May 29th, 2017

CMP Custom Shop Repairs and Upgrades Vintage Rifles

cmp custom shop USGI rifle repairs

CMP Custom Shop Civilian Marksmanship ProgramThe Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) does more than run matches and sell surplus firearms. The CMP also operates a full-service Custom Shop in Anniston, Alabama that does maintenance, repair, and upgrading of USGI-issue rifles at a reasonable cost.

Since the fall of 2013, the CMP Custom Shop has offered repair, upgrade, gunsmithing and custom services for a wide range of U.S. Military rifles, specifically those issued in early eras. As well as regular repairs and troubleshooting, the CMP Custom Shop can upgrade, accurize, and refinish virtually all the rifle types sold by the CMP.

What Rifles Can the CMP Custom Shop Service?
The CMP Custom Shop will work on the M1 Garand, M1 Carbine, 1903/1903A3 Springfield, 1917 Enfield, and the Krag. The Custom Shop will also service Remington 40X, Mossberg 44, and H&R Model 12 rifles. CMP will NOT work on shotguns, pistols, revolvers, M14/M1A, AR15-style rifles or other commercially-produced modern rifles. For a list of services (with prices) visit the CMP Custom Shop webpage.

cmp custom shop USGI rifle repairs

NOTE: Before you can send a rifle to the CMP Custom Shop you must be a customer on file in the CMP system. Customers must meet the same eligibility requirements as for CMP rifle purchases. Once qualified, you can purchase a rifle from the CMP and have the CMP Custom Shop make modifications to it prior to shipping.

CMP Custom Shop Can Work on USGI Rifles Purchased from Other Sources
The CMP Custom Shop can work on rifles that may have been purchased elsewhere as long as they were made by a USGI contractor. Some examples include: Springfield Armory (not Springfield Inc.), Harrington & Richardson, Winchester, International Harvester, Remington, Rock Island, Eddystone, Inland, Underwood, Rock-Ola, Quality Hardware, National Postal meter, Standard Products, IBM, Irwin-Pederson and Saginaw. NOTE: There are many NON-USGI copies of the M1 Garand, 1903 Springfield and especially the M1 Carbine that CMP will be unable to work on.

CMP Custom Shop Garand 1903 repair

CMP Custom Shop Garand 1903 repairFor more information, call (256) 835-8455, x1113, or send email to customshop [at] thecmp.org. Shipping and Correspondence address for the CMP Custom Shop is:

CMP Custom Shop
1803 Coleman Rd
Anniston, AL 36207

Permalink Gear Review, Gunsmithing No Comments »
May 28th, 2017

The Fixed Power Option — Save Thousands on a Comp Scope

Weaver XR series target scope side focus parallax
The 46x48mm side-parallax Weaver XR (matte black) costs less than $900.00 on Amazon.

With the cost of some high-end, high-magnification zoom scopes climbing well past the $3000-dollar mark, some shooters are considering a return to fixed-power optics. These are still quite popular in the short-range Benchrest game where weight is “mission critical” and the need to view mirage at lower power is not so critical. But now we are seeing some F-Class competitors considering fixed-power scopes — primarily for the increased reliability and huge cost savings. The $2000+ you can save (compared to a $3000+ Zoom) could buy a custom action, trigger, and premium barrel!

Weaver XR series target scope side focus parallax

One scope to consider is Weaver’s latest T-Series 46X target scope with side-focus parallax control. With a street price around $900.00, the new Weaver T-Series XR 46x48mm scope offers a lot of bang for the buck compared to the pricey zoom scopes. Compared to the older T-36, this new 46-power XR scope offers more magnification, more elevation, a larger front objective (48mm vs. 40mm), and a larger 30mm main tube (compared to 1″ for the old T-36). The new XR 46X Weaver also features side-focus parallax control. That’s a big change. You could instantly spot a classic Weaver T-36 by the adjustable front objective with its knurled ring and yardage markings. The T-Series XR 46X (as well as the new XR 24X and XR 36X) have the parallax control on the left side of the main tube (photo below).

Weaver XR series target scope side focus parallaxWe have looked through the new Weaver 46X scope and it is very sharp. Brightness is good — it seems comparable with a Leupold 45x45mm Competition (but that was on a bright, sunny day). Initial tests show the clicks to be tactile and positive, but we haven’t had a chance to do a full “box test” to confirm tracking. Weaver claims the new XR series scopes will focus down to 50 feet, but with the 46X we had some questions about its extreme close-focus capability. If you’re shooting beyond 50 yards, the focus should be fine.

The new T-Series 46X XR is offered with two reticle choices, a fine cross-hair (FCH), or FCH with 1/16th MOA dot. Both reticles are well-suited for benchrest work. You can find the new 46X Weaver for under $900.00. That’s way more than the old T-36, but it undercuts Leupold fixed-power competition scopes by hundreds of dollars.

Weaver XR series target scope side focus parallaxOther Side-Focuc 36X T-Series XR Scopes with Side-Focus and 1″ Tubes
The new 46-power XR scope is the star of the XR line-up. Designed to go head-to-head with Leupold’s 45X Competition scope, the 46X Weaver XR offers a modern 30mm main-tube and large (48mm) front objective. If you don’t need the bigger tube and larger objective, but still want side-focus parallax control, Weaver offers two other new XR scopes — a 36x40mm and a 24x40mm. These both retail for under $630.00.

Older T-Series Weavers for Under $450.00
If you’re on a tight budget and don’t need 46-power magnification and side parallax control, you may want to consider the older 36-power T-series Weavers. These adjustable front-objective Weaver “Tees” enjoy a good reputation for reliability. They’re not a bright as the XR models, but you can now purchase the older T-series scopes with adjustable front objectives for well under $450.00 in both black finish and silver finish. For benchrest shooting at a fixed distance, side-focus is not necessary; adjustable front objectives work just fine. Just set and forget.

Permalink Gear Review, Optics 1 Comment »
May 25th, 2017

Rust Blocker Comparison Test — Video Reveals the Ugly Truth

See Results of Anti-Corrosion Product Test in Video

YouTube Link: http://youtu.be/uOB5eCReAQY

What anti-corrosion products really fight rust effectively? You’ll hear many opinions, but what do actual field tests reveal? One rifle shooter, who posts on YouTube as BlueonGoldZ, wanted to separate myth (and marketing claims) from reality, so he completed his own long-term rust test using metal samples. First he used ordinary tap water spray, and then he did a second, longer-duration test with a salt-spray solution. Nine different products were tested: Break Free CLP, Corrosion-X, Frog Lube, M-Pro 7, Outers, Pro-Shot Zero Friction, Rem Oil, Slip 2000, and Tetra Gun Triple Action CLP.

Rust Corrosion test video

BlueonGoldZ initially examined each product for its “beading” properties with a normal tap water spray. But the main test involved many multiple weeks of exposure after a “dense” salt-water spray. (No rust formed after two weeks tap water exposure, so the test was accelerated with salt-water exposure).

Rust Corrosion test video

The clear winners in the test, as shown by the screen shot above, were Corrosion-X (Best), and Frog-Lube (Second Best). The photo shows the test samples two weeks after being sprayed with salt water. The results are pretty dramatic — you can see with your own eyes what happened. We think this is a very useful bit of real-world research.

Results from Similar Long-Term Salt Exposure Test
Unfortunately, BlueonGoldZ’s test did NOT include Eezox, which we have found to be extremely effective (on a par with Corrosion-X). In another long-term test of corrosion preventatives, the two best rust fighters were Eezox and Corrosion-X in that order. Since that test was completed, Corrosion-X, already an excellent product, has been enhanced. CLICK HERE for Long-Term Salt Exposure Test Report.

Permalink - Videos, Gear Review 6 Comments »
May 24th, 2017

Schmidt & Bender 5-25×56 PM II 2FP Scope Review

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Schmidt & Bender 5-25×56mm PM II SFP Review
Test conducted by RifleShooter.com
For police and military use, the Schmidt & Bender PM II (Police Marksman) is the gold standard of extreme use rifle optics. Other high end scopes aspire to the PM II’s level of durability, optical clarity, repeatability, and performance. With our assistance, RifleShooter.com recently conducted an in-depth test of Schmidt & Bender’s 5-25×56 PM II, Second Focal Plane (SFP) version. Here are the results…

» READ FULL 5-25x56mm PM II Scope Review (LONGER VERSION)

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

The test scope is a 5-25×56 PM II (SKU: 677-911-995-A8-A2) with a Second Focal Plane (SFP) P4FL2-MOA reticle; double-turn elevation with rotation indicator; single turn windage; 1/4-MOA click values; illuminated reticle; and side adjustable parallax from 10 meters to infinity. This is an impressive beast — a big, sturdy, well-made optic.

Schmidt & Bender scopes have sophisticated features and a wide array of available options. The many options and features of the 5-26x56mm PM II are explained in this Schmidt & Bender video:

Second Focal Plane (SFP) Reticles
The Second Focal Plane (SFP) reticle design works well for long-range target shooters, benchrest shooters, hunters, and law enforcement. Often, SFP reticles are associated with Minute of Angle/MOA-based reticles. For target shooters who like to dial-in the elevation corrections, frequently SFP is the preferred reticle type. Also, these reticles are offered with thinner lines and markings to aid in target shooting, by not covering up as much of the target area, which is absolutely necessary in such cases as F-Class and Benchrest shooting. With a SFP reticle the size/width of the reticle lines stay constant at all magnifications.

Tall Target and Box Tests

Commentary by Rifleshooter.com Editor
To get an idea of how the PM II tracked I wanted to conduct a tall target and box test. I set up a couple of ISPC targets at 100 yards (below).

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

The target on the left is for the tall ladder test, the target at the right is for the box test.

With the scope zeroed* I set up a tall target test at 100 yards. I placed a 1″ orange dot on a pair of targets (above, left). We then used a four foot level to draw a plum line moving up from the dot and fired the three shot group below.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

I dialed 30 MOA of elevation on the scope and fired another group. Measuring the distance between the two groups, would indicate how well the scope is tracking.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Since 1 MOA is 1.047″ at 100 yards, 30 MOA would be 31.41″ (30 x 1.047″ = 31.41″), looking at my tape measure, everything checked out (above).

Next I conducted a quick box test and set up an IPSC target with a orange paster at 100 yards. To do this I first Fired one round with the scope zeroed, then…

Dialed 6 MOA left, fired one round
Dialed 15 MOA up, fired one round
Dialed 6 MOA right, fired one round
Dialed 6 MOA right, fired one round
Dialed 15 MOA down, fired one round
Dialed 6 MOA left and fired one round

After this, you want to see two holes close to each other on the first target, as well as the correct spacing dialed in between each hole, so how did the PM II do?

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Well, it worked like a champ! The rest of my time with the PM II has been equally impressive.

SUMMARY — Our Assessment of the 5-25×56 PM II

Here are our key conclusions from testing the Schmidt & Bender PM II 5-25×56 SFP:

— It’s a lot of scope. The PM II is pretty much the best scope you’ll be able to buy anywhere in the world. There is a reason they are in such widespread Military and Law Enforcement use, it has earned its reputation.

— Great zero stop. The PM II has the easiest-to-adjust turret and zero stop system I have ever used. On the PM II, Schmidt & Bender’s exclusive “Sub Zero Stop” system allows movement below zero. On the test scope it was 1.75 MOA. This is a great feature if you switch ammunition or elevation and need to bump your zero down.

— Tracks well. This was to be expected with its widespread use by military units throughout the world.

— Crisp, precise adjustments. The tactile feel of the knobs is exceptional.

— Crystal clear glass. Great light transmission and reticle.

This Schmidt & Bender catalog page shows reticle options for the 5-25×56 PM II:

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review
Click image to zoom

Turrets and Controls — How They Work

On the right side of the optic, you’ll notice a .250 MOA single-turn windage adjustment knob. On the top you’ll note the .250 MOA elevation adjustments. The tactile feel of each “click” is impressive — crisp and precise. A large parallax knob is located on the left side of the turret. The smaller knob located closer to the eyepiece is the adjustment knob for the illuminated reticle.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Here the view from behind the scope. Note the DT (double turn) elevation turret. At its current setting in the photo above, it is still on the first revolution (.250 MOA below 0) and as adjustments within the first revolution are made, you’d read the white numbers. During the second revolution, the windows in the top of the turret turn yellow, as shown below.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Test Rifle — .300 Win Mag in Accuracy International AICS AX Chassis
For testing and evaluation purposes I mounted the PM II in Spuhr ISMS mount on a custom made .300 Winchester Magnum rifle. Testing was done with handloaded ammo: Sierra’s 195-grain Tipped MatchKings over Norma brass and Hodgdon H4831SC powder.

This is the test rifle I used. It was built primarily with parts from Brownells.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

  • Stiller action
  • Accuracy International AICS AX Chassis
  • Shilen Select Match barrel, #7 1:10″ twist
  • Badger Ordnance FTE brake
  • Spuhr ISMS mount
  • Jewel HVR trigger
  • Aimpoint T1 micro sight
  • Sierra 7 bipod
  • Here is the Schmidt & Bender 5-25x56mm PM II SFP (foreground) alongside three other S&B products:
    5-25×56 PM II FFP (Desert Tan), 12-50×56 PM II, 3-20×50 PM II

    Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

    Better Pricing, Better Warranty, Better Availabilty
    In addition to increased production and availability, Schmidt and Bender has reduced retail pricing on PMII models 14-19% depending on the model. S&B Marketing Director Kyle Brown commented, “S&B improved its warranty in the USA for 2017, and now offers a USA 20-Year Transferable Limited Warranty. We have reduced our pricing to be competitive; and have greatly increased our on-hand inventory levels to supply our customers with complete and on-time deliveries.”

    Schmidt & Bender has made an effort to support the Precision Rifle Series (PRS). Brown said “for 2017 we have made a very hard push to become more active in PRS with our brand and with our products.”.

    To learn more about Schmidt & Bender optics, CLICK HERE.


    * Zeroing Process for PM II: The zero stop and turret settings are controlled by set screws. Zeroing is a breeze. You don’t have to move caps, insert shims, move clutch mechanisms, and so on. Simply loosen the screws, swing the turret back to “0” and you are all set. To establish a 100-yard zero, I hung a target at 50 yards, fired one round, dialed a correction, fired a confirmation shot and moved back to 100 yards. I fired one round at 100, made a correction and was zeroed. That’s it, three rounds, done.

    Permalink - Videos, Gear Review, Optics 7 Comments »
    May 23rd, 2017

    Precision Acrylic Loading Blocks from Bullets.com

    Bullets.com Acrylic Loading Blocks Pistol Rifle

    High-quality loading blocks precisely sized for your cartridge types make the reloading process easier. Bullets.com now offers acrylic loading blocks that set new standards for this kind of product. Precision CNC-machined from solid acrylic, these beautiful loading blocks were designed by a member of the U.S. Shooting Team. Dimensions are ultra-precise and these blocks even have a primer recess in each hole so the cases sit perfectly. You can order blocks for a variety of rifle cartridge types: .223 Rem Family, .308 Win Family, .308 Tall (.30-06), RSAUM and WSM Magnum, Magnum Tall, .338 LM Family, .50 BMG. In addition, there are blocks for most popular pistol cartridges: .380/9mm, .38 SPL, .38 Super, .40 SW, .44 Magnum, .45 ACP. These blocks are affordable, starting at just $10.95. The popular .308 Win Family blocks are $11.95.

    Click photo to view full-screen image:
    Bullets.com Acrylic Loading Blocks Pistol Rifle

    Tech Insight — Acrylic Machining Process
    The folks at Bullets.com tell us that machining acrylic is not as easy as it seems. Making precision blocks is a multi-stage process involving special equipment. Solid slabs are first machined flat so they are parallel. Then several custom cutters are used to craft precisely-arranged holes with nice chamfers on each hole as well as the outside edge. Every hole bottom has a milled, secondary primer pocket so the primers don’t contact the bottoms. The see-through blocks are finished to a nice sheen.

    Permalink Gear Review, Reloading No Comments »
    May 17th, 2017

    Budget Co-Axial Rest — The $200 Caldwell (Plus Upgrade)

    fire control rest conversion

    Available for under $200.00 including front bag, the Caldwell Fire Control front rest is a remarkable value. It makes the co-axial, joystick design more affordable than ever. We used the Fire Control front rest when testing our Ultimate Varminter 20 Practical AR. Once we removed some sand from the tri-lobe front bag, the rest worked quite well.

    Get a Fire Control Rest for $197.99
    Precision Reloading is running a sale this week on Caldwell products. Now through May 23rd you can get the Caldwell Fire Control Front Rest for just $197.99. That’s a great deal for guys on a tight budget who want a modern joystick-style front rest. With the conversion described in this article, you can put together a system that works pretty darn well, and is more than adequate for many applications, including prairie-dog hunting (from a bench).

    fire control rest conversion

    Upgrading Fire Control Front Rest with Sinclair Top

    While most Fire Control owners are happy with the product, many have wanted to replace the tri-lobe front bag with a more conventional front bag from Protektor or Edgewood. This isn’t as easy as it looks because the width of the Fire Control top is too narrow for most standard 3″-wide front bags. On a “special order” basis, Protektor has crafted some narrower leather front bags that fit pretty well, but some shooters have decided to “upgrade” the entire front assembly.

    Forum member Doug M. (aka DrJeckyl), has come up with an elegant solution that allows a Sinclair Int’l Benchrest Rest Top to be fitted to the Fire Control Rest. Doug notes: “The Caldwell Fire Control is a nice rest for the money, but it comes up short in the rest top department. The Sinclair RT-3 [or its replacement, the Gen II B/R top] fits perfect with minor modifications.” Shown below are the main components:

    fire control rest conversion

    To adapt the Sinclair RT-3 or Gen II B/R top, Doug merely had to drill a couple holes in the RT-3 baseplate, and adapt a spacer to get the height correct: “The Caldwell factory top has a raised mounting portion so a 1/8″ piece of stock will be needed as a spacer to the flat-bottom RT-3. The spacer needs to be cut to the same length as the movable portion on the rest. And you should plan the mounting accordingly so the left thumbscrew clears the vertical height column at full left position (there is a cutaway in the rest under the thumbscrew that allows for easy access to the screw).” We have labeled the photo with dimensions, but Doug cautions you should measure your own original plate to insure the drill locations are correct for your unit.

    fire control rest conversion

    The completed installation, with the RT-3 installed on the Fire Control rest is shown at the top of this article. Doug says it works very well. To learn more about this conversion, with Doug’s measurments for the hole-spacing and his specs on the fasteners, go to the original thread in our Shooter’s Forum. NOTE: Sinclair no longer sells the RT-3 top, but Sinclair’s $75.99 Gen II B/R top can be converted just as easily. LINK to Fire Control Rest Top Conversion Forum Thread.

    fire control rest conversion

    Permalink Gear Review, Hot Deals 1 Comment »
    May 16th, 2017

    GEAR News: CMP Announcement RE Shooting Jacket Rules

    CMP Civilian Marksmanship Shooting coat jacket monard rules

    The great shooting coat controversy has been quelled — at least for the next few months. The CMP will not be banning any brands of commonly-used jackets for now. On Monday, May 15th, the CMP announced that it would halt “strict enforcement” of shooting jacket rules for the remainder of 2017, until new, clear standards can be adopted. Here is the CMP’s statement:

    Moratorium on Strict Enforcement of Shooting Jacket Rules
    The Civilian Marksmanship Program has declared a moratorium on strict enforcement of rules on design and construction of shooting jackets for 2017 until specific procedures and measurement tools are developed to determine the maximum amount of support coats may provide to competitors.

    “The CMP 2018 Rules will contain further clarifications concerning jacket design and construction specifics going forward,” said Mark Johnson, CMP’s Chief Operating Officer. “The CMP strives to institute rules that promote true marksmanship skill and those that resist the equipment race (gamesmanship) facets of our sport.”

    “The CMP’s matches are being developed to enhance competitor learning and increasing their own personal marksmanship skill set, not who can buy the best gadget for means of additional support or easier access to higher point totals,” Johnson said.

    In 2017, the primary emphasis of the shooting jacket rule, 6.6.1 in the CMP Highpower Rifle and Pistol Competition Rules, 21st Edition – 2017, still applies. The rule states, in part, “Shooting jackets made of flexible material may be worn in CMP Rifle events. Shooting jackets may have shoulder, sling and elbow pads providing those pads are not constructed so as to provide rigid artificial support. Jacket constructions that use back braces (…) or other non-flexible materials are prohibited.”

    For 2018, it is the CMP’s intent to provide a clear and concise definition of “flexibility” as it relates to support materials used in shooting jackets and a simple measurement process capable of passing or failing jackets across the entire spectrum of highpower rifle jackets in the marketplace.”

    Jacket Rules Not Abandoned Completely
    We commend readers to look at the second-to-last paragraph in the CMP statement above. The CMP says Rule 6.6.1 still applies, requiring shooting jackets to be made of “flexible materials” without “rigid, artificial support”. Keep that in mind. While the CMP is halting “strict enforcement” of jacket rules, you still can’t show up with a bionic exo-skeleton.

    Permalink Competition, Gear Review, News No Comments »
    May 15th, 2017

    New Otis Smart Chemicals — Cleaners, Lubricants, Protectants

    Otis Smart Chemicals gun cleaner lubricant review CLP protectant

    Otis has released a new line of advanced, American-made chemicals designed to bring next-generation protection to any kind of firearm. Featuring a broad variety of cleaners, lubricants, protectants and CLPs, the Otis Smart Chemical product line offers formulas for any kind of shooter — from 3-Gun competitors to hunters and tactical professionals to gun collectors.

    Video Covers All Otis Smart Chemicals — Cleaners, Lubricants, Protectants:

    Formulated to the exact specification of Otis engineers and designed with intelligent application in mind, most Otis Smart Chemicals are biodegradable and available in liquid or aerosol form (as well as in grease and CLP wipes). A precision applicator pack is compatible with all liquid formulas to deliver a greater level of precision during the application process. Visit www.otistec.com/cleansmart to explore the full line or buy your Otis Smart Chemicals online.

    For cleaning tasks, Otis offers a specific series of dedicated cleaning products. These combine excellent cleaning capabilities with biodegradable chemistry.

    Otis Smart Chemicals gun cleaner lubricant review CLP protectant

    Otis Smart Chemicals gun cleaner lubricant review CLP protectant

    Permalink Gear Review, New Product No Comments »
    May 14th, 2017

    Build Your Own Shooting Bench Using FREE Plans

    Free shooting bench plansFREE shooting Bench Plans

    Building your own portable shooting bench is a great do-it-yourself project. You can build a sturdy bench for well under $100 in materials. Compare that to some deluxe factory-built benches which may cost $600.00 or more.

    FREE Bench Plans on the Web
    You’ll find a wide assortment of home-built shooting bench designs (both portable and fixed) on the internet. Renovation Headquarters has links to FREE Plans and building instructions for fourteen (14) different shooting benches. There are all-wood shooting bench designs as well as benches that combine a wood top with a metal sub-frame or legs.

    CLICK HERE for Shooting Bench FREE Plans Webpage

    Among Renovation HQ’s fourteen featured shooting benches, here are five designs we liked:

    Larry Willis Shooting Bench

    Sandwiched Plywood top, 1.5″ Galvanized Pipe Legs

    Manuel Ferran’s
    Steel Shooting Bench

    Steel (welded) legs and frame, painted plywood top. Folds flat.

    eHow Permanent All-Wood
    Shooting Bench

    Heavy-duty, very solid and sturdy, but easy to build. Good for right- or left-handed shooters.

    Bill Clarke’s
    Basic Shooting Bench

    Restaurant table Cast Metal Pedestal Base, plywood top.

    Missouri Hillbilly’s
    All-Wood Bench

    3/4″ ACX Plywood with 4×6 Beams and Legs

    Heavy Wood Bench That Converts to Three Sections for Transport
    In addition to the fourteen benches mentioned above, here is an interesting break-down bench design. Call it a “semi-portable” bench. The legs and frame are made from stout 4×4 post segments so the bench is fairly heavy. However, this bench can break down into three (3) sections for easier transport to and from the range. Dado-cut channels assure proper top alignment. This might be a good choice if you plan a multi-day excursion to a location without fixed benches. This three-leg bench design can be made from easy-to-locate materials. Note: The dimensions of this bench are are larger than typical fixed benches to accommodate 50 BMGs and other big rifles. CLICK HERE for more details.

    FREE shooting Bench Plans

    (more…)

    Permalink Gear Review, Tech Tip No Comments »
    May 13th, 2017

    Forster Co-Ax Press — Unique Operation Showcased in Video

    Forster Co-Ax Coax Reloading Press Grafs Grafs.com Sale Co-Axial rockchucker

    In recent years, Forster Co-Ax® presses have been somewhat hard to find, as demand has out-stripped supply. However, right now Grafs.com has Co-Ax presses in stock, at just $299.99 — that’s six percent off the regular price. This sale price includes a set of jaws, and includes ground shipping (in the lower 48), after a single $7.95 (per order) handling fee. If you’ve been hankering for a Co-Ax press, now is definitely a good time to buy.

    If you are not yet familiar with the many unique features of the Forster Co-Ax, we recommend you watch the video embedded below. This shows how the press operates and highlights the design elements which set the Co-Ax apart from every other reloading press on the market.

    Video Shows Special Features of Forster Co-Ax Reloading Press

    Forster Co-Ax Press Video Review
    This is a very thorough review of the Forster Co-Ax done by Rex Roach. This 14-minute video shows the key Co-Ax features, explaining how the floating case-holder jaws work (3:30 time-mark), how the dies are held in place (4:40 time-mark), how spent primers are captured (6:10 time-mark), and how to set the primer seating depth (10:00 time-mark). We’ve used a Co-Ax for years and we still learned a few new things by watching this detailed video. If you are considering purchasing a Co-Ax, definitely watch this video start to finish.

    Forster Co-Ax Coax Reloading Press Grafs Grafs.com Sale Co-Axial rockchucker

    The Co-Ax case-holder features spring-loaded, floating jaws. These jaws have two sets of openings, small and large. This allows the system to adapt to various rim diameters. The jaw plates can simply be reversed to switch from small jaw to large jaw. In the photo above, the Co-Ax is configured with the large jaw openings in the center.

    Photos are screen shots from Forster Co-Ax Review by Rex Roach on YouTube.

    Permalink - Videos, Gear Review, Reloading No Comments »
    May 11th, 2017

    New $600 Competition Primer Seater from Primal Rights

    Primal Rights Competition Primer Seater System Rifleshooter.com gear review

    Seating primers is kind of a “dark art”. Many top shooters prefer to seat “by feel” using a hand tool. Others prefer bench-mounted tools that offer higher work-flow rates — with a good bench tool you can prime more cases in a given amount of time, plus it’s easier on the hands.

    There have been many bench-mounted priming options — Forster has a tool, as does RCBS, and Lee. But there is a new player in the game — Primal Rights of South Dakota. And Primal Rights’ new Competition Primer Seater (CPS) may be the most precise bench priming tool yet offered to the public. It is certainly the most expensive. This patented tool costs $600.00! But the CPS delivers something special — superb, repeatable depth control, along with the ability to prime 1000 cases per hour. For some reloaders, that precision + productivity will justify the high price.

    Primal Rights Competition Primer Seater System Rifleshooter.com gear review

    The Primal Rights CPS is built like a Swiss watch — the machining is beautiful. It also uses some unique internal engineering to achieve a superb “feel” when priming. Unlike some other tools, it is also very easy to adjust — simply turn a wheel to adjust seating depth. You can see this in the photos — the word “Deeper” with the directional arrow.

    Operation of Competition Primer System Shown in Video:

    Key Features of the Primal Rights CPS, as stated by the manufacturer:

    Speed with Precision: Some priming tools are very fast. Others are very precise. The CPS is the only priming tool to combine both features into a single unit. You can achieve seating depths accurate to within a thousandth of an inch, all while priming at a comfortable rate of over 20 cases per minute. At that pace you can easily prime over a thousand cases per hour.

    Precision Primer Seating Depth Control: The CPS has a revolutionary adjustable shell holder system which allows you to raise and lower your case in relation to the priming rod. You can seat the primer deeper or shallower in .001″ increments. The adjustment mechanism has tactile and audible clicks to ensure you stay on your desired seating depth. One click = One thousandth of an inch adjustment.

    Integrated Shuttle Feeding System: The CPS uses a manually-operated shuttle system to slide primers from the primer tube into position over the primer rod. This ensures that any jams or misaligned primers are easily and safely discovered by the operator.

    Check Out Competition Primer Seater Gear Review on Rifleshooter.com
    Our friend Bill at RifleShooter.com has just released a detailed review of Primal Rights’ bench-mounted priming tool. He was very impressed with the Primal Rights CPS, finding that it was fast to use yet very precise, with great feel: “The CPS uses a rotational drive system to seat primers. Unlike the lever systems you’ll normally encounter, this allows you better feel as the primer seats. The CPS is expensive. However, it is a solid tool. Amortize it over the time you’ll be reloading and it’ll be worth every cent. If you load a lot of precision ammunition and have the budget to support it, take a look at the CPS. I found it is a game changer. I wish I had one twenty years ago!” READ REVIEW.

    Primal Rights Competition Primer Seater System Rifleshooter.com gear review

    » Read Competition Primer Seater Review on Rifleshooter.com

    Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Gear Review, Reloading 18 Comments »
    May 10th, 2017

    Sig Kilo 2400 ABS Laser RangeFinder Review

    Sig Kilo 2400 ABS Ballistics Laser Rangefinder Bluetooth

    The new Sig Kilo 2400 ABS RangeFinder raises the bar among compact LRFs on the market. This unit offers class-leading ranging ability, combined with an Applied Ballistics solver, handy mobile App, and even a plug-in windmeter. If you are considering getting a new Laser Rangefinder (LRF), you should definitely consider the new Kilo 2400 ABS. With a $1499.00 price, this unit is not inexpensive. However, you’ll be hard-pressed to find any other compact LRF that offers better performance (or more sophisticated features) for the money. Here are highlights of a field test by Andy Backus of Longrangehunting.com. READ FULL FIELD TEST HERE.

    — Claimed Ranging ability: Deer (1400 Yds), Trees (1800 Yds), Reflective Steel (2000 Yds).
    — Syncs with iOS and Android smartphones via Mobile App (Bluetooth Compatible).
    — Embedded Applied Ballistics Elite calculator with bullet database.
    — Onboard temperature, air pressure, and humidity sensors.
    — Display shows hold-over, wind direction/speed, density altitude, and shot angle.
    — Scan mode refreshes at ultra-fast 4 times per second.
    — Lumatic™ OLED display automatically calibrates brightness to changing light conditions.
    — Lightweight magnesium housing with binoculars-style eyecup and diopter adjustment.

    Sig Kilo 2400 ABS Ballistics Laser Rangefinder Bluetooth

    Sig Kilo 2400 OEM User Manual | Sig Kilo 2400 ABS App User Guide

    Sig Kilo 2400 ABS Field Report

    by Andy Backus, Longrangehunting.com
    The Kilo’s scan mode is outstanding and is an important reason that it outperforms other rangefinders. I can’t think of any reason not to always use it on scan mode. The results are instant. The fact that the Kilo’s laser seems to be perfectly lined up with its reticle is another reason for its outstanding ranging performance. I think the size of the circular reticle and corresponding beam divergence of the laser is just about perfect. Because of the outstanding scan mode, the fact that the beam is smaller than some other rangefinders does not mean that you can’t do a good job of ranging freehand. And the relatively small beam means that the max range outperforms most other rangefinders.

    Cycling through the menu and making changes to the settings on the KILO 2400 rangefinder is fast, simple and intuitive. The options are easy to read and understand.

    One other slight negative I noticed is that it is hard to feel the RANGE button being depressed when wearing gloves. I would prefer a more noticeable click when depressing it.

    Using the Mobile App with Ballistic Solver

    The Sig Kilo 2400 ABS comes complete with a mobile App featuring the Applied Ballistics solver. This allows you to create profiles for various rifles and loads. Once you create the profiles and provide ambient altitude, temperature, and wind values, the Kilo 2400 will give you a ballistics solution via its onboard display. To range a target and get a ballistic solution you simply push the RANGE button. The first number that appears in the rangefinder is line of sight distance followed two seconds later by your elevation holdover and two seconds later by your wind hold (in MOA or MIL). The KILO 2400 will continue to cycle through the three numbers every two seconds for 30 seconds.

    Sig Kilo 2400 ABS Ballistics Laser Rangefinder Bluetooth

    Great Features for Hunter in the Field

    The array of on-board sensors along with the built-in Applied Ballistics solver mean that the KILO 2400 is capable of providing an instant and very accurate ballistic solution including wind hold with the push of a single button out to very long range. As a long range hunter this is exactly what I want.

    The automatic brightness adjustment on the KILO 2400 seems to work flawlessly. No matter the lighting conditions on the day I tested, the KILO’s display was perfectly visible.

    You hold the RANGE button down to take advantage of the KILO 2400’s outstanding scan mode and its precise circular reticle displays at just the right brightness level for the lighting conditions. The first number you see displayed on the KILO 2400 is 637 yards and it climbs as the scan mode follows the buck walking away from you. You let go as he stops at 642 yards and the KILO 2400 instantly tells you to dial your scope turret to 11.2 MOA. It also tells you that for a 10 MPH, 90 degree cross-wind you should hold 2.4 minutes. You estimate the full wind value to be about 5 MPH so you’ll hold 1 1/4 minutes.

    Sig Kilo 2400 ABS Ballistics Laser Rangefinder Bluetooth

    Syncing Features and Remote Laser Activation

    When synced to the KILO 2400 via Bluetooth, the Mobile App displays real-time information from the rangefinder including the line-of-sight range, elevation hold-over, and wind correction. It also displays temperature, pressure, density altitude, energy at target, and velocity at target. You can also enter a specific wind speed on this screen and quickly sync it to the KILO 2400.

    One other cool feature on this screen is the opportunity to remotely fire the rangefinder. I played around with this a little bit when I had the KILO 2400 mounted on a tripod and I was trying to get the absolute farthest range I could. By firing the rangefinder remotely there was absolutely no wiggle from pressing the RANGE button on the rangefinder.

    Complete Kit with Key Accessories

    The Sig Kilo 2400 ABS comes complete with a a nice carry case, tripod mount, and even wind-meter that plugs into your mobile device. You get all this…

    Sig Kilo 2400 ABS Ballistics Laser Rangefinder Bluetooth

    - Padded Ballistic Nylon Case
    – TYR Water Resistant Molle Gear Bag
    – Lanyard (Neck-strap)
    - Wind Meter (plug-in for mobile device)
    – One-Piece Machined Tripod Mount
    – Sig Sauer Tactical Pen/Stylus
    Permalink Gear Review, Hunting/Varminting, Optics 3 Comments »
    May 8th, 2017

    Hot New Benchrest Gear from PMA Tool

    PMA Tool Lenzi Rear Bag SEB front rest top Pat Reagin Weaver 46x48 XR T-Series

    Pat Reagin of PMA Tool took some cool new products to the range this past weekend. Look carefully at the photo above. That’s not a standard bag-holder on the SEB NEO rest, and that stylish black rear bag doesn’t look anything like an Edgewood or Protektor. The rifle is also sporting the new-generation Weaver 46x48mm T-Series XR Side-Focus Scope.

    Lenzi Rear Sand Bag
    Pat tells us: “We are now carrying rear bags made by Italian benchrester Alberto Lenzi. Made in Italy, these Lenzi bags are AWESOME! They are available for short range and one that is slighty taller for long range.” The Lenzi rear bags feature a big, 8″x6″ footprint with a thick, slightly concave base that sits very flat on the bench top. Lenzi bags are very stable with a reassuring “dead” feel on the bench. Guys who have tried this bag really like it. Pat says: “I can’t explain it, but the bag seems to absorb energy/recoil better than other bags — the gun tracks a little better and I get back on target really well.” CLICK HERE for more information: Lenzi Long Range Rear Bag | Lenzi Standard Rear Bag.

    PMA Tool Lenzi Rear Bag SEB front rest top Pat Reagin Weaver 46x48 XR T-Series

    – Black leather with Cordura at stock contact points with blue stitching.
    – 1/2″ flat between medium ears.
    – Heavy 8″x6″ base with built-in “donut”.
    – Weight about 15.5 lbs filled with heavy sand in bottom & white sand in ears.

    Lenzi Replacement Top for SEB NEO Front Rest
    A common complaint about the SEB NEO rest is the rest top, specifically the three-piece bag. This rest top made by Alberto Lenzi (an Italian benchrest shooter) addresses the issue by replacing the entire rest top. The rest top features a more conventional design and includes a traditional style front bag that conforms to IBS and NBRSA rules.

    PMA Tool Lenzi Rear Bag SEB front rest top Pat Reagin Weaver 46x48 XR T-Series

    The Lenzi Top with Super-Slick Bag is $269.95, while the bag alone is $79.95. You can also get the Lenzi NEO Replacement Top with an Edgewood bag for $275.95. Finally there is a new Lenzi Cordura style bag that fits this system — you can special request that.

    Weaver 46x48mm T-Series XR Benchrest Scope
    Weaver’s new 46-power T-Series XR scope features a 30mm main tube with side parallax adjustment. Clicks are 1/8 MOA, with 44 MOA windage and elevation travel. Pat Reagin reports: “It’s clear enough. The clicks are a little mushy, but positive. Eye relief is great.”

    PMA Tool Lenzi Rear Bag SEB front rest top Pat Reagin Weaver 46x48 XR T-Series

    Available reticles are Fine Crosshair (FCH) and 1/16 MOA Target Dot. Current “street price” is around $900. Amazon currently has the Target Dot Version for $898.99 with free shipping.

    Permalink Competition, Gear Review, New Product 1 Comment »
    May 7th, 2017

    Replacement Trigger Springs Available for Major Brands

    Ernie the Gunsmith remington tikka cz browning trigger springs

    Ernie The Gunsmith Replacement Trigger Springs
    Ernie Paull from California was an active competition shooter for many years. However, his eyesight has declined so he has turned his attention to providing components for shooters and gunsmiths. Through his Ernie the Gunsmith website, Paull sells a variety of useful products including gun trigger springs, pillar-bedding kits, Accu-Risers, and pillar installation tools. This Bulletin post focuses on Ernie’s trigger springs. Ernie offers springs for a wide variety of rifles: Browning (A-Bolt, A-Bolt 22), CZ (m452), Kimber, Remington (XR100, XCR, 7, 700, 722, 788, 7600 and more), Ruger (77, 77-22, LC6), Tikka (T-3), Weatherby (MK-V), and Winchester (M-70).

    Springs start at just $6.95. Ernie also sells springs for the Rem-compatible Shilen Benchrest trigger, as well as Rem 700 ejector springs and trigger alignment springs. For Rem 700 rifles, Paull makes a spring that fits all Remington M-7 and M-700 triggers including the early X Mark-PRO triggers. Ernie says: “On average, installation of his Model-700 spring will reduce factory triggers’ weight of pull by 1½ to 2½ lbs with no other changes. The exact amount of creep, over-travel, and weight of pull are dependent upon the type and amount of tuning accomplished by your gunsmith.”

    While there is more to a good trigger job (in most cases) than just a spring swap, you need to have the proper rate spring when adjusting trigger pull weight downwards. NOTE: For safety reasons, we recommend you consult a competent gunsmith before modifying factory triggers.

    Why Replacement Springs are Better than Tweaked/Modified Springs
    Ernie has observed that some gunsmiths try to lighten trigger pulls by modifying factory springs in questionable ways: “I have worked with gunsmiths in the past who, when the subject turned to trigger springs, preferred to clip them, grind them, heat them, bend them, smash them, or simply back out the weight of pull screw until there was no or almost no pressure on the spring. With any of these methods, you get a spring whose rate is rapidly rising as the trigger is pulled. As the trigger is released, the spring rate rapidly decreases as it approaches full or near-full extension. A more uniform weight of pull will be achieved when the trigger spring is compressed within its normal working range throughout the entire movement of the trigger. In the long run, the benefits of saved time, plus more uniform and reliable results, will more than offset the cost of these [replacement] springs. If you want a lighter trigger pull, you need a lighter trigger spring.”

    Permalink Gear Review, Gunsmithing 1 Comment »
    May 6th, 2017

    Optics Review: IOR Valdada 36x42mm Benchrest Scope

    IOR Valdada Benchrest 36X 36x42mm optic scope James Mock

    Note: In this review, James Mock talks about his experience with an IOR Valdada 36X fixed power scope. A newer, slightly-modified version of this optic is now available. The current IOR Valdada 36x42mm scope is just like the scope James reviews, except that the rear ocular lens is slightly smaller and the new version is about three ounces (3 oz.) lighter. All of Mock’s observations and comments otherwise apply to the current production model.

    IOR Valdada 36x42mm Benchrest Riflescope

    Review by James Mock
    For the past eight years I have been using the IOR Valdada 36x42mm Benchrest scope on my 6mm Dasher/6PPC switch barrel rifle. It has performed flawlessly during this time. Perhaps this may be the best 600-yard fixed power scope in existence. With the 1 MOA reticle one can judge the distance from sighter to point of aim very accurately. With this knowledge, he/she can either adjust the reticle to the point of aim or may use the hash marks for a definite aiming point. The 1/8th-MOA adjustments are positive and repeatable. There is a provision to set a “zero” after adjustments.

    The lens in this scope may be its outstanding feature. The glass comes from Schott Glass Werkes of Germany, and in my opinion it is as good as one can buy. Another great feature is the spring that is set against the erector tube (this is similar to the system used by the Nightforce BR model). The photo below shows the housing containing that spring.

    IOR Valdada Benchrest 36X 36x42mm optic scope James Mock

    Reticle Options — Fine Cross-Hair or MOA with Hash Marks
    The IOR Valdada 36x42mm scope is offered with a fine cross-hair for those not wanting the MOA reticle. My choice is the MOA reticle with 1/8th-minute dot in the center.

    Tested in Competition — This Scope’s a Winner
    My first success using this scope was at the NBRSA Nationals at Desoto, Kansas in 2010. I won the 200-Yard Sporter Agg with a .1727. The scope performed flawlessly and I was lucky enough to pull the trigger at the right time. The following year I finished second behind Jeff Thompson III in the Sporter 200 at the NBRSA Nationals at Midland, Texas. Hall of Fame shooter Don Powell commented that my shooting had really improved since I switched to the Valdada. This scope is rock solid and it surely didn’t hurt my shooting.

    IOR Valdada Benchrest 36X 36x42mm optic scope James Mock

    I have not shot much short range Benchrest in the last few years, but I still use the Valdada in 300- and 600-Yard matches quite often. Its adjustments are crisp and accurate. The adjustments move the reticle 0.125 inches at 100 yards and therefore 0.75 inches at 600. Using the MOA reticle and the precise adjustments, one can determine the number of clicks needed by using the reticle to see how far off of the aiming point one is on the sighting gongs. If a person wants to “hold off” rather than adjust the scope, he/she can do so by using the hash marks for a definite aiming point.

    Updates to IOR 36x42mm Scope — Slimmer and Trimmer
    Since I got my IOR Valdada 36x42mm scope, there have been some changes made. My scope weighs about 25 ounces but the new one is about 3 ounces lighter. The folks at IOR (Valdada) got input from Bart Sauter and made the ocular (eyepiece) lens smaller and the scope lighter. Bart is now a distributor for Valdada and many in the Benchrest community are now using this fine scope. Billy Stevens won the Super Shoot and qualified for the World Team using the Valdada. If you are interested, please contact Val Leautu in Littleton, CO at 303-979-4578 or Bart Sauter at 270-879-4279.

    Permalink Gear Review, Optics 1 Comment »
    May 4th, 2017

    Get Most Popular Ballistics App for iOS at Half Price

    Ballistic AE Moble App Ballistics Program solver JBM iphone, iPod, iPad

    Ballistic AE Moble App Ballistics Program solver JBM iphone, iPod, iPadNeed a top-notch Ballistics App for your iPhone, iPad, or iPod? Start with Ballistic AE, the number 1 (i.e. most installed) App for iOS systems. Ballistics AE (Advanced Edition) is the most popular iOS ballistics program for many good reasons. Full-featured and easy to use, Ballistics AE has been refined over many years, and it supplies rock-solid solutions derived from JBM Ballistics solver (created by James B. Millard). Unlike some other Apps, Ballistics AE is STABLE on iPhones (with various OS levels). What’s cool is that Ballistics AE is now on sale for $14.99, 50% off the regular $29.99 price.

    We’ve used the Ballistic AE program on an iPhone 5S, iPhone 6, and iPad, and it performed well. Here are some of the features we liked:

    • 1. Mirrors output from online version of JBM Ballistics we often use for initial calculations.
    • 2. Controls are simple to use and (mostly) intuitive.
    • 3. Handy comparison feature lets you compare ballistics for different projectiles side by side.
    • 4. Advanced Wind Kit allows you to account for complex wind situations.
    • 5. Projectile and BC Database is very comprehensive.
    • 6. Software is regularly updated to match Apple OS changes.

    Ballistic-AE for iPhone, iPad, iPod, $14.99 (Sale) | Ballistic for iPad, $14.99 (Sale)

    Ballistic AE Moble App Ballistics Program solver JBM iphone, iPod, iPad

    Comprehensive Projectile Info and BCs
    Ballistics AE has very complete data libraries. The program includes 5,000 projectiles, factory loads, military loads, and performance data points from leading manufacturers, military testing, and performance testing.

    Ballistic Coefficient libraries include the latest commercial BC data, plus Applied Ballistics’ (Bryan Litz) custom G7 BCs, plus G7 military coefficients from Aberdeen Proving Grounds.

    Ballistic AE Moble App Ballistics Program solver JBM iphone, iPod, iPad

    These Videos Explain How to Set Up and Use Ballistic AE:

    Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Gear Review, Hot Deals 1 Comment »
    May 2nd, 2017

    Supersized BAT Sighted at Bruno Shooters Supply

    BAT 50 BMG Action

    BAT .50 BMG Model EX– Now That’s an Action!, by GAS
    A while back, I stopped into Bruno Shooters Supply for a jug of powder and looked into the display case where the new actions are kept. Amid the usual array of BAT Machine, Kelbly and other actions, there was something unlike any action I’d seen before — all I can call it is the BIG BAT (It’s officially the BAT Model EX 2.5). I wasn’t too surprised at the weight (a beefy 13.7 lbs.), but until you lift it it’s hard to appreciate how solid, chunky, hefty, massive (pick your favorite adjective) this thing really is. The action is a 2.5″-diameter, 12″-long BAT for the .50 BMG cartridge. It is simply the biggest, slickest custom action on the planet. In order to give you some sense of scale, I photographed the action alongside a conventional BAT action for short-range Benchrest shooting and I put a .220 Russian case and a .30-06 case into the picture. I’ve handled and fired other .50 BMG actions/rifles before, but this BAT puts them all to shame, as far as fit and finish go.

    BAT 50 BMG Action

    The action is actually quite conventional in design and execution. The bolt is fluted and has two front lugs with a conventional, although super-sized, firing pin assembly. Any Remington-style trigger will mount by way of a normal trigger hanger, allowing for simplified maintenance or replacement in the field. The loading port is 5.5″ long and the barrel threads are 1.5″ x 16 tpi — nothing about this beast is small! There is a conventional rocker-type bolt release on the left side of the receiver body and a recoil lug is built into the bottom of the receiver. In reality, the action is very similar to any other BAT except for the size and it adheres to all of BAT’s high standards for quality of design, manufacture, fit, finish and just plain good looks. Slide that bolt back and it feels as tight as a small Benchrest action!

    BAT 50 BMG Action

    Given the BIG BAT’s $3,125.00 sticker price (before options), not many of us will ever have the opportunity to own or shoot one of these beauties (I certainly won’t). However, it is nice to know they exist and can be bought and enjoyed in many places. CLICK HERE for BAT EX configuration options.

    Permalink Gear Review, New Product 4 Comments »
    May 1st, 2017

    Exotic Wood F-Open Rig for the F-Class World Championships

    Speedy Gonzalez Cerus rifleworks F-Open rifle custom Borden Action

    Gunsmith Thomas “Speedy” Gonzalez recently completed a stunning new F-Open rig for a customer competing at the 2017 F-Class World Championships held at the Connaught Ranges in Ottawa, Canada.

    The special laminated fancy wood stock was crafted by Will McCloskey of Cerus Rifleworks. Cerus mills its stocks with a super-precise, computer-controlled CNC machine. This provides ultra-exact dimensions/geometry for superior tracking. This stock features carbon upgrades — a carbon fiber bedding block and carbon fiber forearm tunnel. Speedy tells us: “The Borden action is conventionally bedded, then glued-in as per our benchrest rifles in order for the stock and barreled action to function as one unit. This feature also eliminates the possiblity of moisture entering into the receiver’s bedding area in a rain or high moisture event.”

    The stock is made from multiple layers of exotic and fancy woods. On the outside is Bocote, a super-dense (extra heavy) exotic from Central America. Next comes Birds-eye Maple, while the core (centerline) layer is Wenge wood. Strengthening the laminate are carbon fiber stringers. A stock like this can be purchased for $799.00 plus $100 for the exotic wood upgrades.

    Speedy Gonzalez Cerus rifleworks F-Open rifle custom Borden Action

    Speedy F-Open Rifle Specifications:

    Cerus Rifleworks stock with R.A.D.
    Borden Accuracy BRMXD action
    Flavio Farè trigger
    Brux barrel with Erik Cortina Tuner
    Nightforce Competition scope
    SEB Mini Coaxial front Rest with F-Class Feet


    Speedy Gonzalez Cerus rifleworks F-Open rifle custom Borden Action
    The handsome, CNC-milled laminated Cerus stock features a R.A.D. Recoil Reduction System.

    Permalink Competition, Gear Review 11 Comments »
    April 30th, 2017

    Ruger Offers Integrally Suppressed Barrel for 10/22 Rifles

    Integrally suppressed barrel .22 LR rimfire 10/22 takedown ISB Silent SR

    Even seen an integrally suppressed rifle? Ruger offers this technology with its new Silent-SR ISB, a multi-baffle integrally suppressed barrel (ISB) for Ruger 10/22 takedown models. This system reduces sound levels to an average of 113.2 dB with standard velocity ammunition. That’s very impressive — consider that an unsuppressed .22 LR firearm can produce noise levels as high as 140 dB with standard velocity ammunition. That’s well above the threshold where irreversible hearing damage begins. (Source: NC Silencers).

    Even if you are not interested in a suppressed rimfire rifle (or live in a state where suppressors are forbidden) we think you’ll be interested in Ruger’s technology. The Silent-SR employs a long, multi-element “baffle stack” that can be easily removed for cleaning.

    Integrally suppressed barrel .22 LR rimfire 10/22 takedown ISB Silent SR

    Watch Integrally Suppressed Barrel in Action. CLICK HERE to View Video on Ruger Site. Scroll to bottom of Ruger page after jump!
    Integrally suppressed barrel .22 LR rimfire 10/22 takedown ISB Silent SR

    Here’s what Ruger says about its new ISB (Integrally Suppressed Barrel) for the 10/22 Take-down:

    The Silent-SR ISB quickly and easily assembles to any Ruger 10/22 Takedown or 22 Charger Takedown, and features an induction-hardened breech with cold hammer-forged barrel that provide easy takedown and accurate return-to-zero.

    Reducing sound pressure levels of .22 LR to an average of 113.2 dB with standard velocity ammunition, a 10/22 Takedown rifle equipped with the Silent-SR ISB is as quiet as a bolt-action rifle with a thread-on silencer. The relatively long barrel of the Silent-SR ISB (compared to other integral suppressors) means the bullet generates energy near that of a 16″ gun for consistent, accurate and effective performance on target. The pushed-cone baffle geometry has been stretched to utilize the volume under the barrel maximizing suppression of the gunshot without disturbing the travel of the bullet.

    Integrally suppressed barrel .22 LR rimfire 10/22 takedown ISB Silent SR

    Disassembly for cleaning is as simple as separating the barrel from your firearm and loosening the Silent-SR ISB’s single assembly screw using the included 5/32″ hex key tool. Once loose, pull the screw to remove all six 17-4 stainless steel baffles, spacer and front cap free of the sleeve for cleaning. The sealed baffles keep the fouling away from the serialized sleeve, yet easily come apart even after thousands of rounds. Finished with Cerakote, the Silent-SR ISB is engineered and built for a lifetime of hard use without clogged ports, seized components or loss of suppression that often plague other integrally suppressed rimfire barrels.

    Permalink Gear Review, Gunsmithing, New Product 3 Comments »
    April 26th, 2017

    Ultimate Large Rifle Primer Shoot-Out — 16 Types Tested

    Target Shooter Magazine Laurie Holland Primer Comparison Test Magnetospeed
    Click Photo to read full test results in Target Shooter Magazine.

    Mother of All LR Primer Tests
    If you shoot a .308 Win, or any cartridge that uses a Large Rifle (LR) primer, you should read an important article by Laurie Holland in Target Shooter Magazine. Holland, a talented shooter from the UK, tested no less than sixteen (16) different large primer types using a custom F-TR target rifle shot from the bench. Laurie loaded .308 Win ammo* with 16 LR primer varieties and then tested for average velocity, ES/SD, and group size. This may be the most comprehensive and thorough LR primer test ever done. Here are the primer types tested:

    1. CBC Magtech 9½
    2. CCI 200 LR
    3. CCI BR2 Match
    4. CCI 250 Magnum
    5. Federal 210
    6. Federal 210M Match
    7. Federal 215M Magnum Match
    8. Fiocchi Large Rifle
    9. Kynoch Large Rifle
    10. Murom KVB-7 (PMC LR)
    11. Norma Superflash LR
    12. PMC LR Magnum
    13. Remington 9½ LR
    14. Remington 9½ M Magnum
    15. Sellier & Bellot LR
    16. Winchester WLR

    LINK: READ Large Rifle Primer Test Complete (16 Primer Types)

    Target Shooter Magazine Laurie Holland Primer Comparison Test Magnetospeed
    Test Rig: Osprey Rifles-built F-TR rifle with Savage PTA action, 32″ Bartlein 1:12″-twist ‘Heavy Palma’ barrel, and Dolphin Gun Company modular stock with an F-Open/Benchrest fore-end.

    Some of Laurie’s results may surprise you. For example, would you guess that Sellier & Bellot primers had the lowest ES, by a significant margin? And get this, among ALL the primers tested, Rem 9½M Magnum primers produced the lowest velocity, while Rem 9½ LR (non-magnum) primers yielded the highest velocity. (The total velocity spread for all primers was 35 fps). That’s counter-intuitive and it’s odd that Rems were at opposite ends of the speed spectrum among ALL primers tested.

    “The rationale for doing side-by-side tests is to see what effect primer choice has on ballistics, i.e. average velocities and MV consistency. There are a great many views on the subject, a few based on tests (including primer flame photography) but most apparently hearsay.” — Laurie Holland

    Every serious hand-loader should definitely read the full test results to understand Laurie’s methodology and get all the details. This is an important test, with significant findings. But if you can’t spare the time right now, here are some highlights below:

    Primer with Lowest Velocity: Remington 9½ M Magnum (2780 fps)
    Primer with Highest Velocity: Remington 9½ LR (2815 fps)
    Primer with Lowest ES/SD: Sellier & Bellot LR (12/3.1 fps)
    Primer with Highest ES/SD: Remington 9½ M Magnum (47/14.0 fps)
    Primer with Smallest Group Size: Remington 9½ LR (0.43″ average, three 5-shot groups)
    Primer with Biggest Group Size: CBC Magtech 9½ (0.7″ average, three 5-shot groups)

    Editor’s Comment: Laurie shot three, 5-shot groups at 100 yards with each primer type. The average group size for the top six primers varied by only 0.10″ (0.43″ to 0.53″), so one can’t conclude that one type is much better than another. Total group size variance (from best to worst) was 0.27″.

    Target Shooter Magazine Laurie Holland Primer Comparison Test Magnetospeed

    “The biggest surprise to me … came from an elderly (at least 10 years) lot of Czech Sellier & Bellot standard caps with an ES of 12 and SD of 3.1 fps, way below those of the nearest competitor. By contrast to the Fiocchis, they were an almost slack fit in the cases and this may have contributed to their consistent performance.” — Laurie Holland

    NOTE: Values in chart are based on 15-Shot strings. The ES/SD numbers will therefore be higher than is typical with five-shot strings.

    All ES/SD Values from 15-Shot Strings

    Target Shooter Magazine Laurie Holland Primer Comparison Test Magnetospeed

    Testing 16 primer types was a huge task — we commend Laurie for his hard work and thoroughness. This extensive test is an important contribution to the “knowledge base” of precision shooting. Laurie’s findings will doubtless influence many hand-loaders who hope to produce more consistent ammunition, or achieve better accuracy. Credit should also be given to Target Shooter Magazine for publishing the results. Well done gentlemen…


    *Reloading method for Test Ammo: “Test batches consisted of 16 or 17 rounds for each primer, charges thrown by an RCBS ChargeMaster and checked on lab-quality electronic scales, adjusted if necessary to within ± 0.04gn, so any charge weight variation would be under 0.1 grain which equates here to 5 fps.”
    Permalink - Articles, Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Gear Review 11 Comments »