July 29th, 2020

Jeff Quinn, Founder of GunBlast.com, Has Passed

Jeff Quinn Gunblast video channel memoriam died epitaph
Jeff Quinn holds his first-ever firearm, a Stevens Model 95 20ga shotgun he received at age 11.

We are sad to announce that Jeff Quinn, founder of GunBlast.com and pioneer internet gun reviewer, passed away on July 27, 2020. He will be missed. We met Jeff a few times at SHOT Show. We can tell you he was a very genuine, forthright man who truly loved the world of firearms. He was committed, to his dying days, to providing honest, reliable evaluations of guns. Over the years, GunBlast’s videos have received over 64 million views.

Jeff Quinn created GunBlast.com in the year 2000, two full decades ago. At the time, very few folks were making gun videos, and even fewer had the commitment to make it a real business. Guns.com explains how Jeff Quinn, with the help of his brother Boge Quinn, helped revolutionize gun reviewing:

“Jeff Quinn was a ‘salt of the earth’ kind of guy [who] loved God, family, and life. When he decided to pursue gun writing in 1999 as a hobby, few expected him to revolutionize the firearms industry — but that’s exactly what he did.

Tired of reading contrived gun reviews in his favorite gun mags, Quinn asked his more tech-savvy brother Boge, ‘If I could write about the gun, can you put it on the internet thing?’ Boge agreed and Quinn got to work. Jeff started photographing and writing about guns … ‘At first, we just reviewed guns that we already had’, said Boge[.] They put it online on a website they called GunBlast. At the time… the internet was still very young.

[At] their first SHOT Show as GunBlast … they visited manufacturers and asked if they could review their guns. ‘A couple of the gun companies would look at me like there was something wrong with me,’ recalled Quinn. Fortunately, a few companies saw the potential and started sending guns for review. Quinn’s personality and look resonated with the gun crowd. You knew right away that he absolutely loved guns and wanted to pass on this passion to the reader. As a result, GunBlast took off.”

In this video, Jeff Quinn’s brother Boge Quinn talks about Jeff’s life, his character, his genuine love of firearms, and the health issues with which he struggled.

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July 29th, 2020

Reloading Rescue — How to Remove a Case Stuck in a Die

stuck72

Western powders, ramshot, norma, accurate

To err is human… Sooner or later you’ll probably get a case stuck in a die. This “fix-it” article, which originally appeared in the Western Powders Blog, explains how to remove a firmly stuck cartridge case using an RCBS kit. This isn’t rocket science, but you do want to follow the directions carefully, step-by-step. Visit the Western Powders Blog for other helpful Tech Tips.

Curing the Stuck Case Blues

decapstem72Sticking a case in the sizer die is a rite of passage for the beginning handloader. If you haven’t done it yet, that’s great, but it probably will eventually happen. When it does, fixing the problem requires a bit of ingenuity or a nice little kit like the one we got from RCBS.

The first step is to clear the de-capping pin from the flash hole. Just unscrew the de-capping assembly to move it as far as possible from the primer pocket and flash hole (photo at right). Don’t try to pull it all the way out. It won’t come. Just unscrew it and open as much space as possible inside the case.

Place the die upside down in the padded jaws of a vise and clamp it firmly into place. Using the supplied #7 bit, drill through the primer pocket. Be careful not to go too deeply inside the cartridge once the hole has opened up. It is important to be aware that the de-capping pin and expander ball are still in there and can be damaged by the bit.

Drill and Tap the Stuck Case
taping72drilling72

Once the cartridge head has been drilled, a ¼ – 20 is tap is used to cut threads into the pocket. Brass is relatively soft compared to a hardened tap, so no lube is needed for the tapping process. RCBS says that a drill can be used for this step, but it seems like a bit of overkill in a project of this nature. A wrench (photo above right) makes short work of the project.

RCBS supplies a part they call the “Stuck Case Remover Body” for the next step. If you are a do-it-yourselfer and have the bit and tap, this piece is easily replicated by a length of electrical conduit of the proper diameter and some washers. In either case, this tool provides a standoff for the screw that will do the actual pulling.

pulling72fingers72

With an Allen Wrench, Finish the Job
Run the screw through the standoff and into the tapped case head. With a wrench, tighten the screw which hopefully pulls the case free. Once the case is free, clamp the case in a vice and pull it free of the de-capping pin. There is tension here because the sizing ball is oversized to the neck dimension as part of the sizing process. It doesn’t take much force, but be aware there is still this last little hurdle to clear before you get back to loading. Don’t feel bad, everyone does this. Just use more lube next time!

wholekit72unstuck72

Article find by EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.
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July 29th, 2020

Legendary American Service Rifles on Shooting USA TV

Shooting Usa service rifles

This week Shooting USA TV has a great show, well worth watching. This episode features the history of U.S. military service rifles. Starting with the Trapdoor in 1873, and ending with the M14 in the 1960s, this episode traces 90 years of battle rifle development. This history lesson ends right before the general adoption of the M16 5.56x45mm infantry rifle.

In addition to history, today’s show talks about using Tripods in Precision Rifle Competition. PRS and NRL shooters can learn multiple ways to use a tripod for support during stages. These methods are explained by Staff Sergeant Tyler Payne from the USAMU Action Shooting Team.

Shooting USA airs Wednesday 9:00 PM Eastern and Pacific, 8:00 PM Central on Outdoor Channel. You can also watch Shooting USA any time online via Vimeo.com.

History of American Service Rifles
The Trapdoor was the first cartridge-firing service rifle, replacing cap and ball rifles. Then came the evolution to better, faster-cycling service rifles used in two World Wars, Korea, and the early Vietnam era. Those rifles were the Krag Jorgensen, 1903 Springfield, M1 Garand, and M14.

Shooting USA Krag Jorgensen

The Krag Jorgensen Served 1892 to 1907. First Smokeless Cartridge Rifle.
Caliber: 30-40 Krag

Shooting USA 1903 Springfield service rifle

The 1903 Springfield Served as Primary Service Rifle 1903 to 1936.
Cartridge: .30-06 Springfield

Shooting USA Craid Jorgensen

The M1 Garand Served 1936 to 1958. First Semi-Auto Service Rifle.
Cartridge: .30-06 Springfield

Shooting USA M14 Service Rifle

The M14 Served 1959 to 1964. First Select Fire Primary Service Rifle.
Cartridge: 7.62x54mm NATO (.308 Winchester)

Tripod Tips for Precision Rifle Shooters

Shooting usa usamu tripod PRS

This week’s Shooting USA episode has a great USAMU Pro Tips Segment showing how to use a tripod for rifle support. Along with clamping the rifle on the top of the tripod, you can used the deployed legs for support in multiple ways.

SSG Tyler Payne explains: “If you’re presented with a barricade where you can support the front of the gun, the tripod really shines as a rear support. With the front of the gun and the rear of the gun both supported, it’s like shooting off of a bench.”


Shooting USA Garand Presidents 100
Shooting USA is available On Demand via Vimeo.com. Watch a single episode for $0.99, or get a full-month subscription for $3.99 and watch as many shows as you like with limited commercial interruptions.

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