November 1st, 2013

Got a Story to Tell? Enter Our November Bulletin Article Contest

AccurateShooter.com contest story bolt flutingDo you have a good story idea for the Daily Bulletin? Are you reasonably handy with a digital camera? Then you could win one of two (2) bolt fluting jobs we will award in our November Reader Story Contest. You can see your work in the Daily Bulletin, and win a cool bolt fluting job performed by Pro-Precision Rifles (PPR) on your Remington, Savage, Tikka, or Winchester action bolt.

Here’s how it works. You submit a story (that you wrote yourself) 500-800 words in length, plus at least three (3) quality digital photos. Our editors will review all the submissions and select the two best articles for publication.

The two winners will be named on December 1, 2013. Each of the two winners will receive a bolt fluting job by Pro-Precision Rifles, an $85.00 to $95.00 value. This is a modification of a bolt performed by PPR. The prize is the fluting job, not the bolt (which shall be supplied by each winner).

AccurateShooter.com contest story bolt fluting
Bolt Fluting Job awards do NOT include custom bolt knobs shown in photo above.

Contest Rules

1. Contestants must submit an original article of 500-800 words. You must write the article yourself (you pledge that this is your 100% original work, not copied in any way from something else).
2. Contestants must submit at least three (3) quality digital photos (taken by contestant himself) to run with the story.
3. Images must be at least 1200 pixels wide and 800 pixels high in JPEG, PNG, or PSD format.
4. Article text and photos shall be submitted via email to mailbox@6mmbr.com .
5. Submissions must be emailed no later than 3:00 pm EST on November 30, 2013. The two (2) winners will be selected by AccurateShooter.com’s editors on December 1, 2013.
6. Each of the two (2) winners will receive a free bolt fluting job of his or her choice limited to the following types of actions: Remington, Savage, Tikka, and Winchester. Note, the prize is the fluting work, not the bolt. Each winner must supply a bolt to be fluted.
7. Each winner must ship one bolt to Pro Precision Rifles, 2397 East Garber Drive, Meridian, ID 83646, (208) 871-7429. PPR will pay for the return shipping inside the continental United States.
8. This contest is limited to U.S. citizens living in the United States. Contestants must be over 21 and eligible to own firearms.
9. Contestants agree that their submissions (both text and photos) have not appeared before in any publication or on any other website. Each contestant warrants that he/she is sole owner of all rights and copyrights associated with the submitted article(s) and photos. Contestants agree that their submissions become the property of AccurateShooter.com, and contestants agree to give AccurateShooter.com the right to publish all submitted stories and photos as AccurateShooter.com sees fit, in its sole discretion.
10. Bolt Fluting Job awards do NOT include custom bolt knobs shown in photo.

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November 1st, 2013

Bill to Promote Shooting Ranges Advances in Congress

Congress buildingMany shooting ranges have been closed over the past few years, victims of “urban sprawl” and concerns over noise and land use. Now there’s a bill in Congress that will help fund new ranges around the country. The U.S. House Judiciary Committee last week voted to advance the Target Practice and Marksmanship Training Support Act (HR 2463). This legislation is sponsored by Congressional Sportsmen’s Caucus (CSC) member Duncan Hunter (Rep., CA) and Caucus Vice-Chair Tim Walz (Dem., MN), along with a bipartisan coalition of 14 other House Members. This bill would allow states to use the excise taxes already collected on sporting equipment and ammunition to develop and maintain much-needed public shooting ranges. Having already received the approval of the Natural Resources Committee, passage of HR 2463 through the Judiciary committee was the final step necessary to send the bill to the House Floor.

If passed by the House, HR 2463 would have to be approved by the U.S. Senate, and then signed by the President before it could become law. Based on recent experience, a Presidential veto doesn’t seem likely. Through December 2012, President Obama has vetoed just two of 621 bills that crossed his desk. That’s the fewest number of vetos since Millard Fillmore held office in the early 1850s.

Summary: H.R.2463 — 113th Congress (2013-2014)
Target Practice and Marksmanship Training Support Act – Amends the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration Act to: (1) authorize a state to pay up to 90% of the costs of acquiring land for, expanding, or constructing a public target range; (2) authorize a state to elect to allocate 10% of a specified amount apportioned to it from the federal aid to wildlife restoration fund for such costs; (3) limit the federal share of such costs under such Act to 90%; and (4) require amounts provided for such costs under such Act to remain available for expenditure and obligation for five fiscal years.

Shields the United States from any civil action or claim for money damages for injury to or loss of property, personal injury, or death caused by an activity occurring at a public target range that is funded by the federal government pursuant to such Act or located on federal land, except to the extent provided under the Federal Tort Claims Act with respect to the exercise or performance of a discretionary function.

Urges the Chief of the Forest Service and the Director of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to cooperate with state and local authorities and other entities to carry out waste removal and other activities on any federal land used as a public target range to encourage its continued use for target practice or marksmanship training.

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