March 19th, 2017

Stunning Carbonia-Blued Colt Woodsman from NRA Museum

Accurateshooter.com john moses browning engraved colt woodsman series three third NRA museum
Photo courtesy NRA Museum Click Photo to View Larger Image

With today’s plastic-framed Glocks and Keltecs, aesthetics have been sacrificed on the altar of functionality. Not so in the early 20th century — in that period, the best firearm designers created guns that looked as good as they worked. One example is the classic Colt Woodsman. This design came from the legendary John Moses Browning and was later refined by Colt before the pistol’s introduction in 1915. The Colt Woodsman’s frame design evolved over time in three distinct series: Series One 1915–1947, Series Two 1947–1955, and Series Three 1955–1977. Shown above is a stunning Carbonia-blued and engraved Third Series model with ivory grips.

Engraved Colt Woodsman from NRA Museum
AccurateShooter NRA Museum Teddy RooseveltIn the NRA Museum’s Robert E. Petersen Gallery are many fine engraved arms. This Colt Woodsman .22 pistol is one of the Third Series guns that were made until 1977. Heavy barrels in either 4.5 or 6 inch lengths were offered in this variation. The Museum’s staff says: “We think the poised golden rattlesnake near the serial number is the [best] embellishment without putting down in any way the ivory grip panels or gold outline inlays.”

You can see this lovely Colt and countless other fine firearms at the NRA Museum in Fairfax, Virginia. The Museum is open every day from 9:30 am to 5:00 pm, and admission is free.

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April 8th, 2015

Engraved Colt Woodsman — Blued Beauty by J.M. Browning

With today’s plastic-framed Glocks and Keltecs, aesthetics have been sacrificed on the altar of functionality. Not so in the early 20th century — in that period, the best firearm designers created guns that looked as good as they worked. One example is the classic Colt Woodsman. This design came from the legendary John Moses Browning and was later refined by Colt before the pistol’s introduction in 1915. The Colt Woodsman’s frame design evolved over time in three distinct series: Series One 1915–1947, Series Two 1947–1955, and Series Three 1955–1977. Shown below is a stunning Carbonia-blued and engraved Third Series model with ivory grips.

Click Photo to View Larger Image
Accurateshooter.com john moses browning engraved colt woodsmand series three third NRA museum
Photo courtesy NRA Museum

Engraved Colt Woodsman from NRA Museum
In the NRA Museum’s Robert E. Petersen Gallery are many fine engraved arms. This Colt Woodsman .22 pistol is one of the Third Series guns that were made until 1977. Heavy barrels in either 4.5 or 6 inch lengths were offered in this variation. The Museum’s staff says: “We think the poised golden rattlesnake near the serial number is the [best] embellishment without putting down in any way the ivory grip panels or gold outline inlays.”

AccurateShooter NRA Museum Teddy RooseveltYou can see this lovely Colt and countless other fine firearms at the NRA Museum in Fairfax, Virginia. The Museum is open every day from 9:30 am to 5:00 pm, and admission is free.

Now through April 20, 2015, the Museum hosts a Theodore Roosevelt exhibit: “The Trappings of an Icon”. This includes Roosevelt memorabilia on loan from Sagamore Hill National Historic Site.

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November 4th, 2014

Shooting USA TV Features Camp Perry National Matches this Week

“Ready on the Left, Ready on the Right… Commence Watching!” On Wednesday, November 5, 2014, Shooting USA will broadcast coverage of the 2014 National Matches and CMP events at Camp Perry, Ohio. This is a “must-watch” episode for anyone interested in competitive shooting. The National Matches at Camp Perry are the World Series of American shooting sports, attracting the nation’s top pistol and rifle marksmen. Shooting USA’s coverage begins Wednesday on the Outdoor Channel. This week’s episode will also feature the m1903 Springfield, an historic American military weapon.

Shooting USA Television Camp Perry

Shooting USA Wednesday Broadcast Times on the Outdoor Channel:

Eastern Time – 3:30 PM, 9:00 PM, 12:00 M
Central Time – 2:30 PM, 8:00 PM, 11:00 PM
Mountain Time – 1:30 PM, 7:00 PM, 10:00 PM
Pacific Time – 12:30 PM, 6:00 PM, 9:00 PM

History of Camp Perry
The National Matches have been held at Camp Perry since 1907. The range is located along the shores of Lake Erie in northern Ohio near Port Clinton. The site was first acquired in 1906, in response to the need for a larger facility for military training and the NRA’s shooting programs. In 1906 Gen. Ammon B. Crichfield, Adjutant General of Ohio, ordered construction of a new shooting facility on the shores of Lake Erie, 45 miles east of Toledo, Ohio. The original land for Camp Perry was purchased in 1906, and the reservation was named after Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry, the American naval commander who won the Battle of Put-in-Bay during the War of 1812.

NRA National Matches

On August 19, 1907, Cpl. L. B. Jarrett fired the first shot at the new Camp Perry Training Site. And that year, 1907, Camp Perry held its first National Pistol and Rifle Championship events. This location has hosted the annual NRA National Matches ever since. Today, over 4,000 competitors attend the National Matches each year, making it the most popular shooting competition in the western hemisphere.

Federal legislation originally launched the National Matches. In February 1903, an amendment to the War Department Appropriations Bill established the National Board for the Promotion of Rifle Practice (NBPRP). This government advisory board became the predecessor to today’s Corporation for the Promotion of Rifle Practice and Firearms Safety, Inc. that now governs the CMP. The 1903 legislation also established the National Matches, commissioned the National Trophy and provided funding to support the Matches.

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October 27th, 2014

Happy Birthday Teddy!

Today, October 27th, is the birthday of President Theodore (“Teddy”) Roosevelt. An avid explorer, hunter, and firearms enthusiast, Teddy Roosevelt (TR) was a larger-than-life figure who lead this nation as it emerged as a world power.

Theodore Roosevelt James Strock Quote

Theodore Roosevelt James Strock Quote

Theodore Roosevelt — A Great Leader
If you want to learn more about TR, we strongly recommend Theodore Roosevelt on Leadership, a book by noted author and political analyst James Strock. This work captures the vision, commitment, and personal courage that marked Theodore Roosevelt’s career. Theodore Roosevelt was a leader of uncommon strength who, through the sheer force of his extraordinary will, turned America into a modern world power. Thrown headfirst into the presidency by the assassination of his predecessor, he led with courage, character, and vision in the face of overwhelming challenges, whether busting corporate trusts or building the Panama Canal. Roosevelt has been a hero to millions of Americans for over a century.

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July 23rd, 2014

Historic President’s Match at Camp Perry

The President’s Rifle Match is a notable rifle competition that is steeped in history. This match was first held in 1878. The top shooter at the 2014 President’s Rifle Match Final was SGT Augustus Dunfey of Phenix City, Alabama. A member of the USAMU squad, Dunfey posted an Aggregate score of 393-14X. Reigning National High Power Champion Brandon Green, also of the USAMU, finished second with 388-15X. High Junior was Nash Neubauer firing a 383-8X. Interestingly. Neubauer’s 383-8X score was good for 6th place overall, beating 94 other shooters, including many military team members. Great shooting Nash! High Senior was Richard Zolnowsky with 376-14X.

Dunfey USAMU President's Match

CLICK HERE for Results of President’s Match and Other National Trophy Matches.

Origins of the President’s Match
The National Rifle Association’s President’s Match was instituted in 1878, as the American Military Rifle Championship Match. In 1884, the name was changed to the President’s Match for the Military Rifle Championship of the United States. It was fired at Creedmoor, New York until 1891. In 1895, it was reintroduced at Sea Girt, New Jersey. Today, the match is held at Camp Perry, Ohio.

Dunfey USAMU President's MatchThe President’s Match was patterned after an event for British Volunteers called the Queen’s Match. That British competition was started in 1860 by Queen Victoria and the NRA of Great Britain to increase the ability of Britain’s marksmen following the Crimean War.

The tradition of making a letter from the President of the United States the first prize began in 1904 when President Theodore Roosevelt personally wrote a letter of congratulations to the winner, Private Howard Gensch of the New Jersey National Guard.

After a hiatus in the 1930s and 1940s, The President’s Match was reinstated in 1957 at the National Matches as “The President’s Hundred.” The 100 top-scoring competitors in the President’s Match were singled out for special recognition.

CLICK HERE for history of the President’s Match.

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March 4th, 2013

eBook Versions of Classic Hunting and Adventure Titles

The Boone and Crockett Club has digitally re-mastered a series of classic hunting and adventure books. Works from Theodore Roosevelt, William T. Hornaday, Charles Sheldon, Frederick C. Selous and others are being converted to high-quality eBook versions for Kindle, Nook, iPad and other eReaders. “Unlike many of older hunting and adventure books available elsewhere for eReaders, the B&C Classics series has been professionally converted to high-quality, true-digital publications. Many come complete with vintage photos and drawings not found in other editions.

boone & Crockett Club

Two titles are available right now in the new B&C Classics series: African Game Trails and Camp-Fires in the Canadian Rockies. Five more titles are in the works. Each book in the series was authored by a Club member in the late 1800s or early 1900s.

African Game Trails” –by Theodore Roosevelt. This edition includes over 100 photos, drawings and maps from the original publication as well as bonus images not found in other editions. B&C eBook price: $9.99 “Camp-Fires in the Canadian Rockies” –by William T. Hornaday and John M. Phillips. Account of British Columbia horseback adventure with Hornaday and Phillips. Includes rare stereo camera photos. B&C eBook price: $9.99.

Other Titles Planned for Future Release:

  • “Wilderness of the Upper Yukon” –by Charles Sheldon
  • “A Hunter’s Wanderings in Africa” –by Frederick C. Selous
  • “Big Game Shooting in Alaska” by Arthur R. Dugmore
  • “Ranch Life and the Hunting Trail” –by Theodore Roosevelt
  • “In Brightest Africa” by Carl Akeley

How to Purchase
These “digitally-remastered” classic B&C titles are available from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and the Apple’ iBookstore. Or, you can purchase direct from the Boone & Crockett online bookstore. A buyer is entitled to download the purchased publication and view it either on a computer or offline with an eReader compatible device such as a Kindle, Nook, Sony Reader, iPad, or netbook.

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September 18th, 2012

Guns & Ammo Taxes Have Supported Conservation for 75 Years

Pittman Robertson Conservation Excise TaxDo you help conserve wildlands for future generations? Well, if you have ever purchased ammunition or a firearm, you do support conservation directly. This month marks the 75th anniversary of the Wildlife Restoration Act. On September 2, 1937, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act, now called the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration Act, which provides funding for wildlife conservation efforts. Since 1937, hunters and shooters have paid for conservation through Federal Excise taxes. Over $4.2 Billion Dollars have been raised for wildlife conservation and habitat restoration through the 10% excise on handgun purchases and 11% excise tax on Long-gun and Ammo purchases.

Funds from excise taxes on arms and ammunition (plus bows and arrows) are apportioned to States by the Dept. of the Interior to pay up to 75% of the cost of approved projects. Project activities include acquisition and improvement of wildlife habitat, introduction of wildlife into suitable habitat, wildlife surveys, hunter education programs, and construction and operation of public target ranges.

The Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration Act has been the “single-most effective wildlife conservation funding mechanism in U.S. history”. Through their excise tax contributions, hunters and shooters have done more to protect wildlife, dollar for dollar, than have the members of private conservation groups. Nobody likes to pay taxes, but hunters and shooters can be rightfully proud of their role in preserving wildlife habitats and wildlife populations in the United States, over the past 75 years. To learn more about the conservation programs supported by gun excise taxes, visit WSFR75.com.

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May 11th, 2012

Teddy Roosevelt Guns to Be Displayed at NRA National Museum

Story based on report by Lars Dalseide for the NRA Blog
The NRA National Firearms Museum will soon showcase the historic Theodore Roosevelt collection in a major exhibit. One highlight of the upcoming exhibit will be a high-grade 1886 Winchester rifle owned and used by Roosevelt before, during, and after his presidency.

Theodore Roosevelt 1886 Winchester

Teddy Roosevelt loved Winchester lever guns. In his book Hunting Trips of a Ranchman, Roosevelt wrote: “The Winchester stocked and sighted to suit myself is by all odds the best weapon I ever had, and I now use it almost exclusively[.]”

According to Senior Curator Phil Schreier, this Winchester was highly customized and upgraded for its famous owner. Notable custom features include Monte Carlo cheek piece, checkered pistol grip, flat metal buttstock, and deluxe color case-hardening. Given its beauty, one might doubt that President Roosevelt actually hunted with this rifle — it looks too shiny and new. There’s a reason for that — he kept sending it back.

Theodore Roosevelt 1886 Winchester

Records show that Roosevelt’s rifle went back to the Winchester plant on five separate occasions. Each time to be refit and refinished to the President’s specifications. That’s why the rifle remains so pristine more than a century after it was crafted. For more information on this rifle and the Roosevelt Collection, tune in to Curator’s Corner on NRANews.com and Sirius/XM Patriot Satellite Radio.

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July 25th, 2011

Theodore Roosevelt Remembered at Camp Perry

Former President Theodore Roosevelt was the “founding father” of the NRA National Matches*. Teddy Roosevelt believed the world was a dangerous place. To assure peace, Roosevelt believed that America needed to be prepared to fight. At the Opening Ceremony of the 2011 NRA National Championships, Dr. Joseph W. Westphal, Under Secretary of the U.S. Army, echoed the views of Roosevelt, who believed “The first step in the direction of preparation to avert war, if possible, and to be fit for war, if it should come, is to teach men to shoot.”

“Though the world has changed considerably in the last century, it is just as unsettled as it was when President Roosevelt established this competition in 1903,” Dr. Westphal said. Roosevelt, who served as an Army colonel during the Spanish-American War, witnessed firsthand how unprepared U.S. soldiers were victimized in battle. Despite winning the conflict, the U.S. suffered disproportionate casualties due to the lack of firearms training.

In his speech at Camp Perry, Dr. Westphal observed that President Roosevelt was a strong advocate of marksmanship training:

“Reflecting with regret on the casualties the U.S. took in the Spanish-American War, President Roosevelt said: ‘The great body of our citizens shoot less as time goes on. We should encourage rifle practice among schoolboys and indeed among all classes as well as in the military services, by every means of our power. Thus and not otherwise may we be able to assist in preserving peace in the world. The first step in the direction of preparation to avert war, if possible, and to be fit for war, if it should come, is to teach men to shoot.’ “

Westphal Invokes History
at Camp Perry Ceremonies

Westphal cautioned that we should not forget the lessons of the past: “So I bring these old historic notes of long-forgotten battles, not because they are curiosities, but because they remind us of why Americans began gathering here over a century ago. It was because they knew the terrible consequences of not being ready for war. In establishing the National Matches at Camp Perry, they promoted the importance of marksmanship in the nation’s defense.”

“Today the Civilian Marksmanship Program trains some 400 marksmanship instructors a year. In addition, 200,000 to 300,000 young people and adults receive training in marksmanship and firearms safety through clubs and junior ROTC,” Westphal said. “The thousands of competitors who will take part in these matches follow on the heels of millions who have benefited directly … from the marksmanship training and safety programs promoted here.”

*In February 1903, an amendment to the War Department Appropriations Bill established the National Board for the Promotion of Rifle Practice (NBPRP). This government advisory board became the predecessor to today’s Corporation for the Promotion of Rifle Practice and Firearms Safety, Inc. that now governs the Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP). The 1903 legislation also established the National Matches, commissioned the National Trophy and provided funding to support the Matches. This historic legislation grew out of a desire to improve military marksmanship and national defense preparedness. President Theodore Roosevelt, Secretary of War Elihu Root and NRA President General Bird Spencer were among the most important supporters of this act.

Story based on report by Steve Cooper in CMP First Shot Online Magazine.

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