November 22nd, 2020

CMP Announces 2021 Program for Sale of Model 1911 Pistols

CMP 1911 Pistol lottery Service Grade Field Rack application procedure

Military pistol collectors take note — you will soon be able to order classic military-issue Model 1911 pistol from the CMP. The Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) will begin accepting orders to purchase CMP 1911 Type Pistols at the beginning of the new year. Orders will be accepted from January 4 to March 4, 2021. NOTE: All 1911 requests must be made through the mail. No 1911s will be available in CMP stores, and no in-store orders will be accepted. For CMP 1911 Pistol Order Forms and additional INFO CLICK HERE.

The CMP’s Historic Model 1911 Handguns
In 2018, the National Defense Authorization Act granted the first transfer of 1911s to the CMP for sale and distribution. Arguably one of the most iconic handguns ever produced, the M1911 served as the standard issue handgun for the U.S. Armed Forces from 1911 to 1985. The single-action, semi-automatic pistol uses .45 ACP rounds and is comprised of a comfortable, basic design.

New orders for CMP 1911s will not be accepted before January 4, 2021, or after March 4, 2021. Any packets received or postmarked outside of those dates will be discarded. Only one CMP 1911 order form per customer per envelope may be submitted. Those who have already purchased a CMP 1911 through the CMP RGN system or the Auction site will NOT be eligible to purchase a second 1911 at this time.

CMP 1911 Pistol lottery Service Grade Field Rack application procedure

The Model 1911 Pistol — An American Classic
Designed by J.M. Browning, the M1911 is a single-action, semi-automatic, magazine-fed, recoil-operated pistol chambered for the .45 ACP cartridge. It served as the standard-issue sidearm for the United States Armed Forces from 1911 to 1986. It was widely used in World War I, World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War.

CMP 1911 Pistol lottery Service Grade Field Rack application procedure

CMP 1911 Pistol Grades and Prices

Each pistol is inspected and test fired by the CMP before it is shipped. Prices for the 1911s are marked at fair market value, in accordance with CMP’s enabling legislation, at the following levels (shipping cost included):

    Service Grade, $1050: Pistol may exhibit minor pitting and wear on exterior surfaces and friction surfaces. Grips are complete with no cracks. Pistol is in issuable condition. Pistols may contain commercial parts.

    Field Grade, $950: Pistol may exhibit minor rust, pitting and wear on exterior surfaces and friction surfaces. Grips are complete with no cracks. Pistol is in issuable condition. Pistols may contain commercial parts.

    Rack Grade, $850: Pistol will exhibit rust, pitting and wear on exterior surfaces and friction surfaces. Grips may be incomplete and exhibit cracks. Pistols may require minor work to return to issuable condition but are functional. Pistols may contain commercial parts.

    Auction Grade — Sales by auction. The condition of the auction pistol will be described when posted for auction.

Selection Priority Procedures
Since these firearms are in high demand, a Random Number Generator will be utilized to provide a list of names in sequential order. Customers will be contacted in the sequence provided by the Random Number Generator. When contacted, CMP 1911 customers will select their grade of pistol (Service, Field or Rack). Customers with higher generated numbers may have fewer grades from which to choose. When the allotment of 1911s is exhausted, the remaining orders will be held in the existing sequence for all future allotments of 1911s. For questions, call CMP 1911 customer service number at 256-770-4744 or send email to: cmp1911@thecmp.org.

Background Checks Are Mandatory
As part of the CMP’s enabling legislation to supply these firearms, all customers will be subject to and must be approved by the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS), conducted through the FBI, to assure eligibility to purchase prior to shipment to a required Federal Firearms License (FFL) dealer.

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October 29th, 2020

How Guns Work — 3D Animations of 1911 and Glock Pistols

3D animation cad computer how guns work video 1911 glock handgun pistol

These three videos show how the classic Model 1911 pistol works. This pistol requires the hammer to be cocked in order to fire. Watch the video to see the operation of the trigger, hammer, firing pin, and slide. After the round is fired the slide retracts and the cartridge ejects. Then, a new round rises in the magazine and chambers as the slide moves forward back into battery. With the hammer cocked when the slide came back, the m1911 is ready for the next shot.

Colt 1911 pistol animation 3D

Striker-Fired Glock Pistol — Modern Design
For comparison with the Model 1911 shown above, this video shows the Glock 19 (Gen 4) pistol with 3D animation. This modern, polymer-framed, striker-fired pistol has constant trigger pull for all shots. Some folks call this a DAO (double-action-only) trigger but that’s not really correct. Unlike the Model 1911, on a Glock there is no external safety on the frame or slide. The trigger “shoe” (the part that contacts finger) includes a central blade. This prevents the gun from firing unless the trigger is depresses normally. Glock calls this the “safe action”.

3D animation cad computer how guns work video 1911 glock handgun pistol

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March 19th, 2018

The 85% Scale 1911-380 — What Would J.M. Browning Think?

Browning 1911-390 Black lable .380 acp 1911 pistol

The classic John Moses Browning-designed Model 1911 pistol was created for the .45 ACP cartridge. Many believe the M1911 represents the pinnacle of .45 ACP pistol performance. The 1911 has served the nation in combat, and even today, full-size, hot-rod model 1911-type pistols dominate the top classes at action pistol shooting competitions (though typically shooting smaller caliber cartridges).

Which raises the question — does it make sense to shoot a down-sized .1911-type pistol with a smaller, lighter-recoiling cartridge? Browning, the company named after genius inventor J.M. Browning, thinks so. In 2014, Browning introduced an 85%-scale version of the 1911 that shoots the .380 ACP, another cartridge that Mr. Browning favored. What happens when the Model 1911 is reduced to 85 percent of its original size and paired with the .380 ACP cartridge?

WATCH: Check Out This Cool Animation to See How the 1911-380 Works:

This gun, with its polymer composite frame, is a LOT lighter than an all-steel 1911. The Browning 1911-380 tips the scales at a mere 17.5 ounces. Gun reviewers have praised Browning’s new 1911-380, saying that it functions great and fits well in the hand. NRA America’s 1st Freedom Editor Frank Winn states: “This is precisely where the [1911-380] Black Label .380 ACP excels so dramatically — as a transitional pistol. The 85-percent scaling caters to those with smaller hands and less grip strength. In every test we conducted, on paper, on steel (plates to 35 yards), and through defensive and competitive drills, the Black Label performed flawlessly.” Testers have praised the pointability and function of the down-sized 1911. It operates like a full-sized 1911*, and the “take-down” procedure is the same. This video shows the features of Browning’s 1911-380.

To be honest, we think this is sort of sacrilege. We like the full-size 1911 and we love the original .45 ACP cartridge. That classic fat round is accurate, easy-to-reload, and makes nice big holes in paper. One could also ask, if you want to shoot a .380 ACP, why not shoot it from another J.M. Browning design, the lovely little Model 1908. This beautiful design also served the U.S. Military, and it’s still one of the best-looking semi-auto pistols ever made. The NRA’s Frank Winn notes: “A revamped Browning design (based on the Colt M1903 “Pocket Hammerless”) became the M1908, the first mature, successful .380 ACP handgun. In 42 years of manufacture, several hundred thousand were sold.”

J.M. Browning 1908 Pocket Hammerless .380 ACP

So, much as we applaud innovation, we’ll stick to the original, full-size 1911. If we want to shoot the little .380 ACP cartridge, we’ll do so with J.M. Browning’s lovely little M1908, or another great .380 ACP pistol, the Sig P230/232. This editor owns a sweet Sig P230 in stainless. It is thin, handsome, durable, and easy to carry. It’s also an appreciating asset.


* The Browning 1911-380 has one main functional difference — it has a magazine disconnect. this means “with the magazine removed, the hammer won’t fall, even with all safeties disengaged”. LINK.

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July 16th, 2017

Army Model 1911 Pistols for CMP? Report from Congress

1911 pistols surplus Army CMP Congress Legislation

Report by NRA Institute for Legislative Action
On July 14, 2017, the U.S. House of Representatives passed H.R. 2810, the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2018. Included in the bill is a provision that would make U.S. Army surplus model 1911 .45 ACP pistols available to the American public through the Civilian Marksmanship program (CMP).*

In November of 2015, then-President Obama signed the NDAA for Fiscal year 2016 into law with language that authorized the Secretary of Defense to transfer 1911s no longer in service to the CMP for public sale. That language made the transfers subject to the Secretary’s discretion and capped them at 10,000 per year. Unsurprisingly, no actual transfers were made under the program while Obama remained in the White House.

This year’s language, however, would effectively make the transfers mandatory and would remove the yearly cap. Currently, the military has some 100,000 excess 1911s sitting in storage at taxpayer expense. The CMP’s sales of 1911s would be treated as other retail sales under the federal Gun Control Act, including the attendant background checks and point of sale record keeping.

TAKE ACTION TODAY
If you would like to see 1911 sales return to the CMP, please contact your U.S. Senators and Representative and urge them to keep the House language on this matter intact in the final bill they send to the president. You can contact Senators and Representative at 202-225-3121.

1911 pistols surplus Army CMP Congress Legislation
Pistol photo courtesy NRA-ILA

* Upon completion of the Senate NDAA, the House and Senate will convene a conference committee to resolve the differences in their bills. Please urge your representatives to retain the House language regarding the 1911s in the final bill.

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July 16th, 2013

Kimber Rimfire Target m1911-Style .22 LR Pistols

accurateshooter.com Kimber rimfire target .22 LR pistolWhile viewing Panteo’s Training with a 22 DVD, we noticed a sweet-looking, silver-tone m1911-style rimfire pistol in the hands of host Michael Bane. At first, we thought this might be a new stainless version of Sig Sauer’s popular 1911-22. But, in actuality, Bane was shooting a Kimber Rimfire Target pistol. Michael’s aluminum-framed Kimber performed great in rapid-fire drills.

Kimber’s line-up of rimfire pistols includes matte black and silver-tone Rimfire Target models ($871 MSRP), plus a deluxe, two-tone Rimfire Super model ($1220 MSRP) with Rosewood grips, front strap checkering, and KimPro II finish. The rather pricey Rimfire Super model is guaranteed to put five shots in 1.5″ or less at 25 yards. Both standard and deluxe models feature aluminum frame and slide, steel barrel, and adjustable match-type sights.

accurateshooter.com Kimber rimfire target .22 LR pistol

Watch Slow-Motion Video of Kimber Rimfire Target (Black Version)

accurateshooter.com Kimber rimfire target .22 LR pistol

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July 14th, 2012

Bonnie and Clyde’s Colt Handguns to Be Auctioned in September

Bonnie Clyde gun auctionWould you like to own guns carried by America’s most infamous criminal couple? Well here’s your chance — the personal handguns of Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker (Bonnie and Clyde), go up for auction in September, along with other personal memorabilia. Bonnie’s personal Colt .38 SPL Detective Special will be auctioned, along with Clyde’s favored Colt .45 ACP Government Model 1911. Bonnie’s revolver was recovered from her bullet-ridden body after the famous 1934 Louisiana roadside ambush which brought a bloody end to Bonnie and Clyde’s notorious crime spree. The snubnose was found strapped to Bonnie’s inner thigh with medical tape. Clyde’s 1911 was found tucked in his waistband.

Both guns have been thoroughly authenticated and carry a rock-solid provenance. Experts predict each handgun will bring $100,000 to $200,000 at auction. Along with the guns, there will be other Bonnie and Clyde possessions up for bid, including Clyde Barrow’s gold pocket watch and Bonnie Parker’s cosmetic case. In addition there’s a letter from Clyde to his brother L.C. Barrow signed “Bud” (the name Clyde used when running from the law). The auction, conducted by RR Auction, will be held September 30, 2012 in Amherst, New Hampshire.

Bonnie Clyde gun auction

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