminting 18 Comments »
January 2nd, 2019

Hunting — Programs to Strengthen America’s Ranks of Hunters

NRA join hunt hunter hunting education hunting license wildlife training

This report based on story in American Hunter magazine, by J. Scott Olmsted, Editor in Chief

The 2016 report of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation, a survey conducted every five years by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, showed that today only about 11.5 million Americans aged 16 or older hunt. That’s only 4.9 percent of adults among a population of 320 million.

Declining Numbers of Hunters — What We Can Do
Too many Americans have left the field; they no longer hunt. Too many current American hunters continue to consider leaving the field. In fact the number of American hunters today is about half what it was 50 years ago, and the decline is expected to continue to accelerate.

Demographers don’t see any uptick on the horizon. Nearly a third of American hunters are baby boomers. The youngest boomers are 54, and trends suggest most hunters stop buying licenses by about 65. So what happens in 11 years when the last of the baby boomers stops hunting?

NRA join hunt hunter hunting education hunting license wildlife training

Indeed wildlife and wildlands are heavily dependent on hunters and fishers to survive and thrive. State agencies, which manage most of the wildlife in America, derive about 59 percent of their collective funding from hunting- and fishing-related activities. A primary source of that funding — hunters — is shrinking. Note that funding doesn’t come from birdwatching or hiking or kayaking, to name a few non-consumptive activities that contribute no funds.

where to hunt map NSSF

Hunter Education Programs from the NRA
The NRA was the first organization to develop a hunter-education course, in 1949 in New York. It became the model. Today, in the digital age, the NRA provides NRA Hunter Education Online.

NRAHE.org offers FREE comprehensive hunter safety information online. The 15-chapter sequence features videos, photos and graphics, audio recordings, interactive modules that prospective hunters may access whenever and wherever they are able to complete it. It provides the best method for teaching future hunters lessons they will remember the rest of their lives.

Let’s not forget our youngest hunters. Since 1985, the NRA’s Youth Hunter Education Challenge (YHEC) has introduced more than 1.2 million young people to safe, ethical hunting. YHEC competitions test participants’ hunting, stalking, and marksmanship skills. To learn more about YHEC, visit Yhec.nra.org.

Youth Hunter Education Challenge

(more…)

Permalink - Articles, Hunting/Varminting No Comments »
December 29th, 2018

Laminated Wood Stocks — Gallery of Guns

March 1-8x24mm FFP scope
GRS Laminated Stock from Norway (Imported by EuroOptic Ltd.)

Some folks think of laminated stocks as modestly-priced, “low-tech” alternatives for varmint and hunting rifles. In fact, for shooting disciplines that do not demand ultra-light weight, good laminated stocks give up nothing in performance to the most sophisticated composite stocks. And with laminates, it is relatively easy to fine-tune fit and ergonomics to suit the individual shooter. Available in a wide choice of colors, laminated stocks can also be very handsome. In our Shooters’ Forum, you’ll find a thread showcasing laminated stocks. It’s worth viewing. There are many interesting designs, and a wide variety of rifles ranging from “walking varminters” to long-range prone rifles.

March 1-8x24mm FFP scope

FalconPilot’s Shehane Tracker in Sierra Laminate with Clearcoat

Shehane African Obeche Wood Laminated Hunter by Cigarcop
Shehane African Obeche laminated wood hunting rifle 250AI

20 Practical Varminter (UK Custom posted by PNSE)

Prone Rifle by Carl Bernosky (posted by 1Shot)

F-Class (Special) by Alex Sitman (posted by J. DeKort)

Veteran’s Team Rifle #2 by Doan Trevor

Permalink Gunsmithing, Hunting/Varminting 2 Comments »
December 27th, 2018

Cartridge Comparison Guide Covers 250+ Cartridges

Cartridge Comparison Guide

Cartridge Comparison GuideThe Cartridge Comparison Guide is a remarkably comprehensive 340-page, spiral-bound book. Covering over 250 cartridges, the Second Edition of the Cartridge Comparison Guide is the product of many years of labor by Andrew Chamberlain, a Utah-based hunter. Andrew says his Guide “compares every factory available cartridge from the 17 calibers up to the 50 caliber cartridges”. (Sorry, most wildcat cartridges are not covered.) Chamberlain’s Guide also compiles cartridge data from major ammunition manufacturers such as Barnes, Federal, Hornady, Norma, Nosler, Remington, Sierra, Swift, Weatherby, and Winchester. It shows the optimal velocity achieved for each bullet weight and calculates bullet energy, recoil, and powder efficiency. Large color photos illustrate handgun and rifle cartridges.

The Cartridge Comparison Guide provides data for thousands of cartridge/bullet/velocity combos. Quick reference data sheets and ballistics charts cover Trajectory, Velocity, and Energy out to 500 yards. The Cartridge Comparison Guide also offers a firearms lexicon, plus Appendices covering Cartridge Selection for Game Animals, Bullet Selection/Design, Bullet Expansion, Wound Channel Characteristics and more.

New Content in Second Edition of Cartridge Comparison Guide
The Cartridge Comparison Guide (Second Edition) costs $29.96 plus shipping and tax. CLICK HERE to visit the Online Store where you can order the 340-page book. Here’s what’s new in the Second Edition:

  • Addition of Shotgun Ammunition (Both Slug and Shot loads).
  • Momentum Calculation for all Rifle, Shotgun and Handgun loads.
  • Integration of Shotgun Slug Ammunition with Center Fire Rifle Data Tables.
  • Factory Load Summary Added (Shows manufacturers and loads produced).
  • One factory load and one hand load for every bullet weight available in each cartridge.
  • Over 90 pages of additional ballistics content (roughly 35% more than in First Edition).

Cartridge Comparison Guide

Great Resource for Hunters
One of Chamberlain’s main goals in creating the Cartridge Comparison Guide was to help hunters select the right cartridge for the job: “This started as a personal project to gather information on the more popular cartridges commonly used for hunting. I wanted to find the best all-around performing cartridge and rifle that a guy on a budget could shoot. I began comparing cartridge performance, versatility, bullet selection, powder efficiency, recoil generation vs. energy produced, standing ballistic data for different environments….”

Giant Cartridge Poster for Computer Wallpaper (1665×1080 pixels)
Here’s a great illustration of hundreds of cartridges and shotshell types. For dedicated reloaders, this would work great as desktop “wallpaper” for your computer. CLICK HERE for full-size image.

cartridge poster

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Hunting/Varminting, Tech Tip No Comments »