September 7th, 2016

Otis Introduces New Line of Cleaning and Lubricating Products

Otis line cleaners smart CLP Bore cleaning lubricant

Otis Technology, the makers of Ripcord pull-through bore cleaning ropes, has introduced a full line of new products to clean, lubricate, and protect firearms. There are dedicated bore cleaners, all-in-one CLP-type products, plus a variety of lubricants. Notably most of these new Otis products are bio-degradable. See the full line-up of new Otis “Smart Chemicals” at: OtisTec.com/cleansmart.

Otis Smart Chemicals are advanced, American-made chemicals designed to bring next-generation protection to any kind of firearm. Featuring a broad variety of cleaners, lubricants, protectants and CLPs, the Otis Smart Chemical line offers formulas for any kind of shooter from 3-Gun competitors to hunters and tactical professionals to gun collectors.

Otis line cleaners smart CLP Bore cleaning lubricantVersatile and Bio-Degradable
Formulated to the exact specification of Otis engineers and designed with intelligent application in mind, most Otis Smart Chemicals are biodegradable and available in liquid or aerosol form (as well as in grease and CLP wipes). A precision applicator pack is compatible with all liquid formulas to deliver a greater level of precision during the application process. Visit www.otistec.com/cleansmart to explore the full line or purchase Otis Smart Chemicals online.

Permalink Gear Review, New Product 1 Comment »
January 7th, 2016

Case Lube Readers Poll — Spray Lubes Are Number One

Mobil 1 reloading case lube

What kind of case lubricant do you use. If you’re like most hand-loaders, you prefer some kind of thin, spray-on lube. Our friend Gavin Gear of UltimateReloader.com surveyed his readers, with the results displayed in the chart below. Thin spray-type lubes took the top spot, followed by waxy-type lubes.* CLICK HERE to Vote in the Case Lube Poll.

case lube survey poll ultimatereloader.com Gavin Gear Hornady one-shot

Gavin explains: “Over the years, I’ve talked quite a bit about different case lube products and techniques for both rifle and pistol reloading. Depending on your goals, the cartridge being reloaded, and what you have on-hand, your options will typically be honed down to a few ‘best options’. But the more you talk with seasoned reloaders, the more options you’ll discover.”

Mobil 1 reloading case lubeSynthetic Motor Oil for Special Tasks
One new lubrication option Gavin has tried is synthetic motor oil “I’ve started using another product for rifle case lube: synthetic motor oil. In particular, I’ve been using this oil to ‘prime’ rifle sizing dies when starting a loading session. This priming combined with fresh spray lube (Dillon DCL recently) has been a good combination for .223/5.56 and .308/7.62x51mm loading sessions.

I just pour a bit of synthetic motor oil into the quart jug cap, dip my finger into the cap, and apply about one drop to the outside of the case with my fingers. I then dip the end of a Q-Tip into the oil cap (just a drop applied), and roll the end of the Q-Tip between my fingers. The Q-Tip is then ‘rolled’ inside the case mouth to provide lube for the expander ball. I’m wondering how many thousands of applications I could get out of one quart of motor oil!

READ more case lubrication tips at UltimateReloader.com


*This Editor’s own perference follow this ranking. For regular case-sizing with benchrest cases (and close-fitting dies), I use Ballistol aerosol (active ingredient is mineral oil). Not chalky or gummy, Ballistol is very, very slippery. A thin sheen lubricates extremely well yet wipes off easily. For heavy case-forming duties I use Imperial Die Wax.

Clean and Lube
One advantage of Ballistol is that, wiped on a patch, it will remove carbon residue from case necks. That way you can clean and lube your case in one step before running your case into the Full-length sizing dies. Just spray a little on a cotton patch. After cleaning the case-neck flip the patch over and lube the case body.

Permalink Reloading 5 Comments »
February 3rd, 2009

Recommended Lubes for Case Sizing and Neck-Turning

If you’re using a body die or a full-length sizing die, try using Ballistol (in the aerosol can) as a lube. It works GREAT without the tacky or gooey residue left by most case lubes. It will also clean off carbon residues on the neck as you lube the case. Just spray a little on a cotton patch (or your fingertips) and wipe each case before you run it up into the die. If you are using a steel neck bushing, be sure to wipe the neck as well. You can usually do a 6-10 BR-sized cases before you need to re-apply Ballistol on the patch. Ballistol is non-toxic, non-petroleum based, and will not harm your skin. It is very slippery, but can easily be removed with a rag or paper towel. Try it–you may retire your One-Shot. Derived from Pine Oil, Ballistol can also be used to protect wood stocks.

Use Heavier Lube for Case-Forming
Note, for heavy case-forming or necking up case necks, we still recommend a thicker lubricant, such as Imperial die wax. But for normal case sizing, after your neck has been expanded, Ballistol will do the job, and you won’t need to tumble the brass afterwards. All you need is a very thin layer of Ballistol, and this easily wipes off with a paper towel.

Neck-Turning Lubes
For lubing the neck-turning tool mandrel while turning case necks, many folks use a blend of STP® Oil Treatment and Mobil 1 lube. Chuckw2 reports: “Try STP and Mobile 1 Synthetic oil in a 50/50 mixture. Very slick, but it sticks so you will need to tumble your cases after turning.” STP is a very thick lubricant, that flows and clings almost like honey. Jason reports the STP blend comes off easily in an ultra-sound bath, using a bit of detergent. STP is also now available in a convenient 7-ounce tube, so you don’t have to buy a large bottle. Another even cheaper option is assembly lubricant. For turning his case necks, RStreich uses assembly lube from an auto parts store. He notes: “The brand I have is reddish in color and kind of sticky like honey. It’s far better than the Imperial die wax I was using before.”

Permalink Reloading, Tech Tip 3 Comments »
May 21st, 2008

Sources for Ballistol Lube (and Mysteries Revealed)

Regular readers of the Daily Bulletin know we’ve recommended Ballistol as a near-ideal case lube for basic full-length sizing. It’s extremely slick, and goes on very thin when applied with the aerosol version. Unlike many other case lubes, you won’t need to use a solvent or tumble the brass afterwards to remove. All you need is a very thin layer of Ballistol, and this easily wipes off with a paper towel. (For case-forming and neck expansion, we recommend a thicker lube such as Imperial Die Wax or Mobil 1.)

Unfortunately, many folks have told us that they can’t find Ballistol at local shops, or they want to combine it with a reloading supply order to cut down on shipping costs. Here are sources for Ballistol, including Brownell’s and MidwayUSA. For convenience, we recommend the aerosol version, but the liquid version can be diluted and used also.

Brownell’s
1.5 oz. Aerosol $4.43 982-000-001
6.0 oz. Aerosol $6.82 982-000-002

MidwayUSA
1.5 oz. Aerosol $3.99 727130
6.0 oz. Aerosol $6.49 831231

BULK ORDER SOURCES:

Ballistol USA
PACKAGE 1: BALLISTOL-LUBE
Two – 1.5oz. aerosols
Three – 6 oz. aerosols
$ 24.00 + 9.00 s&h = $ 33.00

FireHawktech.com
Basic Aerosol Pack
Two – 1.5 oz. Aerosol Can
One – 6 oz. Aerosol Can
Total $20.95 incl. shipping

Aerosol 5-pak
One – 1.5 oz. Aerosol Can
Four – 6 oz. Aerosol Can
Total $39.95 incl. Shipping

Ballistol Frequently Asked Questions
Q: Is the “Ballistol Lube” with the white label the same as the Ballistol “Sportsman’s Oil” with the green label.

A: Yes. Same product, just different labels. But remember there are both aerosol and liquid versions. The aerosol comes out very thin — like water. The liquid is thick — like motor oil.

Q: The liquid version is more economical by weight, but can I dilute it down?

A: Yes, Ballistol liquid can be diluted with water, up to a 10:1 ratio and it will remain slick. We recommend about a 6:1 ratio for use as a general case cleaner and lubricant — but you should experiment yourself.

Q: Will Ballistol get gummy over time, like other lubricants?

A: Nope. Here’s an interesting story. In 1952, a bottle with Ballistol, with the cap only loosely attached, was found in the attic of a deceased German hunter. The purchase receipt was found proving that the Ballistol had sitting for over 30 years. Yet, it still had the consistency of freshly produced Ballistol.

Q: If Ballistol oil can be diluted with water, does that mean it will promote corrosion?

A: No. Ballistol emulsifies in water. The resulting product will displace H20 like WD40, and then leaves a thin, protective oil. Ballistol is also mildly alkaline (pH between 8.5 and 9.5), so it neutralizes mild acidic residues such as hand sweat or residues from black powder (which are acidic).

Q: What’s Ballistol made from — it smells funny?

A: Ballistol is made from medical grade mineral oil, alkaline salts of oleic acid, several alcohols, Benzyl Acetate and oil from vegetable seeds. The smell comes from medicinal Anethole oil, which is derived from the Anise plant. Ballistol is biodegradable and non-toxic. CLICK HERE for the Material Data Safety Sheet

For more information on Ballistol, contact Ballistol USA, (800) 253 2460, (252) 261 0408 (fax).

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