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July 23rd, 2022

Saturday at the Movies: SAKO and Tikka Factory Tours

Sako Tikka Factory tour video carbon fiber hunting stock rifle Finland

Sako, and its subsidiary Tikka, make some of the finest hunting rifles you can buy. These offer smooth actions, and very good out-of-the-box accuracy for factory rifles. In addition, Sako and Tikka now offer high-tech carbon fiber stocks, along with Sako’s handsome wood stocks. With the three videos showcased today, you get a virtual tour of the Sako/Tikka production facilities in Finland.


Visit SAKO Rifles Website | Visit Tikka Rifles Website

Tour of Finland SAKO/Tikka Factory — 22-Minute Video

In this informative video, the Canada in the Rough team tours the Sako/Tikka factory in Riihimäki, Finland. All aspects of the production process are covered — crafting actions, barrel-making, stock fitting and more. It was interesting to see the hammer-forging process for barrels, and the exacting measurements that are performed on the actions and bolt assemblies. If you have an interest in rifle production and the type of modern, computer-controlled machinery now being used, definitely watch this video.

Sako Tikka Factory tour video carbon fiber hunting stock rifle Finland
Sako Tikka Factory tour video carbon fiber hunting stock rifle Finland

Visit to SAKO/Tikka Carbon Fiber Stock Factory

This Sako-produced video shows how the company’s modern carbon-fiber stocks are produced. The stock production process is highly automated, to ensure that the finished stocks have very precise dimensions. These carbon Sakos are some of the nicest carbon-fiber stocks we’ve ever seen.

Sako carbon fiber stock factory
Sako Tikka Factory tour video carbon fiber hunting stock rifle Finland

SAKO Factory Tour in Riihimäki, Finland

In this segment, huntress and outdoor video host Mia Anstine tours the Sako manufacturing facility in Riihimäki, Finland. This video covers both firearms production and ammunition manufacturing. In a follow-up video posted below, Mia tests Sako rifles and Sako ammunition at a Finland range. Mia also reported on her Sako factory tour in the Beretta Blog. She notes: “Sako built its original manufacturing facility during World War I. To this day they still utilize the original buildings but have also grown over the years to include larger production areas and updated equipment.”

Sako Tikka Factory tour video carbon fiber hunting stock rifle Finland
Sako Tikka Factory tour video carbon fiber hunting stock rifle Finland

Canada in the Rough Video Tip from Boyd Allen — we welcome reader submissions
Permalink - Videos, Gear Review, Gunsmithing, Hunting/Varminting No Comments »
July 18th, 2021

Sunday GunDay: Sako TRG-22 & TRG-42 Hunting Rifles in Norway

Many years ago, when we decided to do a story about SAKO’s TRG series of rifles, we remembered our friend Terje Fjørtoft in Norway. Terje has owned, and hunted with, both the TRG-22 (in .308 Win), and its big brother, the TRG-42 (chambered in .338 Lapua Magnum). Unlike many TRG owners in the USA, Terje has carried his “tactical hunters” into the field, and tested their effectiveness on large game in both coastal and mountain environments, in warm weather and cold. Terje tells us the TRGs have proven to be rugged and reliable. And they are accurate. The .308 Win TRG-22 delivers about 0.45 MOA groups at 420 yards shot from bipod. The .338 LM TRG-42 shoots about 0.55 – 0.7 MOA at that distance.

A Tale of Two TRGs by Terje Fjørtoft

I live in Brattvåg, along the coast of Norway, but I hunt and shoot at the nearby island “Fjørtoft” (same as my last name) and a small island outside Fjørtoft. I grew up on Fjørtoft as a child, and we hunt seals there in the spring and fall. The large, top photo shows me with my black TRG-42 338 Lapua Mag (“LM”) during a seal hunt a couple years ago. Click on the thumbnail at right to watch a video that shows me shooting the .338 LM. Most of the photos in this story are from that hunt. Because the .338 LM was really “overkill” on the seals (and expensive to reload), I replaced that rifle with a TRG-22 in .308 Winchester.

We hunt seals primarily for wildlife control. This is because the seals carry an internal parasite, called “Kveis”, a small worm that breeds inside the seals (after eating contaminated fish). When the seals expel the Kveis into the water, the Kveis larvae are consumed by the fish and then the fish become unfit to eat. The parasite literally eats the fish from the inside out. It’s not very pretty and it has hurt our Norwegian fishing industry. So there is an important purpose for our seal hunting. We hunt mostly from islands, targeting the seals in the water, and retrieving them with a small boat.

Because the seals spend most of their time in the water, a seal-hunter needs a very accurate rifle [to take head shots at distance]. I like the TRG-22 because it is very accurate out of the box, with a very nice bipod that works well in the field. The stock is comfortable with good adjustment range. The TRG features a 10-rd magazine and the barrel is pre-threaded for a muzzle brake or suppressor.

I have also used my TRGs for hunting big game, deer and what Americans call “Elk”. You can see, further down on this page, a picture from a hunting stand taken late in the evening, in the fading light. Yes I successfully bagged a nice buck during that trip with my TRG-42. When hunting, I use a Leica 900 rangefinder, Swarovski 7×42 Habicht binoculars, and a Silva windwatch. For Optics on the TRG-22, I have a Zeiss 6-24×56 scope, in Tikka Optilock rings. To get more scope adjustment I milled 0.9 mm off the front scope base mount. The Zeiss is great for viewing small targets past 400 meters. It was very difficult to find a longer shooting place than 575 meters on this Island (Uksnøy) but I found a place where I can shoot out to 930 meters, and I’ve made an 80-cm steel gong for a target. At this range, the bullet must fly nearly all the distance over the water.


Terje Shooting the TRG-42 without suppressor. Big recoil, big flash.

Both the TRG-22 and TRG-42 are very accurate right out of the box. The only thing I did before I first shot the TRGs was to clean the barrels very thoroughly. This is because the SAKO factory test shoots the gun without cleaning the barrel. I also adjust the cheek piece upward when shooting the rifles with a big scope. However, if you raise the cheek piece too high you can’t get the bolt out without removing the whole cheek piece. The only real modification I’ve made to my TRGs was to put rubber foot pads on the feet of the SAKO factory bipod. This gives the bipod better grip on slick surfaces such as concrete, or the rocks on the offshore islands.

.338 LM vs. .308 Win — Smaller Can Be Better
A few years ago I had a black TRG-42 (338 LM), but after a year, I sold it, and ordered a TRG-22 from the SAKO factory. After a one-year wait, I got the new green TRG-22 in February this year. One main reason I changed to .308 Win was the cost of ammo. I can reload .308 Win ammo for about one-third the price that it costs to reload .338 LM. One other reason is that my usual shooting distance is about 390 meters–at that distance the .308 is more than effective enough. Also, with the .338 LM, the barrel and the suppressor heated up after only a few shots, but with my new .308, I can shoot at my own pace without this problem. After my most recent shooting trip I once again confirmed how accurate, and fun-to-shoot, the TRG-22 is. I think now the TRG-22 has become my favorite plinking gun.

Though it is fun to experience the big boom and flash of the .338 LM, I’ll admit that it is just too much rifle for most applications. The .338 LM is REAL overkill for seal hunting. Here in Norway we have a rule that the smallest caliber we can use is 6.5×55 with a 140gr (or heavier) bullet, but everyone who hunts seals knows that the seals stay mostly in the water, and therefore you must take a headshot at distance up to about 200 meters. Making the headshot with a smaller caliber is advised for two reasons. First, when a big .338 bullet hits the water, there is a danger it will skip and ricochet quite some distance. Second, if you use too powerful a load/gun/caliber and take a headshot on a swimming seal, the seal sinks like a rock.

Reloading for the TRG-22 (.308 Win)
With the TRG-22, I found it was easy to get an accurate load. My groups with 155gr Scenars are consistently good with a variety of different powders. I’ve tried both light and heavy bullets, but I favor the 155gr Scenars over the 185gr Scenars because the 155s fly a lot faster and drop less.

Three loads (all with Fed 210m primers) that have worked well are: 155gr Scenar with VV N150, 885m/sec; 155gr Scenar with Norma N-11, 890m/sec, and 185gr Scenar, VV N150, 770m/sec. Norma N-11 is a low-cost powder for target shooting. N-11 is similar to Norma 203B or Norma 202 but it varies quite a bit from lot to lot.

I use a RCBS Rock Chucker press, and currently use a standard RCBS full-length die kit to reload my .308 rounds. However, I recently ordered a Redding Competition 3-die set with a .335 bushing. I look forward to trying the Reddings. I have just started to test different seating depths. The 155s just “kiss” the lands at 74.10 mm. I’ve tried 74.00 mm, 74.10 mm and 73.55 mm, but so far saw no significant differences.

Reloading for the TRG-42 (.338 LM)
For the .338 LM, I started with a 250gr Scenar and 95 grains of Vihtavuori N-170. That load was very accurate at about 850 m/sec, but it produced excessive muzzle flash. And, in the winter, the muzzle velocity was inconsistent, and there was too much unburned powder. Next I tried Norma N-15, which proved very accurate at about 880 m/sec. With that load I shot my best TRG-42 group at 380 meters. I set the 250gr Scenar to touch the rifling with 93.2 mm COAL, and I used Federal 215m primers in Lapua-brand brass. Norma MPR2 and VV N-560 (860 m/sec) also were very accurate with the 250 Scenar.

My seal hunting bullet was the 200gr Nosler BT. This bullet grouped very well with 90-94 grains Norma N-15. Velocity was about 970m/sec if I remember correctly. I also tried the 300gr Sierra MK, and got 1/2″ 3-shot groups at 100 meters with 93.5 grains of VV N-170, but this combination produced terrible groups at longer range.

Loading for the .338 LM was not difficult — about the same as loading for .308 Win, except that you use nearly twice the amount of powder. I didn’t crimp the bullets in the neck, didn’t use any special tricks or neck lube. I used RCBS .338 LM full-length die. That functioned, but it would not be my first choice today. Overall, my better loads in the .338 shot in the 0.5-0.7 MOA range. My best group was four shots in 25mm (1″) at 380 meters (416 yards).

Hunting in Norway


I’m not a competitive sport-shooter. Normally, the only time I go to a “commercial” rifle range is to take the test for my hunting license. Every year, I must re-qualify for a shooting license to hunt big game and seals.

Hunters Tested Annually
In Norway, you must pass an actual shooting test before you can hunt big game. This test requires five shots at a deer silhouette target at 100 meters. No rests are allowed–you must shoot off-hand or with a sling only. You have to place five shots inside a 30 cm circle over the front leg.

Every big game hunter that passes this test is authorized to hunt at “dusk and dawn” and in moonlight. So, we do a lot of our hunting in the twilight hours. However, no night-vision or artificial illumination (spotlights) are allowed. We usually hunt deer at dusk and dawn. In the evening, we go on post two to three hours before it is dark, and sit there waiting for the deer to show up–hopefully before it is too dark. In the morning we go to the post one hour before you see any light of the sun, and wait for the deer to show up until the daylight. But when it is full moon we sometime have enough light to hunt in the middle of the night. In the photo, you can see a deer through the scope of my TRG-42. This was very late in the evening. CLICK HERE for BIG Photo.

Sound Suppressors for Hunting Rifles

Suppressors are legal to use for hunting in Norway. I have suppressors on all my rifles, even my little CZ 452 in 17 HMR. To me, shooting a rifle without a suppressor is like driving a car without an exhaust system. The suppressor reduces both noise AND recoil significantly. With a good suppressor, there is no loss of accuracy. The only “negative” in using a suppressor is extra weight on the end of the barrel.

I crafted my own home-made suppressor. It’s similar to my commercially-made TRG-22 suppressor, but the core is made from titanium to be lighter in weight and more corrosion-resistant. I used a lathe at work to craft the inside of the new suppressor. The core of the unit is built from a 27.5 cm X 40mm round bar of titanium while the outer cylinder is made from a 42mm stainless steel tube. I wanted to use titanium for the exterior cylinder as well, but I couldn’t source the right size titanium tube.


Commercial Suppressor on TRG-42

Comparing .308 Win vs. 6mmBR
I also have a 6BR hunting rifle (compensated of course). I have a lot of field time with the 6BR rifle, and feel very confident with that gun. When I got the Krieger 6mmBR barrel on the SAKO Varminter, I fell in love with that rifle from day one, and that rifle is my first choice for small game hunting.

I also like the TRG-22 gun very much and enjoy it more and more with each new field trip. That .308 is my big game rifle and my long-range target rifle.

I recently tested my TRG-22 rifle at 387 meters. This was just “fun shooting” at steel plates, and I didn’t measure groups. But I was happy with the results. Once I corrected for the 5 m/sec crosswind, I was able to put five successive shots on a 10 cm (4″) diameter steel target at 387 meters (423 yards).

My SAKO Varminter in 6mm BR and my TRG-22 are two very different rifles. The TRG-22 is much heavier. I guess the TRG-22 is about 6.5-7 kg while my SAKO 6BR is about 4.5-5 kg, both with suppressor, scope, and bipod. The 6BR with suppressor is much quieter than the TRG-22 with suppressor. The recoil of the 6BR is a lot softer than the TRG-22. So far my 6BR is more accurate. A typical three-shot group with the 6BR is 25-40 mm at 387 meter (423 yards), and that is with just 10X magnification from a Zeiss scope. With my TRG-22, my 3-shot groups run about 50-60 mm, shooting with bipod and beanbag. But I think with a better .308 Win reloading die and more practice, I can improve my groupings with the TRG-22.

SPEC SHEET

The SAKO TRG-22 and TRG-42 are built in Finland by SAKO, a subsidiary of Beretta. In America, the guns are distributed by Beretta USA. Both TRGs (22/42) are available in forest green or a matte black textured finish. A two-stage match trigger is standard.

The stock is somewhat unconventional. It is an external shell, bolted to an internal metal chassis. The action bolts directly to the chassis, without bedding. The injection-molded stock is adjustable for comb height, length of pull (with spacers), vertical butt-pad height and cast-off.

Weight TRG-22
4.7 kg (black)
4.9 kg (green)

Barrel TRG-22
660 mm (26″), hammer-forged, optional stainless or phosphate finish

Capacity
10-round Mag (TRG-22)
7-round Mag (TRG-42)

Calibers
.308 Win (TRG-22)
300WM, .338 LM (TRG-42)

Permalink - Articles, - Videos, Hunting/Varminting 1 Comment »
July 1st, 2021

Video Showcase: Sako and Tikka Finland Factory Tour

Sako Tikka Factory tour video carbon fiber hunting stock rifle Finland

Sako, and its subsidiary Tikka, make some of the finest hunting rifles you can buy. These offer smooth actions, and very good out-of-the-box accuracy for factory rifles. In addition, Sako and Tikka now offer high-tech carbon fiber stocks, along with Sako’s handsome wood stocks. With the three videos showcased today, you get a virtual tour of the Sako/Tikka production facilities in Finland.


Visit Sako Rifles Website | Visit Tikka Rifles Website

Tour of Finland Factory — 22-Minute Video

In this informative video, the Canada in the Rough team tours the Sako/Tikka factory in Riihimäki, Finland. All aspects of the production process are covered — crafting actions, barrel-making, stock fitting and more. It was interesting to see the hammer-forging process for barrels, and the exacting measurements that are performed on the actions and bolt assemblies. If you have an interest in rifle production and the type of modern, computer-controlled machinery now being used, definitely watch this video.

Sako Tikka Factory tour video carbon fiber hunting stock rifle Finland
Sako Tikka Factory tour video carbon fiber hunting stock rifle Finland

Visit to SAKO/Tikka Carbon Fiber Stock Factory

This Sako-produced video shows how the company’s modern carbon-fiber stocks are produced. The stock production process is highly automated, to ensure that the finished stocks have very precise dimensions. These carbon Sakos are some of the nicest carbon-fiber stocks we’ve ever seen.

Sako carbon fiber stock factory
Sako Tikka Factory tour video carbon fiber hunting stock rifle Finland

SAKO Factory Tour in Riihimäki Finland

In this segment, huntress and outdoor video host Mia Anstine tours the Sako manufacturing facility in Riihimäki, Finland. This video covers both firearms production and ammunition manufacturing. In a follow-up video Mia tests Sako rifles and Sako ammunition at a Finland range. Mia also reported on her Sako factory tour in the Beretta Blog. She notes: “Sako built its original manufacturing facility during World War I. To this day they still utilize the original buildings but have also grown over the years to include larger production areas and updated equipment.”

Sako Tikka Factory tour video carbon fiber hunting stock rifle Finland
Sako Tikka Factory tour video carbon fiber hunting stock rifle Finland

Canada in the Rough Video Tip from Boyd Allen — we welcome reader submissions
Permalink - Articles, - Videos, Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Gear Review, Gunsmithing No Comments »
May 28th, 2021

Sako Rifles from Finland — 100 Years of History

Sako rifle gunsmithing 100th Anniversary virtual showroom

Sako Ltd. was founded on April 1, 1921. This year Sako celebrates its 100th birthday. Now part of the Beretta firearms family, this prestigious Finnish firearms manufacturer has a rich history of producing quality rifles constructed by skilled master craftsmen.

The original Sako factory was established as part of the Finnish Civil Guard and was designed to meet its gun repair needs. The workshop became an independent financial unit on April 1, 1921. Sako marks that date as its moment of establishment. The workshop was initially called Suojeluskuntain Ase-ja Konepaja Osakeyhtiö (Civil Guard Firearm and Engineering Co Ltd). In 1927, it became a limited company with its name abbreviated to the acronym Sako.

Sako rifle gunsmithing 100th Anniversary virtual showroom
Sako is manufacturing a limited edition of numbered Sako TRG 22 “Finland 100″ rifles with white camouflage, inspired by Sako’s 100-year anniversary.

The TRG 22 “Finland 100″ Jubilee model is offered in .308 Win caliber. The white snow camouflage coloring of the stock and barreled action of this collector’s item reflects the severity of the Finnish winter, and pays homage to the heroes of the Winter War. The Sako TRG 22 “Finland 100″ rifle has the text “Finland 100″ and the gun’s serial number laser-engraved on its frame. The rifle is packaged in a carry case with an engraved Jubilee knife.

SAKO Modern Technology and Craftsmanship

SAKO — Engineered for Accuracy

SAKO Premium Rifle Options

SAKO Virtual Showroom

Sako rifle gunsmithing 100th Anniversary virtual showroom

Permalink - Videos, Gear Review, Gunsmithing 1 Comment »
April 5th, 2021

Sako Marks 100th Anniversay of Manufacturing in Finland

Sako 100th Anniversary 100 years Finland

Sako Ltd. was founded on April 1, 1921. So this week Sako celebrates its 100th birthday. Now part of the Beretta firearms family, this prestigious Finnish firearms manufacturer has a rich history of producing quality rifles constructed by skilled master craftsmen.

The original Sako factory was established as part of the Finnish Civil Guard and was designed to meet its gun repair needs. The workshop became an independent financial unit on April 1, 1921. Sako marks that date as its moment of establishment. The workshop was initially called Suojeluskuntain Ase-ja Konepaja Osakeyhtiö (Civil Guard Firearm and Engineering Co Ltd). In 1927, it became a limited company with its name abbreviated to the acronym Sako.

The company then moved from Helsinki to a factory site in Riihimäki, where it continues to operate to this day. In Riihimäki, the assembly of a new model of rifle, the M28, began. Nicknamed ‘Pystykorva’ (the dog breed ‘Spitz’), this rifle proved to be of even better quality than similar weapons being used by Finnish defense forces. Simultaneously, the company also began to manufacture cartridges.

Sako 100th Anniversary 100 years Finland

During the 1950s, Sako entered the U.S. market. The Sako L46 rifle impressed American hunters. The L46’s build quality and excellent performance quickly drew loyal American customers, and exports of Sako products to the USA steadily increased year after year.

Sako 100th Anniversary 100 years Finland

One Million Tikka T3s Have Been Sold
For the past 21 years, Sako has seen major growth in yearly product volumes. In 2020, Sako manufactured and sold the one-millionth unit of the Tikka T3, a rare feat for any bolt action rifle. 2020 also saw the launch of the revamped Sako S20 hybrid rifle. This versatile rifle allows the user to switch between hunting or precision shooting by simply exchanging the fore-end and stock.

Also, Sako reached its all-time production record at more than 113,000 rifles produced in a year and broke its record for cartridge production with more than 11 million cartridges made. Additionally, Sako launched its first copper bullet designed and manufactured in-house, the Sako Powerhead Blade.

In 1996, Sako saw a huge success in their Sako 75 range of products, which was Sako’s first model to be designed as new from the very beginning. This success launched Sako into its next step with major international sales. In 1999, Beretta Holding Group acquired all the company’s shares. “At Beretta USA, we are proud to partner with the highly skilled and experienced men and women of SAKO as they continue to innovate and deliver top-quality, high-performing, precise, and reliable rifles to our demanding American customers,” Francesco Valente, GM and COO of Beretta USA, said.

Permalink Gunsmithing, News 1 Comment »
January 4th, 2019

10 BEST Bolt-Action Rifles of All Time — What Do YOU Think?

Ten 10 best bolt action rifles shooter

A while back, RifleShooter online magazine published a list of the purported Ten Best Bolt-Action Rifles of All Time. Ten classic rifle designs (including the Remington 700 and Winchester Model 70) were featured with a paragraph or two explaining their notable features.

“Best” Lists Stir Controversy…
These Top 10 lists are always controversial. While most readers might approve of half the entries, there are always some items on the Top 10 list that some readers would challenge. Here is RifleShooter’s Top 10 list. What do you think? Are there some other bolt-actions that are more deserving?

1. Springfield M1903
2. Mauser 98
3. Winchester Model 70
4. Remington Model 700
5. Weatherby V

6. Sako L61/AV
7. Savage Model 110
8. Ruger M77
9. Tikka T3
10. Mannlicher-Schonauer

10bolt1402.

Permalink - Articles, Gear Review, Hunting/Varminting 22 Comments »
February 13th, 2017

Bargain Finder 74 — AccurateShooter’s Deals of the Week

Accurateshooter Bargain Finder Deals of Week

At the request of our readers, we provide select “Deals of the Week”. Every Monday morning we offer our Best Bargain selections. Here are some of the best deals on firearms, hardware, reloading components, and shooting accessories. Be aware that sale prices are subject to change, and once clearance inventory is sold, it’s gone for good. You snooze you lose.

1. Aero Precision — Cerakote AR Upper and Lower Kit, $399.99

Aero Precision AR16 Upper Lower Cerakote Kit

Thinking of putting together an accurate AR for the new PRS Gas Gun series (or 3-Gun matches)? Here’s a good place to start. Aero Precision now offers a kit with Upper and Lower Receivers and Handguard — all with a durable Cerokote finish. Just add barrel, buttstock, trigger, controls and your bolt carrier group. Note: This kit will work with the .223 Rem and similar-length, larger-caliber cartridges such as the 6mmAR and 6.5 Grendel. If you want to shoot a 6.5 Creedmoor, you’ll need an AR10 platform rifle.

2. Midsouth — Labradar Chronograph and Accessories

Labradar chronograph

Midsouth Shooters Supply is now carrying the advanced Labradar chronograph. This unique unit allows you to measure your shots without having to set up a tripod and skyscreens downrange. When you start using a Labradar, you’ll never want to go back to old-style chronographs. You can also purchase the Labradar from Bruno Shooters Supply. Price is $559.95 from either vendor. NOTE: In a few months Labradar plans to offer Bluetooth functionality, allowing you to control the machine remotely with your mobile device. This functionality will come via new software — the Bluetooth transceiver is built-in to all current Labradar units, so you can buy one now and use Bluetooth later (when the software is released this spring).

3. EuroOptic.com — Tikka T3 Liquidation Sale, Huge Discounts

Tikka T3 sale inventory closeout reduction discount truckload

Looking for a great price on an excellent hunting rifle? Here is the Tikka Deal of the Decade. EuroOptic.com has received nearly 3,500 Tikka T3 rifles, which will be sold at deep discounts as part of an inventory clearance program by Beretta, Tikka’s parent company. The Tikka T3 is a good, stout rifle with a smooth action, crisp trigger, and quality barrel. Accuracy is typically well under 1 MOA (for three shots). T3 barreled actions also are a good “core” for a tactical build. The strong T3 action handles detachable magazines, and fits a variety of third-party stocks.

4. Natchez — RCBS ChargeMaster Dispenser, $259.99

RCBS Chargemaster scale dispenser Natchez

Here’s a very good deal on the popular RCBS ChargeMaster combo scale/powder dispenser. This unit sells elsewhere for up to $389.00. You may want to act quickly as sale pricing changes frequently and many other vendors have recently raised their prices. Grafs.com sells this for $382.99 now while the current Amazon.com price is $296.99. You can save a lot through Natchez right now.

5. Amazon — Lyman Electronic Trigger Pull Gauge, $51.95

Lyman Trigger Pull gauge electronic Walmart Amazon

If you are serious about your precision firearms, you need one of these. We use the Lyman Electronic Trigger Pull Gauge to test the triggers on all our match and varmint rifles. The unit is precise and repeatable. Once you try one of these you won’t want to go back to crude spring trigger gauges. Amazon.com offers this unit for $51.95 with free shipping for Prime members. Walmart also has it for $51.95 with free shipping or free in-store pickup.

6. Sportsman’s Guide — Frankford Arsenal Case Tumbler Kit

AccurateShooter Deals of week bargain discount savings Frankford Arsenal Case Tumbler Kit Media Separator bargain sportmans Guide

For just $69.99, this Frankford Arsenal Kit provides everything you need to clean brass: Vibratory Tumbler, Rotary Media Separator, Bucket, Corn Cob Media (3 lbs.), and Brass Polish. The Case Tumbler holds up to 600 9mm cases or 350 .223 Rem cases. The separator system is generous, with a 3.5-gallon bucket. NOTE: Sportsman’s Guide Buyers Club members can purchase for $62.99.

7. Amazon — Tipton 12-pc Ultra-Jag Set, $16.99

Tipton Nickel jag Set plated 12-piece sale

Brass jags work well — with one hitch. Strong copper solvents can leech metal from the jag itself, leaving a tell-tale blue tint on your patches. This “false positive” can lead shooters to over-clean their barrels. No such problem with these nickel-plated Ultra Jags. For just $16.99 you can get 12 jags in a handy, clear-top fitted caddy. All Tipton nickel-plated jags have 8-32 thread, except for the .17 caliber jag which has a 5-40 thread.

8. Amazon — Neiko Digital Calipers, $16.45

Amazon Neiko Digital Caliper

Even if you have a good set of calipers, you may want to get one of these Neiko 01407A Digital Calipers. The #1 best-selling digital caliper on Amazon.com, this Neiko tool features a large LCD Screen and measures up to 6.0 inches. With over 2300 customer reviews, this product has earned an overall rating of 4.4 out of 5 stars. It’s hard to go wrong for $17.74, even if you just use these as a spare set for measuring group sizes and case trim lengths.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Hot Deals, Reloading No Comments »
November 14th, 2016

SAKO Factory Tour in Finland — And Tests For Hunters

Beretta Factory SAKO Tour Finland

Beretta, makers of fine shotguns, rifles, and pistols, also owns Finnish rifle-maker SAKO. In this article, which first appeared in the Beretta Blog, hunting guide Mia Anstine writes about her visit to the Sako factory and her live-fire shooting test to secure her hunting permit. CLICK HERE for full story.

Visting the SAKO Factory in Finland, by Mia Anstine
What a joy to wake up in Finland and prepare for a tour of Sako. I enjoyed a European breakfast with a view of downtown Helsinki. Shortly I joined the hosts and writer’s group, and we boarded the bus for a ride to Riihimaki, to the manufacturing facility.

Sako built its original manufacturing facility during World War I. To this day they still utilize the original buildings but have also grown over the years to include larger production areas and updated equipment.

Video shows Sako Rifle-Making and Hunting in Finland’s Backcountry (worth watching):

Beretta Holding’s acquisition of the Sako company brought additional opportunity for growth. The company added state-of-the-art machinery which has aided in increased production. However, they’ve still maintained their signature quality-built products by keeping the human element integrated throughout the production line.

After a quick tour of the Sako facility, we headed to the shooting range. We shot a number or Sako and Tikka rifles, but first, we sighted in our hunting rifles in preparation for a brown bear and moose hunt. I would be hunting with a Sako model 85 Hunter chambered in 9.3 mm. (Editor: For fans of this big 0.366 caliber, Sako offers both 9.3x62mm and 9.3x66mm Sako chamberings).

Beretta Factory SAKO Tour Finland

Hunters Must Pass Marksmanship Tests
To hunt bear in Finland, you must first pass a hunting test as well as shooting test. The timed, live-fire event [requires] five rounds in the kill zone of a brown bear at 100 meters. Of course, the ever-courteous Finns had ladies go first, so I felt more than a bit of pressure, and I know I shot a bit faster than necessary. Regardless, I cycled rounds and passed with ease.

Next, we headed to a different bay at the shooting range where we experienced the hunting test from days of old. In this test, we shot from standing position at a moose target. First, we shot three rounds in the kill zone, from 100 meters, and then three at the moose target as it raced by, from right-to-left and left-to-right, at 20 kilometers per hour. While this test is no longer required, it was a pleasure to try our hands at it.

CLICK HERE for full story on BERETTA BLOG

Permalink Hunting/Varminting, News 2 Comments »
January 22nd, 2016

SHOT Show Day Three

Shot show Day 3 Three Las Vegas

SHOT Show, the firearms industry trade show, is a huge event. There are more guns and shooting accessories than you can possibly imagine. On Thursday we saw everything from a giant CADEX .50 BMG with a 24″-long suppressor to a tiny Kahr .380, the thinnest carry gun in production. Here are some highlights from Day Three, a combination of old and very, very new. McMillan has a new, as-yet-unnamed tactical stock, Walther showcased an amazing electronic trigger, and Uberti revived America’s Wild West heritage with a line of single-action revolvers.

CZ 455 Tactical/Varmint Rimfire Rifles

CZ tactical rimfire 455

CZ USA still continues to offer some of the best .22 LR rifles for cross-training and tactical rimfire games. The CZ 455 Varmint Tacticool and Varmint Precision Trainer (Camo) feature proper, full-size stocks (with adult-scale ergonomics) so these rimfires look and feel like a centerfire tactical rig. CZ 455s have smooth actions and crisp triggers.

Walther LG400 Air Rifle with Electronic Trigger

Walther .22 lr Rimfire electronic trigger

Look carefully — this Walther LG400 Alutec air rifle is different than any gun you’ve ever shot. You see it has an ELECTRONIC trigger. This sophisticated, battery-powered trigger offers a super-precise, super-light release (it’s more a “touch” than a “pull”). For top-level international and Olympic shooters, the electronic trigger can offer a competitive advantage. Later this year Walther will offer an electronic trigger in its top-of-the-line smallbore rifle.

“Name This Stock” — New Tactical Stock from McMillan

Kelly McMillan Name this Stock NTS Tactical

Kelly McMillan, president of McMillan Fiberglass Stocks is holding the latest tactical stock from McMillan. It features a girder-style open fore-end that fits any barrel contour. At the rear, the stock boasts an adjustable cheekpiece along with a straight toe for riding a sandbag. Interestingly, this stock has no name (as yet). At SHOT Show, McMillan is running a “Name This Stock” contest. The winner will receive a free stock.

Giant Super-Sized Scope at Zeiss Booth

Zeiss big scope booth Victory

At its booth, Zeiss displayed what must be the world’s largest rifles-scope replica. This giant scope, as big as a totem pole, certainly did draw the attention of anyone who walked by. The big news at Zeiss this year is the Victory V8 line of scopes with 8X zoom ratio.

Uberti Classic Single Action Pistols

Uberti Single Action Pistol line

We love vintage-style revolvers. This year Uberti offered a beautiful array of single-action pistols in a variety of styles. Along with its line of “Wild West” repro pistols, Uberti makes excellent lever guns based on classic Winchester designs. This editor owns two Uberti lever-action rifles, and they are both beauties.

Anschutz Model 9015 Competition Air Rifle

Steve Boelter Anschutz 9015 Air Rifle

Our friend Steve Boelter, President of Anschutz North America, showed us the latest and greatest competition rifles from the respected German gun-maker. In this photo, Steve is holding the new Anschutz 9015 air rifle. Above is the new, top-of-the-line Anschutz smallbore target rifle. In a week or so we’ll release a video showing the details of both these rifles.

SHOT Scenery — From Russia with Love

Pretty 
Girls Shot Show Russia

It wouldn’t be SHOT without a few Booth Babes, or should we say Booth Babe-bushkas. These charming young ladies really ARE from Russia. Yuliya, on the right, hails from far-away Vladivostok in Siberia. She said she appreciated the warmer weather in Las Vegas.

Tikka T3 Compact Tactical Rifle for the Canadian Rangers

Tikka Canadian Rangers Rifle

On display at the SAKO booth was the Tikka T3 Compact Tactical Rifle which has been adopted by the Canadian Rangers. This will replace the Ranger’s beloved, but antiquated Lee-Enfield rifles. The Canadian Rangers, an element of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) Reserve, serve as the CAF’s eyes and ears in sparsely-settled northern and coastal areas of Canada. The Rangers have helped secure Canada’s hinterlands since 1947.

Browning “Hell’s Canyon” Gun Vaults

Browning Hell's Canyon gun safe Vault

Browning showcased a series of large gun safes with much-enhanced fire-proofing and thicker steel walls. The new “Hell’s Canyon” Series of gun vaults offer 40% thicker steel plus 2 – 3 times the fire protection of typical gun safes. These “Hells Canyon”-series safes are impressive.

Kim Rhode — Olympic Gold Medal Winner

Kim Rhode shotgun Olympic Gold medals

We had a chance to interview shotgun superstar Kim Rhode, who has won Gold Medals at multiple Olympic Games. She told us some very interesting facts. For example, did you know that roughly 70% of females are left-eye dominant? Kim revealed some techniques that right-handed, cross-dominant shooters can use to improve their scores. We’ll reveal that in an upcoming video interview with Kim, shown here at the autograph table with some of her Olympic medals.

Permalink Competition, New Product, News 1 Comment »
September 21st, 2015

Sako Extractor Mod for Rem-Action 6mmBR Tubegun

Sako Extractor Remington bolt

Jonathan Ocab, a High Power shooter from California, had gunsmith Doan Trevor install a Sako-style extractor in the Rem 700 bolt in Ocab’s 6mmBR Eliseo R5 tubegun. Jonathan produced an excellent video showing how the Sako extractor improves the ejection of the short, fat 6mmBR cartridges in his rifle. Jonathan’s video demonstrates 6mmBR case ejection with an unmodified Rem 700 factory bolt versus a factory bolt fitted with a Sako-style extractor.

Johnathan explains: “Note how even when slowly operating the bolt, the bolt with the Sako extractor easily ‘kicks’ out the brass on ejection with minimal chance of operator error resulting in a failure to extract. While the unmodified bolt has issues ejecting brass on slow operation, it will eject if the operator pulls the bolt back quickly (fast and with some force).

While a Sako-style extractor isn’t an absolute necessity, this video shows the definite improvement this modification provides. For short cartridges like the 6mmBR, this is very useful. This modification is highly recommended for competition shooters, especially High Power competitors who seek improved function in rapid-fire stages. This modification is fairly inexpensive and any competent gunsmith should be able to perform the work (usually under $100 with parts and labor).”

EDITOR’s NOTE: In his video, Jonathan deliberately worked the unmodified Remington bolt slowly to show how the standard Rem extractor can struggle with short fat cases like the 6mmBR. In fact, when you work a standard, unmodified bolt more quickly, the extraction can be much more positive. Cycling the bolt with more “snap” provides more energy to eject the cases. We have run an R5 Tubegun chambered in 6mmBR with an unmodified Rem 700 bolt (no SAKO extractor), and the extraction was reliable, provided the bolt was worked quickly.

Permalink Gunsmithing, Tech Tip 4 Comments »
September 1st, 2015

Get $150.00 Credit with Purchase of Tikka Rifles

Tikka Beretta Bucks $150.00 off sale discount T3 Rifle

Hunting season is right around the corner. Here’s a good deal if you need a reliable, accurate hunting rifle with a proven pedigree. The Tikka T3 is popular with game hunters around the globe. Right now when you buy any new Tikka rifle you’ll get $150 in Beretta Bucks to apply towards the purchase of Beretta gear, Tikka and Sako accessories, and even Sako ammunition. This offer ends October 31, 2015. Visit www.Tikka.fi for complete details and redemption instructions.

Tikka Beretta Bucks $150.00 off sale discount T3 Rifle

All Tikka rifles are included in this promotion — pick whichever model you prefer, from the basic T3 Hunter with wood stock all the way up to the T3 Sporter with accessory rail and adjustable cheek-piece and buttplate. Other popular models include the T3 Lite and the T3 Super Varmint (shown above). If you’re wondering how Tikka rifles perform in the field, here is a detailed BushBrothersNZ video review of the T3 Lite. This review spotlights the T3’s controls and functions, with particular attention to the operation of trigger, safety, and bolt.

New Zealand Video Review of Tikka T3 Lite Rifle

*Eligible guns include all Tikka rifle models bought at retail, in the United States, between the dates of August 1, 2015 and October 31, 2015. Offer limited to one (1) $150 credit per Tikka rifle purchased. $150 credit will be issued in the form of Beretta Bucks for online redemption only at www.BerettaUSA.com. Beretta Bucks must be redeemed by April 30, 2016. No substitutions or exchanges permitted.
Permalink News 1 Comment »
July 9th, 2015

Canadian Rangers Replace Lee-Enfields with Tikka T3 CTRs

Canadian Ranger Tikka T3 CTR Compact Tactical Rifle CAF AccurateShooter

Ever heard of the Canadian Rangers, an element of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) Reserve? Founded in 1947, the Rangers serve as the CAF’s eyes and ears in sparsely-settled northern and coastal areas of Canada. The Rangers cover the remote frontiers, performing public safety as well as security duties. For their entire history, the Canadian Rangers have always used a compact model of the Lee-Enfield No. 4. But that’s about to change…

Stirring Rapid-Fire Demonstration by Canadian Rangers

The Rangers have decided to replace their beloved (but antiquated) Lee-Enfields for something more advanced — the Tikka T3 Compact Tactical Rifle (CTR) in .308 Winchester.

Canadian Ranger Model Tikka Compact Tactical Rifle Features:

1. Barrel, Bolt, and Action made by Colt Canada under license from SAKO.
2. Larger bolt handle and enlarged trigger guard to accommodate gloved hands.
3. Protected front and rear iron sights.
4. Laminated stock in unique gray/orange or red colour with Ranger Crest.
5. Two-stage trigger with three-position safety.

The first 125 prototypes have been delivered to the Rangers for field testing. Feedback from the Rangers will be incorporated in the final production rifles. The contract calls for 6500+ production rifles to be delivered to the Rangers by end of 2018.

Canadian Ranger Tikka T3 CTR Compact Tactical Rifle CAF AccurateShooter

In addition to the rifle, the package will include a custom-molded Pelican hard transport case, plus a soft transport case (outfitted with sling and cleaning kit). Both hard case and soft case feature the Canadian Ranger Crest.

Permalink New Product, News 5 Comments »
March 7th, 2015

Gunsmithing: Installing a Picatinny Rail

In the video below, Forum Member Thomas Haugland (from Norway) shows how to install a Picatinny-type rail on a Sako action. Every stage of the process is illustrated — removing the barrel from the action, drilling/tapping the action, aligning/attaching the rail, and finally mounting the scope and test-firing the rifle. Note that the action is removed using a large adjustable-end wrench with brass disks to protect the finish. This is possible because this particular Sako action has a flat bottom and top. With a different action you’ll want to use a custom action wrench.

In the video, Thomas and his assistant actually fabricate the rail from scratch. That’s probably beyond the ability of most do-it-yourselfers. You can purchase precisely machined Picatinnny rails from Seekins Precision and other sources instead. Still, it is interesting to see the milling of the rail. Note that, before screwing the rail to the top of the action, Thomas applies a marine epoxy (timeline 3:18). This effectively beds the rail to the top of the action and provides a more secure installation.

You can find more interesting gunsmithing, hunting, and long-range shooting videos on Thomas Haugland’s YouTube Channel.

Permalink - Videos, Gunsmithing, Tech Tip 3 Comments »
January 29th, 2014

Beretta Will Open $45 Million Manufacturing Facility in Tennessee

Beretta USA announced today that it will open a new firearms manufacturing plant in Sumner County, Tennessee. Beretta, a global manufacturer of sporting and military firearms, will invest $45 million in a state-of-the-art manufacturing and R&D facility in the Gallatin Industrial Park. Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam stated that this new facility will create 300 new Tennessee jobs. Beretta hopes to complete construction on the facility this year. Moving production and R&D functions to Tennessee will allow Beretta to scale down its operations in the state of Maryland. In recent years, Maryland has become less attractive to firearms-related businesses.

Beretta USA Tennesee Firearms factory Gallatin Sumner

Beretta supplies sporting and self-defense firearms to consumers worldwide. The company manufactures the U.S. Armed Forces M-9 pistol, the standard sidearm of U.S. soldiers since 1985. Beretta will make firearms at the new Gallatin plant from both their sporting and tactical product lines.

Established in 1526, Beretta is one of the oldest industrial companies in the world. The company has enjoyed 16 generations of continuous family ownership. Firearms bearing the Beretta name have been sold for almost 500 years. Beretta also owns and markets other leading firearms brands, including Benelli, Franchi, SAKO, Stoeger, Tikka, and Uberti. For more information, visit www.beretta.com.

“From the moment when we started to consider a location outside of the State of Maryland for our manufacturing expansion, Governor Haslam and his economic development team did an excellent job demonstrating the benefits of doing business in Tennessee. We are convinced we could find no better place than Tennessee to establish our new manufacturing enterprise.”
— Franco Gussalli Beretta, Vice President and Managing Director of Fabbrica D Armi S.p.A and Executive Vice President of Beretta USA.

Permalink Gunsmithing, News 2 Comments »
January 21st, 2014

Finnish Fire-Power: TRG M10 Multi-Caliber Rifle from Sako

SAKO m10 tactical rifle

Report by Jason Baney, EuroOptic.com
At Media Day at the Range, some of us were privileged to shoot a very accurate new tactical rifle — the Sako TRG M10. People have been clamoring for this “bad-ass” multi-caliber rifle, which has not yet been released to the public. The M10 was one of the top submissions for the PSR (Precision Sniper Rifle) contract and we can see why. The ergonomics, function, and adjustments are very smooth and intuitive. As proof, though I had never previously handled an M10, much less practiced with one, we managed to complete our video in just one take. I was quickly able to figure out the adjustments and get shots on target. That bodes well for a serious tactical rifle designed for combat.

When compared to previous Sako TRG models, the M10 is notable for its modular construction, wide range of adjustments, and, of course, its ability to shoot multiple cartridge types (.308 Win, .300 Win Mag, .338 Lapua Mag). As with other PSR submissions, Sako’s M10 has user-changeable barrels that can be switched easily.

Watch Jason Shoot Sako TRG M10 at 960 Yards

The M10 is currently only available to the military market, but the hope is to push it to the commercial (civilian) market after military orders are filled. When this happens, EuroOptic plans to be one of the first vendors to offer TRG M10s to civilian customers. We do not know the price of the TRG M10 at this time — we asked Sako reps but they wouldn’t even venture a guess.

SAKO m10 tactical rifle

SAKO m10 tactical rifle

This 8-minute Video Covers Sako M10 Features in Great Detail:

Permalink - Videos, New Product 2 Comments »