November 25th, 2018

Wheelgun Wow Factor — Colt Pythons Numbers 2, 3, and 5

Colt Python Snake NRA Museum low serial number pistol
Photos courtesy NRABlog.com.

Each day, on Facebook, the NRA National Firearms Museum showcases something special from the Museum collections. A while back the Museum displayed a trio of snakes — three very special Colt Pythons. From bottom to top, these three prized wheelguns are: Colt Python serial number 2, number 3, and number 5. And yes, that is the original box for Python #2 (at bottom). The museum says such low serial number guns were typically produced for a company executive or key members of the gun design team.

Colt Python Snake NRA Museum low serial number pistol

Loved for their beautiful finish, nice balance, and great trigger, Colt Pythons have proven to be excellent investments. Since the Colt Python was first introduced in 1955, Python prices have gone through the roof. A pristine, LNIB early-era Colt Python can now command $4000.00 or more. The Museum estimates the price of Pythons has risen 14,300% since 1955. How much did a Python cost in 1955? You could purchase the Royal Blue model for just $125.00! Factory-engraved models started at $245.00, according to this Colt advertisement from June, 1955:

Colt Python Snake NRA Museum low serial number pistol

You can see hundreds of other interesting firearms on the National Firearm Museum website, www.NRAMuseum.com. Or, if you’re lucky, you can see the collections in person. The NRA now operates three Museum locations: the NRA National Firearms Museum in Fairfax, Virginia; the NRA National Sporting Arms Museum (at BassPro) in Springfield, MO; and the Frank Brownell Museum of the Southwest in Raton, NM.

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December 7th, 2017

The Winchester Model 52 That Shot 3000 Bullseyes in One Day

Samuel Sam Moore Calvin Coolidge 3000 Bullseye NRA Museums

Here’s a rifle that earned a Presidential medal. It has a unique heritage, having been used to shoot 3000 consecutive bulleyes in a single day. The year was 1926 and a high school shooter named Sam Moore hoped to set a record. With his trusty Winchester Model 52 rifle in hand, Moore fired 3,000 rounds downrange, only stopping when his rifle became too hot to hold and daylight was fading fast. But he had fired 3,000 consecutive bullseyes in NRA Junior Rifle competition (target at 50 feet). The event, which set a world record, received national attention.

Samuel Sam Moore Calvin Coolidge 3000 Bullseye NRA Museums Moore was summoned to Washington, DC on April 26, 1926 to meet President Calvin Coolidge. At the White House, President Coolidge presented Moore with a gold medal. The engraving on the back reads: “Presented to L.S. Moore by the President of the United States [on] behalf of the National Rifle Association. Junior Rifle Corps World Record — 3000 — consecutive bullseyes.”

Moore went on to graduate from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1931, helped develop the Fairbairn-Sykes fighting knife, served in WWII as a USMC aviator and maintained his interest in shooting until his passing in 1982. Moore’s rifle and engraved gold medal were donated to the National Firearms Museum by his son David.

Photos and story from NRA Museums Facebook Page

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September 11th, 2015

The 9/11 Revolver — A Memento of Bravery and Sacrifice

9/11 September 11 2001 pistol twin towers terrorist attack

Report based on article in NRABlog.com
Today, on the anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attack, it’s appropriate that we remember the brave public safety personnel who lost their lives on September 11, 2001. Officer Walter Weaver of the NYPD, was one of the many police officers and fire fighters who rushed into the Twin Towers to help save lives.

This stainless steel revolver was recovered from the World Trade Center ruins at Ground Zero. It was identified to have been carried by Officer Weaver on September 11, 2001. He was last seen on the 6th floor of the North Tower attempting to free passengers on an elevator. Officer Weaver’s family donated the gun to the NRA National Firearms Museum, where it now holds a place of honor as a reminder of the law enforcement officers who put their lives on the line daily.

Officer Walter Weaver’s revolver can be found in Gallery 13, Firearm Traditions for Today, at the NRA National Firearms Museum in Fairfax, Virginia.

9/11 September 11 2001 pistol twin towers terrorist attack

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