March 30th, 2019

New Protektor Model Aluminum Front Rest — Made in USA

Protektor Protector read sand bag front aluminum rest bag benchrest windage top

You probably know the name Protektor Model for quality front and rear bags. The Protektor DR rear bag is extremely stable, making it the choice of many top Benchrest and F-Class shooters. But guess what — Protektor makes more than leather products now.

Protektor recently introduced a slingshot-style aluminum front rest, and it looks impressive. It is offered with standard top for $195.00. The deluxe version with Windage-adjustable top costs $295.00. Both versions have an adjustable fore-end stop and nice big Mariners Wheel for elevation control. The deluxe windage-top version, shown below, also comes with a bubble level.

Protektor Protector read sand bag front aluminum rest bag benchrest windage top

The Windage-adjustable version is shown above (as well as in top photo). The left-right Windage is controlled with a simple knob that spins a shaft on the left side of the top. Height adjusts from 4-7/8″ to 7″ via the nicely-crafted Mariners Wheel. NOTE: The black triangular base is a third-part item, NOT part of the rest. Also the $295.00 price does NOT include front bag, which is sold separately. A deluxe Protektor square-ear front bag for 3″ forearms costs $43.00.

Basic Protektor Aluminum Rest is $195.00
Shown below is the basic Protektor rest, a good value at just $195.00 (rest only — no bag). This includes a machined aluminum top, large Mariners Wheel, and adjustable feet. This has a 7.75″ x 14″ footprint and weighs 5.65 lbs without sand-bag. That makes it pretty easy to carry around — a plus for varminters. The rest top fits standard-sized Protektor bags, which, as filled, take the total weight to about seven pounds.

Protektor Protector read sand bag front aluminum rest bag benchrest windage top

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April 9th, 2016

Tuning Your Sandbag Hardness — Tech Tip by Speedy

Over the years, noted gunsmith and a Benchrest Hall-of-Fame inductee Thomas ‘Speedy’ Gonzalez has learned a few things about “tuning” rear sandbags for best performance. On his Facebook page, Speedy recently discussed how sand bag fill levels (hard vs. soft) can affect accuracy. Speedy says you don’t want to have both your front and rear sandbags filled up ultra-hard. One or the other bag needs to have some “give” to provide a shock-absorbing function (and prevent stock jump).

SAND BAGS & HOW TO FILL THEM by Speedy Gonzalez

I was asked several times by competitors at the S.O.A. Matches and F-Class Nationals as to how I fill my sand bags for benchrest competition. Here is a copy of a reply I gave several years ago:

Back in the old days, about the time Fred Flintstone was still alive, I worked for Pat McMillan for free, from time to time to learn all his secrets. One day little Speedy was filling some new sand bags out behind Pat’s shop, stuffing them with more sand than Taco Bell put beans in their Burritos. When Pat stepped out the back door and inquired as to what in the hell was I doing packing them there bags the way I was.

I looked up at him with eyes like a kid with his hands in a cookie jar. My reply must have sounded like Homer Simpson “Doooh”. Finally I said “I don’t know, Boss. I just thought you were supposed to fill these babies up and go shoot. I got that ‘You dumb bastard look’ from Pat and I knew it was lecture time. This was what he told me:

You can not have two bags filled so hard that you gun bounces on them in the process of firing round at your target, especially if you have a rig with a very flexible stock. The bags must be set up in a manner for them to absorb the initial shock of the firing pin moving forward and igniting the primer. Then [they must] maintain their shape and absorb the second shock wave as well the rearward thrust and torque of the rifle. What happens to the rifle when this is not done? Well let me tell you. The rifles have a very bad tendency to jump and roll in the bags. This causes many of those wild, lost shots that one can’t explain.

Charles Huckaba, Ken Terrell, Larry Baggett, Ralph Stewart and some of us Texas shooters talk about this phenomena quite often. We have all agreed that:

  • 1: You can not have two hard bags [i.e. both front AND rear] in your set-up.
  • 2: Heavy sand magnifies these phenomena.
  • 3: If you are a bag squeezer, pack ears hard and leave bag pliable enough to squeeze for the movement required. You may pack front bag as hard as rules permit.
  • 4: Free recoil shooters pack both bags firm, but not so hard as to allow stock jump. Especially if you have a stock with a very flexible forearm.
  • 5: We use play-ground sand, also know as silica sand. I sift mine to get any large impurities out then mix it with 25% to 50% with Harts parakeet gravel to the desired hardness that I am looking for. The bird gravel keeps the sand from packing itself into that solid as a brick state.

Speaking of bricks — another thing that happens when shooters employ that heavy zircon sand is the ears form a low spot under them from recoil and then tend to rock back and forth with the rifle causing many low shots to crop up. Edgewood makes an Edgewood/Speedy rear bag specially reinforced under the ears to eliminate this scenario.

One last note –If you use the Cordura bags keep them sprayed with a good silicon spray or “Rain-Ex”. This keeps them from getting sticky. Hey guys, try that and see if it helps. — Speedy

P.S.: I do not like the solid double-stitched leather bottoms. While this seems like a good idea, I see more shooters have problems because of them. They tend to slide around the bench and or slide with the rifle on recoil. The standard Protektor with Cordura rabbit ears and an Otto ring bag with a Cordura front would be what I would suggest to the new shooter or one of the Edgewood / Speedy rear bags, these mimic the “Donut” and feature a ring of leather around the bottom circumference that keep the bottom from rocking on the bench or ground if that is where you reside these days…

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