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October 15th, 2021

New ZEISS LRP S5 First Focal Plane (FFP) Scopes

Zeiss LRP S5 first focal plane ffp scopes hunting MOA MRAD

New Zeiss Scopes Raise the Bar for First Focal Plane Optics
Here is big news for PRS/NRL competitors, and all shooters who favor FFP (First Focal Plane) scopes. ZEISS has released two all-new, state-of-the-art FFP scopes, and they are mighty impressive, with superb glass, and best-in-class elevation travel. The new LRG S5 Series Scopes, the LRP S5 318-50 (3-18x50mm) and LRP S5 525-56 (5-25x56mm) are precise and tough. Choose either Milliradian (MRAD) or Minute-of-Angle (MOA) reticles/click values. Both models boast a 34mm main tube, European-style fast-focus eyepiece, Ballistic Stop elevation turret (with 40.7 MRAD or 140 MOA of total elevation travel), and an external locking windage turret. The LRP S5 318-50 costs $3299.99, while the LRP S5 525-56 sells for $3599.99.

Zeiss LRP S5 first focal plane ffp scopes hunting MOA MRAD

Here is the big news — The SCHOTT glass in these scopes is amazing. We mean unrivaled clarity and sharpness for a tactical scope. The turrets offer great repeatability and precision, and these LRP S5 optics are tough — really tough. Engineered and built in Germany, LRP S5 series scopes are engineered to withstand a 1500 g-force of recoil.

Zeiss LRP S5 first focal plane ffp scopes hunting MOA MRAD


CLICK HERE to Watch All ZEISS LRP S5 Technical Videos

Zeiss LRP S5 first focal plane ffp scopes hunting MOA MRAD

ZEISS FFP Scopes Advanced Features
The ZEISS LRP S5 318-50 and 525-56 scopes are available in four configurations, all with 34mm main tubes. The optical system delivers exceptional image quality and renders the finest of details. The premium optical design utilizes ZEISS Fluoride lens elements, SCHOTT glass and ZEISS’s proprietary T-Star lens coatings for optimum color fidelity, image brightness, exceptional resolution and edge-to-edge sharpness within the entire field-of-view. The scopes deliver 90% light transmission to the eye, clearer visuals, and faster target identification down range. The exterior facing lenses are final coated with ZEISS LotuTec protective lens coating process for anti-fogging and to repel water, dust, dirt, fingerprints and more.

High Performance Optics: Fluoride lens elements, SCHOTT glass, and ZEISS T-Star coatings
Best-In-Class Total Elevation Travel: 40.7 MRAD or 140 MOA total elevation travel value
Highly Repeatable and Tactile Turrets: 0.1 MRAD and .25 MOA precise click adjustment
Daylight Visible Illuminated Reticle: Digitally controlled, diffractive reticle illumination
Compact and Heavy-Duty Riflescope: Able to withstand up to 1,500 g-force of shock testing

The MOA-based turrets are adjustable with .25 MOA click values and offer 30 MOA of travel per rotation. Each click is audible and provides a tactile confirmation for every adjustment. The MRAD turret features a more pronounced click at whole MRAD intervals. The 3-18×50 and 5-25×56 scopes offer best-in-class 140 MOA or 40.7 MRAD total elevation adjustment which enables shooters to engage targets up to 1500 yards and beyond.

“For longer-range shooting, precision is crucial. With our new ZEISS LRP S5 we have decisively expanded our product line to provide an elite riflescope that can dominate at every competition” states Kyle Brown – Director of Marketing and Product for Carl Zeiss SBE, LLC. “With the compact and heavy-duty design of these riflescopes we have validated and proven that they are ready to tackle the toughest shooting competitions and the most difficult hunts”, emphasized Brown.

Zeiss LRP S5 first focal plane ffp scopes hunting MOA MRADIlluminated MOA and MRAD Reticles
Both new ZEISS FFP scopes offer daytime visible illuminated reticles. Two new illuminated reticles — ZF-MOAi and ZF-MRi — provide intuitive aiming solutions. The ZF-MOAi and the ZF-MRi illuminated reticles represent MOA and MRAD smart reticle designs respectively. Each incorporate distinct, clean, and easy-to-understand reference marks along the main horizontal and vertical lines of the reticle. And these reticles offer relevant windage hold-offs in the field-of-view below centerline. Both offer fine line reticle subtensions and floating center dots to serve the demands of precision shooters and long-range hunters alike. At right is the LRP S5 318-50’s MRAD Reticle at 18-power. The MOA reticle also has central illumnination.

ZF-MRi MRAD FFP Reticle Video
ZF-MOAi – MOA FFP Reticle Video

ZEISS FFP Scopes Have Been Tested by Top Tactical Shooters

Zeiss LRP S5 first focal plane ffp scopes hunting MOA MRAD

ZEISS LRP S5 riflescopes have been developed with significant input from top PRS Pro Series competitors. Their comments helped ZEISS developed FFP optics that set new standards for lens quality, elevation travel, and durability. These scopes are not inexpensive ($3299+) but we expect they will be in high demand among top PRS/NRL shooters.

phil cashin masterpiece arms mpaPhil Cashin, PRS Pro Competitor and owner of MasterPiece Arms states: “I think ZEISS has hit a home run with this optic. Excellent turret design, easy to read markings, huge amounts of elevation travel and an outstanding reticle. The ZF-MRi reticle is perfectly designed for PRS/NRL style shooting: floating center dot, 0.2 subtensions and the diffractive illumination provide unique contrast, so the shooter does not get lost in the reticle. Plus the clutter-free tree design makes it easy to spot impacts and misses for follow-up shots.”

Full Overview of LRP S5 525-56 — 7:55 min Video

ZEISS LRP S5 Scopes Also Perform Well for Hunters
While we will soon see these ZEISS LRP S5 scopes on the firing lines at PRS/NRL matches, these superb optics are NOT just for competition. With their exceptional low-light performance and rugged durability, these scopes are also a great choice for hunters. Shown below is the 518-50 model with MOA reticle.

Zeiss LRP S5 first focal plane ffp scopes hunting MOA MRAD
Zeiss LRP S5 first focal plane ffp scopes hunting MOA MRAD

Where to Buy New Zeiss LRP S5 FFP Scopes

These new scope models will be available in November at leading vendors including EuroOptic, MidwayUSA, and Mile High Shooting.

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September 11th, 2021

Do You REALLY Know MilliRadians? Intro to Mils and Mildots

mildot ranging milliradian Milrad

We first ran this article in 2012, and it was very well received. Since then, many Forum members have requested an explanation of MILS and mildots, so we decided to run this feature again…

1 Milliradian (Milrad or ‘Mil’) = 1/1000th of a radian | 1 Milliradian = 0.0573 degrees.

Mildot scope reticleIn this NSSF Video, Ryan Cleckner, a former Sniper Instructor for the 1st Ranger Battalion, defines the term “MilliRadian” (Milrad) and explains how you can use a mildot-type scope to range the distance to your target. It’s pretty simple, once you understand the angular subtension for the reticle stadia dots/lines. Cleckner also explains how you can use the milrad-based reticle markings in your scope for elevation hold-overs and windage hold-offs.

Even if you normally shoot at known distances, the hold-off capability of milrad-reticle scopes can help you shoot more accurately in rapidly-changing wind conditions. And, when you must engage multiple targets quickly, you can use the reticle’s mil markings to move quickly from one target distance to another without having to spin your elevation turrets up and down.

WEB RESOURCES: If you want to learn more about using Milliradians and Mildot scopes, we suggest the excellent Mil-dot.com User Guide. This covers the basics you need to know, with clear illustrations. Also informative is The Truth about Mil Dots by Michael Haugen. Mr. Haugen begins with basic definitions: 360 degrees = 2 x Pi (symbol π) Radians. That means 1 Radian is about 57.3 degrees. 1 Milliradian (Milrad or ‘Mil’) = 1/1000th of a radian. Thus 1 Milliradian = .0573 degrees.

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August 26th, 2021

MIL vs. MOA — Angular Measurements for Optics Explained

Mil MOA reticle ranging PRS tactical minute angle precision rifle series
Visit PrecisionRifleBlog.com for a discussion of MIL vs. MOA.

Many guys getting started in long range shooting are confused about what kind of scope they should buy — specifically whether it should have MIL-based clicks or MOA-based clicks. Before you can make that decision, you need to understand the terminology. This article, with a video by Bryan Litz, explains MILS and MOA so you can choose the right type of scope for your intended application.

This March-FX 5-40x56mm Tactical FFP scope features 0.05 MIL Clicks.
Mil MOA reticle ranging PRS tactical minute angle precision rifle series

You probably know that MOA stands for “Minute of Angle” (or more precisely “minute of arc”), but could you define the terms “Milrad” or “MIL”? In a helpful video, Bryan Litz of Applied Ballitics explains MOA and MILs (short for “milliradians”). Bryan defines those terms and explains how they are used. One MOA is an angular measurement (1/60th of one degree) that subtends 1.047″ at 100 yards. One MIL (i.e. one milliradian) subtends 1/10th meter at 100 meters; that means that 0.1 Mil is one centimeter (1 cm) at 100 meters. Is one angular measurement system better than another? Not necessarily… Bryan explains that Mildot scopes may be handy for ranging, but scopes with MOA-based clicks work just fine for precision work at known distances. Also because one MOA is almost exactly one inch at 100 yards, the MOA system is convenient for expressing a rifle’s accuracy. By common parlance, a “half-MOA” rifle can shoot groups that are 1/2-inch (or smaller) at 100 yards.

What is a “Minute” of Angle?
When talking about angular degrees, a “minute” is simply 1/60th. So a “Minute of Angle” is simply 1/60th of one degree of a central angle, measured either up and down (for elevation) or side to side (for windage). At 100 yards, 1 MOA equals 1.047″ on the target. This is often rounded to one inch for simplicity. Say, for example, you click up 1 MOA (four clicks on a 1/4-MOA scope). That is roughly 1 inch at 100 yards, or roughly 4 inches at 400 yards, since the target area measured by an MOA subtension increases with the distance.

one MOA minute of angle diagram

MIL vs. MOA for Target Ranging
MIL or MOA — which angular measuring system is better for target ranging (and hold-offs)? In a recent article on his PrecisionRifleBlog.com website, Cal Zant tackles that question. Analyzing the pros and cons of each, Zant concludes that both systems work well, provided you have compatible click values on your scope. Zant does note that a 1/4 MOA division is “slightly more precise” than 1/10th mil, but that’s really not a big deal: “Technically, 1/4 MOA clicks provide a little finer adjustments than 1/10 MIL. This difference is very slight… it only equates to 0.1″ difference in adjustments at 100 yards or 1″ at 1,000 yards[.]” Zant adds that, in practical terms, both 1/4-MOA clicks and 1/10th-MIL clicks work well in the field: “Most shooters agree that 1/4 MOA or 1/10 MIL are both right around that sweet spot.”

READ MIL vs. MOA Cal Zant Article.

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June 11th, 2019

New NX8 Scopes from Nightforce with 8X Zoom

Nightforce new NX8 riflescope scope 8X magnification light weight EuroOptic

New Nightforce NX8 Scopes Serve Both Tactical and Hunting Roles
With its new NX8 offerings, Nightforce offers full-featured tactical scopes that are light and compact enough for hunting. Nightforce’s NEW NX8 Scopes bridge the gap between hunting and tactical optics — allowing shooters to get greater performance out of a smaller, lighter package. Nightforce says it has accomplished that without compromising durability, functionality, or optical clarity that has made their scopes so popular.

The two new additions to the NX8 line are the 2.5-20×50 F1 and the 4-32×50 F1 with both magnification options offered in the MOAR and MIL-C Reticles. Nightforce has managed to build a package that combines an impressive zoom range with a compact scope body while still providing tons of travel, close parallax adjustment, and refined First Focal Plane (F1) reticles.

Jason at EuroOptic explains: “These scopes represent a movement that has been brewing towards hybrid use scopes (hunting and target/tactical) and are some of the best executions of that trend thus far. We expect that these additions to the NX8 series will be immensely popular and will spur further development in this category.”

STATUS: EuroOptic expects the new NX8 models to arrive in July. EuroOptic is currently taking pre-orders for all four new NX8 scopes — CLICK links below.

New Nightforce NX8 Riflescopes:

NX8 2.5-20x50mm Scope, Mil-C Reticle – C623

NX8 2.5-20x50mm Scope, MOAR Reticle – C622

NX8 4-32x50mm Scope, Mil-C Reticle – C625

NX8 4-32x50mm Scope, MOAR Reticle – C624

Nightforce new NX8 riflescope scope 8X magnification light weight EuroOptic

The new Nightforce NX8 series combines durability and high optical performance with an 8X zoom range. Compact and light-weight, NX8 scopes offer both MOA and Mil-Radian reticles.

Product Tip from EdLongRange. We welcome reader submissions.
Permalink New Product, Optics 5 Comments »
September 17th, 2018

New First Focal Plane 4-16x50mm ATACR from Nightforce

Nightforce FFP first focal plane atacr scope prs optic new 4-16x50mm

Here’s a new ATACR scope from Nightforce that looks to be a fine choice for PRS and tactical competitors who prefer a medium zoom range. The new ATACR 4-16x50mm F1 features a first focal plane (FFP) design that keeps the reticle size constant relative to the target at all magnification levels. This scope boasts other qualities that made the previously-introduced second focal plane 4-16X ATACR popular — it’s tough, compact, and has a ton of “up”. The scope offers either 110 MOA or 30 Mils of elevation, with Zerostop, in a 33 oz. package with 34mm main tube. There’s an integrated stubby throw-lever for fast zooming.

Nightforce FFP first focal plane atacr scope prs optic new 4-16x50mm

The 4-16x50mm F1 ATACR is available in with ether 0.1 Milrad clicks or 1/4-MOA clicks with reticle hash marks to match the click values. Both optics retail for $2425.00 (street price). That’s pretty expensive for a 4-16X optic, but still over $1000 less than a 3-20x50mm Schmidt & Bender PMII.

Nightforce FFP first focal plane atacr scope prs optic new 4-16x50mm

Both 4-16x50mm F1 ATACR models feature outstanding ED (low-dispersion) glass and digital illumination for low-light use (red or green at user preference) These scopes are quite compact — 13.1 inches overall. Eye relief is ample 3.5 inches (89mm). Included with the scope are custom Tenebraex flip-up lens covers.

Permalink New Product, Optics 1 Comment »
September 2nd, 2018

Huge $200 Rebate on Bushnell Elite Tactical Scopes

Bushnell Tactical Rebate Program $200 savings

With most optics rebate programs, typical savings are fifty bucks — maybe $75 if you’re lucky. Here’s something WAY better — now through the end of October 2018, Bushnell is offering TWO Hundred Dollars ($200) off the price of Bushnell Elite Tactical Riflescopes. That’s great for PRS and tactical shooters — that $200 can pay for your support bags and other essential accessories.

Terms of Bushnell Rebate
Purchase any qualifying Bushnell Elite Tactical Riflescope (excluding red dot) and receive a $200 rebate. Limited to 2 qualifying riflescope purchases. Product must be purchased between 9/1/2018 through 10/31/2018. DEADLINE for mail in or online submission 11/30/2018. Click here to Download FORM.

Here our two of our favorite First Focal Plane (FFP) Bushnell Elite Tactical Scopes. Compact for their magnification ranges, both are good choices for hunters and/or PRS Competitors:

Bushnell Tactical Rebate Program $200 savings

Bushnell Tactical Rebate Program $200 savings

Permalink Hot Deals, Optics, Tactical No Comments »
May 24th, 2017

Schmidt & Bender 5-25×56 PM II 2FP Scope Review

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Schmidt & Bender 5-25×56mm PM II SFP Review
Test conducted by RifleShooter.com
For police and military use, the Schmidt & Bender PM II (Police Marksman) is the gold standard of extreme use rifle optics. Other high end scopes aspire to the PM II’s level of durability, optical clarity, repeatability, and performance. With our assistance, RifleShooter.com recently conducted an in-depth test of Schmidt & Bender’s 5-25×56 PM II, Second Focal Plane (SFP) version. Here are the results…

» READ FULL 5-25x56mm PM II Scope Review (LONGER VERSION)

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

The test scope is a 5-25×56 PM II (SKU: 677-911-995-A8-A2) with a Second Focal Plane (SFP) P4FL2-MOA reticle; double-turn elevation with rotation indicator; single turn windage; 1/4-MOA click values; illuminated reticle; and side adjustable parallax from 10 meters to infinity. This is an impressive beast — a big, sturdy, well-made optic.

Schmidt & Bender scopes have sophisticated features and a wide array of available options. The many options and features of the 5-26x56mm PM II are explained in this Schmidt & Bender video:

Second Focal Plane (SFP) Reticles
The Second Focal Plane (SFP) reticle design works well for long-range target shooters, benchrest shooters, hunters, and law enforcement. Often, SFP reticles are associated with Minute of Angle/MOA-based reticles. For target shooters who like to dial-in the elevation corrections, frequently SFP is the preferred reticle type. Also, these reticles are offered with thinner lines and markings to aid in target shooting, by not covering up as much of the target area, which is absolutely necessary in such cases as F-Class and Benchrest shooting. With a SFP reticle the size/width of the reticle lines stay constant at all magnifications.

Tall Target and Box Tests

Commentary by Rifleshooter.com Editor
To get an idea of how the PM II tracked I wanted to conduct a tall target and box test. I set up a couple of ISPC targets at 100 yards (below).

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

The target on the left is for the tall ladder test, the target at the right is for the box test.

With the scope zeroed* I set up a tall target test at 100 yards. I placed a 1″ orange dot on a pair of targets (above, left). We then used a four foot level to draw a plum line moving up from the dot and fired the three shot group below.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

I dialed 30 MOA of elevation on the scope and fired another group. Measuring the distance between the two groups, would indicate how well the scope is tracking.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Since 1 MOA is 1.047″ at 100 yards, 30 MOA would be 31.41″ (30 x 1.047″ = 31.41″), looking at my tape measure, everything checked out (above).

Next I conducted a quick box test and set up an IPSC target with a orange paster at 100 yards. To do this I first Fired one round with the scope zeroed, then…

Dialed 6 MOA left, fired one round
Dialed 15 MOA up, fired one round
Dialed 6 MOA right, fired one round
Dialed 6 MOA right, fired one round
Dialed 15 MOA down, fired one round
Dialed 6 MOA left and fired one round

After this, you want to see two holes close to each other on the first target, as well as the correct spacing dialed in between each hole, so how did the PM II do?

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Well, it worked like a champ! The rest of my time with the PM II has been equally impressive.

SUMMARY — Our Assessment of the 5-25×56 PM II

Here are our key conclusions from testing the Schmidt & Bender PM II 5-25×56 SFP:

— It’s a lot of scope. The PM II is pretty much the best scope you’ll be able to buy anywhere in the world. There is a reason they are in such widespread Military and Law Enforcement use, it has earned its reputation.

— Great zero stop. The PM II has the easiest-to-adjust turret and zero stop system I have ever used. On the PM II, Schmidt & Bender’s exclusive “Sub Zero Stop” system allows movement below zero. On the test scope it was 1.75 MOA. This is a great feature if you switch ammunition or elevation and need to bump your zero down.

— Tracks well. This was to be expected with its widespread use by military units throughout the world.

— Crisp, precise adjustments. The tactile feel of the knobs is exceptional.

— Crystal clear glass. Great light transmission and reticle.

This Schmidt & Bender catalog page shows reticle options for the 5-25×56 PM II:

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review
Click image to zoom

Turrets and Controls — How They Work

On the right side of the optic, you’ll notice a .250 MOA single-turn windage adjustment knob. On the top you’ll note the .250 MOA elevation adjustments. The tactile feel of each “click” is impressive — crisp and precise. A large parallax knob is located on the left side of the turret. The smaller knob located closer to the eyepiece is the adjustment knob for the illuminated reticle.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Here the view from behind the scope. Note the DT (double turn) elevation turret. At its current setting in the photo above, it is still on the first revolution (.250 MOA below 0) and as adjustments within the first revolution are made, you’d read the white numbers. During the second revolution, the windows in the top of the turret turn yellow, as shown below.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Test Rifle — .300 Win Mag in Accuracy International AICS AX Chassis
For testing and evaluation purposes I mounted the PM II in Spuhr ISMS mount on a custom made .300 Winchester Magnum rifle. Testing was done with handloaded ammo: Sierra’s 195-grain Tipped MatchKings over Norma brass and Hodgdon H4831SC powder.

This is the test rifle I used. It was built primarily with parts from Brownells.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

  • Stiller action
  • Accuracy International AICS AX Chassis
  • Shilen Select Match barrel, #7 1:10″ twist
  • Badger Ordnance FTE brake
  • Spuhr ISMS mount
  • Jewel HVR trigger
  • Aimpoint T1 micro sight
  • Sierra 7 bipod
  • Here is the Schmidt & Bender 5-25x56mm PM II SFP (foreground) alongside three other S&B products:
    5-25×56 PM II FFP (Desert Tan), 12-50×56 PM II, 3-20×50 PM II

    Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

    Better Pricing, Better Warranty, Better Availabilty
    In addition to increased production and availability, Schmidt and Bender has reduced retail pricing on PMII models 14-19% depending on the model. S&B Marketing Director Kyle Brown commented, “S&B improved its warranty in the USA for 2017, and now offers a USA 20-Year Transferable Limited Warranty. We have reduced our pricing to be competitive; and have greatly increased our on-hand inventory levels to supply our customers with complete and on-time deliveries.”

    Schmidt & Bender has made an effort to support the Precision Rifle Series (PRS). Brown said “for 2017 we have made a very hard push to become more active in PRS with our brand and with our products.”.

    To learn more about Schmidt & Bender optics, CLICK HERE.


    * Zeroing Process for PM II: The zero stop and turret settings are controlled by set screws. Zeroing is a breeze. You don’t have to move caps, insert shims, move clutch mechanisms, and so on. Simply loosen the screws, swing the turret back to “0” and you are all set. To establish a 100-yard zero, I hung a target at 50 yards, fired one round, dialed a correction, fired a confirmation shot and moved back to 100 yards. I fired one round at 100, made a correction and was zeroed. That’s it, three rounds, done.

    Permalink - Videos, Gear Review, Optics 8 Comments »