August 13th, 2018

Win Valuable Prizes in Lyman Products Reloading Sweepstakes

Lyman reloading products savage 10 BA stealth 6.5 Creedmoor contest sweepstakes give-away

Lyman is running a cool contest for the next seven weeks (8/13/18-9/21/18). Now through September 21, 2018, you can win an impressive Grand Prize that includes a Savage Rifle and nearly $1000 worth of reloading gear (including Lyman’s new, 8-station turret press). Lyman’s Ultimate Reloading system provides everything you need to load precision rifle and pistol ammo. CLICK HERE for contest details and Entry Instructions.

Sign up for Lyman’s “Zero’d In” newsletter to receive updates and info on great new Lyman Products and be entered in our sweepstakes to win everything you’ve always wanted for your reloading bench! The contest runs August 13 through Sept 21, 2018. All entries must be received by September 21, 2018.

The Grand Prize includes:
• Savage 10 BA Stealth 6.5 Creedmoor Rifle
• Lyman Ultimate Reloading System
• Long Range Rifle Manual
• Rifle Maintenance Mat

Lyman reloading products savage 10 BA stealth 6.5 Creedmoor contest sweepstakes give-away

Lymans’ Ultimate Reloading System
The Ultimate Reloading System includes deluxe All-American 8-Station Turret Press, Electronic Powder Scale/Dispenser (Gen 6), Turbo 1200 Case Tumbler, Priming tool, Case Trimmer, and many other reloading tools and accessories.

- An All-American 8 Reloading press (8 Station Turret)
– Pro 1200 Turbo® Tumbler
– Electronic Gen 6 Powder System
– Universal® Trimmer
– Voucher for Free Lyman Die Set Voucher
– 50th Ed. Lyman Reloading Handbook
- E-ZEE Prime Hand Priming Tool
– Magnum Inertia Bullet Puller
– Universal Loading Block
– Case Prep Multi Tool and Bench Wrench
– Quick Slick™ Case Lube Pump
– Stainless Steel Calipers
Permalink Hot Deals, News, Reloading No Comments »
August 11th, 2018

G1 vs. G7 Ballistic Coefficient Models — What You Need to Know

G1 G7 BC drag models

Over the past 12 months, this article was one of the TOP TEN most-read Daily Bulletin features. We’re reprising it today for those who may have missed it the first time. The above diagram comes from a TiborasurasRex YouTube Video comparing G1 and G7 BC models. CLICK HERE to watch the video.

The better, up-to-date ballistics programs let you select either G1 or G7 Ballistic Coefficient (BC) values when calculating a trajectory. The ballistic coefficient (BC) of a body is a measure of its ability to overcome air resistance in flight. You’ve probably seen that G7 values are numerically lower than G1 values for the same bullet (typically). But that doesn’t mean you should select a G1 value simply because it is higher.

Some readers are not quite sure about the difference between G1 and G7 models. One forum member wrote us: “I went on the JBM Ballistics website to use the web-based Trajectory Calculator and when I got to the part that gives you a choice to choose between G1 and G7 BC, I was stumped. What determines how, or which one to use?”

The simple answer is the G1 value normally works better for shorter flat-based bullets, while the G7 value should work better for longer, boat-tailed bullets.

G1 vs. G7 Ballistic Coefficients — Which Is Right for You?
G1 and G7 refer both refer to aerodynamic drag models based on particular “standard projectile” shapes. The G1 shape looks like a flat-based bullet. The G7 shape is quite different, and better approximates the geometry of a modern long-range bullet. So, when choosing your drag model, G1 is preferrable for flat-based bullets, while G7 is ordinarily a “better fit” for longer, boat-tailed bullets.

G1 G7 Ballistic coefficients

Drag Models — G7 is better than G1 for Long-Range Bullets
Many ballistics programs still offer only the default G1 drag model. Bryan Litz, author of Applied Ballistics for Long Range Shooting, believes the G7 standard is preferrable for long-range, low-drag bullets: “Part of the reason there is so much ‘slop’ in advertised BCs is because they’re referenced to the G1 standard which is very speed sensitive. The G7 standard is more appropriate for long range bullets. Here’s the results of my testing on two low-drag, long-range boat-tail bullets, so you can see how the G1 and G7 Ballistic coefficients compare:

G1 BCs, averaged between 1500 fps and 3000 fps:
Berger 180 VLD: 0.659 lb/in²
JLK 180: 0.645 lb/in²

The reason the BC for the JLK is less is mostly because the meplat was significantly larger on the particular lot that I tested (0.075″ vs 0.059″; see attached drawings).

For bullets like these, it’s much better to use the G7 standard. The following BCs are referenced to the G7 standard, and are constant for all speeds.

G7 BCs:
Berger 180 VLD: 0.337 lb/in²
JLK 180: 0.330 lb/in²

Many modern ballistics programs, including the free online JBM Ballistics Program, are able to use BCs referenced to G7 standards. When available, these BCs are more appropriate for long range bullets, according to Bryan.

[Editor’s NOTE: BCs are normally reported simply as an 0.XXX number. The lb/in² tag applies to all BCs, but is commonly left off for simplicity.]

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading No Comments »
August 11th, 2018

Speer Releases Handloading Manual Number 15

Speer 15th reloading hand loading handloading manual book Amazon 6.5 creedmoor recipes

Speer Ammunition has just released the latest edition of its reloading handbook: The Speer Handloading Manual No. 15. Shipments of this new book are being delivered to dealers now. It will be available on Amazon next week. The MSRP for the new Speer Manual is $34.95. We think the new book is worth the price — it is well-organized and quite complete. But if you are not a fan of conventional books, be aware that you can get a significant portion of Speer’s rifle and pistol load data for FREE on Speer’s website.

Why Buy the Book?
» New DATA for 6.5 Creedmoor and 12 More New Cartridge Types
» Complete Instructions for Handloading Rifle and Pistol Cartridges
» Updates for More Than 120 Cartridge Types

This new edition is Speer’s largest volume yet, featuring updated recipes with the latest propellants for more than 120 legacy cartridges. In addition, the new 15th Edition includes load data for 13 popular new cartridges, including 6.5 Creedmoor, .204 Ruger, and 300 Blackout. The 15th Speer Handloading Manual also features authoritative articles by expert shooters.

FREE Online INFO and DATA from Speer

On its website, Speer-Ammo.com, Speer also offers Rifle and Pistol Reloading Data, Reloading Safety Page, Step-by-Step Handloading Guide, and helpful Glossary of Reloading Terms.

Rifle Reloading Data (FREE Searchable Database)
Pistol Reloading Data (FREE Searchable Database)
Step-by-Step Handloading How-To
Reloading Safety Page (Worth Reading!)
Reloading Glossary

Speer 15th reloading hand loading handloading manual book Amazon 6.5 creedmoor recipes

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August 10th, 2018

Get Latest Powder Burn Rate Chart HERE

Hodgdon IMR Winchester Burn Rate Powder speed table relative table chart

Hey guys, you’ll probably want to download this Powder Burn Rate Table issued by Hodgdon/IMR. This table shows the latest IMR powders including the Enduron series (IMR 4166, 4451, 4955, 7977), high-lighted in green below. This 150-entry comparison table provides useful information for all hand-loaders. When doing load development, and testing one powder versus another, it’s generally wise to choose propellants that share the same relative burn rate, as least for starters. This invaluable burn rate chart ranks powders from eight major powder-makers: Accurate, Alliant, Hodgdon, IMR, Norma, Ramshot (Western), Vihtavuori, Winchester.

NOTE: Hodgdon powders are blue, IMR standard powders are yellow, IMR Enduron powders are green, and Winchester Powders are Red. DOWNLOAD Chart HERE.


Latest POWDER BURN RATE TABLE from HODGDON/IMR

Hodgdon IMR Winchester Burn Rate Powder speed table relative table chart

CLICK HERE to Download Chart as PDF File

Story find by EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.
Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading 7 Comments »
August 10th, 2018

TECH Tip: How to Adjust FL Dies for Correct Shoulder Bump

Sinclair full length sizing die should bump set-back case
CLICK HERE for Sinclair Int’l 3-part video series on using Full-length Sizing Dies.

How Much Shoulder Bump Do You Want?

Some of our readers have questioned how to set up their body dies or full-length sizing dies. Specifically, AFTER sizing, they wonder how much resistance they should feel when closing their bolt.

Forum member Preacher explains:

“A little resistance is a good, when it’s time for a big hammer it’s bad…. Keep your full-length die set up to just bump the shoulder back when they get a little too tight going into the chamber, and you’ll be good to go.”

To quantify what Preacher says, for starters, we suggest setting your body die, or full-length sizing die, to have .0015″ of “bump”. NOTE: This assumes that your die is a good match to your chamber. If your sizing or body die is too big at the base you could push the shoulder back .003″ and still have “sticky case” syndrome. Also, the .0015″ spec is for bolt guns. For AR15s you need to bump the shoulder of your cases .003″ – .005″, for enhanced reliability. For those who have never worked with a body die, bump die, or Full-length sizing die, to increase bump, you loosen lock-ring and screw the die in further (move die down relative to shell-holder). A small amount (just a few degrees) of die rotation can make a difference. To reduce bump you screw the die out (move die up). Re-set lock-ring to match changes in die up/down position.

That .0015″ is a good starting point, but some shooters prefer to refine this by feel. Forum member Chuckhunter notes: “To get a better feel, remove the firing pin from your bolt. This will give you the actual feel of the case without the resistance of the firing pin spring. I always do this when setting up my FL dies by feel. I lock the die in when there is just the very slightest resistance on the bolt and I mean very slight.” Chino69 concurs: “Remove the firing pin to get the proper feel. With no brass in the chamber, the bolt handle should drop down into its recess from the full-open position. Now insert a piece of fire-formed brass with the primer removed. The bolt handle should go to the mid-closed position, requiring an assist to cam home. Do this several times to familiarize yourself with the feel. This is how you want your dies to size your brass, to achieve minimal headspace and a nearly glove-like fit in your chamber.”

We caution that, no matter how well you have developed a “feel” for bolt-closing resistance, once you’ve worked out your die setting, you should always measure the actual amount of shoulder bump to ensure that you are not pushing the shoulder too far back. This is an important safety check. You can measure this using a comparator that attaches to your caliper jaws, or alternatively, use a sized pistol case with the primer removed. See Poor Man’s Headspace Gauge.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading 3 Comments »
August 7th, 2018

Complete RCBS Reloading System — $179.88 with Rebate

RCBS Reloading RockChucker Master Kit

Amazing DEAL: $229.88 – $50.00 Rebate = $179.88 Net Price!

Here is an Insanely Good Deal. Cabela’s is selling the complete RCBS Rock Chucker Supreme Master Reloading Kit for $229.88 — a $100.00 savings off normal retail. But wait — it gets better. If purchased this month, this Reloading Kit Qualifies for an RCBS $50 Factory Rebate good through the end of August. That puts your net cost for this entire Reloading kit to $179.88! You’ll pay $150 for the RCBS Rock Chucker Press by itself (SEE Price HERE). NOTE: This kit is out-of-stock this morning but Cabela’s is accepting back-orders at this $229.88 price.

RCBS Reloading RockChucker Master Kit
Kit includes everything showe EXCEPT metal press base, sold separately.

We checked around and this reloading kit typically sells for around $330. For example, MidwayUSA sells the kit for $329.99. Right now, Cabela’s beats MidwayUSA’s price by over 100 bucks. Then kick in the $50 RCBS Rebate and you’re getting one of the best deals of the year.

RCBS Rock Chucker Supreme Master Reloading Kit includes all these items:

– Rock Chucker Supreme Single Stage Press
– M500 Balance Beam Scale (with pan)
– Uniflow Powder Measure
– Nosler Reloading Manual
– Hand Priming Tool for small and large Primers
– Universal 40-Case Loading Block
– Powder Funnel for .22 to .45 Calibers
– Case Lube Kit, with Lube Pad and Case Lube
– Case-Neck Brush Tool
– Chamfer/deburring “Rocket” Tool
– Folding Hex Key Set (with 8 SAE sizes)

RCBS Reloading RockChucker Master Kit

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August 6th, 2018

Bargain Finder 150: AccurateShooter’s Deals of the Week

Accurateshooter Bargain Finder Deals of Week

At the request of our readers, we provide select “Deals of the Week”. Every Monday morning we offer our Best Bargain selections. Here are some of the best deals on firearms, hardware, reloading components, optics, and shooting accessories. Be aware that sale prices are subject to change, and once clearance inventory is sold, it’s gone for good. You snooze you lose.

1. Grafs.com — 10% Off Lapua + 10% Off Shooting Supports

Accurateshooter Bargain Finder Deals of Week

Accurateshooter Bargain Finder Deals of Week

Grafs.com is running two great 10% Off Sales through 8/8/18. First, ALL in-stock Lapua products are 10% Off — yes that includes brass, bullets, and loaded ammo. Serious shooters know that Lapua makes superior cartridge brass, great bullets, and some of the very best loaded ammo you can buy. Grab some great Lapua brass soon — the sale stops at 11:59 pm CT on August 8, 2018. The second big Grafs.com sale is on bipods, tripods, monopods, shooting sticks, front rests, rear rests, and bags. Basically any product designed to support the front or rear of your rifle is marked down 10%. Graf’s big Shooting Rest Products Sale also runs through 11:59 pm on August 8th.

2. Midsouth — 6.5mm Nosler Match Bullets, $23.99 Per 100

Midsouth Nosler Monster 6.5mm .265 bullets sale 2018 Rebate

Looking for quality bullets for your 6.5 Creedmoor or 6.5×47, but can’t afford the Big-Name 6.5mm match bullets that cost up to $50 per 100-ct box? You’re in luck. Now with this Midsouth Sale, you can get 500 quality, Nosler-made 6.5mm bullets for just $119.99. That works out to just $23.99 per 100 — less than half the price of some other bullet brands. Choose either 123gr at $119.99/500 or the 140gr at $124.99/500. If you are shooting at steel in the PRS game, these bullets should give you all the accuracy you need. Put the money you save into barrels and optics.

3. Brownells — Howa 1500 Barreled Actions, Starting at $239.99

Howa Barreled Action Mini Cerakote Tan HACT trigger 1500 Brownells

Howa makes excellent, smooth-running actions, and the Howa HACT 2-stage trigger is WAY better than most domestic factory triggers. Right now you can save big bucks on Howa 1500 barreled actions, complete with HACT trigger and trigger-guard, starting at $239.99. Both regular actions and Mini Actions are offered. Available chamberings include 22-250, 6.5 Grendel, 6.5 Creedmoor, 7.62×39, .308 Winchester, and .30-06 Springfield. Some of these barreled actions come with a rugged Cerakote finish, while others have a blued finish. When you visit Brownells.com, see if there is a Free Shipping CODE. Here is a partial list of the Howa 1500 barreled actions available:

22-250 Rem, 20″ or 24″ Hvy Bbl, $399.99
6.5 Grendel, 22″ Sporter Barrel, $379.99
6.5 Creedmoor, 22″ Sporter Barrel, $339.99
6.5 Creedmoor, 24″ Heavy Barrel, $387.99
7.62×39, Mini, 20″ Heavy Barrel, $249.99
.308 Win, 20″ Fluted Heavy Barrel, $284.99
.308 Win, 20″ Heavy Barrel, $259.99
.308 Win, 24″ Heavy Barrel, $259.99
.30-06 Sprg, 22″ Sporter, Cerakote, $349.99

4. RCBS August 2018 Bucks or Bullets Promotion

Rcbs bucks bullets promotion August 2018 Rebate

Get Bucks or Bullets with purchase of Qualifying RCBS Products. This August RCBS Rebate offers buyers a choice of money or bullets. You get a $10 Prepaid Card or 100 Free Bullets with: Qualifying Die Sets, Hand Priming Tool, Universal Hand Priming Tool, Trim Mate Case Prep Center, or a M500 Mechanical Scale. Alternatively, you can get a $50 Prepaid Card or 500 Free Bullets with: Rock Chucker Supreme Kit, Universal Case Prep Center, Explorer or Explorer Plus Kits, Pro Chucker 5 or 7, or an Ultrasonic Case Cleaner 2. (Rebate FORMS HERE.)

Program End Date: August 31, 2018 | Redemption Deadline: September 30, 2018

5. EuroOptic — Vortex Viper PST FFP 6-24x50mm Optic, $649.99

Vortex Viper PST MRAD 6-24x50 scope sale bargain First Focal Plane

Here’s a killer deal on a Front Focal Plane (FFP) optic good for PRS competition and tactical applications. The Vortex Viper PST 6-24x50mm scope features 0.1 Milrad clicks with an EBR-2C illuminated reticle with Mil-based hash marks. This reticle also features the “Christmas Tree” type lower half, which provides range hold-overs with horizontal markings for wind holds. Not that long ago, this scope sold for around a thousand bucks. Now you can get the Vortex Viper PST 6-24x50mm for just $649.99. That’s a great price for a PRS-ready FFP comp scope with a proven track record and rock-solid Vortex warranty. EuroOptic’s Sale price is $649.99. This is a great deal — this same scope sells elsewhere for $749.99

6. CDNN — Ruger Precision Rimfire, $399.99

Ruger Precision Rimfire .22 LR

The brand new Ruger Precision Rimfire has become one of 2018’s most popular rifles. This .22 LR rig offers a turn-key rimfire solution for tactical shooters, PRS competitors, and anyone who likes modular rifles. The Ruger Precision Rimfire rifle offers adjustable cheekpiece and length of pull, AR-style grip, free-floating M-Lok fore-end, and an 18″ barrel (1:16″ twist) pre-threaded for brakes or suppressor. CDNN Sports sells this versatile, bolt-action rimfire rig for $399.99.

7. Natchez — Weaver 36X T-Series Competition Scope, $389.99

Weaver 46x48mm XR Competition Scope Amazon Sale

Right now you can order the 36-power Weaver T-Series XR scope for just $389.99. That’s an awesome, but act quick — this price could change. Natchez currently has the silver 36x40mm Weaver XR for just $389.99 — a fantastic price. 36X is enough power for benchrest competition. And even if you don’t shoot benchrest, this is a great scope for load development or general accuracy testing. The 36-power T-Series scopes have a 40mm front objective and side-focus parallax control. You can also get this XR 36x40mm scope in black for $499.99.

8. Savage Arms Rifle Rebate Program

Factory Rebate Savage tactical rifle

Purchase a Model 10 Savage® Ashbury Precision, 10/110 BA Stealth, or 10/110 BA Stealth Evolution and receive a $100.00 Factory Rebate. These rifles are available in a variety of chamberings. FFL Dealer required for purchase. The Model 10 BA Stealth Evolution in 6.5 Creedmoor would be a good entry-level platform for PRS factory class. Expect to pay under $1000 net with the $100 Rebate. This Savage rebate program runs though August 31, 2018. GET REBATE FORM.

9. Amazon — 12″x12″ Sight-In Splatter Targets, 10 for $9.99

Sight-in 12

This 12″x12″ Splatterburst Target combines splatter shot marking with a grid background, with five aiming points. The handy combination of grid and bright neon shot circles is great, allowing you to get zeroed quickly. And for long-range applications, the grid lets you quickly estimate your group size. Get a 10-pack for $9.99, or a 25-pack for $17.99 (better deal). This particular target has earned rave reviews — 87% of verified buyers gave this a FIVE-Star rating. One example: “Excellent quality and durability. The adhesive is really strong. High contrast makes down range targeting easy and the splatter contrast is [great].” Another buyer posted: “These targets are the way to go when shooting long distance. Can easily make out your [shot] impacts with a spotting scope.”

10. Amazon — PRS Practical Shooter’s Guide — $19.99/$9.99

Marcus Blanchard Practical Shooter's Guide

Thinking of getting started in the Practical/Tactical shooting game? Looking for ways to be more stable when shooting from unconventional positions? Then you may want to read Marcus Blanchard’s Practical Shooter’s Guide (A How-To Approach for Unconventional Firing Positions and Training). Unlike almost every “how to shoot” book on the market, Blanchard’s work focuses on the shooting skills and positions you need to succeed in PRS matches and similar tactical competitions. Blanchard provides clear advice on shooting from barricades, from roof-tops, from steep angles. Blanchard says you need to train for these types of challenges: “I believe the largest factor in the improvement of the average shooter isn’t necessarily the gear; it’s the way the shooter approaches obstacles and how they properly train for them.” Paperback version is $19.99 while the eBook (Kindle) version is $9.99.

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August 5th, 2018

Cartridge “Efficiency” — Factors to Consider from the USAMU

USAMU Handloading Guide Facebook cartridge efficiency

Efficient cartridges make excellent use of their available powder and case/bore capacity. They yield good ballistic performance with relatively little recoil and throat erosion.

USAMU Handloading Guide Facebook cartridge efficiency

Cartridge Efficiency: A Primer (pun intended!) by USAMU Staff

Each week, the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit (USAMU) publishes a reloading article on its Facebook Page. In this week’s article, the USAMU discusses cartridge case efficiency and its benefits. While this is oriented primarily toward NRA High Power Rifle and Long Range (1000-yard) competition, these factors also apply to medium/big game hunters. Assuming one’s rifle and ammunition are accurate, key considerations include ballistic performance (i.e., resistance to wind effects, plus trajectory), recoil, and throat erosion/barrel life.

Efficient cartridges make excellent use of their available powder and case/bore capacity. They yield good ballistic performance with relatively little recoil and throat erosion. A classic example in the author’s experience involved a featherweight 7x57mm hunting/silhouette rifle. When loaded to modern-rifle pressures, just 43-44 grains of powder pushed a 139gr bullet at 2900 fps from its 22” barrel. Recoil in this light rifle was mild; it was very easy to shoot well, and its performance was superb.

An acquaintance chose a “do everything” 7mm Remington Magnum for use on medium game at short ranges. A larger, heavier rifle, it used ~65 grains of powder to achieve ~3200 fps with similar bullets — from its 26″ barrel. Recoil was higher, and he was sensitive to it, which hampered his shooting ability.

Similarly efficient calibers include the 6mm BR [Norma], and others. Today’s highly-efficient calibers, such as 6mm BR and a host of newer developments might use 28-30 grains of powder to launch a 105-107gr match bullet at speeds approaching the .243 Winchester. The .243 Win needs 40-45 grain charges at the same velocity.

Champion-level Long Range shooters need every ballistic edge feasible. They compete at a level where 1″ more or less drift in a wind change could make the difference between winning and losing. Shooters recognized this early on — the then-new .300 H&H Magnum quickly supplanted the .30-06 at the Wimbledon winner’s circle in the early days.

The .300 Winchester Magnum became popular, but its 190-220gr bullets had their work cut out for them once the 6.5-284 and its streamlined 140-142gr bullets arrived on the scene. The 6.5-284 gives superb accuracy and wind performance with about half the recoil of the big .30 magnums – albeit it is a known barrel-burner.

Currently, the 7mm Remington Short Action Ultra-Magnum (aka 7mm RSAUM), is giving stellar accuracy with cutting-edge, ~180 grain bullets, powder charges in the mid-50 grain range and velocities about 2800+ fps in long barrels. Beyond pure efficiency, the RSAUM’s modern, “short and fat” design helps ensure fine accuracy relative to older, longer cartridge designs of similar performance.

Recent design advances are yielding bullets with here-to-fore unheard-of ballistic efficiency; depending on the cartridge, they can make or break ones decision. Ballistic coefficients (“BC” — a numerical expression of a bullet’s ballistic efficiency) are soaring to new heights, and there are many exciting new avenues to explore.

The ideal choice [involves a careful] balancing act between bullet BCs, case capacity, velocity, barrel life, and recoil. But, as with new-car decisions, choosing can be half the fun!

Factors to Consider When Evaluating Cartridges
For competitive shooters… pristine accuracy and ballistic performance in the wind are critical. Flat trajectory benefits the hunter who may shoot at long, unknown distances (nowadays, range-finders help). However, this is of much less importance to competitors firing at known distances.

Recoil is an issue, particularly when one fires long strings during competition, and/or multiple strings in a day. Its effects are cumulative; cartridges with medium/heavy recoil can lead to shooter fatigue, disturbance of the shooting position and lower scores.

For hunters, who may only fire a few shots a year, recoil that does not induce flinching during sight-in, practice and hunting is a deciding factor. Depending on their game and ranges, etc., they may accept more recoil than the high-volume High Power or Long Range competitor.

Likewise, throat erosion/barrel life is important to competitive shooters, who fire thousands of rounds in practice and matches, vs. the medium/big game hunter. A cartridge that performs well ballistically with great accuracy, has long barrel life and low recoil is the competitive shooter’s ideal. For the hunter, other factors may weigh more heavily.

Cartridge Efficiency and Energy — Another Perspective
Lapua staffer Kevin Thomas explains that efficiency can be evaluated in terms of energy:

“Cartridge efficiency is pretty straight forward — energy in vs. energy out. Most modern single-based propellants run around 178-215 ft/lbs of energy per grain. These figures give the energy potential that you’re loading into the rifle. The resulting kinetic energy transferred to the bullet will give you the efficiency of the round. Most cases operate at around 20-25% efficiency. This is just another way to evaluate the potential of a given cartridge. There’s a big difference between this and simply looking at max velocities produced by various cartridges.”

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading 3 Comments »
August 4th, 2018

Power to the People — 21st Century Powered Neck-Turning Lathe

21st Century Shooting neck turn neck-turning power lathe powered cutting tool arbor case neck brass cartridge

Do you neck-turn hundreds of cases annually? Then you deserve this outstanding tool. This innovative neck-turning system is truly a game-changer. The 21st Century Shooting Powered Neck-Turning Lathe is quite simply the best system ever created for quickly and precisely uniforming (and reducing) the neckwall thickness of cartridge brass. We have the original manual 21st Century neck-turning lathe, and can attest that it works great. But with the new powered system you can turn necks faster and more efficiently, with less effort. This is like going from a stick shift to an automatic transmission. The cases feed very smoothly and the results are beautiful. Once you’ve tried the Powered Neck-Turning Lathe you won’t want to use anything else. Watch this video to see how it works:

Power is activated by the red button on the end of the blue, horizontal feed handle:

Click the Speaker Button on video frame to play with sound (audio).

The Powered Neck-Turning lathe is a modular system. Swing the bar from right to left to feed the case. The power head (with case holder) glides on stainless steel rails for smooth movement. This allows very precise feed rate. Power is supplied via a button that is built into the end of the feed handle. Push the red button to make the case spin. It’s as simple as that.

21st Century Shooting neck turn neck-turning power lathe powered cutting tool arbor case neck brass cartridge

The folks at 21st Century Shooting explain why the system works so well: “The floating design of our Neck Turner and Case Driver allows the case mouth (bore) to run on the arbor absolutely concentric. This, therefore, allows the outside diameter to be turned concentric with the inside diameter.”

Here is another video that shows how the lathe system operates:

Click the Speaker Button on video frame to play with sound (audio).

Complete Powered Neck-Turning Lathe System
The powered neck-turning system comes with everything you need, starting at $679.00. This includes: Motor Assembly, Lathe Base, “L” bracket, Neck-Turning Tool, Cutter, Case Holder, Driver, Turning Arbor, Expander Die Body, and Expander Mandrel. 21st Century currently offers a choice of nine popular calibers: .17, .20, .22, .243 (6mm), .264 (6.5mm), .270, .284 (7mm), .30, and .33. The case holders are appropriately sized for the common rim sizes in that caliber. Choose either stainless arbor and mandrel or Titanium Nitride-coated arbor and mandrel (for $20 more). Some of the larger calibers cost a bit more.

Permalink - Videos, Bullets, Brass, Ammo, New Product, Reloading No Comments »
August 4th, 2018

Wet Tumbling Brass with Stainless Media — Eye-Opening Results

Stainless Tumbling Media Brass Cleaning

On our main Accurateshooter.com website, you’ll find a comprehensive review of the STM system for cleaning cartridge brass with stainless media. To clean brass with stainless media, start with five pounds of small stainless pins sold by StainlessTumblingMedia.com. Place these along with a gallon of water, a little liquid cleaner, and two pounds of cartridge brass in a rotary tumbler, and run the machine for one to four hours.

CLICK HERE for Stainless Media Brass Cleaning System Review »

Forum Member Tests STM System
Our reviewer, Forum member Jason Koplin, purchased the STM media and a new Thumler’s Tumbler. He then tested the STM cleaning procedure on his own brass, including some extremely dirty and tarnished “range pick-up” brass. Jason was thoroughly impressed with how well the STM process worked — as you can see from the “before and after” photos below. Brass which looked like it was ready for the scrap heap was restored to “like-new” appearance. Check it out:

stainless tumbling Media

stainless tumbling Media

Works Great on Both Rifle Brass and Pistol Brass
The process works equally well on both rifle brass and pistol brass (see below). Jason observed that one surprise benefit of the STM cleaning procedure is a big reduction in noise in his reloading room. Jason said the water-filled rotary tumbler was much quieter than his vibratory tumblers.

.45 ACP pistol Brass STM Stainless Media

.45 ACP pistol Brass STM Stainless Media

You’ll want to read Jason’s full review which shows more before and after images. The full article features a “how-to” video created by Forum member Cory Dickerson, the young man who pioneered the stainless tumbling process and founded STM. The video shows how to load brass, media, and cleaner solutions into the tumbler, and how to separate media from brass once the tumbling is done.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading 7 Comments »
July 31st, 2018

Eyeball Your Brass — How to Diagnose Flawed Cases

Case Diagnostics 101 Sierra Bullets .223 Rem 5.56 brass cartridge safety

Ever wondered what caused a particular bulge or marking on a case? And more importantly, does the issue make the case unsafe for further use? Sierra Bullets Ballistic Technician Duane Siercks offers some insight into various issues and their causes in this article from the Sierra Blog.

Incipient Case-Head Separation
This is a Winchester .308 Win case that has a real issue. This case has a very obvious incipient case head separation in the process of becoming a complete failure.

Sierra Case reloading pressure safety inspection

This is most commonly caused by over-sizing the case causing there to be excess headspace on the case. After a few firings and subsequent re-sizing, this case is just about ready to come completely apart. Proper die adjustment is certainly a requirement here. Of course this case is not safe to reuse.

Excessive Pressure (Load Too Hot)
If you will notice in the picture of the case rim, there are two pressure signs to notice. First, look at the primer. It is basically flattened to about the max of what could be considered safe. If this was the only pressure sign noted, I would probably be fine with this load, but would constantly keep an eye on it especially if I was going to use this load in warmer temperatures. This load could easily cross into the “excess pressure” realm very quickly.

Sierra Case reloading pressure safety inspection

There is another sign of pressure that we cannot ignore. If you’ll notice, there is an ejector mark apparent that is located over the “R” of the R-P headstamp. This absolutely tells us that this load would not have been in the safe pressure range. If there were any of these rounds loaded, they should not be fired and should be dis-assembled. This case should not be reloaded.

Split Case-Neck
Here we have an R-P .22-250 case that has died the death. Everything looks fine with this case except the neck is split. This case must be tossed.

Sierra Case reloading pressure safety inspection

A split neck is a normal occurrence that you must watch for. It is caused by work-hardening of the brass. Brass cases get harder with age and use. Brand new cases that are stored for a period of time can become hard enough that they will split like this case within one to two firings. I have had new factory loads do the same thing. Then as we resize and fire these cases repeatedly, they tend to get harder and harder. Eventually they will split. The life of the case can be extended by careful annealing practices. This is an issue that would need to be addressed in an article by itself. Of course this case is no longer usable.

In the classes that I teach, I try to use examples like this to let the students see what they should be looking for. As always, if we can assist you, whether you are new to reloading or very experienced, contact us here at Sierra Bullets by phone at 1-800-223-8799 or by email at sierra@sierrabullets.com.

Dented Case Body
Here we have a Lake City 7.62×51 (.308 Win.) case with two heavy marks/dents in the case body.

Sierra Case reloading pressure safety inspection

This one may be a bit of a mystery. It appears as if this case may have been caught in the action of a semi-auto rifle when the firearm jammed or the case failed to clear during the cycling process. I probably would not reload this case just to prevent any feeding problems. This also appeared to be a factory loaded round and I don’t really see any pressure issues or damage to the case.

CLICK HERE for MORE .223 Rem Case Examples in Sierra Blog

It is very important to observe and inspect your cases before each reloading. After awhile it becomes second nature to notice the little things. Never get complacent as you become more familiar with the reloading process. If ever in doubt, call Sierra’s Techs at 1-800-223-8799.

Sierra Bullets Case Diagnostics Blog

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July 31st, 2018

Reloder 23 and Reloder 26 — Good for Magnum Cartridges

Alliant Bofors Nitrochemie Reloader Reloading RL Reloder powder 22 23 25 26

Do you shoot a magnum cartridge? Here are two modern-formulation powders you may want to try: Reloder 23 and 26. We have been particularly impressed with Reloder 23. It has worked well in competition for target cartridges such as the 7mm RSAUM. Reloder 23 is like a slower version of Reloder 16 — a very temp-stable powder which has proven a worthy rival to H4350.

Ever heard of Alliant Reloder 23? Or Reloder 26? These two relatively new European-produced Reloder propellants were introduced in 2014. Most folks haven’t tried these Reloder powders because it took quite a while for the first shipments of RL 23 and RL 26 to arrive in the USA. But now these two new propellants are available in the USA, with substantial inventories in stock at some larger vendors. For example, Powder Valley has both RL 23 and RL 26 in stock now at $23.50 per pound. Many other vendors have ample RL 23, but RL 26 is a bit harder to find.

From our Forum members who shoot large magnum cartridge types with heavy bullets, we have heard good things about both RL 23 and RL 26. Reports from the field indicate that both these powders are delivering impressive velocities with low velocity ES/SD.

What are the characteristics of RL 23 and RL 26? That question was answered by Paul Furrier who works for ATK, the parent company of Alliant Powders. Posting in our Shooters’ Forum, Paul writes:

“Let me provide some factual info about these products. Some of the stuff that gets propagated is not correct. Reloder 23 is produced by our Swedish partner Bofors, and Reloder 26 is produced in Switzerland by our extremely capable partner Nitrochemie. I have seen it stated that they are both made by Bofors, so that is incorrect.

I have also noticed people are equating Reloder 23 to Reloder 22, and Reloder 26 to Reloder 25. Both of those statements are definitely incorrect. We do state that the performance of Reloder 23 is similar to Reloder 22, and it is, in general burn speed terms, but they are most certainly not the same. We have worked quite a lot of recipes for Reloder 23, and they are not the same as Reloder 22. Reloder 26 is definitely slower burning than Reloder 25, so there shouldn’t be any confusion there either.”

Alliant Bofors Nitrochemie Reloader Reloading RL Reloder powder 22 23 25 26

Furrier says that RL 23 is NOT sensitive to temperature shifts: “Reloder 23 was developed to bring a truly temp-stable powder to the Reloder 22 burn-speed range using Bofors new process technology. This is the second product developed for us with this TZ® process, the first being AR-Comp™. We see terrific efficiencies, SDs, accuracy and flat temp response from these powders. Please try them, I think you will be impressed.”

(more…)

Permalink Gear Review, Reloading 2 Comments »
July 30th, 2018

Road Warrior — Reloading Station Inside “Toy-Hauler” RV

Smart Car Toy Hauler
Smart Car Toy Hauler

It’s summer time. That means many of our readers are on the road (attending major shooting matches or enjoying summer vacations). How do you do your reloading chores while living like a gypsy for a few weeks? Here’s a solution from Forum member Dave Gray (U.S. Army Retired).

Dave is a self-declared “full-time RVer” who spends most of his time on the road. Behind his Ram 3500 pickup, Dave tows a huge 41-foot Heartland Cyclone toy hauler featuring a 12X8 foot garage in the rear. In the rear garage area, which holds a Smart Car, Dave has set up a removable reloading bench complete with RCBS Rockchucker single stage press and Dillon progressive press.

Smart Car Toy Hauler

Smart Car Toy HaulerReloading Bench Mounts to RV Wall with Brackets
Dave explains: “I used a 2″X6″X5′ board for the bench. It’s perfect for my needs, and is easy to disassemble. I made it this small so that I can park my Smart Car in the garage during travel to my destinations. The bench, attached to the wall frames, is very solid. The presses’ centers are 3″ and 6.5″ from the brackets. [There are] four bolts on the wall into aluminum wall frame and 3 bolts in the bench. If I ever have to replace the current board, I’ll do so with oak or birch or hickory. When I’m not reloading, I remove the presses and store them in a protected space. I can easily attach other equipment to the bench by using C-Clamps.” Dave’s “rolling reloading room” looks very well thought-out. We commend Dave for his inventiveness.

Smart Car Toy Hauler

Permalink - Articles, Reloading 1 Comment »
July 30th, 2018

Get Smart — Read FREE Applied Ballistics TECH Articles

Want to improve your understanding of Ballistics, Bullet Design, Bullet Pointing, and other shooting-related tech topics? Well here’s a treasure trove of gun expertise. Applied Ballistics offers three dozen FREE tech articles on its website. Curious about Coriolis? — You’ll find answers. Want to understand the difference between G1 and G7 BC? — There’s an article about that.

“Doc” Beech, technical support specialist at Applied Ballistics says these articles can help shooters working with ballistics programs: “One of the biggest issues I have seen is the misunderstanding… about a bullet’s ballistic coefficient (BC) and what it really means. Several papers on ballistic coefficient are available for shooters to review on the website.”

Credit Shooting Sports USA Editor John Parker for finding this great resource. John writes: “Our friends at Applied Ballistics have a real gold mine of articles on the science of accurate shooting on their website. This is a fantastic source for precision shooting information[.] Topics presented are wide-ranging — from ballistic coefficients to bullet analysis.”

READ All Applied Ballistics Articles HERE »

Here are six (6) of our favorite Applied Ballistics articles, available for FREE as PDF files. There are 31 more, all available on the Applied Ballistics Articles Webpage.

Permalink - Articles, Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading, Tech Tip 2 Comments »
July 27th, 2018

Getting the Most Out of Your Progressive Press — PowerUser Tips

Ultimate Reloader Progressive Press Hornady
Blue, Red, Green — There are many Progressive Press options on the market…

When you need ammo fast — lots of ammo, it’s hard to beat a progressive reloading press for output. We use progressive presses to load handgun ammo and .223 Rem cartridges for varmint safaris. With good dies, and proper press set-up, today’s progressive presses can produce surprisingly uniform and accurate ammo. No, you won’t see Benchrest Hall-of-Famers loading PPC cartridges on progressives. However, if you need 1000 rounds for your next prairie dog adventure, you should consider getting a progressive. Below you can see a Hornady Lock-N-Load AP configured to load .308 Winchester in bulk.

Hornady .308 winchester lock-n-load progressive press

CLICK HERE to Read Full Article

ultimate reloader progressive

UltimateReloader.com has published helpful Tips to Optimize Progressive Rifle Loading. No matter whether you have a Red (Hornady), Green (RCBS), or Blue (Dillon) progressive, this article can help you load more efficiently and produce better results. Here are some highlights:

Proper Brass Prep
Just like a good paint job requires good prep work, great rifle ammo requires good brass prep. In order to make sure your rifle loading goes smoothly, make sure to perform the following brass prep steps:

  • Clean the brass (tumble, ultrasonic, etc.)
  • Inspect brass for cracks, deep dents, etc.
  • For military brass: de-prime, ream/swage primer pockets, size with small-base sizer die (small base usually optional).
  • Measure brass length — if too long, size and then trim.
  • Final inspection before loading.
  • Cleaning primer pockets may be something you’ll consider (I don’t clean primer pockets except for rare cases or match ammo).

Smooth and Steady Pace
Since you’re loading rifle ammunition on a progressive, you’re already saving a load of time, so there’s no need to rush things! Attention to detail is super-important for safety and for good results. Always keep an eye on powder level (goes down FAST) and what’s happening at each station.

The Right Press and Press Setup
Look for a heavy-duty, well-built press that will stand up to rifle loading. You’ll also want to make sure your powder measure will have the proper capacity (~25 grains for .223, ~50 grains for 308). If you are bulk reloading, ensure you have enough stations for sizing, charging, powder check, bullet feed, bullet seating, and (optional) bullet crimp.

More Ultimate Reloader Resources for Users of Progressive Presses:

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Gear Review, Reloading No Comments »
July 25th, 2018

Free HazMat Deals at Natchez and MidwayUSA

Free hazmat promotion promo code discount cci midwayusa brownells natchez hazardous material charge

Need powder or primers? Or want to lay in a supply of the hard-to-find stuff — such as H4350 — for a rainy day? Well you’re in luck. With these promotions you can get FREE (or virtually free) hazmat charges for powder and primer purchases. These Hazmat deals can save you $25-$40 on your order. Don’t dawdle — these deals expire soon!

Natchez Shooters Supplies is offering FREE Hazmat on purchases of $99.99 or more. This deal runs now through July 27, 2018 (Friday) at 11:59 PM EST. Use Code FH180725.

MidwayUSA is offering Free Hazmat on $150.00+ orders of CCI Primers. Note: This promotion does NOT apply to ANY powders at all or any other brands of primers. It is good for CCI primers only, now through July 31, 2018 at 11:59 pm CST. Use Code CCI201807.

Permalink Hot Deals, Reloading No Comments »
July 24th, 2018

Doh! Make Sure Your Ammo Fits Your Chamber!

Ruptured Cartridge Case

If you don’t match your ammo to your chamber, bad things can happen, that’s for sure. A while back, Forum member BigBlack had an experience at the gun range that reminds us of the importance of safety when shooting. He encountered evidence that someone had fired the wrong cartridge in a 7mm WSM rifle. The problem is more common than you may think. This Editor has personally seen novices try to shoot 9mm ammo in 40sw pistols. BigBlack’s story is along those lines, though the results were much more dramatic. It’s too bad a knowledgeable shooter was not nearby to “intervene” before this fellow chambered the wrong ammo.

7mm-08 is Not the Same as a 7mm WSM
BigBlack writes: “I know this has probably been replayed a thousand times but I feel we can never be reminded enough about safety. This weekend at the range I found a ruptured case on the ground. My immediate thoughts were that it was a hot load, but the neck area was begging for me to take a closer look, so I did. I took home the exploded case and rummaged through my old cases until I found a close match. From my investigative work it appears someone shot a 7mm-08 in a 7mm WSM. Take a look. In the above photo I’ve put together a 7mm WSM case (top), the ruptured case (middle), and a 7mm-08 case (bottom).”

The photo reveals what probably happened to the 7mm-08 case. The shoulder moved forward to match the 7mm WSM profile. The sidewalls of the case expanded outward in the much larger 7mm WSM chamber until they lacked the strength to contain the charge, and then the case sides ruptured catastrophically. A blow-out of this kind can be very dangerous, as the expanding gasses may not be completely contained within the action.

Can’t Happen to You? Think Again.
This kind of mistake — chambering the wrong cartridge — can happen to any shooter who is distracted, who places even a single wrong round in an ammo box, or who has two types of ammo on the bench. One of our Forum members was testing two different rifles recently and he picked up the wrong cartridge from the bench. As a result, he fired a .30-06 round in a .300 Win Mag chamber, and the case blew out. Here is his story:

“I took two of my hunting rifles I have not used for over 25 years to the range yesterday to get new scopes on paper, a .30-06 and .300 Win Mag. I had four boxes of old Winchester factory ammo (two of each cartridge), which had near identical appearances. I accidentally chambered a .30-06 round in the Sako .300 Win Mag rifle. It sprayed powder on my face and cracked the stock at the pistol grip. If I had not been wearing safety glasses I might be blind right now.

Safety eyewear glasses
You should always wear protective eyewear, EVERY time you shoot.

“I feel lucky and am very thankful for being OK — other than my face looks funny right now. I am also grateful for learning a valuable lesson. I will never put two different cartridges on the bench at the same time again.”

READ More about this incident in our Shooters’ Forum.

Permalink Reloading, Tech Tip 4 Comments »
July 23rd, 2018

Bargain Finder 148: AccurateShooter’s Deals of the Week

Accurateshooter Bargain Finder Deals of Week

At the request of our readers, we provide select “Deals of the Week”. Every Monday morning we offer our Best Bargain selections. Here are some of the best deals on firearms, hardware, reloading components, optics, and shooting accessories. Be aware that sale prices are subject to change, and once clearance inventory is sold, it’s gone for good. You snooze, you lose.

1. Midsouth — Lyman Brass Smith Ideal Press, $77.49

Lyman C-Frame Ideal compact press cast iron

Lyman’s new Ideal compact press works great as a second, lighter-duty press. It also is a good choice for loading at the range. It can easily be mounted to a range bench with C-clamps. With its cast-iron body, this C-Frame press is stronger than other presses in its price class. If you are looking for a secondary press for decapping, bullet-seating and other tasks not requiring heavy leverage, this is an excellent choice. The Lyman Ideal costs just $77.49 at Midsouth Shooters Supply.

2. Grizzly.com — Bald Eagle Rests $139.95 – $199.95

Bald Eagle Deal front rest cast iron slingshot

Bald Eagle (by Grizzly) offers one of the best value-priced front rests on the market. We’ve seen F-Class shooters win matches with the Bald Eagle Slingshot Windage Rest, which costs less than a fifth of a premium co-axial rest. For a new shooter, this is a very cost-effective solution. One Forum member purchased the Bald Eagle for his young grandson, deciding it was the best rest under $300.00. All three rests shown offer a cable (with large knob) for easy windage adjustment. The Slingshot model, in cast iron or aluminum, has an elongated front leg for added stability. This also brings the Windage knob within easy reach. The basic aluminum, triangle rest is compact and easy to carry. Note: Front sandbag sold separately.

3. Graf & Sons — Sightron Scope + 1050 Rds .22LR Ammo, $99.99

hodgdon H4350 powder available brunos midsouth powder valley
NOTE: This is for Phone orders only. Repeat: You must order by phone to get this offer!

Here is a stunning deal. Get a 3-9x32mm Sightron scope — adequate for a basic hunting rifle. Then Graf’s will knock $50 off the price, for a net cost of $99.99. But there’s more. When you CALL in this order, Graf’s will give you TWO (2) 525-round boxes of Federal .22 LR Ammo, a $49.98 value. That’s a heck of a deal. But act soon. This is a limited time offer. And remember, this is for PHONE ORDERS ONLY — call Graf & Sons at 800-531-2666.

4. Midsouth and Powder Valley — Hodgdon H4350 on Sale

hodgdon H4350 powder available brunos midsouth powder valley

For a long time Hodgdon H4350 powder has been very hard to find. Now some of our favorite online retailers have H4350 in stock now, in both 1-pound and 8-pound containers. Midsouth Shooters Supply has Hodgdon H4350 8-lb jugs for $191.45 and H4350 one-pound containers in stock for $26.45. Powder Valley has one-pound containers of H4350 in-stock now for $26.55 and the 8-pounders for $189.75. That’s an excellent price. If you want an 8-pounder, we suggest you act quickly.

5. Natchez — Bushnell Elite 4500 6-24x40mm Scope, $359.99

Bushnell Elite Scope Varmint 6-24x40mm Sale

Bushnell’s highly-regarded Elite 4500 Series scopes offer very good performance and reliability for the price. Here’s a great deal on a Bushnell 6-24x40mm Elite 4500 with Multi-X Reticle, 1/4-MOA clicks, and 1″-diameter main tube. Right now this fine optic is just $359.99 — nearly $240 off the regular price. This would be a good choice for a varmint rifle. Hard to find better glass at anywhere near this price. Verified buyer states: “Great scope. Clear, tracks correctly, and is repeatable. Great glass, to my eyes better than Leupold VX3 and Weavers.” Get FREE Shipping with code FS180723 through 7/24/18.

6. CDNN — Walther Creed 9mm Pistol, $269.99

Five Budget 9mm sale bargain full-size 9x19mm pistol Canik RP9 Kahr S&W M&P Walther Creed CT9

The Walther Creed offers excellent ergonomics, good accuracy, and well-designed controls at a killer price — $269.99 at CDNN Sports. This gun, designed to be a value-leader, emulates Walther’s more expensive PPQ model (MSRP $649.00) at a much lower price. The Creed’s frame size and shape is the same as the PPQ, but the Creed lacks interchangeable backstraps. Slide and trigger are very similar. The Creed features a snag-free bobbed hammer. Testers have praised the new Creed, saying that, despite the bargain price, it “sacrifices little to nothing in… ergonomics, accuracy, and reliability.”

7. Grafs.com — Magnetospeed Sporter $178.99

Deals of Week Magnetospeed sporter Kit

If you have been waiting to get a Magnetospeed… wait no longer. Priced at just $178.99 at Grafs.com, the Magnetospeed Sporter model costs less than half as much as Magnetospeed’s V3 models. This chronograph attaches directly to your barrel so you don’t have to go downrange to position tripods and set up skyscreens. For most people the Sporter Model contains all the features they need. Using Magnetospeed’s XFR adapter (sold separately), data can be transferred easily from the display module to your mobile device. READ Magnetospeed Sporter Review.

8. Brownells — 9x19mm Ammo, $9.99 per 50-round Box

Brownells 9mm handgun pistol ammo ammunition sale

The 9mm Luger (aka 9x19mm) is the world’s most popular centerfire handgun cartridge. Now you can purchase quality, big-name 9mm ammo for under $10 per 50-count box. Choose either the aluminum-cased Federal Champion ammo (115gr FMJ), or the brass-cased Sellier and Bellot ammo (124gr FMJ). We’ve shot both types of ammo and they both functioned well in SIG, Glock, and S&W pistols. Order by the box, or buy 1000 rounds of the Federal 115gr FMJ for $174.90, just 17.5 cents per round.

9. Amazon — Jialitte Scope Bubble Level, $11.99

Scope Optic bubble level 30mm 1

If you shoot long range, you need a scope level. This nicely designed Jialitte Scope Bubble Level is fully CNC-machined to close tolerances for a good fit. It features a 30mm milled inside diameter, plus an inner insert ring so it will also fit 1″-diameter main tubes — that dual-diameter versatility is a nice feature. We also like the way the unit is nicely radiused, and has a low profile in the middle. User reviews have been very positive. You could easily pay $35.00 or more for a 30mm scope level. Purchasers have praised this product — almost all verified buyers have rated this five stars.

Permalink Hot Deals, Optics, Reloading 1 Comment »
July 22nd, 2018

How Powder Moisture Content Affects Pressure and Speed

vihtavuori vv moisture content powder propellent
This Technical Report Comes from the Vihtavuori website.

Powder Moisture Content — Did You Know?
Variations in moisture content change the burning rate of a powder and thereby chamber pressures and muzzle velocity. The moisture content of the Vihtavuori N100 and N300 series powders is usually around 1%, while the N500-series’ normal moisture content is 0.6% because of the added nitroglycerine.

So what difference does moisture content make? Here’s an example. In a test, a [Vihtavuori] powder sample was dried by heating it, losing about 0.5 % of its weight. Cartridges were then loaded with the dried powder and fired using a pressure gun. Chamber pressures and muzzle velocities produced by these special cartridges were compared to those produced by cartridges loaded with untreated powder. (The powder charge and bullet were of course the same in both sets of cartridges.)

After Powder Drying:
Pressure Increased 11% from 320 MPa to 355 MPa
Velocity Increased 2.6% from 2526 to 2592 FPS

Comparing results showed chamber pressures increased from 320 MPa to 355 MPa with the dried powder, and the muzzle velocity increased accordingly from 770 m/s to 790 m/s (2526 to 2592 FPS). And note, this is only one example, of one caliber and loading. The difference might be much higher depending on the cartridge and loading combinations.

Recommendation: Store powder below 68°F in 55-65% humidity.

What does this tell us? Well, it seems we need to forget the old saying “Keep your powder dry”! Instead, focus on proper powder storage, at a temperature below 20°C/68°F and humidity between 55 and 65%. Safe reloading everybody!

vihtavuori vv moisture content powder propellent

Tech Tip sourced by EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.
Permalink Reloading, Tech Tip No Comments »
July 20th, 2018

Try Rotating Cases During Bullet Seating to Reduce Run-Out

Bullet Seating Reloading rotate cartridge Run-out TIR

Here is a simple technique that can potentially help you load straighter ammo, with less run-out (as measured on the bullet). This procedure costs nothing and adds only a few seconds to the time needed to load a cartridge. Next time you’re loading ammo with a threaded (screw-in) seating die, try seating the bullet in two stages. Run the cartridge up in the seating die just enough to seat the bullet half way. Then lower the cartridge and rotate it 180° in the shell-holder. Now raise the cartridge up into the die again and finish seating the bullet.

Steve, aka “Short Range”, one of our Forum members, recently inquired about run-out apparently caused by his bullet-seating process. Steve’s 30BR cases were coming out of his neck-sizer with good concentricity, but the run-out nearly doubled after he seated the bullets. At the suggestion of other Forum members, Steve tried the process of rotating his cartridge while seating his bullet. Steve then measured run-out on his loaded rounds. To his surprise there was a noticeable reduction in run-out on the cases which had been rotated during seating. Steve explains: “For the rounds that I loaded yesterday, I seated the bullet half-way, and turned the round 180 degrees, and finished seating the bullet. That reduced the bullet runout by almost half on most rounds compared to the measurements from the first test.”

READ Bullet Seating Forum Thread »

run-out bullet

run-out bullet

Steve recorded run-out measurements on his 30BR brass using both the conventional (one-pass) seating procedure, as well as the two-stage (with 180° rotation) method. Steve’s measurements are collected in the two charts above. As you can see, the run-out was less for the rounds which were rotated during seating. Note, the change is pretty small (less than .001″ on average), but every little bit helps in the accuracy game. If you use a threaded (screw-in) seating die, you might try this two-stage bullet-seating method. Rotating your case in the middle of the seating process won’t cost you a penny, and it just might produce straighter ammo (nothing is guaranteed). If you do NOT see any improvement on the target, you can always go back to seating your bullets in one pass. READ Forum Thread..

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading 5 Comments »