June 9th, 2016

Using a 50-Yard Sighting Target with Vintage Military Rifles

Garand sighting 50 yard target

Take a look at that unusual target below. We bet you’ve never seen one of these before. It’s a 50-Yard Sighting Target for the M1 Garand. It’s designed to allow a rifleman to confirm his zeros for multiple yardages all the way out to 1000 yards. But importantly, he can establish those zeros at a very “short” shooting facility, since the target is positioned at a mere 50 yards.

Garand sighting 50 yard target

Here’s how it works. The target is placed at fifty (50) yards. You start at the bottom, aiming at the black circle. Then check your come-up table and work your way up, clicking step-by-step to the various horizontal lines set for 200, 300, 500, 600 and 1000 yards. This is NOT “spray and pray” — you need to have a pretty good idea of the clicks you need, based on your ammo’s ballistics. This target is calibrated for the U.S. Military M72 Ball Ammo. The targets are available from Champion’s Choice ($0.75 each) or from Creedmoor Sports (12 for $5.95).

Lapua’s Kevin Thomas used this target to get zeroed for the recent D-Day Anniversary Match at the Talladega Marksmanship Park. Kevin used the target for both his M1 Garand as well as his M1903A1 Springfield, both chambered for the .30-06 Springfield cartridge.

Garand sighting 50 yard target

Zeroing at a Short Distance — How to Use the 50-Yard Sighting Target, by Kevin Thomas
As part of my preparation for the Garand Match at the CMP’s Talladega Marksmanship Park, I needed to zero my new M1 Garand, but I was crunched for time. I didn’t have time to get to my normal range and confirm zeros at actual yardages. But a 50-yard zero target came to the rescue. Made for M1s using the M72 National Match ammo, the target allows the shooter to establish fairly good zeros at 200, 300, 500, 600 and 1,000 yards if you’ve got access to a 50-yard range.

I have no idea when these 50-yard Sighting Targets were first developed, but they’ve been around for at least as long as I’ve been involved in this game (longer than I care to admit). It consists of a tall target, with a smallish black bullseye located at the bottom center. The bullseye is an aiming point only. Extending through the top of the target is a vertical line that runs directly up the center, to nearly the top of the paper. Across this, there are intersecting horizontal lines that are marked 200, 300, 500, 600 and 1,000.

The target was designed for the M1 rifle using then-issued M72 National Match ammunition. This ammo launched a 173gr FMJBT bullet at approximately 2,640 fps. It was a good load in its day, supersonic out to the 1,000-yard line. While that ammo is fairly scarce these days, this isn’t a problem for the handloader. My standard match load for the M1 Garand utilizes the 175gr Lapua Scenar HPBT, and delivers remarkably similar ballistic performance. Thus my normal Garand load translates nicely to this 50-yard target. Yes, this is by design. No point in reinventing the wheel when Lake City has already established what works!

Garand sighting 50 yard target

In use, the shooter sets the target up at a measured 50 yards, and (this is critical) checks the vertical line with a plumb bob or a carpenter’s level, to ensure that it is absolutely vertical. Once the target is set, the rifle is fired and the group noted. From there, it is a simple matter of zeroing it normally to bring the groups into alignment with the vertical line, at the elevation needed for a particular range. Once your group is hammering the intersection of the vertical line and the horizontal line marked “200”, you have established your 200-yard zero for that rifle. Record the number of clicks, and you’re good to go. Raise the impacts up to coincide with the line marked “300” and you now have a 300-yard zero as well. And so on, right up the target. Record those settings in your data book, and you’re ready to go to the range at the full distances. If done carefully, you may be in the X-Ring, but at the very least, you’ll be well-centered and ready to get some hard dope recorded for future shoots.

The same target can also be used with an M14/M1A, at least at the shorter distances. The ballistics of the M118 and the current M118LR are similar enough that this will get you on target at the full distances, probably requiring just a half MOA or so change from the 50 yard zero you recorded. Same bullets, moving at a slightly more sedate 2,550 fps, you’ll be in the ballpark at least.

Bryan Litz has recently popularized the short-range zeroing methods once again, reintroducing it to a new generation of shooters that may not have been aware of the old M72 short-range zero target. The same principles apply, and with the advent of the myriad computer ballistics programs and chronographs on the market today, any shooter can rapidly develop his own zero targets to accomplish the same result. But in the meantime, especially with the M1’s resurgent popularity, it’s nice to know that there’s an easy way to do things without a trip to a full-length range. The modestly-priced 50-Yard Sighting Targets can be ordered through Champion’s Choice or Creedmoor Sports.

Oh, and when I arrived in Talladega, yes, my zeros were good! All’s well that ends well. Safe Shooting! — Kevin Thomas

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July 19th, 2015

CMP Armorer Explains Garand Headspacing Procedures

M1 Garand head space

Garand matches are among the most popular and well-attended of the CMP competition disciplines. When obtained directly from the CMP, Garands are fun to shoot and affordable. However, with these classic battle rifles, you need to ensure that the headspace is set properly to ensure safe function and good brass life.

Garand WWII posterIn the archives of The FIRST SHOT, the CMP’s online magazine, CMP Armorer John McLean has written an excellent article entitled: “Everything You Ever Wanted to Know about Checking M1 Garand Head Space.” We recommend all Garand shooters read the article.

McClean explains: “Excessive headspace will cause the brass to stretch more than it should and increases the likelihood of a case failure. Insufficient headspace may contribute to slam fires, light strikes on primers, misfires and more wear on parts due to the additional force needed to chamber the rounds.”

Garand Head Space Gauges
McClean writes: “Both Forster and Clymer make fine gauges but we have found that there are differences between the two companies’ gauges that make the Clymer gauges best for use with the M1. The headspace that the original manufacturers of the M1 considered correct can be determined by checking new or nearly new rifles that we have here at CMP. With that information we have determined that Springfield Armory and the other manufacturers of the M1 used gauges that were very close to the Clymer dimensions… and therefore we use, and recommend using only the Clymer gauges.”

How to Check for Proper Headspace
In the article, McClean goes on to show how to properly use the “GO”, “NO GO”, and “FIELD” gauges. You’ll want to read the Complete Article. One of the important points McClean makes is that the ejector can affect headspace reading. Accordingly, “the bolt must be disassembled and the ejector removed, or clearance notches must be made on the headspace gauges so there will be no contact between the headspace gauges and the ejector.”

CLICK HERE to read COMPLETE ARTICLE….

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July 15th, 2015

Vintage Sniper Rifle Match July 17th at Camp Perry

Vintage Sniper Rifle Match

This Friday, July 17th, the CMP hosts the Vintage Sniper Rifle Match at Camp Perry. One of the most popular vintage rifle matches held each summer at Perry, this is a two-man team competition using scoped rifles of WWI and WWII Vintage. Many competitors use some version of the M1903 Springfield, but you’ll also see scoped M1 Garands, K31s, Mausers, and even a Lee-Enfield or two.

Vintage Sniper Rifle Match

Two-person teams will fire 10 rounds in 20-second intervals from scoped vintage military rifles set on sand bags. One team marksman shoots from the prone position at 300 and 600 yards, while the other serves as a spotter to relay shot position. Marksman and spotter switch positions on the firing lines, allowing each teammate to play both roles. Scores are then combined for an Aggregate team total.

Two M1 Garands, fitted with scopes and lace-on cheekpads.
Vintage sniper rifle team match camp perry

Who can identify this rifle, with its unusual scope mount?
Vintage sniper rifle team match camp perry

Our friends at Criterion Barrels have written an interesting article about last year’s Vintage Sniper Rifle Match. It you want an “insider’s perspective” on the 2014 Match, plus Vintage Sniper gunsmithing tips, read this article. Here are some highlights:

About the Match and the Rifles
The Vintage Sniper Match was the brainchild of Hornady’s Dave Emary. The competition was inspired by his father, a World War II scout sniper, who carried a rifle similar to the 1903A4 rifle builds that can be found today on the Camp Perry firing line. Bob Schanen worked alongside Dave and the CMP staff in establishing the various competition rules prior to the first official Vintage Sniper Match in 2011. The match developers made a point to offer some level of flexibility in rifle configuration, allowing specific types of non-issue optics and rifle rebuilds. This helped make the match more inclusive.

Hornady’s Dave Emary and “Gunny” R. Lee Ermey (right):
AccurateShooter.com CMP Vintage Sniper Rifle Match

Bob Shanen has two vintage sniper competition rifles. Both builds are based off of the USMC Model 1941 sniper rifle, a design similar to the M1903A1 National Match rifle. Bob’s rifles both carry 8x Lyman Junior Target Spotter scopes with a thin crosshair reticle. Bob attributes a large part of his rifle’s accuracy to the Criterion M1903 match-grade barrels installed on each rifle by Rick Humphreys, a Milwaukee area gunsmith. These tack-driving barrels are capable of half-MOA accuracy.

Camp Perry — The Venue
The hallowed grounds of Camp Perry have hosted some of the nation’s finest shooters each summer for more than a century. Some of the world’s greatest marksmen have accomplished remarkable feats on the ranges of this lakeside military outpost. Located on the coast of Lake Erie, Camp Perry is positioned just outside of the scenic town of Port Clinton, Ohio. It is our firm belief that every shooter should make the pilgrimage to the Camp Perry at least once in their lifetime. If not participating in an event, visitors should at least make an attempt to meet the competitors, witness the wide selection of firearms used by participants, and pay a visit to the various vendors on base.

Photos from Garand Thumb Blog and NRA Blog.

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July 12th, 2015

Want a Challenge? Try the CMP’s Four Gun Aggregate

CMP 4-Gun As-Issued Santiago

by Dennis Santiago
Tricked-out match guns are fun but, if you want to prove that you’ve got an eagle eye and steady hands, a true test of skill is the Civilian Marksmanship Program’s As-Issued Four Gun Aggregate.

CMP 4-Gun As-Issued SantiagoThe Four Gun Aggregate encompasses a series of CMP John C. Garand 30-shot matches (200-yard As-Issued Military Rifle Match Course A) on NRA SR targets at one of the CMP Regional Games or the Nationals officiated by the CMP. These are the only places you can earn the coveted neck-ribbon CMP achievement medals.

You will need four as-issued rifles. The first is the M-1 Garand. (The course of fire is named after this rifle’s inventor.) This remarkable battle rifle will test your prowess at slow prone, rapid prone, and offhand. The match winner will put almost all bullets into a saucer.

You do get to hear that classic “ping” when the en bloc clip ejects with this gun. It’s a good idea to write your firing point number on your hand for each match because you will move around over the course of the tournament.

Next comes the hyper-accurate 1903 Springfield. You can use either the WW I M1903 or the later WW II M1903A3 model with peep sights. A Springfield will typically shoot groups half the size of a Garand with the same ammunition. Think potential in terms of tea cups instead of saucers.

(more…)

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October 3rd, 2014

Blast from the Past: M1 Garand and M14 Training Films

M1 GarandClassic American battle rifles have regained popularity via M1 Garand matches, service rifle matches, the M1A Match at Camp Perry, and Vintage Sniper competitions. If you own a classic M1 Garand, or an M1A, the modern semi-auto descendant of the M14, you should enjoy the two videos presented here. With help from our friend Grant G., we managed to located two original U.S. Army training films, one for the M1 Garand, and one for the M14. Both films use clever animated drawings to show the gas guns’ internal operations and cycling processes.

M1 Garand Training Film
Here is a U.S. Army training film for the M1 Garand (officially the United States Rifle, Caliber .30, M1). The M1 Garand was the first semi-automatic battle rifle to be generally issued to the infantry of a major nation, though other countries issued semi-auto rifles to special units. Gen. George S. Patton called the Garand “The greatest battle implement ever devised.”

Animated Diagrams Show M1 Garand Operational Cycle starting at 2:00-Minute Mark:

M14 Training Film
The successor to the M1 Garand was the M14. The 27-minute official U.S. Army video below demonstrates the operation of the M14. Field-stripping is shown from the 5:13 time-mark through 8:30. Cut-away drawings show the M14’s gas operation at 8:40.

M1 Garand

The complete 8-step functioning cycle is demonstrated from the 9:25 time-mark through 22:41. These eight operations are: 1) Feeding; 2) Chambering; 3) Locking; 4) Firing; 5) Unlocking; 6) Extracting; 7) Ejecting; and 8) Cocking. This movie is fairly long, but fans of battle rifles will find it well worth their time. Every M1A owner should definitely watch this video start to finish.

Watch M14 Functioning Cycle Starting at 9:25 Mark:

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July 2nd, 2014

’03 Springfield vs. Enfield vs. Garand Shoot-out with the “Gunny”

Here’s a fun and entertaining video feature from our Daily Bulletin archives. In this USA vs. UK smackdown, “Gunny” Ermey pits his m1903 Springfield and M1 Garand against a British Lee-Enfield. Watch the video to see who comes out on top.

In this entertaining video, retired Marine Gunnery Sergeant and popular TV host R. Lee Ermey, challenges Gary Archer, a British ex-pat, to a shoot-off with classic military rifles. In Round One, Ermey employs a Springfield m1903 while his opponent shoots the British 1907 Lee-Enfield No. 1, MK III. The quick-cycling bolt of the .303-caliber Enfield, and its larger internal magazine, give the Brit an advantage and Archer beats Ermey decisively.

But the Gunny doesn’t give up. For Round Two, Ermey replaces his 1903 with an M1 Garand. The Gunny then proceeds to show why the .30-06 Garand was a superior combat weapon. Gary Archer protests that it’s “hardly sporting” to pit a bolt-gun against a semi-auto like the Garand, but Ermey quashes that complaint saying: “Hey, Churchill, it’s my show. Besides… this is war, I love my M1 Garand… and all’s fair in love and war.”

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June 5th, 2014

Vintage Military Rifle Fans Line Up for IHC Garands at CMP Stores

Looking for an authentic M1 Garand? Well, here’s your opportunity. The CMP Stores (North and South) opened this morning with a limited stock of IHC (International Harvester) Garand Rifles. Some buyers camped out yesterday to get the “pick of the litter”. It wasn’t exactly a “feeding frenzy” but there certainly was a lot of buying activity in a short span of time. It’s nice to see these old battle rifles acquired by Americans who appreciate the legacy of the M1 Garand. The CMP noted: “We expect the next partial IHC release to be in November, 2014, but it may be sooner.”

Rifles on Display — The Calm Before the Storm
IHC Garand

Here Come the Buyers
IHC Garand

IHC Garand

Doing the Paperwork
IHC Garand

A Classic M1 Garand Is Going to a New Home

IHC Garand

And Here is How an IHC M1 Garand Shoots, Off-Hand, Rapid-Fire:

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May 5th, 2012

Sales of Hatcher’s Book of the Garand Help Support CMP

The folks at the Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) say that Hatcher’s Book of the Garand is a must-read for M1 Garand shooters, historians, and collectors. Available in both paperback and hardback editions, this book was written by Maj. Gen. Julian Hatcher, Technical Editor for the American Rifleman magazine. The Book of the Garand is Hatcher’s first-hand account of the U.S. War Department’s search, testing, manufacturing, and distribution of the M1 Garand.

Gen. Julian Hatcher Garand book

CLICK HERE for Paperback Edition, $17.99 | CLICK HERE for Hardback Edition, $24.99

If you purchase this book, you’ll be helping out the CMP. When ordering from the links above, which connect to the Canton Street Press website, CMP will receive 10% of book sale proceeds.

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April 13th, 2012

Lothar Walther Offers Finished Garand and AR15 Barrels

Lothar walther logoLothar Walther has some new “pre-fit” barrel offerings that should interest Garand and AR shooters. Garand Match competitors and vintage military rifle shooters will be pleased that LW is now offering “finished” Garand barrels, pre-chambered in your choice of six (6) different chamberings: .270 Win, 7×64, .308 Win,.30-06, 8x57IS and 9.3×62. These are all four-groove barrels with 24″ length. Twist rates along with land/groove diameters are listed on the Lothar Walther website. NOTE: Though these barrels come pre-chambered, you’ll still need a competent gunsmith for final fitting and headspacing.

Finished M1 Garand Barrel
Garand Finished Barrels

AR15 Barrels — Multiple Contour Options
For AR15 shooters, Lothar Walther now offers a wide variety of pre-chambered AR15 barrels, set up for either .222 Rem and .223 Rem. With the .223 Rem barrels you have a choice of either standard .223 Rem OR .223 Wylde chambers. You can select either stainless steel or what LW calls “special rifle steel”. For most of these contours, other calibers/chamberings (.204 Ruger, .17 Rem., .30/.221 Fireball, 6.5 CSS, 6.8 SPC) are available on request. Extra charges may apply. Gunsmith required for attachment of barrel extension, drilling of gas port, and attachment of gas block, and (optional) front sight.

Contour 6000:16
Contour 6100:20
Contour 6100:24
Contour 6200:24
Contour 6200:26
Contour 6300-1675-MU

North American customers can order these “finished” Garand and AR15 barrels by contacting:

Lothar Walther Precision Tools
3425 Hutchinson Rd.
Cumming, GA 30040
Phone: 770-889-9998
E-Mail: lotharwalther [at] mindspring.com

Product tip from EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.
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November 11th, 2011

M1 for Vets Project Seeks Donations

M1 for VetsCreedmoor Sports and the M1 for Vets organization are working together on a program that helps armed services veterans get involved in the shooting sports. The M1 for Vets Project helps veterans attend High Power shooting events such as the Creedmoor Cup and the National Matches at Camp Perry, Ohio.

The M1 For Vets Project is not affiliated with the CMP, NRA or any large firearms organization. It’s a small, grassroots group of shooters and collectors that want to show their appreciation and respect for our young men and women who have served our Nation. Almost all M1 recipients have been combat-wounded and want to continue to use the marksmanship skills they have acquired.

M1 for Vets  Veterans

Project founders explain: “Our mission is to help our returning wounded warriors get back on the line and win. We accept donated M1s and refurbish them. We then provide the rifles, logistics support and specialized training necessary for disabled veterans to compete in national matches. The rifle, ‘beans and bullets’, the training and esprit de corps is what we provide.”

Over $9000.00 Raised This Year
After a successful event at this year’s Western Creedmoor Cup, Creedmoor Sports announced that — with your donations — it has helped raise over $9000 this year. You can donate through the Creedmoor Sports website using this link: M1 For Vets Donations.

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October 15th, 2010

CMP Seeks Volunteers for Gun Gauging and Grading Program

CMP Volunteer ProgramInspecting and grading thousands of surplus rifles is a huge task. Accordingly, the Civilian Marksmanship program seeks volunteer manpower to help with this process. In an effort to give the Garand shooting and collecting communities an opportunity to view and participate in CMP Inspection and Repair processes and to reduce labor costs, the CMP established a volunteer program starting in July, 2010. Most volunteers work for 3-5 days.

M1 Garand cmpThe CMP is looking for more volunteers. Assignments are based primarily on individual level of familiarity with the Garand, and the CMP’s needs at the time. Although the CMP tries to ensure that volunteers spend time working with Garands, some time may be spent in warehousing, packing, or shipping operations. Volunteers must be pre-approved, with work sessions scheduled in advance. No walk-ons. Volunteers should submit requests at least two weeks prior to planned visits (many volunteers schedule “shifts” months in advance).

The CMP reports: “[The] volunteer program that was in effect from 2001-2006 was a huge success and benefited the CMP and all the great people who had donated their time. Without exception, all past volunteers reported their visits as very educational, recreational and enjoyable. Most of the past volunteers had made several repeat visits from all parts of the country, and many have become ambassadors for the program. The CMP is a charity and expenses associated with volunteering may be tax-deductible.”

Volunteers absorb all costs for transportation, lodging and meals. Most volunteers stay 3-5 days per trip. Tools and gauges are available, but the CMP encourages volunteers to bring their own. To learn more about the CMP Volunteer program, or to schedule work sessions, contact Brian Vick at bvick [at] odcmp.com, or call 256-835-8455 x 1126.

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September 25th, 2010

CMP Open House at Camp Perry Store Next Weekend

CMP North WarehouseIf you’re located anywhere near Camp Perry, Ohio, you may want to plan a road trip on Saturday, 2 October, a week from today. On October 2nd, the CMP North Store is running a special Customer Appreciation Day and Open House. The store opens at 8:30 a.m. and closes at 4 p.m. in the afternoon.

Over 400 surplus military rifles will be on display. If you don’t have an M1 Garand yet, here’s you chance to hand-pick a classic rifle for your collection. CMP Armorers will help customers inspect the rifles they have picked out and assist customers with the purchasing process.

CMP North Open House

Open House visitors get free complimentary coffee and donuts in the morning and complimentary hot dogs and chips in the afternoon. In addition to food and refreshments CMP will give out free summer event T-shirts to the first 50 visitors to the store. Guests may also take home free CMP giveaways while they last, Conrad said.

The CMP North store recently reopened following an inventory organization period following the 2010 National Matches. The store sells surplus M1 Garand rifles to qualified buyers along with ammunition, books, clothing, memorabilia and a limited supply of .22 caliber rifles, air rifles and accessories. For more information, call the CMP North Store at 419-635-2141 Ext. 1505. CLICK HERE for a map and directions to the CMP North store.

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June 22nd, 2010

Garand Assembly Diagram Printed on Large Mats

Here’s a handy product for our readers who collect military rifles or who shoot in the CMP’s Garand Matches. Second Star to the Right, a company based in Stonewall, Lousiana, offers vinyl mats printed with the breakdown/assembly instructions for the M1 Garand. These mats are faithful reproductions of the 1952 Army instruction diagram used to train GIs and armorers. There are two models: 1) 30″ x 26″ Deluxe heavy-weight version with grommets ($25.00); and 2) 19″ x 14″ “Collectors Edition” lighter-weight version ($17.00). You can either use the mat draped on your bench as a cleaning surface, or hang it on the wall for decoration.

In addition to its M1 Garand mats, Second Star plans to introduce mats for other firearms such as the M14, M1 Carbine, and M16. For more information call Second Star at (318) 560-2579. Second Star’s website is not yet active, but you can send email to: the2ndstar2010@yahoo.com .

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August 1st, 2009

Hornady Ammo Chosen for Springfield & Garand Matches

Hornady has been selected as the official ammunition supplier for the 2009 National Springfield and Garand Matches, to be held August 7 and 8, in Camp Perry, Ohio. Hornady’s 30-06 Garand Match Ammunition will be issued to all shooters competing in the Springfield Rifle Match, John C. Garand Match, and the Vintage Military Rifle Match.

Hornady A-max Garand Ammo

Hornady 30-06 M1 Garand Match Ammunition delivers a 168gr A-Max bullet at 2710 fps MV. Hornady’s Garand ammo is purpose-built for the Garand platform, employing medium burn-rate propellants that protect the M1 rifle’s gas port system, meeting all SAAMI guidelines.

According to Hornady, some 30-06 military surplus ammunition and current 30-06 commercial ammunition is too powerful for the gas operating system of the M1 Garand. “Permanent damage can occur while shooting standard [modern] factory-loaded 30-06 ammunition in the M1 Garand,” said Dave Emary, Hornady Chief Ballistic Scientist. “Typical factory loads contain propellants that when fired, result in port pressures and gas volumes that are too high, causing violent stress to the rifle’s operating rod, bolt, and receiver.”

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May 13th, 2009

M1 for Vets Program Serves Wounded Veterans

M1 for VetsCreedmoor Sports has announced its support of the M1 for Vets program, which provides financial and logistical support to wounded U.S. Veterans, allowing them to compete at Camp Perry and other major rifle matches. M1 for Vets has also donated refurbished M1 Garand rifles to more than 160 wounded war heroes.

Supporting these efforts, for a limited time, Creedmoor Sports will donate to M1 for Vets $5 from every internet order over $100. When you order from Creedmoor Sports’ website (and spend over $100.00), Creedmoor “kicks-in” $5.00 to support this worthy program.

About M1 for Vets
M1 for Vets is a non-profit organization dedicated to financial and logistical support of returning Combat Wounded Veterans from Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and the Global War on Terror (GWT), for the purpose of helping them compete in national shooting sports. The goal is to give transitioning combat wounded veterans an opportunity to get back on the rifle range to participate in shooting competition. These are tough young men and women who quickly adapt and are able to overcome difficulties. In the video below, M1 for Vets recipients are interviewed at the 2008 Camp Perry National Matches.

YouTube Preview Image
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May 13th, 2009

Huge Turnout for Eastern CMP Games & Creedmoor Cup — Sherri Gallagher-Hurd Wins Match

Sherri HurdDennis DeMille of Creedmoor Sports reported that the 2009 Eastern CMP Games and Creedmoor Cup was a rousing success, setting new attendance records. Over 184 shooters competed in the individual Creedmoor Cup on Saturday, May 10th. Complete Results are posted on the CMP website.

Sherri Gallagher-Hurd was the overall match winner (and match rifle class winner), firing a score of 790-34x. SFC Grant Singley of the US Army Marksmanship Unit was the high service rifle shooter with a score of 788-38x. High Senior was Doug Morrison, a former US Army Reserve service rifle shooter, who has made the transition to match rifle. Doug fired a fine score of 785-31X. CWO3 Peter Burns won the M1 Garand Match and the Vintage Military Rifle Match. The USAMU Praslick Squad won the 4-man Service Rifle Team event. William Flagg, Jr. won the Rimfire Sporter event, shooting an excellent 590-33X.

The shooter who traveled the furthest to compete in this match was William Ellis, from England. William was able to bring his rifle to shoot in the matches, but had to buy ammunition in the US upon his arrival.

Match Report courtesy the NRA Blog. Hurd file photo from NRA Media Relations

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