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August 11th, 2022

Inertial Trigger is a Great, Low-Cost Upgrade for LabRadars

LabRadar chronograph to register bullet speed JKL inertial trigger recoil activated

SUMMARY: This article reviews a device that “triggers” the LabRadar chronograph to register bullet speed. Rather than activate by sound or Doppler reading, this $35 JKL Inertial Trigger works from the rifle’s instantaneous recoil pulse when a shot is fired. After some frustration with his LabRadar when shooting at a range with reflective surfaces, our tester is now reporting that 100% of his actual shots are being captured correctly by his LabRadar chrono equipped with the JKL Inertial Trigger. He won’t use his LabRadar without it now. Other users have become instant fans of this inertial LabRadar trigger as well. It is very affordable and it works great. VIEW LARGE PHOTO.

JKL Inertial Trigger for LabRadar Chronograph

Product Review by F Class John
The LabRadar chronograph has been one of the most revolutionary tools in the shooting world because of how it collects velocity data, how it reports (and stores) that data, and, ultimately, the ease with which it can be positioned and operated. However, it’s not a perfect system. A majority of the complaints come from users whose LabRadars sometimes fail to record all the shots fired in a string. For the average plinker, this may not be an issue. But for serious shooters trying to do ladder tests or load development requiring all shots to be reported, it can be frustrating when a shot is missed.

LabRadar chronograph to register bullet speed JKL inertial trigger recoil activated

Traditionally, LabRadar has recommended trying different settings that compensate for the gap between the unit and muzzle as well as well as having different options for how the unit recognizes a shot fired. While these options work to some degree, they aren’t a guaranteed fix especially when shooting at ranges with concrete baffles or with roofs, walls, and dividers that can alter sound waves. While nobody can precisely explain why shots are lost under certain circumstances, the fact remains it DOES happen. In addition, the default system can sometimes pick up stray shots from nearby rifles.

Not willing to give up on this sophisticated chronograph, many shooters have looked for a foolproof way to prevent such failures from happening. In fact, for this shooter, the frustration was so high that I actually sold my first LabRadar and went back to another chronograph before ultimately buying another LabRadar almost a year later. But I made that repeat purchase only after vowing to finding a way to make the LabRadar work — EVERY time, for EVERY shot.

See How JKL Inertial Trigger Works in this Video

JKL Inertial Trigger — Outstanding Product That Works Great
Enter the JKL Trigger for the LabRadar. This is an easy-to-use, inertial-driven trigger that activates simply from the recoil of your gun. The unit consists of a small rectangular pad attached to a long audio cable. All you do is plug in the audio cable, attach the pad to your gun with the provided hook and loop (Velcro) material. Then (important), you must change the LabRadar trigger settings from “Doppler” to “Trigger”. The unit works great and is easy to set up. In my experience, the unit will activate no matter where you place it on a stock. However the recoil of every gun is slightly different, so you will need to make sure you find a location that doesn’t interfere with your shooting setup.

LabRadar chronograph to register bullet speed JKL inertial trigger recoil activated

An unexpected benefit of using the JKL trigger is that it gives you a larger area in which to place your Labradar unit, making it more convenient to setup on benches or range stations. I found this a welcome relief since the LabRadar originally seemed somewhat fussy about where I placed it. Now I can place the LabRadar in more convenient locations — as long as it’s still near my gun and pointed at the target correctly, I get consistent bullet speed data.

LabRadar chronograph to register bullet speed JKL inertial trigger recoil activated

Are There Issues with “False Positives”?
If there is any downside to using the JKL Inertial Trigger, it’s that a very hard bump or aggressive working of the action can trigger a false reading. However these are easy to identify in your data, because the speed value is way lower than true fired shot values. Simply remove that low entry or otherwise ignore it in your calculations. To be fair, this “bump activation” really doesn’t happen very often once you get used to using the inertial trigger.

SUMMARY — Outstanding Accessory for LabRadar Users
Bottom line — if you own a LabRadar, then definitely get a JKL Inertial Trigger. Priced at just $35.00 this device is not expensive, yet it’s one of the most effective accessories you can buy for the LabRadar. I’ve recommended these inertial triggers to dozens of shooters. Every one of those guys who did buy a JKL trigger says they can’t imagine using a LabRadar without one. If you love what the LabRadar can do, but have been frustrated with shots not getting recorded 100% of the time, then definitely get yourself a JKL Inertial Trigger. It turns a good system into an amazing system. JKL Industries states that its inertial trigger “will work on anything from a .22 LR to a suppressed system or with standard rifle and brake.”

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April 16th, 2022

Saturday at the Movies: Firearms Science Series — 7 Smart Videos

NRA firearms science videos ballistics chronography mil-dot eye dominance

NRA Media offers a series of informative videos about the Science of Shooting, covering a wide range of topics, from eye dominance to long-range ballistics. These videos feature high production values, with super-slow motion segments, as well as helpful computer graphics to illustrate the principles covered.

The videos are narrated by Jessie Harrison, a top action pistol shooter (and the first women ever to achieve USPSA Grand Master status). Jessie is assisted by talented shooters such as Top Shot Season 4 Champion Chris Cheng. There are 40 videos in the Firearm Science Video Series. Here are seven good NRA science videos, with links to others below.

CLICK HERE to Access All 40 NRA Firearm Science Videos »

BULLET TRAJECTORY — Factors at Play and Zeroing Strategies

Host Jessie Harrison (formerly Jessie Duff) and Veteran Air Force Sniper and Long Range Expert George Reinas help us understand the factors behind bullet trajectory. NOTE: There are some exaggerations in the graphics in the videos, and inconsistent terminology use, but it’s still a helpful basic primer on the subject of trajectories. This popular video has over 1 million YouTube views.

SHOOTING POSITIONS — Prone, Standing, Sitting, Kneeling

Olympic Gold Medalist Jamie Gray demonstrates the four positions used by competition shooters: Prone, Standing, Sitting, and Kneeling. Helpful overlay graphics show how the human skeleton aligns in each of these positions. This video should help hunters as well as competitive position shooters. If you shoot silhouette, definitely watch this video!

INTERNAL Ballistics — Cartridge Ignition and Bullet in Barrel


NRA firearms science videos ballistics chronography mil-dot eye dominance

What happens inside the barrel of your gun when you pull the trigger? In this edition of Firearm Science, Jessie Harrison goes over internal ballistics, which studies the combustion of propellant, the pressure developed, and the motion of the bullet along the bore of the barrel. There are some good 3D animations showing how the powder charge ignites and the bullet moves through the barrel.

CHOKE TUBES and Shot Patterns — Shotgun Science

With over 2 million YouTube views, this shotgun-centric video is the most popular of all the NRA Firearms Science series videos. Here Olympic trap shooter Corey Cogdell explains how choke tubes affect a shotgun’s shot pattern in this edition of Firearm Science. We recommend that all Shotgun hunters watch this video — it explains the effect of choke tubes very well.

ZEROING RIFLES for Long Range — Tech Tips

The process of zeroing rifles for long range is covered in this Firearm Science video featuring George Reinas, a veteran Air Force sniper. George demonstrates how to adjust his scope to compensate for bullet drop at long range. Our friend Dennis Santiago was involved in the making of this video, which was filmed at the Burbank Rifle & Revolver Club in Southern California.

CHRONOGRAPHS — Calculating the Speed of a Bullet

pistol shooting science Jessie Duff NRA Ballistic PendulumThis video shows a conventional chronograph with front and rear light sensors. The bullet first trips the front sensor and then the rear sensor as it flies over the unit. The difference in sensor time is used to calculate bullet speed. This is not the only kind of chrono in common use today. The popular MagnetoSpeed chrono works by tracking the bullet as it passes over two magnetic sensors mounted on a bayonet-style fixture on the barrel.

The high-tech LabRadar chronograph employs Doppler Radar to measure the speed of a bullet without the need to send the round directly over sensors. No need to set up tripods down-range. Just set the unit near your rifle’s muzzle, on the side. There is also an inertial trigger accessory for LabRadars. Interestingly, this video also explains how, in the days before electric lamps, digital processors, and radar, scientists used a mechanical “Ballistic Pendulum” to calculate bullet velocity using Newtonian physics. The Ballistic Pendulum (shown at right) was first used in the mid 1700s.

EYE DOMINANCE — How to Determine Which Eye is Dominant

Host Jessie Duff and longtime shooter Krystie Messenger demonstrate how eye dominance affects aim and teach you how to determine your dominant eye in this edition of Firearm Science. There are very simple tests you can do to determine your eye dominance. This Editor is right-handed but left-eye dominant. All competitive shooters should check for eye dominance. If you are cross-dominant, you can alter your head position or put a paper patch on one frame of your shooting glasses.

Other NRA Firearm Science Videos

Firearm Science: Using Mil-Dots to Estimate Range

Firearm Science: Terminal Ballistics

Firearm Science: Rimfire vs. Centerfire

Firearm Science: Eye Protection

Firearm Science: Shooting Moving Targets

Firearm Science: Trigger Control (Pistol)

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March 11th, 2022

Big Bore Brilliance — Paul Phillips Optimizes the .416 Barrett

global precision group ELR .416 barrett RCC machined brass 500 yards solid Cutting Edge bullets

Paul Phillips Ko2mPaul Phillips is a past King of 2 Miles, and one of the world’s top Extreme Long Range (ELR) Shooters. He recently showcased one of his ELR rifles that shoots the .416 Barrett cartridge with huge, 550gr Cutting Edge bullets seated in CNC-machined RCC (Robertson Cartridge Company) brass that costs $10 per case.

Even with these giant-sized cartridges, Paul Phillips is getting remarkable accuracy. He recently went out to a snow-covered rifle range to do some testing. We include some test results in this article. Paul’s rig delivered 1.056″ to 1.748″ 3-shot groups at 500 yards. That’s .202 to .335 MOA for three shots. (1 MOA = 1.047″ at 100 yards, or 5.235″ at 500 yards). That’s very impressive accuracy for such a big cartridge with serious recoil.

Confidence is Gained from Consistent Accuracy

Report by Paul Phillips
After being retired from my 30 years of service in military and law enforcement, I started my own company, Global Precision Group LLC. We specialize in Long range shooting. I am currently doing some R&D for a new ammunition company, Ultimate Ammunition, (UA) out of Las Vegas. UA specializes in Military, Law Enforcement, and Custom ammunition.

global precision group ELR .416 barrett RCC machined brass 500 yards solid Cutting Edge bullets
global precision group ELR .416 barrett RCC machined brass 500 yards solid Cutting Edge bullets

On this particular day, it was a very cool 15 degrees F. I was testing ammunition for the .416 Barrett. Since winning the King of 2 Miles in 2019, my team has been looking at ways to make everything better. The competition is fierce and everyone is getting better and better. Finding single-digit Standard Deviations (SDs) is a must. Holding SDs under 5 FPS can be what it takes to win.

global precision group ELR .416 barrett RCC machined brass 500 yards solid Cutting Edge bulletsAfter several weeks of testing, I think I found the perfect combination for the .416 Barrett in my rifle. My optimal load runs about 3000 FPS using the following components:

Cutting Edge 550 Grain Solid Bullets with Tips

RCC Brass (CNC-machined)

Vihtavuori 20N29 Powder

RWS primers

Loaded for ~3000 FPS load velocity goal

I figure if I can keep my 3-round groups under two inches consistently, I have a chance to win on any Sunday. The average group size of these groups was 1.47 inches at 500 yards. With big bore rifles it gets very costly to test. That is why I am limiting my test groups to 3 rounds. See below:

global precision group ELR .416 barrett RCC machined brass 500 yards solid Cutting Edge bullets
global precision group ELR .416 barrett RCC machined brass 500 yards solid Cutting Edge bullets
global precision group ELR .416 barrett RCC machined brass 500 yards solid Cutting Edge bullets

Note the single-digit Extreme Spread and SD for all of these three-shot groups, as recorded by the LabRadar (see below). The average SD for these three groups at 500 yards was about three.

global precision group ELR .416 barrett RCC machined brass 500 yards solid Cutting Edge bullets
NOTE: This is an animated GIF with THREE images, alternating every 4.5 seconds.

Not just the ammunition deserves credit. I also have to give credit to the quality Manson reamer, BAT action, Bartlein Barrel, Bix’N Andy trigger, Manners ELR stock, Nightforce Optic, and Accu-Tac bipod with my new P skis. All these gear/hardware items, combined with quality ammunition, allow these kind of groups.

Products featured in this article include:

Accu-Tac Bipods
Bartlein Barrel
BAT Machine Action
Bix’N Andy Trigger
CROSSTAC Shooting Mat
Cutting Edge Bullets
Edgewood Shooting Bag
Kestrel with Ballistics
LabRadar
LongShot Cameras
Manners Composite Stock
Manson Precision Reamer
Nightforce Optics
RCBS Press and Tools
RCC (CNC-machined) Brass
Vihtavuori Powder

global precision group ELR .416 barrett RCC machined brass 500 yards solid Cutting Edge bullets
For more information, visit GlobalPrecisionGroup.com, and the GPG Facebook Page.

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February 2nd, 2022

Edelkrone StandONE Folding Base Is Perfect for LabRadars

edelkrone standone all terrain foldable camera stand labradar radar

Do you own a LabRadar chronograph, or perhaps you are planning to add one to your range gear this season? With a LabRadar, you don’t have to go downrange to set up the chrono on a tripod and fuss with bore-sighting. LabRadars are excellent chronographs, particularly when paired with an inertial trigger.

Here is an excellent accessory that can be easily fitted to LabRadars. This Edelkrone StandONE all-terrain foldable camera stand can provide a stable base when shooting from a bench or the ground. It can quickly and easily adjust to uneven ground so that your LabRadar sits properly vertical and square to the horizon. The versatile Edelkrone StandONE sells for $119.20 at B&H Camera.

edelkrone standone all terrain foldable camera stand labradar radar
Note how the StandONE can adapt to uneven ground through the multiple hinges on the legs.

Forum member X-47B found this stand and he says it works great with his LabRadar. He is a commercial photographer, so he is familiar with the latest and greatest camera stands. In our Shooters’ Forum he posted: “Working in commercial photography and video I come across all different equipment. When I got this Edelkrone StandONE folding base, I realized it is the perfect base for a LagRadar. Works on friction, no ball-head needed. It works on any terrain and folds up tiny, so it’s perfect for prone or the bench.” Stated load capacity is 15 pounds, and this is made to hold expensive camera gear, so there’s no problem placing a LabRadar unit on top.

edelkrone standone all terrain foldable camera stand labradar radar

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November 9th, 2021

Slick Folding Base for LabRadar from Arkco Machine

labradar base unit arkcomatt stainless folding

High-Quality Portable Base for LabRadar Chronograph

If you currently own a LabRadar, or plan to buy one soon, there’s a smart new accessory you should consider buying. Matt Owens of ArkcoMachine.com offers a great, compact Quad Base for the LabRadar that works better than the flat, orange baseplate offered by the manufacturer.

Matt, aka “Arkcomatt”, explains: “These are machined from aluminum and put together with stainless steel screws. The rubber feet are held on with screws also. No more coming off. The legs have nylon washers between them and the base for smooth operation. The screws are torqued and thread locker applied. One of the best things is, with the standard attachment, it will fit in the case with the unit. No more having to take apart! Just fold the legs. It takes up less room on the bench and allows you to get it closer to the rifle. It is very stable and holds up very well in high winds.” ORDER BASE HERE.

labradar base unit arkcomatt stainless folding

labradar base unit arkcomatt stainless folding

arkcomatt swivel mount labradar quad baseArkco Machine’s folding Quad Base costs $89.95. The base offers better stability than the LabRadar factory mount, and is also easier to transport because it folds. This makes your LabRadar easier to deploy on a bench or when shooting prone.

Arkco Machine now offers handy swivel (ball) mounts for mounting your LabRadar to Arkco’s Quad Base. Choose either the Quick-Release Heavy-Duty Swivel Mount ($24.95, see photo at right) or the basic Light-Duty Ball Mount, just $10 (shown below). We like the Heavy-Duty unit because it can also be used for spotting scopes.

Arkco Machine also offers stainless spike feet for use when prone shooting. The spikes (shown below) screw in the same holes as the rubber feet.

labradar base unit arkcomatt stainless folding

Forum Member Praise Arkco Machine’s LabRadar Folding Base:
You can read user reviews of the LabRadar Quad Base in this Forum Thread.

Bullet-maker Bart Sauter has one of these bases now and he endorses it: “These bases are great for the LabRadar. Stable and compact — completely grab and go!”

Forum member Peterson1 agrees: “This is more stable than the Labradar base for my use–off a concrete BR bench, yet takes up less space. Also easier/quicker to set unit up and aimed at target. Never take the unit off for transport in LabRadar case. Only negative — you can’t trade in the factory LabRadar base toward purchase of this base. So buy smart the first time!”

Forum Member SkiUtah02 uses the base with optional spiked feet: “Met up with Matt at the Sierra Cup and bought my base with … spikes for the feet to put into the ground. Just had a chance to test it today and it worked great. I removed the rubber feet, and screwed in the four spiked feet, added a threaded-rod-coupling nut onto the bolt so that I could mount an old photography lighting stand swivel head to the base! Worked perfectly. Thanks Matt!”

labradar base unit arkcomatt stainless folding

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September 14th, 2021

Mobile Power Sources for SmartPhones, Tablets, & LabRadars

LabRadar FosPower USB Battery pack charnging LED

Today’s precision shooter is connected. He or she is likely to bring a number of electronic items to the range, such as a smartphone, tablet computer, Kestrel, LabRadar chronograph, and more. These digital devices all require electricity to operate. Unfortunately, most ranges don’t include convenient charging stations for your gadgets. Therefore you need to bring battery back-up. Here are three good options, with storage capacities from 10200 mAh to 42000 mAh. The first unit is fully weather-proof, so it is good for hunters and tactical shooters exposed to the elements. The largest power pack, with AC outlet, is quite versatile and works well on car-camping trips.

1. FosPower 10200 mAh Waterproof Charger, $29.99

FosPower USB Battery pack waterproof shockproof LED

When you’re at the range or on a hunt, it’s smart to have a USB-output battery pack for smart phone, target-cam monitor, even a LabRadar. There are many battery packs available, but most are fairly fragile, with exposed ports. This “ruggedized” FosPower 10200 mAh charger is different. It is waterproof, dust-proof, and shock-proof. (IP67 certified: dust and water resistance for up to 3ft/1m for 30 minutes under water.) It can handle all that a PRS competitor or hunter can dish out. It even has a handy LED light. Right now it’s priced at $29.99 with FREE Shipping for Prime members.

2. EasyAcc 20000 mAh Battery Pack with Fast Charging, $42.99

USB

If you want to charge multiple devices, such as a tablet and a LabRadar, you need serious capacity. The EasyAcc 20000 mAh battery pack can charge up to four devices simultaneously. Notably, this $42.99 Battery Pack charges faster than most other 20K packs. It has two power input ports, allowing it to fully charge in 6-7 hours. (We have another 20000 mAh battery unit that takes over 16 hours to fully charge!). This unit will charge an iPhone 7 six times, a Samsung S8 four times or an iPad Mini two times. Note, 78% of Amazon purchasers rated this unit Five Stars (with 13% Four-Star reviews).

3. Jackery 240Wh USB, 110v AC, 12v DC Power Station, $199.99

USB

Many folks have asked us “How can I use a laptop, chronograph, or electronic powder dispenser that requires 110 volt AC power when I’m at the range?” Sure you can take power from your car’s 12 volt cigarette lighter jack, but you’ll still need a very long cable and a 12 volt to 110 volt step-up transformer. If you run a cable from the parking lot to the bench or shooting bay you’ll have to leave a window open in your vehicle and fellow shooters can trip over the long cord.

A better solution is to get a portable, combo USB + 110 volt + 12 volt power unit. This versatile 240Wh Jackery Power Station will drive a 110v device, 12v units, PLUS charge a USB tablet and cellphone, all at the same time. You can run a LabRadar for DAYS with this advanced Lithium Ion power-pack. It will also power CPAP machines and other 12v devices. One nice feature is rapid charging. Before your range session or camping trip, plug this into the wall. It will get fully charged in about 3.5 hours from a 110v outlet. Also this unit can recharge from a paired Jackery solar panel ($179.99 sold separately, see below). By itself (without solar panel) the Jackery portable power source is $199.99 on Amazon. See Jackery Product Store.

USB

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April 20th, 2021

LabRadar Owners — You Should Get this $35 Inertial Trigger

LabRadar chronograph to register bullet speed JKL inertial trigger recoil activated

SUMMARY: This article reviews a device that “triggers” the LabRadar chronograph to register bullet speed. Rather than activate by sound or Doppler reading, this $35 JKL Inertial Trigger works from the rifle’s instantaneous recoil pulse when a shot is fired. After some frustration with his LabRadar when shooting at a range with reflective surfaces, our tester is now reporting that 100% of his actual shots are being captured correctly by his LabRadar chrono equipped with the JKL Inertial Trigger. He won’t use his LabRadar without it now. Other users have become instant fans of this inertial LabRadar trigger as well. It is very affordable and it works great. VIEW LARGE PHOTO.

JKL Inertial Trigger for LabRadar Chronograph

Product Review by F Class John
The LabRadar chronograph has been one of the most revolutionary tools in the shooting world because of how it collects velocity data, how it reports (and stores) that data, and, ultimately, the ease with which it can be positioned and operated. However, it’s not a perfect system. A majority of the complaints come from users whose LabRadar’s sometimes fail to record all the shots fired in a string. For the average plinker, this may not be an issue. But for serious shooters trying to do ladder tests or load development requiring all shots to be reported, it can be frustrating when a shot is missed.

LabRadar chronograph to register bullet speed JKL inertial trigger recoil activated

Traditionally, LabRadar has recommended trying different settings that compensate for the gap between the unit and muzzle as well as well as having different options for how the unit recognizes a shot fired. While these options work to some degree, they aren’t a guaranteed fix especially when shooting at ranges with concrete baffles or with roofs, walls, and dividers that can alter sound waves. While nobody can precisely explain why shots are lost under certain circumstances, the fact remains it DOES happen. In addition, the default system can sometimes pick up stray shots from nearby rifles.

Not willing to give up on this sophisticated chronograph, many shooters have looked for a foolproof way to prevent such failures from happening. In fact, for this shooter, the frustration was so high that I actually sold my first LabRadar and went back to another chronograph before ultimately buying another LabRadar almost a year later. But I made that repeat purchase only after vowing to finding a way to make the LabRadar work — EVERY time, for EVERY shot.

See How JKL Inertial Trigger Works in this Video

JKL Inertial Trigger — Outstanding Product That Works Great
Enter the JKL Trigger for the LabRadar. This is an easy-to-use, inertial-driven trigger that activates simply from the recoil of your gun. The unit consists of a small rectangular pad attached to a long audio cable. All you do is plug in the audio cable, attach the pad to your gun with the provided hook and loop (Velcro) material. Then (important), you must change the LabRadar trigger settings from “Doppler” to “Trigger”. The unit works great and is easy to set up. In my experience, the unit will activate no matter where you place it on a stock. However the recoil of every gun is slightly different, so you will need to make sure you find a location that doesn’t interfere with your shooting setup.

LabRadar chronograph to register bullet speed JKL inertial trigger recoil activated

An unexpected benefit of using the JKL trigger is that it gives you a larger area in which to place your Labradar unit, making it more convenient to setup on benches or range stations. I found this a welcome relief since the LabRadar originally seemed somewhat fussy about where I placed it. Now I can place the LabRadar in more convenient locations — as long as it’s still near my gun and pointed at the target correctly, I get consistent bullet speed data.

LabRadar chronograph to register bullet speed JKL inertial trigger recoil activated

Are There Issues with “False Positives”?
If there is any downside to using the JKL Inertial Trigger, it’s that a very hard bump or aggressive working of the action can trigger a false reading. However these are easy to identify in your data, because the speed value is way lower than true fired shot values. Simply remove that low entry or otherwise ignore it in your calculations. To be fair, this “bump activation” really doesn’t happen very often once you get used to using the inertial trigger.

SUMMARY — Outstanding Accessory for LabRadar Users
Bottom line — if you own a LabRadar, then definitely get a JKL Inertial Trigger. Priced at just $35.00 this device is not expensive, yet it’s one of the most effective accessories you can buy for the LabRadar. I’ve recommended these inertial triggers to dozens of shooters. Every one of those guys who did buy a JKL trigger says they can’t imagine using a LabRadar without one. If you love what the LabRadar can do, but have been frustrated with shots not getting recorded 100% of the time, then definitely get yourself a JKL Inertial Trigger. It turns a good system into an amazing system. JKL Industries states that its inertial trigger “will work on anything from a .22 LR to a suppressed system or with standard rifle and brake.”

Permalink - Articles, - Videos, Gear Review, Tech Tip No Comments »
June 18th, 2020

NRA Firearm Science Videos Offer Insights on Many Topics

NRA firearms science videos ballistics chronography mil-dot eye dominance

NRA Media offers a series of informative videos about the Science of Shooting, covering a wide range of topics, from eye dominance to long-range ballistics. These videos feature high production values, with super-slow motion segments, as well as helpful computer graphics to illustrate the principles covered.

The videos are narrated by Jessie Duff, a top action pistol shooter (and the first women ever to achieve USPSA Grand Master status). Jessie is assisted by talented shooters such as Top Shot Season 4 Champion Chris Cheng. There are over forty videos in the Firearm Science Video Series. Here are five NRA videos, with links to others below. You’ll find all NRA Firearm Science Videos HERE

BULLET TRAJECTORY — Factors at Play and Zeroing Strategies

Host Jessie Duff and Veteran Air Force Sniper and Long Range Expert George Reinas help us understand the factors behind bullet trajectory. NOTE: There are some exaggerations in the graphics in the videos, and inconsistent terminology use, but it’s still a helpful basic primer on the subject of trajectories.

SHOOTING POSITIONS — Prone, Standing, Sitting, Kneeling

Olympic Gold Medalist Jamie Gray demonstrates the four positions used by competition shooters: Prone, Standing, Sitting, and Kneeling. Helpful overlay graphics show how the human skeleton aligns in each of these positions. This video should help hunters as well as competitive position shooters. If you shoot silhouette, definitely watch this video!

ZEROING RIFLES for Long Range — Tech Tips

The process of zeroing rifles for long range is covered in this Firearm Science video featuring George Reinas, a veteran Air Force sniper. George demonstrates how to adjust his scope to compensate for bullet drop at long range. Our friend Dennis Santiago was involved in the making of this video, which was filmed at the Burbank Rifle & Revolver Club in Southern California.

CHRONOGRAPHS — Calculating the Speed of a Bullet

pistol shooting science Jessie Duff NRA Ballistic PendulumThis video shows a conventional chronograph with front and rear light sensors. The bullet first trips the front sensor and then the rear sensor as it flies over the unit. The difference in sensor time is used to calculate bullet speed. This is not the only kind of chrono in common use today. The popular MagnetoSpeed chrono works by tracking the bullet as it passes over two magnetic sensors mounted on a bayonet-style fixture on the barrel.

The high-tech LabRadar chronograph employs Doppler Radar to measure the speed of a bullet without the need to send the round directly over sensors. No need to set up tripods down-range. Just set the unit near your rifle’s muzzle, on the side. There is also an inertial trigger accessory for LabRadars. Interestingly, this video also explains how, in the days before electric lamps, digital processors, and radar, scientists used a mechanical “Ballistic Pendulum” to calculate bullet velocity using Newtonian physics. The Ballistic Pendulum (shown at right) was first used in the mid 1700s.

EYE DOMINANCE — How to Determine Which Eye is Dominant

Host Jessie Duff and longtime shooter Krystie Messenger demonstrate how eye dominance affects aim and teach you how to determine your dominant eye in this edition of Firearm Science. There are very simple tests you can do to determine your eye dominance. This Editor is right-handed but left-eye dominant. All competitive shooters should check for eye dominance. If you are cross-dominant, you can alter your head position or put a paper patch on one frame of your shooting glasses.

Other NRA Firearm Science Videos

Firearm Science: Using Mil-Dots to Estimate Range

Firearm Science: Terminal Ballistics

Firearm Science: Rimfire vs. Centerfire

Firearm Science: Eye Protection

Firearm Science: Shooting Moving Targets

Firearm Science: Trigger Control (Pistol)

Firearm Science: Aiming Handguns

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May 12th, 2020

JKL Inertial Trigger — Great Upgrade for LabRadar Chronograph

LabRadar chronograph to register bullet speed JKL inertial trigger recoil activated

SUMMARY: This article reviews a device that “triggers” the LabRadar chronograph to register bullet speed. Rather than activate by sound or Doppler reading, this $35 JKL Inertial Trigger works from the rifle’s instantaneous recoil pulse when a shot is fired. After some frustration with his LabRadar when shooting at a range with reflective surfaces, our tester is now reporting that 100% of his actual shots are being captured correctly by his LabRadar chrono equipped with the JKL Inertial Trigger. He won’t use his LabRadar without it now. Other users have become instant fans of this inertial LabRadar trigger as well. It is very affordable and it works great. VIEW LARGE PHOTO.

JKL Inertial Trigger for LabRadar Chronograph

Product Review by F Class John
The LabRadar chronograph has been one of the most revolutionary tools in the shooting world because of how it collects velocity data, how it reports (and stores) that data, and, ultimately, the ease with which it can be positioned and operated. However, it’s not a perfect system. A majority of the complaints come from users whose LabRadar’s sometimes fail to record all the shots fired in a string. For the average plinker, this may not be an issue. But for serious shooters trying to do ladder tests or load development requiring all shots to be reported, it can be frustrating when a shot is missed.

LabRadar chronograph to register bullet speed JKL inertial trigger recoil activated

Traditionally, LabRadar has recommended trying different settings that compensate for the gap between the unit and muzzle as well as well as having different options for how the unit recognizes a shot fired. While these options work to some degree, they aren’t a guaranteed fix especially when shooting at ranges with concrete baffles or with roofs, walls, and dividers that can alter sound waves. While nobody can precisely explain why shots are lost under certain circumstances, the fact remains it DOES happen. In addition, the default system can sometimes pick up stray shots from nearby rifles.

Not willing to give up on this sophisticated chronograph, many shooters have looked for a foolproof way to prevent such failures from happening. In fact, for this shooter, the frustration was so high that I actually sold my first LabRadar and went back to another chronograph before ultimately buying another LabRadar almost a year later. But I made that repeat purchase only after vowing to finding a way to make the LabRadar work — EVERY time, for EVERY shot.

See How JKL Inertial Trigger Works in this Video

JKL Inertial Trigger — Outstanding Product That Works Great
Enter the JKL Trigger for the LabRadar. This is an easy-to-use, inertial-driven trigger that activates simply from the recoil of your gun. The unit consists of a small rectangular pad attached to a long audio cable. All you do is plug in the audio cable, attach the pad to your gun with the provided hook and loop (Velcro) material. Then (important), you must change the LabRadar trigger settings from “Doppler” to “Trigger”. The unit works great and is easy to set up. In my experience, the unit will activate no matter where you place it on a stock. However the recoil of every gun is slightly different, so you will need to make sure you find a location that doesn’t interfere with your shooting setup.

LabRadar chronograph to register bullet speed JKL inertial trigger recoil activated

An unexpected benefit of using the JKL trigger is that it gives you a larger area in which to place your Labradar unit, making it more convenient to setup on benches or range stations. I found this a welcome relief since the LabRadar originally seemed somewhat fussy about where I placed it. Now I can place the LabRadar in more convenient locations — as long as it’s still near my gun and pointed at the target correctly, I get consistent bullet speed data.

LabRadar chronograph to register bullet speed JKL inertial trigger recoil activated

Are There Issues with “False Positives”?
If there is any downside to using the JKL Inertial Trigger, it’s that a very hard bump or aggressive working of the action can trigger a false reading. However these are easy to identify in your data, because the speed value is way lower than true fired shot values. Simply remove that low entry or otherwise ignore it in your calculations. To be fair, this “bump activation” really doesn’t happen very often once you get used to using the inertial trigger.

SUMMARY — Outstanding Accessory for LabRadar Users
Bottom line — if you own a LabRadar, then definitely get a JKL Inertial Trigger. Priced at just $35.00 this device is not expensive, yet it’s one of the most effective accessories you can buy for the LabRadar. I’ve recommended these inertial triggers to dozens of shooters. Every one of those guys who did buy a JKL trigger says they can’t imagine using a LabRadar without one. If you love what the LabRadar can do, but have been frustrated with shots not getting recorded 100% of the time, then definitely get yourself a JKL Inertial Trigger. It turns a good system into an amazing system. JKL Industries states that its inertial trigger “will work on anything from a .22 LR to a suppressed system or with standard rifle and brake.”

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December 1st, 2019

Bargain Finder 219: Deals of the Week Cyber Monday Edition

Accurateshooter Bargain Finder Deals of Week
Accurateshooter Bargain Finder Deals of Week

At the request of our readers, we provide select “Deals of the Week”. Every Sunday afternoon or Monday morning we offer our Best Bargain selections. Here are some of the best deals on firearms, hardware, reloading components, optics, and shooting accessories. Be aware that sale prices are subject to change, and once clearance inventory is sold, it’s gone for good. You snooze you lose.

1. Amazon — ADDTOP Power Bank with Solar Panels, $39.99

Power bank battery USB charger solar panels remote charging

Power — modern shooters need mobile battery power to run a LabRadar, charge a Tablet monitoring a Target Camera, or charge you smartphone running a Ballistics App. Here’s one of the best compact USB-port batteries you can buy. This offers 25000 mAh of energy, PLUS it has four solar panels (one built-in, three external). This ADDTOP Power Bank is on sale now for $39.99 on Amazon, a good deal.

2. Amazon — Samsung 10″ Galaxy Tab (Android OS), $147.00

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10

These days, every serious rifleman can really use a tablet computer. Use it with WiFi target-cam systems. Run Ballistics and Reloading Apps. And plug in a $49.99 Teslong endoscope to monitor your bore. This 10″ Samsung Galaxy Tab boasts a 2019 Android OS, long (13-hr) battery life, and easy MicroSD memory boosting. Right now this Samsung is on sale for $147.00 with Free Shipping, a great deal. Or order for $156.99 with 64GB MicroSD card (the BEST DEAL).

3. Cutting Edge Bullets — 25% Off $150+ Orders

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10

Cutting Edge Bullets crafts some of the best-performing projectiles for extreme long range (ELR) shooting. Cutting Edge Solids have set many records. And now you can get these great bullets for 25% OFF. But act soon. This deal is for TODAY ONLY, December 2, 2019. Use Code CYBER19 to get25% OFF all orders over $150.00, with FREE Shipping.

4. Brownells — Electronic Muffs, $24.99 (40% Off)

Brownells electronic premium muffs discount sale ear protection

Brownells new, Second Generation Premium Electronic Earmuffs incorporate dual microphones that let you hear range commmand while suppressing harmful noises. These affordable muffs fold for easy storage, and you can plug your smartphone into the 3.5mm input jack. Right now these muffs are discounted from $41.99 to $24.99 — a 40% savings!

5. Midsouth — Hornady 6.5 Creedmoor Brass and 140gr Bullets

hornady 6.5 creedmoor brass ELD bullets

Do you shoot a 6.5 Creedmoor? Well here’s the deal of the year on 6.5 Creedmoor brass and bullets. Get 100 pieces of Hornady 6.5mm Creedmoor Brass for just $34.99. Then add Hornady 6.5mm 140gr ELD Bullets at $64.99/250. That’s just $24.99 per 100, an awesome deal.

6. Multiple Vendors — LabRadar Chronograph, $499.95 ($60 OFF)

labradar midsouth brunos creedmoor sale chrongraph

The LabRadar is arguably the most sophisticated consumer chronograph on the market. These units rarely go on sale — but here’s your chance. Right now you can now get a LabRadar for $499.95 — that’s $60 off the normal price. (Sale price good through December 2, 2019). Purchase direct from Mylabradar.com, or order for $499.95 from leading vendors Midsouth Shooters, Bruno’s, and Creedmoor Sports.

7. EuroOptic — 15% OFF Nightforce NXS and SHV Scopes

eurooptic sale

Nightforce Optics makes great scopes for all disciplines. You’ll see Nightforces on the rifles of top benchrest, F-Class, and PRS/NRL competitors. Right now EuroOptic is running a big Nightforce promo. Save 15% on Nightforce NXS or SHV scopes. No rebate forms needed — the 15% savings is processed when you buy.

8. Powder Valley — Free HazMat Through 12/2/2019 — All Brands

Powder Valley Inc. Primers Free Hazmat Haz Mat shipping Cyber Sale Black Friday

Need powder and/or primers? Then head over to Powder Valley. Starting November 29, 2019 (this coming Friday), you can get FREE HazMat for all brands of reloading powders and primers with orders over $179.00. And yes you can combine powder and primers in the same shipment. This FREE HazMat offer runs through December 2, 2019. Go to PowderValleyInc.com and select FREE HazMat during checkout, starting Friday November 29th.

9. SIG Sauer — Huge Optics Sale, up to 60% Off

SIG Sauer electrooptics optics scope sale

Now through midnight December 2, 2019, save up to 60% on SIG Sauer riflescopes, red dot sights, rangefinders, binoculars and spotting scopes while supplies last. Choose from 58 different styles. There are some great deals to be had, with prices slashed up to 60%. But ACT SOON, this is a one-day-only sale!

10. Bushmaster Firearms — 50% Off Entire Site Today Only

area 419 sale

Bushmaster Firearms is running a big sale today with 50% Savings on uppers, lowers, muzzle brakes, mags, cleaning supplies and more. There are some truly impressive deals. But you better jump on it — the Sale ends 12/2/2019 at 11:59 pm EDT.

11. AREA 419 — CZ 457 MTR Fully Loaded, $950

area 419 sale

Tactical-style .22 LR rimfire rifles permit PRS/NRL shooters to cross-train effectively with low-cost ammo. The new CZ 527 MTR is a great platform for a rimfire precision custom. Area 419 has developed a cool 527 MTR-based rig with all the bells and whistles. Area 419’s fully loaded CZ 457 MTR comes complete with an ARCAlock rail, AREA 419 scope base, and Area 419 bolt knob. This is certainly a top choice for a sub-$1000, .22 LR PRS cross-trainer. Buy now and save $170.00.

12. Creedmoor Sports — $10 Off $150+ Orders and Ammo Sale

Cyber monday sale creedmoor sports .223 Rem ammo ammunition discount code

On Cyber Monday, Creedmoor Sports is offering $10 Off all orders over $150.00, with FREE Shipping. In addition, Creedmoor Sports has discounted its excellent 75gr .223 Rem Ammo. Get 50 rounds for just $30.00. That’s a 32.5% discount off the regular $39.75 price.

13. Midsouth Shooters — Aguila 9mm FMJ Ammo, $8.49 50rd Box

9mm luger 9x19mm pistol fmj handgun ammo ammunition

We bet most readers own at least one 9mm handgun. Here’s a killer deal on major-brand 9x19mm FMJ ammo — which is fine for general range use and training. The $8.49 price for 50 rounds works out to just seventeen cents ($0.17) per round. At that rate it’s not worth hand-loading, if you value your time at all. Act soon, this deal may expire on 12/2/2019 at 11:59 pm.

14. Palmetto State Armory — Taurus G2c 9mm Pistol, $179.99

Carry pistol $185 bargain Taurus G2C ccw handgun review discount sales

This is a good little compact carry gun at a great price. Palmetto State Armory has the black-on-black Taurus 9mm G2c for just $179.99. But it gets even better — with Taurus Factory Rebate your net cost is just $154.99! That’s one of the lowest prices we’ve ever seen for a big name, reliable 9mm handgun. Buy soon before the Rebate Offer expires.

15. Amazon — Jialitte Scope Bubble Level, $10.99

Scope Optic bubble level 30mm 1

All serious rifle shooters need a scope level. This nicely designed Jialitte Scope Bubble Level features a 30mm milled inside diameter, plus an inner insert ring so it will also fit 1″-diameter main tubes — that dual-diameter versatility is a nice feature. We also like the way the unit is nicely radiused, and has a low profile in the middle. Price is just $10.99 with free shipping. User reviews have been very positive. You could easily pay $35.00 or more for a 30mm scope level.

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November 18th, 2019

Bargain Finder 217: AccurateShooter’s Deals of the Week

Accurateshooter Bargain Finder Deals of Week

At the request of our readers, we provide select “Deals of the Week”. Every Sunday afternoon or Monday morning we offer our Best Bargain selections. Here are some of the best deals on firearms, hardware, reloading components, optics, and shooting accessories. Be aware that sale prices are subject to change, and once clearance inventory is sold, it’s gone for good. You snooze you lose.

1. Bullet Central — Lapua Brass Sale

lapua brass sale

We’re coming up on the end of the year and that means it won’t be long until it’s time for matches. Get ahead during the off season by taking advantage of the Lapua brass sale at Bullet Central. It’s smart to buy your brass for the 2020 season now, so you can do your brass prep and loading during the winter months.

2. Multiple Vendors — LabRadar Chronograph, $499.95 ($60 OFF)

labradar midsouth brunos creedmoor sale chrongraph

The LabRadar is arguably the most sophisticated consumer chronograph on the market. These units rarely go on sale — but here’s your chance. Right now you can now get a LabRadar for $499.95 — that’s $60 off the normal price. (Sale price good through December 2, 2019). Purchase direct from Mylabradar.com, or order from leading vendors Midsouth Shooters (in-stock $499.95), Bruno’s (back-order $499.95), and Creedmoor Sports ($499.95 in stock).

3. Brownells — Giant Ammo Clearance

brownells ammunition ammo sale and clearance

You can find discounts on certain ammunition brands at various vendors, but we’ve never seen a huge clearance like this with so many ammo types on sale. Take some time to check out all the amazing Ammo Clearance Deals now at Brownells. Over 1800 products are clearance priced so there’s sure to be something for everyone.

4. Natchez — Holiday Discount Codes, Save $10, $25, $40

natchez discount codes.

Right now you can get direct money OFF nearly all products at Natchez Shooters Supply. Save $10 on purchases of $100 or more with CODE D191118A, or save $25 on $200 with CODE D191118B, or save a full $40 (13.3%) on orders of $300 or more with CODE D191118C. You must act soon, however, as these Discount Codes expire at 11:59 pm November 20, 2019. Some restrictions apply.

5. Field & Cave Outfitters — Silhouette Targets, up to 40% off

steel varmint silhouette steel targets field cave outfitters

If you’re tired of shooting at paper targets, check out these sturdy varmint benchrest silhouette targets from Field & Cave Outfitters. There are a variety of animals to choose from. Right now you can save up to 40% off on these quality steel silhouette targets. The Prairie Dog and Armadillo are laser-cut and bent 18ga cold-rolled steel. The Coyote and Hog are 3/8″-thick AR500 steel, laser- cut then welded.

6. Sportsman’s Warehouse — Ruger Security-9mm Pistol, $279.99

sportsman's warehouse security-9 glock ruger security 9mm

Here’s a great deal for those looking to either add a handgun to their collection or for those just getting started in the shooting sports. We found the Ruger Security-9 in 9mm for a great price of $279.99. Under $280 for a reliable, sturdy Ruger 9mm — that’s a smart choice for personal defense. This features a blued steel slide, 4″ barrel, polymer frame, and 15-rd magazine.

7. Amazon — Padded Shooting Mat, $37.99

redneck roll-up padded shooting mat

Are you new to prone shooting or tired of using an old worn out mat? Grab one of these Redneck Convent padded shooting mats and you shoot in style and comfort all day long. These pads are weather, chemical and water resistant and the durable PVC material is easy to clean and maintain. Best of all it rolls up for easy storage and transport.

8. Midsouth — Frankford Arsenal Vibra Prime, $39.99

frankford arsenal vibra prime primer tube loader

Do you still load up your priming tubes the old fashion way, one at a time out of a flip tray? Save yourself time and trouble with the Frankford Arsenal Vibra Prime Primer Tube Loader. This tool loads a universal primer tube in just seconds and can transfer the primers to just about any brand primer tube just as easily. We’ve used one of these for years without Hornady, RCBS and Dillon tubes without any issues.

9. Amazon — Waterproof Clipboard, $19.98

waterproof clipboard

Planning on hitting the range or that next match but the forecast says there might be a few showers? Fear no more as you can grab one of these waterproof clipboards and keep your load data notes or your shooting partners scores safe and dry. We keep one of these with us anytime we go to a match because you can flip it over and use it as a regular clipboard when it’s dry too!

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November 17th, 2019

Chrono Test — LabRadar vs. MagnetoSpeed vs. Oehler 35P

labradar chronograph test magnetospeed V3 oehler 35P 6mmBR Ackley BRA

We see comparison tests of cars, cameras, and other hardware. But how about chronographs? What could we learn by setting up three different chronographs, and running a 20-shot string over all three at the same time. One of our Forum members, Randy S. (aka AAA) did that very test with three of the best chronographs you can buy: LabRadar, MagnetoSpeed, and an Oehler model 35P. The MagnetoSpeed was attached to the barrel of an F-Class rig, with the LabRadar placed on the left side of the shooting bench. The Oehler 35P was positioned about 23 feet downrange. The photo above shows the set-up. A 20-shot string was recorded with the results in a spreadsheet.

AAA talks about this interesting experiment in a Shooters’ Forum Thread. Here is his report:

Comparison Testing Three Chronographs

We all have our favorite chronograph. Each gives a number, but how would that number compare to the same round fired with another chronograph? I wanted to know so a friend and I set up the following test with three chronographs: LabRadar, MagnetoSpeed V3, and Oehler Model 35P.

For the test we fired Berger 105gr VLDs over the three chronographs simultaneously. The test rifle was my 6mm BR Ackley (BRA) F-class rig with fire-formed brass and 200 rounds on the new barrel.

Chronogaphs Tested
LabRadar
MagnetoSpeed V3
Oehler Model 35P
Temperature: 86 deg. F
Elevation: 854 feet
Cartridge: 6mm BRA (105gr Berger VLD)
Time between shots: 45 seconds

To start off, five rounds were fired to make sure all systems were recording and to warm the barrel. Then the test was 20 shots fired across all three instruments with 45 seconds between shots. The Oehler was set 7.5 yards from the muzzle so 12 FPS was added to the recorded value.

We were using the internal trigger on the LabRadar. The manual says the Vo indicated is the actual muzzle velocity when using the internal trigger, but not if using the Doppler. The 12 FPS Oehler adjustment (back to MV) was based on the Berger Ballistics Calculator.

The LabRadar Chronograph is on sale now through 12/7/2019. Buy for $499.95, a $60.00 savings.
magnetospeed chronograph test

Results of the Triple Chronograph Shoot-Out:

labradar chronograph test magnetospeed V3 oehler 35P 6mmBR Ackley BRA

LR-M is FPS variance between LabRadar and MagnetoSpeed V3. LR-O is FPS variance between LabRadar and distance-adjusted Oehler 35P. You can see all three chronos were very consistent. ES was identical with the MagnetoSpeed and Oehler 35P, while SD was identical with the LabRadar and Oehler 35P. CLICK HERE for spreadsheet.

The tester, Randy S. (aka AAA) says: “Judge for yourself, but I was impressed by all.”

magnetospeed chronograph test
This is a manufacturer’s photo showing the Magnetospeed V3 as mounted. This is NOT the test set-up.

Comments by Forum Members
Our Forum members expressed interest in this Triple Chronograph test. Some confirmed that the LabRadar and Magnetospeed give very similar FPS numbers, based on their own tests:

“Great test and thanks for sharing. I’ve tested my MagnetoSpeed and LabRadar together and results are always within 2-4 FPS of one another.” — Big D

“Very happy to see your numbers support my decision to buy a MagnetoSpeed. Had read reports comparing it to the Oehler and the numbers I get seem to be supported by my long range shooting results. Many thanks for taking the time and effort [to perform] this comparative test. Always good to get actual test results.” — Texas10

“I did a 4-shot test with my MagnetoSpeed and another shooter’s LabRadar a couple of days ago. The results were within 4 fps with the LabRadar being optimistic.” — Pat Miles

Forum Member Powderbreak studied AAA’s original spreadsheet from the chronograph trio test, then figured out the shot-by-shot FPS variance between the machines. He concluded that all the machines performed very well. Powderbreak posted:

Analyzing the Triple Chronograph Test — What Can We Conclude?

AAA did a great job of comparing the 3 chronos. What conclusions can be drawn?

1) I have not checked the manufacturer’s claims of accuracy, but the three chronos are very close to one another. There is no way for us to determine the actual true velocities, but we do not need to do so. Any of the chronos would be more than adequate for an accurate shooter.

2) The resolution of the three chronographs is actually pretty astounding. One foot per second (FPS) is a resolution of 0.033%.

3) AAA did a great job of reloading a very consistent round. With an extreme spread of 33 fps out of 3014 for 20 rounds, that is only 1.09% total spread of velocities.

4) There is a closer velocity match between the MagnetoSpeed and the LabRadar, but that does not mean the Oehler is less accurate. There is simply an offset between the Oehler and the other two. This could be due to the greater distance, the location, or the internal working of the Oehler.

5) Believe your chronograph, it is probably the most accurate reloading tool that you own.

Brian Litz of Applied Ballistics carefully explained the operation, set-up, accuracy and comparison of AB’s chronographs in his books. [Those books] are well worth the money, and give great insight into the workings of chronographs.” — Powderbreak

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September 22nd, 2019

Mobile Power — Chargers for Phones, Laptops, Tablets, LabRadars

LabRadar FosPower USB Battery pack charnging LED

Today’s precision shooter is connected. He or she is likely to bring a number of electronic items to the range, such as a smartphone, tablet computer, Kestrel, LabRadar chronograph, and more. These digital devices all require electricity to operate. Unfortunately, most ranges don’t include convenient charging stations for your gadgets. Therefore you need to bring battery back-up. Here are three good options, with storage capacities from 10200 mAh to 42000 mAh. The first unit is fully weather-proof, so it is good for hunters and tactical shooters exposed to the elements. The largest power pack, with AC outlet, is quite versatile and works well on car-camping trips.

1. FosPower 10200 mAh Waterproof Charger, $29.99

FosPower USB Battery pack waterproof shockproof LED

When you’re at the range or on a hunt, it’s smart to have a USB-output battery pack for smart phone, target-cam monitor, even a LabRadar. There are many battery packs available, but most are fairly fragile, with exposed ports. This “ruggedized” FosPower 10200 mAh charger is different. It is waterproof, dust-proof, and shock-proof. (IP67 certified: dust and water resistance for up to 3ft/1m for 30 minutes under water.) It can handle all that a PRS competitor or hunter can dish out. It even has a handy LED light. Right now it’s priced at $29.99 with FREE Shipping (on orders over $25.00).

2. EasyAcc 20000 mAh Battery Pack with Fast Charging, $37.99

USB

If you want to charge multiple devices, such as a tablet and a LabRadar, you need serious capacity. The EasyAcc 20000 mAh battery pack can charge up to four devices simultaneously. Notably, this $37.99 Battery Pack charges faster than most other 20K packs. It has two power input ports, allowing it to fully charge in 6-7 hours. (We have another 20000 mAh battery unit that takes over 16 hours to fully charge!). This unit will charge an iPhone 7 six times, a Samsung S8 four times or an iPad Mini two times. Note, 77% of Amazon purchasers rated this unit Five Stars (with 13% Four-Star reviews).

3. Webetop 42000 mAh USB, 12v DC, 110v AC Power Station, $108.99

USB

Many folks have asked us “How can I use a laptop, chronograph, or electronic powder dispenser that requires 110 volt AC power when I’m at the range?” Sure you can take power from your car’s 12 volt cigarette lighter jack, but you’ll still need a very long cable and a 12 volt to 110 volt step-up transformer. If you run a cable from the parking lot to the bench or shooting bay you’ll have to leave a window open in your vehicle and fellow shooters can trip over the long cord.

A better solution is to get a portable, combo 12 volt + 110 volt power unit. This versatile 42000 mAh Webetop Power Station will drive a 110v device, plus charge a tablet and cellphone, all at the same time. You can run a LabRadar for days with this power-pack. It will also power CPAP machines and other 12V devices. One nice feature is rapid charging. Before your range session or camping trip, plug this into the wall. It will get fully charged in 7-8 hours. It’s a bargain right now for $108.99 on Amazon.

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August 11th, 2019

Sunday GunDay — Eye-Catching Rifles from America and the UK

sunday gunday Rem 700 .270 winchester win tye sims
Here is Tye Sim’s .270 Win Mountain Rifle: “This is off a trued and blue-printed Rem 700 action. I love it.”

For today’s Sunday GunDay feature, we thought we’d present a selection of rifles featuring both cool gear and scenic venues. We’ve got quite a mix — hunting rifles and competition rigs, full customs as well as factory rifles. And there are some interesting calibers including 6.5 Creedmoor, .270 Win, .308 Win, plus a couple WSM variants. Enjoy our Sunday lineup!

Gary Costello Blair Atholl Scotland F-Open F-Class .300 WSM

To begin, here is the beautiful Blair Atholl range in Scotland. Owner Gary Costello posted: “Great day today, weather was interesting but not as bad as we thought!” Gary, a top F-Class shooter in the UK who often runs a .300 WSM, has been featured in a previous Sunday GunDay spotlight story HERE

F-class F-Open Andrew Stone .284 Win Labradar

Andrew Stone is an F-Class shooter from the Southern USA. Here his F-Open rig is set up for load testing from the bench at his beautiful, tree-lined home range. Targets are at 600 yards. Andrew is using a SEB front coaxial rest and LabRadar chronograph mounted on an aftermarket tripod.

F-TR Brian Harder rifle F-TR

In the photo above is Brian Harder’s handsome .308 Win F-TR rifle. This features a Kelbly action, McMillan stock, and Vortex scope with level. Up front is a SEB Joystick Bipod (Joy-Pod) with accessory ski-type feet. Note that Brian runs a front scope extension tube (sunshade), and a mirage shield on the barrel. These items do make a difference, particularly on hot summer days!

F-Class 7mm 270 WSM hydro-dip Bartlein

Here’s another British Beauty. This is the 7mm-270 WSM F-Classer belonging to Forum member Ian B. (aka “Elwood”). It features a Stolle Panda F-Class action, 32″ straight-contour Bartlein barrel, and a custom Joe West stock, modified by Ian and then hydro-dipped in brilliant blue by Hydro Graphics in the UK.

Bergara B14 6.5 Creedmoor HMR

Factory rifles can be interesting too. That’s pretty impressive accuracy shown by Steven Castleman’s Bergara B14 HMR chambered in 6.5 Creedmoor. On this day Steve was shooting Hornady factory ammo loaded with 147-grain ELD Match bullets.

Savage Stealth 10 BA Rifle hog hunting

Here’s a stunning silhouette of a Savage 6.5 Creedmoor. Ed Whipple posted: “Borrowing a Savage 10 BA Stealth from my buddy Ron. He wanted a 100-yard head shot on a hog. I’m not listening to Ron any more. Federal Fusion bullet ain’t messing around.”

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April 28th, 2019

Sunday GunDay: The Modern .308 Win F-TR Rifle

F-TR Rifle laminated stock X-Ring Borden Action SEB Joy-Pod
A carpet is used up front for smoother tracking with the Joy-Pod’s flat, ski-style feet. The arms of the Joy-Pod were painted to match the stock. The rear bag features low-drag material on the ears.

On Sundays, we feature notable rifles that exhibit fine craftsmanship, quality components, and noteworthy shooting accessories. Today we are featuring an F-TR (F-Class Target Rifle) rig that showcases the types of components, and accessories used by top F-TR competitors — including a coaxial bipod and Labradar Chronograph. If you’re considering getting started in the F-TR game, take a close look at this modern F-TR build from Forum member DM.Oakes.

F-TR Rifle laminated stock X-Ring Borden Action SEB Joy-Pod

Modern F-TR Rig with Borden Action, Krieger Barrel, and SEB Joy-Pod
This handsome .308 Win F-TR rig features a smooth-running Borden BRM action, 30-inch 1:10″-twist Krieger barrel, and an X-Ring Laminated Wood stock. Up front is a coaxial “Joy-Pod” joystick bipod. This is a state-of-the art, wide footprint bipod used by many competitors at the Worlds in Canada. The long joystick allows the “driver” to quickly adjust both elevation and windage in a smooth, continuous motion. The Joy-Pod can be adjusted so it will hold setting during the shot — you don’t have to “hard-hold” the joystick. Many shooters let the joystick slide through their fingers as the rifle moves back on recoil. With a little practice (and careful placement of the rear sand-bag), the tracking is excellent and you can slide the gun right back to point of aim after each shot.

Action: Borden BRM
Trigger: Blue-printed Jewell BR
Barrel: Krieger 30″ / 4-Groove / 1:10″ twist (.30 Cal)
Chamber: .308 Winchester with 0.170 Freebore
Stock: X-Ring Laminated F-Class
Scope: Nightforce 12-42x56mm Competition
Potential Name: Blue Thunder

F-TR Rifle laminated stock X-Ring Borden Action SEB Joy-Pod
This F-TR rifle is shown during load testing with a LabRadar chronograph.

» Full LabRadar Field Test/Review by Ray Gross

If you are considering purchasing a LabRadar Chronograph system, we strongly suggest you read the very thorough and informative LabRadar Review by Ray Gross, past Captain of the USA F-TR team. Ray notes: “It takes me about 3 minutes to set up [my LabRadar] at the range. Because there are no downrange screens, I do not have to hold up other shooters on the range like I would when setting up a traditional chronograph. The convenience alone will mean that I will use it more often than my old chronograph. Every time I take it out, I enjoy it a little bit more.”

Bart Sauter Ray Gross LabRadar Benchrest Review Chronograph Bench tripod

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