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March 8th, 2023

Measure Pull Weight with Lyman Electronic Trigger Pull Gauge

lyman digital electronic adjustable trigger pull weight gauge

We like Lyman’s Electronic Digital Trigger Pull Gauge, which is faster and more precise than the previous model. The latest Lyman Pull Gauge measures trigger pull weights from 1 ounce to 12 pounds with resolution of 0.1 ounces (2.8 grams). It features an adjustable, 4-position rod which retracts into the gauge body. We think that anyone running match triggers below 2.5 pounds pull weight should have a gauge like this. Among the pull gauges on the market, we think the Lyman unit offers great performance for the price. This gauge has a $69.95 MSRP, but it’s now $54.99 at Midsouth and $59.99 on Amazon.

Features: More Precise Strain Gauge | Improved Grip Shape | Adjustable Rod Lengths

Lyman’s Electronic Digital Trigger Pull Gauge is designed to be the fastest and most accurate trigger pull gauge available. State-of-the-art strain gauge technology allows for repeatable accuracy of 1/10 ounce (2.8 grams). The gauge features a large, easy-to-read LCD display and you can switch from ounces to grams with the push of a button. The gauge can also deliver a pull weight average of the last 10 readings. That’s very helpful, particularly when working with factory triggers that may not be very consistent.

The Lyman Trigger Pull Gauge features a solid, collapsible rod with four locking positions. Being able to adjust length makes it easier to use the gauge with a wide variety of firearms — pistols, rifles, and shotguns. The locking feature prevents the rod from flexing when applying pressure to the trigger. When not in use, the rod conveniently collapses into the gauge body, making the whole unit more compact. The new Trigger Pull Gauge comes in an internally-padded plastic case that can be easily stored in a drawer or on your work bench.

lyman digital electronic adjustable trigger pull weight gauge

Permalink Gear Review, Tech Tip 1 Comment »
March 6th, 2023

Why You Should Own a Suppressor — 18 Good Reasons

suppressor silencer true pearce gunsamerica digest hearing protection
Read full story in GunsAmerica Digest for all 18 reasons to own a suppressor.

Do you own a suppressor yet? If you live in a state where silencers are allowed, there are many good reasons to get a modern suppressor. The process for acquisition has been streamlined. Vendors such as SilencerCo can now handle most of the legal paperwork required. And the choice of suppressors is greater than ever before.

Along with basic noise reduction, what are the key reasons to get a suppressor? There are actually many. True Pearce, Editor of the GunsAmerica Digest, has written an excellent article about the benefits of suppressors: Why a Silencer Might Prevent Dementia & 17 Other Reasons You Need a Suppressor. Here are FIVE of the 18 reasons outlined in the article. We recommend you read the full story to access ALL 18 reasons. That full article has worthwhile insights for anyone considering getting a suppressor.

CLICK HERE for FULL STORY with ALL 18 REASONS »

Reason — Protect Your Hearing
Owning and using a suppressor helps prevent hearing loss. Hearing loss is a legitimate health concern that all firearms owners should be concerned about. Firearms are loud. The average firearm without a suppressor is between 140-165 dB and creates what is called an impulse noise (i.e. a noise that lasts for less than one second).

OSHA’s limit for impact/impulse noise is 140 dB…. Every time you fire a gun (including a .22 LR) without hearing protection or a suppressor, you can permanently lose hearing and it never returns. Surgery and hearing aids cannot restore the hearing you lose — it’s gone forever. Suppressors do not make your gun silent! However, they can make the impulse noise much less than 140 dB.

Reason — Reduce Muzzle Blast
A suppressor reduces or eliminates muzzle blast. Traditionally, we associate flinching with recoil, and while recoil can contribute to flinching, many shooters are finding that when using a suppressor on a caliber with no recoil they don’t suffer from the concussion, noise, and blast. As a result, they don’t close their eyes, flinch, or jerk the trigger.

Reason — Reduce Felt Recoil
A suppressor … reduces recoil or kick. Nobody that’s telling the truth enjoys getting punched in the shoulder, and that’s essentially what happens when you shoot a lightweight centerfire magnum rifle. Suppressors are very effective at slowing the recoil down or [reducing it significantly]. I personally observed a small (70-lb) 12-year-old boy shoot a 5.5-pound 6.5 PRC with a suppressor. After shooting he got up smiling and said, “That didn’t kick at all!”.

True Pearce Suppressor Silencer GunsAmerica Digest

Reason — Reduce Muzzle Rise to Keep Your View on Target
Suppressors reduce muzzle rise and make it possible to stay on target through your shot [so you can watch the trace and impact]. This allows you to make your own wind calls and corrections.

Reason — Reduce Dust and Dirt Kicked Up from Muzzle Blast
Suppressors prevent snow, dust, dirt, or other debris from blowing up when you shoot prone. If you’ve shot much with muzzle brakes, you know this is a real thing.

CLICK HERE to Read all 18 Reasons to Own a Suppressor »

suppressor silencer true pearce gunsamerica digest hearing protection
GunsAmerica Digest Editor True Pearce hunting with his horses and suppressed rifle.

Related Article: ATF Announces New e-Form 4 Platform for Suppressor Registration

suppressor silencer true pearce gunsamerica digest hearing protection

Permalink Gear Review, Hunting/Varminting, Tactical, Tech Tip No Comments »
March 5th, 2023

Sunday Gunday: S&W’s New M&P FPC 9mm Folding Carbine

Smith Wesson S&W M&P FPC 9mm folder folding carbine

Smith & Wesson has just introduced an all-new, very innovative folding rifle — the M&P FPC 9mm carbine. Pistol-caliber carbines are hot right now for good reason. 9mm Luger (9x19mm) ammo is inexpensive — $15-$18 per 50rd box in bulk. That’s a fraction of the cost of .223 Rem, 6.5 Creedmoor, or .308 Win ammo. With ample quantities of factory 9mm ammo available, you don’t have to struggle to find powder and primers. And a complete, factory-loaded 9mm Luger round (at $0.30-$0.36 per round) costs less than what you might pay just for the bullet you’d put in a 6mm or 6.5mm rifle cartridge.

Moreover, the “fun factor” is high with 9mm carbines. You can shoot the same ammo in your pistol and rifle. That makes it simpler to do a fun day at the range. Plus, many indoor ranges that prohibit most other centerfire rifles will allow you to shoot a 9mm carbine indoors.

S&W M&P FPC Carbine Folds to 16⅜” and Takes S&W Pistol Mags

S&W’s new M&P FPC Carbine ($659.00 MSRP) has some other major advantages — easy transport and smart on-board storage for full-capacity magazines. The FPC’s buttstock has twin slots that hold 17-rd and/or 23-rd magazines compatible with S&W 9mm pistols. That’s cool. And here’s the notable attraction — when folded, S&W’s FPC Carbine is just 16 3/8″. S&W delivers the new FPC in a cool zippered carry case with four internal pockets. That nice, padded carry case is included in the affordable $659.00 price.

Smith Wesson S&W M&P FPC 9mm folder folding carbine

Because it folds at the bolt face rather than behind the action the new M&P FPC is much more portable than most folding stock rifles. And your optics stay in place. Smith & Wesson states: “[Our] side-folding mechanics … deliver a unique compact feature and allow the user to keep their sight system mounted on the gun both in the folded and extended positions. Extra magazine storage in the buttstock, familiar M&P fire controls, and reliable palm swell grip adaptors all make this new pistol carbine a great addition to the M&P family”. The barrel is 16.25″ with a suppressor-friendly 1/2-28 threaded muzzle with thread protector. To reduce felt recoil, the FPC has an integrated recoil buffer system.

Smith Wesson S&W M&P FPC 9mm folder folding carbine
Smith Wesson S&W M&P FPC 9mm folder folding carbine


Watch this video to see how S&W’s new FPC Carbine unfolds and shoots. You’ll see impressive rapid-fire action starting at the 00:24 time-mark. This is indeed a pretty cool carbine.

The FPC carbine’s compatibility with pistol magazines is a real plus. John Myles, S&W New Product Manager, explained that: “The team at Smith & Wesson aimed to design a pistol carbine that was compatible with various M&P series pistol magazines.”

S&W M&P 9mm FPC Features
The M&P FCP ships with three (3) magazines: one 17-rounder and two 23-round mags. The buttstock can hold two magazines, which are accessible with a handy quick-release catch. Notably the M&P FPC is sold with an excellent, zippered carry bag that transports the folded carbine securely along with magazines and other gear. Check it out:

Smith Wesson S&W M&P FPC 9mm folder folding carbine

One reviewer was very impressed with the value of this new carbine: “Smith & Wesson M&P FPC ($659) ups the ante with a few premium touches while staying $100 under the MSRP of the cheapest Ruger PCC model — to get the same features from Ruger’s platform you’d spend over a grand, and it doesn’t fold.”
FreeRangeAmerican.us.

Smith Wesson S&W M&P FPC 9mm folder folding carbine

Smith & Wesson M&P FPC Video Reviews

Gun reviewers have released hands-on test videos showcasing Smith & Wesson’s new M&P FPC carbine. Generally the reactions have been very positive. Reviewers noted that the FPC’s folding mechanism works great, the carbine is very reliable, the trigger is decent, and the supplied carry case is excellent. Here are three videos released in the last week after S&W’s official product announcement on February 28, 2023.

Smith & Wesson M&P FPC List of Features

Smith & Wesson’s official product release states: “The new optics-ready M&P® FPC™ showcases our brand new, compact, folding design. Coming with (one) 17-round and (two) 23-round magazines, the in-stock magazine storage w/ quick-release latch makes reloading convenient and quick. The M&P FPC™ is compatible with M&P full-size and compact pistol double-stack magazines, and includes a carrying bag with additional storage and Velcro straps.”

Smith & Wesson M&P FPC Folding Carbine Features:
Compact, horizontal folding design with locking latch
Folding design does not interfere with optics
30 3/8″ unfolded length to 16 3/8″ folded
Flat-face trigger with crisp break
Integrated recoil buffer system
Picatinny rail on top for optics
Reversible magazine catch
1/2-28 threaded muzzle with thread protector
In-stock mag storage w/quick-release tab
Compatible with M&P Pistol magazines
M-LOK handguard slots on handguard
Charging handle doubles as retainer
Carrying case with inside pockets

VIEW S&W M&P FPC 9mm Carbine PDF Spec Sheet »

Smith Wesson S&W M&P FPC 9mm folder folding carbine
This article is Copyright 2023 AccurateShooter.com. Any appearance of this article on a different website is unauthorized and obligates payment of damages.

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March 5th, 2023

Reloading at the Range — Zediker Explains the Basics

Glen Zediker Reloading at Range

Glen Zediker Reloading at RangeThe February 2013 edition of Shooting Sports USA magazine has an interesting feature by Glen Zediker, who sadly passed away in October 2020. In this Transporting Success, Part I article, Zediker explains the advantages of loading at the range when you are developing new loads or tuning existing loads. Glen, the author of the popular Handloading for Competition book, discusses the gear you’ll need to bring and he explains his load development procedure. In discussing reloading at the range, Glen focuses on throwing powder and seating bullets, because he normally brings enough sized-and-primed brass to the range with him, so he doesn’t need to de-prime, re-size, and then re-prime his cases.

Zediker writes: “Testing at the range provides the opportunity to be thorough and flexible. You also have the opportunity to do more testing under more similar conditions and, therefore, get results that are more telling. Once you are there, you can stay there until you get the results you want. No more waiting until next time.”

Zediker starts with three-shot groups: “I usually load and fire three samples [with] a new combination. I’ll then increase propellant charge… based on the results of those three rounds, and try three more. I know that three rounds is hardly a test, but if it looks bad on that few, it’s not going to get any better.”

Glen reminds readers to record their data: “Probably the most important piece of equipment is your notebook! No kidding. Write it down. Write it all down.

RCBS Partner PressThere’s More to the Story…

Editor’s Note: In Zediker’s discussion of loading at the range, he only talks about throwing powder and seating bullets. In fact, Glen opines that: “There is little or no need for sizing.” Well, maybe. Presumably, for each subsequent load series, Zediker uses fresh brass that he has previously sized and primed. Thus he doesn’t need to de-prime or resize anything.

That’s one way to develop loads, but it may be more efficient to de-prime, re-size, and load the same cases. That way you don’t need to bring 50, 80, or even 100 primed-and-sized cases to the range. If you plan to reload your fired cases, you’ll need a system for de-priming (and re-priming) the brass, and either neck-sizing or full-length sizing (as you prefer). An arbor press can handle neck-sizing. But if you plan to do full-length sizing, you’ll need to bring a press that can handle case-sizing chores. Such a press need not be large or heavy. Many benchresters use the small but sturdy RCBS Partner Press, for sale now at Amazon for $114.99. You may even get by with the more basic Lee Precision Compact Reloading Press, shown in Zediker’s article. This little Lee press, Lee product #90045, currently retails for $44.99 at Midsouth.

Glen Zediker Reloading at Range

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March 4th, 2023

Saturday Movies: Inside Look at Modern Ammunition Factories

Lapua norma sellier bellot ammunition ammo factory germany finland sweden usa

While many AccurateShooter.com readers load their own competition centerfire rifle ammunition, we all still need factory ammo for our rimfire rifles in .17 and .22 calibers. And most of the 60+ million American handgun owners rely on factory-made ammunition for their pistols and revolvers.

Today’s video collection showcases state-of-the-art ammunition factories in Europe and the United States. You can see the extremely accurate Lapua .22 LR ammo being produced, as well as excellent centerfire ammunition being made by Norma, Remington, Sellier & Bellot and other makers.

From the creation of lead bullet cores to the final packing of ammunition, you can see it all in these videos. Watch primers being made, brass being annealed, bullets being jacketed, tips being inserted, and every phase of production. Weighing and testing procedures are also revealed.

Modern Ammo Production in Multiple Facilities

This 11.5-minute video shows highly automated bullet and ammunition production in multiple facilities in Europe and the USA. You can see bullets produced from start to finish beginning with lead smelting. Then watch pistol and rifle cartridges being made on modern, computer-controlled assembly lines. Watch from start to finish. Here are some notable highlights:

00:10 — Lead Melting Pots and Billet Caster
01:20 — Lead made into strings and then formed into bullets
01:50 — Brass alloy sheets fed into machine and then punched (2:10-2:35).
03:35 — Lead pistol cores being produced
04:15 — Pistol ammo being packaged
06:15 — Ammo loaded into belts
07:15 — Completed primers being shuttled then loaded into brass (Second factory)
07:20 — Bullets being seating into rifle ammunition
07:32 — Cartridge case-neck treatment
07:42 — Robot arm loads finishes cartridges into boxes
08:04 — Cups being pressed (Third Factory S&B)
08:45 — Cartridge case draw
09:06 — Priming pistol cases
09:20 — Bullet production and weight control (10:02)
10:08 — Cartridge assembly and cartridge sealing (10:38)
11:00 — Pistol ammo packaging

Lapua Rimfire Ammunition Production in Germany

This video shows Lapua rimfire ammo production in Schönebeck, Germany. The video shows quantities of the excellent X-ACT .22 LR ammunition being produced and packaged. Starting at the one-minute mark, you can see the ammo being inspected with advanced scanning machines. Then at 1:16 time-mark you can see the ammo accuracy-tested in a tunnel, with results displayed on a computer screen (1:27).

Norma Ammunition Production in Sweden

In this video, the RecoilTV team lead by EIC Iain Harrison ventures to Sweden to visit the Norma ammunition production plant in Huvudentré, Sweden. Demand for Norma ammo has risen dramatically. A Norma marketing manager notes that production has doubled in the last three years.

This second Norma ammunition video shows close-ups of the production process and the machinery used for centerfire ammo. This was filmed at the Norma factory in Åmotfors, Sweden, which has operated continuously for over 120 years. Among the many interesting highlight is a sequence showing how polymer bullet tips are inserted. See 6:50 time-mark.

Lapua norma sellier bellot ammunition ammo factory germany finland sweden usa

Sellier & Bellot Ammunition Factory in Czech Republic

In this video, Larry Vickers of Vickers Tactical tours a Sellier & Bellot ammunition plant in the Czech Republic. This video shows details of primer production as well as bullet-making, brass-making, and production-line cartridge manufacturing.

Remington Ammunition Plant Re-Opened by Vista Outdoors

This video shows ammo production at the re-opened Remington ammunition plant in Lonoke, Arkansas. “This is one of the largest ammunition manufacturing plants in the world” said Mark Keefe, NRA Publications editorial director. “It was set up in 1969 by DuPont, who owned Remington at the time. They do it all here. Cases, bullets, centerfire rifle, centerfire pistol, rimfire and shotshell.” It’s great to see this plant back in production after Remington Ammunition filed for bankruptcy in 2020 and the assets of the Remington conglomerate were auctioned off. Ultimately, Vista Outdoor, owner of Federal, CCI and Speer, purchased the assets of Remington Ammunition and got the Lonoke plant running again, better than ever.
This article is Copyright 2023 AccurateShooter.com. Republication on any other site gives rise to statutory penalties and compensatory damages.

Permalink - Videos, Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Gear Review, Tech Tip 1 Comment »
March 3rd, 2023

Find Best Holsters for Your Handguns with Holster Finder

Midwayusa holster finder database 125,000 holsters

Here’s a helpful, time-saving tool for handgun owners. MidwayUSA’s online Holster Finder lets you quickly find the right holsters for virtually all popular makes and models of pistols and revolvers. The wide variety of carry styles, materials, and features can make finding the right holster difficult or confusing. Drawing on a database of over 125,000 gun/holster combinations, the MidwayUSA Holster Finder turns that complex task into an easy three-step process.

Midwayusa holster finder database 125,000 holsters

The selection process is simple: 1. Choose Pistol or Revolver; 2. Select Make and Model of Handgun (and barrel type/length); 3. Click to view results. Just choose your gun type, select your make, model and barrel, then view the results. All major holster types are included: Ankle, Belly Band, Belt (outside waistband), Chest, Competition, Drop Leg, Inside Waistband (IWB), Paddle, Pocket, and Shoulder. Check out the MidwayUSA Holster Finder at MidwayUSA.com/holster-finder.

Midwayusa holster finder database 125,000 holsters
Midwayusa holster finder database 125,000 holsters

MidwayUSA’s Marketing VP Jeff Larkin says: “Our team built the Holster Finder so our customers could find all holsters we offer for their specific firearm without sorting through thousands of search results. Finding the perfect holster is now easier than ever — just a few clicks, and we’ll show you everything that fits!”

Permalink Gear Review, Handguns, News 1 Comment »
March 2nd, 2023

Trim, Chamfer, and Debur Brass with Giraud Tri-Way Trimmer

Giraud Tri Way Trimmer Case Cutter tool
Close-up of the Tri-Way Trimmer with clear plastic chip guard removed.

Giraud Tool offers a case trimmer/chamferer device that works with a power drill (or other power source). Giraud’s patented Tri-Way Trimmer is a self-contained unit powered by your drill or motor. Using a sharp carbide blade it will trim your cases to length, deburr, and cut both inside and outside chamfers — all in one pass. That’s pretty impressive for a $110.00 tool that fits in the palm of your hand.

Giraud Tri Way Trimmer Case Cutter tool

Product Features
1. Fully adjustable for cartridge length (and depth of chamfer).
2. Carbide blade cuts a 15° inside case mouth chamfer and 45° outside chamfer.
3. Case holder supported by sealed ball bearing raceway.
4. Tool includes removable, transparent plastic chip guard.
5. Tool can work in any orientation (vertical, horizontal, or any angle).

The Giraud Tri-Way Trimmer is designed to be powered by a portable hand drill, drill press, or other dedicated rotating power source. The tool indexes off the shoulder of your cases, but the blade adjusts so that cartridge overall length (COAL) can be controlled with precision. Constructed out of 6061-T6 aluminum and 303 stainless steel, the Tri Way tool should last a lifetime. Note: This tool is not universal. The Tri Way is dedicated to a single cartridge and “related” cartridges with similar body dimensions. Thus you need a specific tool for each cartridge family. For example, the .308 Win tool will also trim .243 Win, .260 Rem, and 7mm-08.

Cartridge Sizes Available for Giraud Tri Way Trimmer:
.223 Remington (Also trims .17 Remington, .204 Ruger, .222 Remington, .222 Remington Magnum)
7.62 x 39mm (Russian)
.300 Blackout (Also trims .17 Rem Fireball, .20 Vartarg, .221 Fireball)
.308 Winchester (Also trims .243 Winchester, .260 Remington, 7mm-08)
.30-06 Springfield (Also trims .25-06, .270 Winchester, .280 Remington)
.300 Winchester Mag (Also trims ​Also trims .264 Winchester Magnum, 7mm Remington Magnum, .308 Norma Magnum)

Giraud Tri Way Trimmer Case Cutter tool

Product Tip from EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.
Permalink Gear Review, Reloading, Tech Tip 2 Comments »
February 28th, 2023

How to Use a Kestrel with Applied Ballistics Software

Kestrel Wind Meter F-Class John Applied Ballistics

Kestrel wind and weather meters are often regarded as the best on the market — for good reason. Here are a series of three videos by F-Class John that show how the Kestrel 5700 with Elite Ballistics works. This article reviews the advanced Kestrel 5700 Elite Wind Meter with sophisticated ballistics capabilities. Our review features three videos by F-Class John that show how the Kestrel 5700 Elite functions with Applied Ballistics APP software and LiNK connection.

Kestrel Wind Meter F-Class John Applied Ballistics

This Part I Video starts with a basic Kestrel Anemometer (blue case, 00:00-00:40) wind meter. Then reviewer F-Class John looks at the “smart” Kestrel 5700 with Elite Ballistics. John explains the many features of the Kestrel 5700 and how it holds a powerful ballistics calculator in the convenient, easy-to-tote Kestrel package. With Elite Ballistics, once you enter data about your bullets, velocity, zero, and rifle, the Kestrel can calculate come-ups and wind corrections. If you don’t yet own a Kestrel, we highly recommend you watch this series of videos that explains advanced Kestrel features in detail.

This Part II Video shows the key features of the advanced software APP used by the Kestrel 5700 unit with Elite Ballistics. The Kestrel 5700 can “talk” to a mobile device that runs the Applied Ballistics software APP that contains bullet databases and allows you to enter key information such as muzzle velocity, bullet BC, zero distance, velocity, wind, and environmental factors (altitude, temperature etc.). There are also gun-specific factors such as scope height over bore and barrel twist rate. The video also explains how “range cards” are created and how to view them with your Elite Ballistics-enabled Kestrel. John notes: “The APP is great because you don’t have to fiddle with the Kestrel’s buttons. It’s much easier to enter data and change settings with the APP.”

This Part III video shows how to determine true wind direction by aligning the SIDE of the unit into the wind. You essentially want to set the unit 90 degrees to the wind direction so the impeller runs as slowly as possible. Then, after you set your target distance (See 3:03), the unit can give you precise come-ups for your intended target (10.28 MOA for 559 yards here). The Kestrel then calculates the cross-wind correction as well (See 3:12).

DISCLAIMER: This video and description contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links, the video author may receive a small commission. This helps support F-Class John’s YouTube channel and allows him to continue to make videos like this.

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February 27th, 2023

BargainFinder 388: AccurateShooter’s Deals of the Week

AccurateShooter Deals of the Week Weekly Bargain Finder Sale Discount Savings

At the request of our readers, we provide select “Deals of the Week”. Every Sunday afternoon or Monday morning we offer our Best Bargain selections. Here are some of the best deals on firearms, hardware, reloading components, optics, and shooting accessories. Be aware that sale prices are subject to change, and once clearance inventory is sold, it’s gone for good. You snooze you lose.

NOTE: All listed products are for sale to persons 18 years of age or older. No products are intended for use by minors.

1. Palmetto SA — S&W M&P 9mm Shield Bundle, $374.99

sw pistol sale
Great value Bundle PLUS $75 S&W Factory Rebate

S&W makes some great firearms and one of their best values is the M&P 9mm M2.0 pistol. With this multi-item BUNDLE you get the M&P Shield M2.0 9mm plus a cleaning kit, range bag, and tactical knife — all for $374.99. On top of that, S&W offers a $75 Rebate on this pistol. That lowers your net cost to just $299.99!

2. MidwayUSA — Vortex 20-60x60mm Spotting Scope, $349.99

vortex scope sale
Great spotting scope for the price with rock-solid warranty

Having a quality spotting scope can help when in the field, at matches, or just having fun at the range. We found a great deal on the Vortex Diamondback 20-60x60mm spotting scope, now just $349.99 at MidwayUSA. This spotting scope has good light transmission throughout the magnification range. Sharpness is good, and the spotting scope’s construction stands up to rough use in the field. This spotter is protected by Vortex’s VIP Unlimited Lifetime Warranty.

3. Brownell’s — LEE Breechlock Kit, $157.50 with Discount Code

lee press sale
Get a complete reloading kit for less than the cost of a single-stage press

Would you like to grab a complete reloading setup for under $200? Brownells offers the Lee Breechlock Press Package for a low $174.99 price. But it gets better — enter Brownells 10% Off codes TA10 or WLS10 at checkout to bring the price down to a crazy low $157.50 (before tax/shipping). This is a great deal on a complete reloading package with all the essentials — Press, Powder Measure, Scale, Priming Tool, Chamfer Tool, Shellholders, and more.

4. Amazon — HQA TSA-Approved Rifle Case, $109.99

rifle case sale
Very rugged, full-featured TSA-approved roller case

Whether flying or just transporting your rifles to the range it’s important to protect them with a rugged, quality gun case. The solidly-built HQ ISSUE 41″ Tactical Rifle Case meets all the TSA requirements and can withstand tough treatment. Offered in two colors — Flat Dark Earth and Gray — this case has rollers to ease movement through the airport. Handy pick-n-pluck foam allows a secure custom fit for your firearms. NOTE: This case is 41″ overall so it will NOT fit long-barrel competition rifles unless the action is separated from the stock/chassis. For larger rifles, one good option is the Eylar 53″ Protective Roller Rifle Hard Case priced at $199.99.

5. Graf’s — Frankford Arsenal Trimmer, $69.99

frankford arsenal sale
Adjustable collet for all case sizes — strong user reviews

The nicely-crafted Frankford Arsenal Universal Precision Trimmer is a versatile tool that can work with most popular cartridge types. This case-trimming system indexes on case shoulders for precise trimming every time. The adjustable collet system works with shouldered cases from .17 Remington to .460 Weatherby and fits just about any drill or drill press.

6. Graf’s — Federal .22 LR Hi-Vel ammo, 525 Rounds $36.99

federal 22 ammo sale
Quality USA-made ammo, just $0.07 (seven cents) per round

With the high cost of primers, powder, and bullets these days, more gun guys/gals are shooting rimfire rifles. If you need good .22 LR ammo at a very attractive price, check out Federal .22 LR Hi-Vel ammo at Graf’s. Get a bulk pack with 525 rounds for just $36.99. That works out to $3.52 for 50 rounds — a great price for good-quality major USA brand ammo.

7. Natchez — Pistol and Rifle Magazines on Sale

pistol magazine sale
Huge selection of pistol and rifle magazines deeply discounted

Have you been waiting for the right time to pick up more magazines for your favorite pistol or rifle? Right now Natchez is running a big Multi-Brand Magazine SALE. You’ll find mags for Glock, Ruger, SIG Sauer, Smith & Wesson, Taurus, and Kimber at big savings. For example, a Glock G17 Gen5 17rd magazine is just $19.99. That’s 17% off the regular $23.99 price.

8. Amazon — RCBS Automatic Priming Tool, $115.99

rcbs priming sale
Popular and efficient bench-top priming unit

If you’re looking to prime your cases fast and consistently then check out the RCBS Auto Priming Tool. This tool mounts securely to a bench top. It is simple to use but reliable and very consistent thanks to its single-stage lever system. You can load up to 100 primers in the two provided vertical primer-holder tubes. This system is very efficient — you can insert a case and prime it in just a few seconds. Here are verified owner comments: “Fast with very consistent sitting depth”; “Works fantastic, netting me over 500 cases an hour easily — my hand-priming days are over”; “Loading the primers into the feeding tube is easier than handling individual primers [with] traditional tools.”

9. Amazon — Hunpal Compact Tripod, $19.99

tripod rest sale
Handy tripod for hunters and varminters — low-cost and compact

For plinking fun days or a varmint trip, sometimes a simple, small-format front rest may be all you need. This HUNTPAL Portable Tripod offers versatility, low cost, and a compact footprint. With aluminum construction, non-slip rubber feet, and the ability to work as either a tripod or monopod, this HUNTPAL unit can be helpful for varminters and hunters in the field. It can also work as a front rest for sighting in a hunting rig.

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February 26th, 2023

Sunday GunDay: Transformer — F-TR Rifle Built from Varmint Rig

Brandon .223 Rem F-TR Pac-Nor PacNor Varmint Remington VSSF John Pierce Hydro-dip Hydrographics

We’re having a wicked winter in some parts of the nation. California is experiencing blizzards and snow-bound highway closures. In the middle of the nation, major snowstorms hit many states, and 470,000 customers lost electrical power after an ice storm in Michigan.

Rifle Transformed from Ordinary Varmint Rig to a Stunning F-TR Machine
As an antidote to these weather-related worries, for this Sunday GunDay we’re offering a bit of beauty amidst snow — a handsome rifle showcased in a white winter wonderland. This handsome rifle started life as a rather ordinary .204 Ruger Rem VSSF varmint rig. With a new barrel, a new stock, and a stunning flame-pattern hydro-dip coating, this is now an ultra-accurate .223 Rem F-TR competition rifle.

Flames in the Snow…

Forum Member Brandon Schlund (aka “Bois Blanc Boy”), photographed this handsome flame-themed F-TR rifle against the snowy background of Michigan’s Bois Blanc Island. Brandon posted this to our long-running Pride and Joy Rifle Forum thread. He notes: “This is my first F-TR build, which started out as a stock Remington .204 Ruger. I had the action blue-printed, firing pin was bushed by Speedy, and I had a new bolt handle and knob installed by John Pierce.” This rifle is now fitted with a 3-groove Pac-Nor 1:6.5″-twist barrel chambered in .223 Remington to shoot the 90gr Bergers. Other components are: Kelbly KTS stock, Phoenix bipod, and Sightron 8-32x56mm SIII scope. Brandon says: “It took a long time to get this gun where it is now but I’m truly happy with it!” Here’s the “before” photo:

Brandon .223 Rem F-TR Pac-Nor PacNor Varmint Remington VSSF John Pierce Hydro-dip Hydrographics

The Transformation — F-TR Comp Rig Made from Rem .204 Ruger Varminter
Report by Brandon Schlund
This rifle started out as a “plain Jane”, factory Remington VSSF II. I shot it on varmint hunts in factory configuration. Then I decided to transform the rifle into a .223 Rem F-TR gun. As the .204 has the same bolt face as a .223 made sense to go in that direction since I would be able to use the gun for varmint hunting as well as F-TR.

While I had shot some F-Class matches with my dad (Joe Schlund aka Bench on AccurateShooter) it wasnt much. When we did a PD hunt in Wyoming I primarily shot my .204 but I decided I wanted a cartridge that could reach out a little further and also do double duty — competition and varminting.

Brandon .223 Rem F-TR Pac-Nor PacNor Varmint Remington VSSF John Pierce Hydro-dip Hydrographics
CLICK HERE for full-screen photo.

The first step in transforming this rifle was selecting a barrel. We ordered a Pac-Nor, 1:6.5″-twist, 3 groove, 30.5″ heavy Palma contour. This was then chambered with a PTG .223 ISSF reamer with 0.169″ freebore to run the .224 caliber heavies. I went with Pac-Nor because both my father and my brother Mark (aka Labrador2 on AccurateShooter) owned Kelbly-built F-TR rifles with the same barrels. Mark and my father couldn’t be happier with the results. Pac-Nor has great customer service along with a short wait time.

I sent the barrel and the factory Remington 700 action down to Kelbly’s where they did the chambering and cut the threads. While Kelbly’s had my action I had them blueprint it. A Kelbly KTS stock with the three-way buttplate and adjustable cheek piece came next. After getting behind Dad’s rifle and Mark’s gun there was no reason to look any further. With all its adjustments, the KTS stock fits very comfortably.

Loading for the .223 Rem with H4895 and 90gr Bergers
As a .223 Rem, this rifle has proven very accurate — it’s a bullet-hole cutter at 100 yards (low twos easy). Our best load is with Hodgdon H4895, 90gr Berger VLDs, CCI BR4 primers. This load is running at about 2835 FPS but YMMV (remember this is a LONG 30.5″ barrel). The Bergers are loaded .008″ into the lands with base-to-ogive of 2.035″.

Our loading technique may be tedious — with lots of sorting and measuring. But brother Mark, father Joe, and I all enjoy the steps. Our three .223 Rem match guns all love the same load which makes loading much easier. Believe it or not we use a Hornady Lock-N-Load progressive ammo plant, which is great when loading for three guns. Our consistency is fantastic with run-out a mere .001-.0015.

We also turn necks and weigh our primers. Does neck-turning and primer weighing really make a difference? Who knows but we try to eliminate more variables since we have to the time to do it, and we actually enjoy the procedures.

Pierce Engineering Installed Action and Modified Bolt
Being from Michigan, Pierce Engineering has done a lot of work for my family’s guns. For this project the Pierce team bedded the action and glued in a single-shot follower. The stock bolt handle/knob was too short for comfort in the KTS stock. Pierce added a longer handle and tactical knob to the bolt. I then installed a .223 Rem Lapua case base into the knob.

Brandon .223 Rem F-TR Pac-Nor PacNor Varmint Remington VSSF John Pierce Hydro-dip Hydrographics
The complete .223 Rem rifle ready to shoot F-TR, as fitted with 8-32X56mm Sightron and Phoenix Bipod, weighs 17 pounds, 15 ounces.

Brandon .223 Rem F-TR Pac-Nor PacNor Varmint Remington VSSF John Pierce Hydro-dip HydrographicsFlame Graphics by Camo Creek Hydrographics
After the action was bedded by Pierce, the stock was sent to Camo Creek Hydrographics in Fenton, Michigan. I selected a flame-style design which Camo Creek applied through hydro-dipping. The stock went back to Pierce’s shop, which applied three coats of clear over the entire stock. The clear-coating really enhanced the flame graphics.

Firing Pin Bushed by Speedy
I sent the bolt to Thomas “Speedy” Gonzalez to have the firing pin hole bushed as otherwise the load could crater the primers pretty bad. Knowing I’d be shooting heavy-weight .22-Cal bullets with a stout load this was a good idea. Speedy also cut his trademark grooves into the bolt shroud which looks amazing. His work is top notch! There is zero cratering now, even with the hottest of loads.

Competition Components — 8-32x56mm Sightron and Phoenix Bipod
For an F-TR rig you need a quality high-magnification optic and a premium, wide-base bipod. I installed a 8-32x56mm SIII Sightron. This was another easy choice because of the attractive price and because my family has four other Sightrons that work great.

I installed a fore-end Picatinny rail to attach a Phoenix Bipod. I extended the Mariners wheel handles by adding short sections from an aluminum arrow shaft. This lets me adjust elevation without stretching forward. I also installed a Calvin Elite Timney Trigger set at 6 ounces.

$2500.00 Invested in Rifle Transformation and Upgrade
How much did this all cost? Brandon tells us “I have roughly $2500 into the rebuild of the gun from a .204 Ruger to the .223 Rem.”

Bois Blanc Island in Michigan
Here on Bois Blanc Island we don’t have many amenities, but we do have the ability to shoot 550 yards at our local gravel pit on state land. It’s snow-bound right now as you can see. But later in the year this will be our close-to-home training center.

Brandon .223 Rem F-TR Pac-Nor PacNor Varmint Remington VSSF John Pierce Hydro-dip Hydrographics

Winter at Bois Blanc Island, Michigan — Here’s the gravel pit where we can load test during
warmer weather. When I took this photo, it was a “balmy” 10-degree day.

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February 26th, 2023

Best of Both Worlds — SEB’s One-of-a-Kind Hybrid F-Open Stock

Accurateshooter.com Seb Lambang F-Class wood aluminum stock bag rider

NOTE: This is an older article, but with the SW Nationals taking place last week, we thought our readers might enjoy a repeat view of a very rare and unique F-Class rig. This hybrid wood and aluminum stock is a “one-of-kind” custom, crafted by Sebastian (“Seb”) Lambang, creator of the SEB Coaxial Rests and Coaxial Joystick Bipod.

Back in 2013, our friend Sebastian (“Seb”) Lambang engineered an impressive wood and aluminum F-Class stock. The stock features a long, box-section aluminum fore-end with a wood rear section and wood-trimmed “wings” on the front bag-rider. The aluminum fore-arm has “buick vents” for weight reduction. From the end of the action rearward, the stock is mostly wood, with light and dark fancy wood laminates on opposite sides (left and right).

Accurateshooter.com Seb Lambang F-Class wood aluminum stock bag rider

Accurateshooter.com Seb Lambang F-Class wood aluminum stock bag rider

The foot of the buttstock has a very wide aluminum rear bag-rider with rails. The rear wood section appears to be two solid pieces of wood — but that is deceiving. Seb explains: “To save weight, the buttstock is hollow (using thin-walled wood)”. To strengthen the construction, Seb added carbon fiber inside the buttstock. So what you see is a wood outer shell with carbon fiber layers on the inside. The stock sports vertically-adjustable cheek-piece and buttplate. The thick, rubber buttpad should diminish felt recoil even when shooting big cartridges with heavy bullets.

Accurateshooter.com Seb Lambang F-Class wood aluminum stock bag rider

Accurateshooter.com Seb Lambang F-Class wood aluminum stock bag rider

This is an interesting, innovative stock design. And as with everything Seb produces, the craftsmanship, fit and finish are superb.

To go with this gun, Seb also crafted a handsome set of angled scope rails with beautifully-machined scope rings. Imagine being able to custom-make one-off products of this quality in your own machine shop!

Accurateshooter.com Seb Lambang F-Class wood aluminum stock bag rider

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February 25th, 2023

Saturday Movies: Best Brownells Videos — Tools, Tips, and More

Brownells video archive youtube channel scope mounting air travel AR15 reloading .22 LR cleaning

Brownells is a well-known retailer of guns, gun parts, tools, accessories, ammo, and pretty much everything gun-related. What you may not know is that Brownells has a very active video production department that releases new “how-to” and product information videos every week. These videos offer helpful advice on gun cleaning/maintenance, reloading, as well as selecting/assembling components for various kinds of rifles. And every week Brownells serves up a new products video. There now over 1000 videos on the Brownells YouTube Channel, which is truly a remarkable resource.

Here are six of our favorite videos from Brownells. There’s a helpful guide to scope installation, AR owners will find some good advice on spare parts, new reloaders can learn how to use the OAL tool, and all gun owners should watch the video on ammunition storage.

Scope-Mounting — Common Mistakes to Avoid

Always be careful when mounting a rifle scope. This isn’t a super-complex or highly technical task, but there are ways you can mess it up. This video explains common pitfalls to avoid when mounting a scope.

1. Make sure the rings don’t touch ANY part of the turret housing, objective bell, or eyepiece.

2. Be certain the scope rings are tightly clamped to the scope base. Grasp the scope with one hand and the rifle with the other, then ensure there is no play.

3. Make sure there’s clearance between the objective bell and the rifle. No part of the scope should touch the rifle itself.

4. NEVER over-tighten the scope rings. You can actually crush the scope tube and damage the optic beyond repair. Stick to the torque specs!

How to Use Hornady OAL Tool and Hornady Bullet Comparator

Gun Tech Steve Ostrem explains how to properly use Hornady’s Overall Length Gauge to determine length-to-land precisely. The OAL Gauge uses a “Modified Case” that threads onto the tool and holds a bullet. Push on the back of the gauge until you feel the bullet just touch the rifling. (We do this gently at first, tapping the rod a couple time to ensure the bullet is aligned correctly). Once you’ve got the length, then use the tool with a comparator on your calipers to get the length-to-lands. NOTE: We recommend taking the measurement 3-4 times in a row to get a reliable number. With a little practice your should be able to get repeatable measurements within .0015″.

Air Travel with Firearms — Key Regulations You Must Follow

You can travel on commercial airlines with firearms. But you must follow the TSA regulations, and your particular airline’s rules. First, make sure your guns are UNLOADED before your leave home. Guns need to be carried in proper hard-sided cases that cannot be pried open. Be prepared to unlock the case if the TSA wants to inspect what’s inside. TSA agents can cut the locks if they need to open the case but can’t locate you. If you use special TSA-approved locks, TSA agents have master keys that let them open the case without destroying your locks. You CAN transport up to 11 pounds of ammunition — with restrictions explained in the video.

How to Store Ammunition Safely and Securely

This has been one of the most popular Brownells videos — with over 1.7 million views. Here’s the deal — ammunition WILL keep for a long time if you store it properly. DO store ammunition in a cool, dry place that doesn’t have wide temperature swings. Temperature cycling will also degrade primers and powder. Put it in airtight ammo cans to keep out the moisture. Tupperware containers will work too. Brownells also recommends putting moisture-absorbing silica packs in your ammo containers. DON’T just keep ammo in factory cardboard factory boxes stacked in the basement, attic, or garage (especially on the floor). Factory ammo boxes can absorb moisture which can degrade primers and corrode the brass cases. Yes, sealed military ammo will usually handle this kind of storage for quite a while, but it’s still not wise.

Must-Have Spare Parts for AR-Platform Rifles

In this video, two knowledgeable gun techs answer the question: “What spare parts should I keep on hand for my AR-15?” On the list are: Gas Rings, Buffer Spring, Extractor Spring and Pin. NOTE: You may want to try the one-piece spiral gas ring rather than the standard rings which require alignment. The cotter pin and cam pin can also easily get lost when the Bolt Carrier Group is disassembled for cleaning. On the lower receiver you’ll want spare springs and detents for the pivot/takedown pins. If you’re using lighter-power springs, keep standard-power spares on hand. If your rifle stops working, swap in the factory-spec springs to find out if the problem is the gun or your ammo. Also, if you have upgraded your trigger, always keep the original trigger as a backup.

Cleaning Advice for .22 LR Rimfire Rifles

Gun Techs Steve Ostrem and Caleb Savant debunk some myths about cleaning .22 LR barrels. One myth is that cleaning will harm the accuracy of a .22 LR barrel. Caleb thinks this myth is the result of people cleaning a barrel from the muzzle and damaging the muzzle crown, which CAN diminish accuracy. If it’s done right, cleaning won’t damage the bore. However, you certainly do NOT have to clean your 22 LR’s bore every time you go to the range. But DO clean the action every time you shoot the rifle, especially on a semi-auto. What about shooting a lot of lead bullets? Won’t that lead up the bore? The guys give us the straight skinny on lead fouling, too. When you see your .22 LR rifle’s groups opening up, you may want to consider cleaning.
This article is Copyright 2023 AccurateShooter.com. Reproduction on any other website gives rise to monetary damages.

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February 24th, 2023

Tactical Range Box for AR Owners — Very Handy Product

MTM AR15 Range Box

MTM tactical AR 15 range boxWe’ve always liked the capacious, durable range boxes from MTM Case-Gard. And MTM offers a special “Tactical” version for AR shooters. This detachable-lid Tactical Range Box features a magwell-filling “action block insert” to support your AR securely during cleaning. Magwell posts like this have been used for years by AR gunsmiths. It’s a fast and convenient way to secure your AR.

The Tactical Range Box also comes with two adjustable cradles that will support most conventional bolt-action rifles and lever guns. These plastic cradles are gentle on fancy stocks, and they can be removed and stowed in the bottom of the box during transport.

The Tactical Range Box uses a two-piece design. The removable top storage compartment holds oils, solvents, brushes, patches, and small accessories. Unlatch the top box to reveal a large, deep storage area that will hold tools, earmuffs, ammo boxes and other larger items. MTM Range Boxes are big enough to hold pretty much everything you need at the range, except your front rest and rear sandbag. Midsouth Shooters Supply offers the MTM Tactical Range Box (item 008-TRB40) for just $52.72. Like MTM’s standard Shooting Range Box, the Tactical Range Box is well-built and much less flexy than generic plastic tool-boxes. Check out the features of this range box in the video below.

MTM AR15 Range Box

Practical USER TIP — Keep some heavy items in the box for more stability. Forum member Tom Alvez explains: “I have one of those range boxes… It’s a great product, really. But, unless there is some pretty heavy stuff in the box when the rifle cleaning starts it may get pretty skittery. Maybe [add] a block or two of lead — that could come in handy later.”

For more info, contact MTM® Molded Products at (937) 890-7461 or visit MTMCase-gard.com.

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February 21st, 2023

Reloading TIP — O-Rings Can Help Reduce Run-out When Sizing

reloading die O-ring
reloading die O-ring

Here’s an inexpensive procedure that can help you load straighter ammo, with slightly better measured concentricity (i.e. less run-out) on the case necks and bullets. Simply use a Rubber O-Ring on the underside of the die locking ring. This allows the die to self-align itself (slightly) to the case that is being sized. Without the O-Ring, if the flat surface on the top of your press is not perfectly square with the thread axis, your die can end up slightly off-angle. This happens when the bottom of the locking ring butts up tight against the top of the press. The O-Ring allows the die to float slightly, and that may, in turn, reduce the amount of run-out induced during case sizing.

Top prone shooter GSArizona, who sadly passed last year, tried this trick and said it works: “Go to your local hardware store and get a #17 O-Ring (that’s the designation at Ace Hardware, don’t know if its universal). Slip the O-Ring on the die and re-adjust the lock ring so that the O-Ring is slightly compressed when the die is at the correct height. Size and measure a few more cases. You will probably see a slight improvement in neck concentricity as the die can now float a bit as the case enters and leaves it. This isn’t going to be a dramatic improvement, but it’s a positive one.”

We want to stress that adding O-Rings to sizing dies may help some reloaders, but we don’t offer this as a panacea. Try it — if using the O-Ring reduces measured runout that’s great. If it doesn’t, you’ve only spent a few pennies to experiment.

reloading die O-ring

Lee Precision makes die lock rings with built-in O-Rings. Lee’s distinctive lock ring design allows the same kind of self-alignment, which is good. However, Lee lock rings don’t clamp in place on the die threads, so they can move when you insert or remove the dies — and that can throw off your die setting slightly. By using an O-Ring under a conventional die lock ring (that can be locked in place), you get the advantages of the Lee design, without the risk of the lock ring moving.

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February 20th, 2023

New ZEISS Flip-Up and Fold-Flat Lens Covers for Riflescopes

zeiss 2023 scope optic flip-up fold-flat pro lens cover

New for 2023, ZEISS offers added protection for ZEISS riflescopes in the form of ‘Flip-Up and Fold-Flat Pro Lens Covers’. These heavy-duty lens covers are designed with several key – and proprietary – features that set them apart from similar products currently available. Retail prices are $34.99 for the ocular (eyepiece) lens covers and $49.99 for the objective lens cover. The new accessories will be available from Authorized ZEISS Retailers in North America, beginning late April 2023.

zeiss 2023 scope optic flip-up fold-flat pro lens cover

“Our all-new flip-up lens covers are manufactured with a robust stay-secure dual-clamping system and provides OEM fitment for current ZEISS riflescopes; they also offer a few extra unique features as well,” said Kyle Brown – Director of Marketing/Product for Carl ZEISS SBE, LLC. “These lens covers remain open and secured in place when in the folded-flat, shooter-ready position — even under heavy recoil. They offer great protection from the environmental elements and will help keep those valuable lenses from getting scratched. The benefit is simple: clean and scratch-free optics at-the-ready. And clean optics will help you deliver precise and accurate hits on target.”

zeiss 2023 scope optic flip-up fold-flat pro lens cover

ZEISS will offer a total of nine unique lens covers sizes, each providing an excellent OEM fit for each ZEISS riflescope. All are made in the USA with Nylon 11 material to resist harsh UV light and maintain proper fitment – even with extreme shifts in temperature – and reduce weight. Each lens cover utilizes dual clamps with stainless steel hardware and springs to ensure long-term fit and serviceability. Both ocular and objective lens covers provide a fold-flat securing system which allows for the flip-up cap to be held in the shooter-ready position parallel with the scope’s main tube, and then remain there, secure during recoil.

Additional Proprietary Features
The design of the objective lens cover offers two unique, proprietary features: 1) The integrated spare battery containment system provides a spare battery when and where it’s needed most; 2) The on-board Torx® wrench containment system provides a secure and out-of-the-way, yet handy, location for keeping this valuable turret tool where it belongs. These features provide great benefits for hunters and shooters.

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