October 6th, 2016

Nikon Offers World’s First Rangefinder with Vibration Reduction

Vibration Reduction Image stabilization Laser Rangefinder Monach VR hunting hunter

It’s about darn time … that somebody offered vibration damping in a laser rangefinder (LRF). This “anti-shake” technology has been available in binoculars for years, but now it’s finally available for a laser rangefinder — thanks to Nikon. Nikon’s new MONARCH 7i VR Laser Rangefinder is the world’s first LRF with automated vibration compensation. Nikon’s VR (Vibration Reduction) technology reduces the effect of external vibrations caused by shaking and hand movements. The system steadies the image seen through the 6X viewfinder, while simultaneously aligning/steadying the irradiated laser beam for faster, more precise ranging.

“Vibrations of the image in the viewfinder caused by hand movement (sinusoidal waves) are reduced to approximately one-fifth (or less) based on Nikon’s measurement standards. With the push of a button you’ve just made the world stand still for a fast, precise distance measurement.”

Vibration Reduction Image stabilization Laser Rangefinder Monach VR hunting hunter

Nikon says its VR technology will “reduce optical vibrations by nearly 80%“. The VR system stabilizes the viewed image AND simultaneously aligns the image with the activated laser beam. This delivers a “rock-solid” view of your target for faster, more precise ranging. Hunters will find that the target mark on the rangefinder remains much more stable, so you can range more quickly and efficiently. Watch this video to see how VR technology works:

Comment: VR technology IS a big deal for the hunter in the field. Bottom line — this anti-shake technology will let hunters range faster and range distant targets more reliably. The difference when ranging small game at long ranges is quite noticeable. Right now Nikon is the only company offering VR technology in rangefinders, but we expect other LRF-makers to follow suit. Surprisingly, the MONARCH 7i VR Laser Rangefinder is quite affordable. MSRP is $399.95.

Instant-On VR Functionality
The VR Function begins immediately when the laser rangefinder is on, meaning there is no extra time spent trying to toggle between settings. Holding down the ranging button allows the user to continuously scan for 8 seconds. A fast measurement is received (in approximately half a second), regardless of the distance, thanks to Nikon’s Hyper Read technology. The MONARCH 7i VR has an effective measurement range of 8-1000 yards and displays measurements in .1-yard increments. In addition, the Nikon’s ID (Incline/Decline) Technology compensates for uphill or downhill shooting angles by providing the true horizontal distance for your ballistics solver.

Vibration Reduction Image stabilization Laser Rangefinder Monach VR hunting hunter

The MONARCH 7i VR represents a major step in hunting technology by helping alleviate the difficulty of keeping the rangefinder steady enough to range distant objects. This issue is partially due to the compact size of most laser rangefinders, which makes it challenging to brace it against a solid object, such as a tree or the edge of a deer stand. The rangefinder’s small size, combined with a strong wind, unbalanced position, physical exertion or just plain-old “buck fever” can make it virtually impossible to hold the target mark of the rangefinder on target and keep it still long enough to get a distance reading. VR changes all that, and we commend Nikon for making this technology available to sportsmen.

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November 30th, 2011

New Nikon EDG Spotting Scopes with Vibration Reduction

Nikon has raised the bar in Spotting Scope technology. It has introduced the first-ever spotters with built-in Vibration Reduction. This may be a significant breakthrough. Image stabilization has revolutionized hand-held photography, and it could definitely improve the practical functioning of spotting scopes. If you have ever used a big, heavy spotting scope, you know that it is easy to induce vibration and shaking — merely with a heavy hand on the focus knob. And when the wind blows, a big scope acts like a sail, so it can wobble and vibrate in gusts. Just a small amount of shake or vibration can make it difficult to see your target, slowing down your target acquisition time considerably.

Nikon Vibration Reduction EDGE spotting scope

Nikon’s new 85mm EDG Fieldscopes are the first spotting scopes on the planet with lens-adjusting image stabilization. The EDGs employ a lens-shift type VR (Vibration Reduction) system that counters vibration and shaking. According to Nikon, the EDG VR system greatly reduces external vibrations caused by wind and the operational vibrations occurring during focusing, panning and tilting. Nikon claims its VR system reduces vibration to 1/8th the level of a conventional spotting scope.

HOW IT WORKS — This system uses two independent Angular Velocity sensors to detect pitching (vertical movement) and yawing (horizontal movement). Both sensors then detect diagonal movements. Upon the detection of movement, the sensors provide instructions to the two Voice Coil Motors (VCM) that command and control the Vibration Reduction-optical system to eliminate the shake or blurring. These sensors can detect movement every 1/1000 second. The system can effectively reduce vibrations by roughly 88% (compared to a conventional spotting scope), providing the equivalent of a shutter speed approximately two stops faster.

Nikon Vibration Reduction EDGE spotting scope

So how much does this new VR technology cost? Hold on to your hat — MSRP for the 85mm EDG VRs (either body style) is a shocking $5,499.95! At least that includes eyepiece and protective case. We can only hope that, as this technology matures, it will be implemented at much lower cost. Consider that $200.00 point-and-shoot cameras now offer image stabilization. Given time, we can expect the vibration reduction systems to go down in price, and to become commonplace in premium spotting scopes.

Available in a straight or angled body, the all-new EDG VR Fieldscopes come standard with a 20-60x Zoom Eyepiece, ED (Low-Dispersion) glass, and multi-coated lenses. The 85mm EDGs feature a five-meter close focus distance and waterproof, fogproof construction. Weighing in at just over 84 ounces (w/o batteries), the straight-body EDG is 14.9″ long, while the angled version is 15.7″ long. Nikon’s VR system takes four AA batteries which provide roughly 17 hours of battery life with alkaline batteries and up to 32 hours with lithium. While the VR function can be manually activated, an auto power-off function helps conserve battery life. Seven optional EDG eyepieces are available. Three tripod mount screw holes permit flexible mounting.

Nikon Vibration Reduction EDGE spotting scope

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